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Protecting the world's greatest literaturenot to mention keeping up wit Miss Havishamis tiring work for an expectant mother. And Thursday can definitely use a respite. So what better hideaway than inside the unread and unreadable Caversham Heights, a cliché-ridden pulp mystery in the hidden depths of the Well of Lost Plots, where all unpublished books reside? But peace and Protecting the world's greatest literature—not to mention keeping up wit Miss Havisham—is tiring work for an expectant mother. And Thursday can definitely use a respite. So what better hideaway than inside the unread and unreadable Caversham Heights, a cliché-ridden pulp mystery in the hidden depths of the Well of Lost Plots, where all unpublished books reside? But peace and quiet remain elusive for Thursday, who soon discovers that the Well itself is a veritable linguistic free-for-all, where grammasites run rampant, plot devices are hawked on the black market, and lousy books—like Caversham Heights—are scrapped for salvage. To top it off, a murderer is stalking Jurisdiction personnel and nobody is safe—least of all Thursday.


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Protecting the world's greatest literaturenot to mention keeping up wit Miss Havishamis tiring work for an expectant mother. And Thursday can definitely use a respite. So what better hideaway than inside the unread and unreadable Caversham Heights, a cliché-ridden pulp mystery in the hidden depths of the Well of Lost Plots, where all unpublished books reside? But peace and Protecting the world's greatest literature—not to mention keeping up wit Miss Havisham—is tiring work for an expectant mother. And Thursday can definitely use a respite. So what better hideaway than inside the unread and unreadable Caversham Heights, a cliché-ridden pulp mystery in the hidden depths of the Well of Lost Plots, where all unpublished books reside? But peace and quiet remain elusive for Thursday, who soon discovers that the Well itself is a veritable linguistic free-for-all, where grammasites run rampant, plot devices are hawked on the black market, and lousy books—like Caversham Heights—are scrapped for salvage. To top it off, a murderer is stalking Jurisdiction personnel and nobody is safe—least of all Thursday.

30 review for The Well of Lost Plots

  1. 5 out of 5

    James

    Book Review 3 of 5 stars to The Well of Lost Plots, the third thriller and mystery book in the "Thursday Next" series written in 2003 by Jasper Fforde. For those new to the series, it's a detective story where crimes occur inside books, and real-life people can jump inside the book to fix the problem or solve the crime. In book 3, things take a bit of a turn... Thursday, the main investigator, needs some down time, and goes to the "Well of Lost Plots," where unpublished books go to die. But Book Review 3 of 5 stars to The Well of Lost Plots, the third thriller and mystery book in the "Thursday Next" series written in 2003 by Jasper Fforde. For those new to the series, it's a detective story where crimes occur inside books, and real-life people can jump inside the book to fix the problem or solve the crime. In book 3, things take a bit of a turn... Thursday, the main investigator, needs some down time, and goes to the "Well of Lost Plots," where unpublished books go to die. But crimes and murders start happening there too... and it's confusing poor Thursday because she doesn't understand who would care about a book that hasn't been published yet having its story changed! (Not sure how I feel about that as a writer myself...) But then she's trapped inside a story she doesn't know much about. That can be scary. The series is complex, full of fantasy and drama you never quite understand. The concept of the well of lost plots is delicious, but it made things even more complicated. It was here that I decided to stop reading the series as it started going over my head a little bit. I felt silly and inept! I may go back soon to pick it up again, as I've never read another series of books like it... and this one takes the cake of all 3 I've read to date. Hope you enjoy. About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators. [polldaddy poll=9729544] [polldaddy poll=9719251]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lena

    Im sad to say I didnt enjoy this book anywhere near as much as the first two in the series. While I think Ffordes choice to set the action almost entirely in the Bookworld was an intriguing one, I also got the sense he was in over his head. Like many of the partially completed books in the Well of Lost Plots, there is a great amount of creativity on display here, but also a lot of half-baked ideas and poorly developed characters. The action took place in so many different settings and with such I’m sad to say I didn’t enjoy this book anywhere near as much as the first two in the series. While I think Fforde’s choice to set the action almost entirely in the Bookworld was an intriguing one, I also got the sense he was in over his head. Like many of the partially completed books in the Well of Lost Plots, there is a great amount of creativity on display here, but also a lot of half-baked ideas and poorly developed characters. The action took place in so many different settings and with such a huge cast of characters that I never felt entirely grounded within either the story or the people in it. The book just seemed to be going in too many different directions at one time, and while a good chunk of the tale was resolved by the ending, there were enough loose ends left lying about I couldn’t tell what had been set up for the next book and which he had just sort of forgotten about. That said, I did still enjoy the copious literary references, the smart humor, and Fforde’s unusual way of musing about the process of creating books. But the experience was unsatisfying enough I’m not sure I’ll continue. Die-hard Next fans: does the fourth one get any better?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    5.0 to 5.5 stars. I liked this book so much that when I finished it I had to really wonder whether I should go back and re-read the first two books in the series (which I have 4 stars and 3 stars respectively). The writing was absolutely superb, the plot was engaging and very original and the literary references hysterical. I found myself more than once jumping to Wikipedia to find out from which book a particular character or reference originated. A few fun examples (1) a rage counseling 5.0 to 5.5 stars. I liked this book so much that when I finished it I had to really wonder whether I should go back and re-read the first two books in the series (which I have 4 stars and 3 stars respectively). The writing was absolutely superb, the plot was engaging and very original and the literary references hysterical. I found myself more than once jumping to Wikipedia to find out from which book a particular character or reference originated. A few fun examples (1) a rage counseling session for the characters of Wuthering Heights, (2) Miss Havisham from Great Expectations in a contest with Mr Toad (from The Wind in the Willows) to set the land speed record and (3) King Solomon as head of the Jurisfiction's Arbitration Department. In a world of cookie cutter fantasy and science fiction, Jasper Fforde has created something that is truly original. HIGHEST POSSIBLE RECOMMENDATION!!!

  4. 4 out of 5

    F.R.

    In which my irritation at this series reaches a boiling point. I had an odd reaction to the two previous Thursday Next novels, a curious mixture of subtle enjoyment and distinct annoyance. The enjoyment came from the fact that Im a man who loves books and they were distinctly literary reads. But there was also a huge amount of quirkiness (never a quality I particularly like) and an arch oh-isnt-this-soooo-clever! self-satisfaction to the proceedings. There were points in the previous books where In which my irritation at this series reaches a boiling point. I had an odd reaction to the two previous Thursday Next novels, a curious mixture of subtle enjoyment and distinct annoyance. The enjoyment came from the fact that I’m a man who loves books and they were distinctly literary reads. But there was also a huge amount of quirkiness (never a quality I particularly like) and an arch ‘oh-isn’t-this-soooo-clever!’ self-satisfaction to the proceedings. There were points in the previous books where I laughed, but also points when I wanted to hurl my copy hard into the nearest brick wall. It’s rare that a series can walk such a fine tightrope, but ‘The Well of Lost Souls’ marks the point where I – at least – fell off. The previous books split Thursday Night’s adventures between the real world (which is in fact a fantasy version of our world) and the world of books – where she can interact with great characters from fiction. The ‘real world’ stuff contained most of the plot, while the stuff set in books worked as amusing little sketches. In this volume however it’s all set in the book world, so its sketch after sketch, knowing reference after knowing reference, beloved character behaving oddly after beloved character behaving oddly. There is no grounding, nothing to reign in the silliness – it’s just wackiness built on wackiness until I really wanted to scream. One of the most irritating things is how lazy it all seems. You have to hand Fforde bouquets for his inventiveness, but the clever jokes and ideas he comes up with are never developed into anything else. So we have Mr Toad in an automobile race against Miss Haversham; rage counselling sessions in ‘Wuthering Heights’; and ‘Macbeth’ retold for Yeast. All very silly stuff which doesn’t really go any further than those brief descriptions I’ve just given you. There are numerous instances of sketches revealing their points in the first few lines, but staying on for page after page and hammering those points to death. Probably the nadir is a retelling of the trial scene from ‘Alice in Wonderland’, which lacks all of Carroll’s true invention and adds absolutely zero to the original. (After awhile it reminded me of those little comic asides in the cartoon series ‘Family Guy ‘ – a show I remain ambivalent to. They are pointless, silly and not even half as funny as they would like to be.) And yet within this superficial silliness, Fforde actually asks us to care. But how can one really care when the Miss Haversham of this book finds herself in jeopardy? All we have to do is open ‘Great Expectations’ and there she is again. And the Miss Haversham of this novel isn’t so well developed as a character away from Dickens that a reader would come to care for Fforde’s version instead. She – and many other literary figures – are just tossed in as throwaway jokes, but so little else is done with them that they remain pencil sketches of other author’s characters. Though perhaps the most irritating thing of all is that throughout this book there seems to be a smug belief that this one of the cleverest and funniest novels anyone could ever read. The witty allusions, the literary knowledge and the endless, endless puns – you can almost hear the author slapping his back in congratulations at his own brilliance. Unfortunately this reader just found the whole thing incredibly tedious, and so even though the series goes on from here, I have now disembarked.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    This one took a bit more time to get going than the previous two. The point wasn't really clear until a third of the way through, but that's not awful. It's a lot of fun just visiting this strange world - even stranger since most of this one was in the book world, not the 'real' one. The book world provides so many wonderful opportunities for fun & humor. Mrs. Havisham, the depressing spinster from Great Expectations, loves to drive fast so it only makes sense she has a rivalry with Mr. Toad This one took a bit more time to get going than the previous two. The point wasn't really clear until a third of the way through, but that's not awful. It's a lot of fun just visiting this strange world - even stranger since most of this one was in the book world, not the 'real' one. The book world provides so many wonderful opportunities for fun & humor. Mrs. Havisham, the depressing spinster from Great Expectations, loves to drive fast so it only makes sense she has a rivalry with Mr. Toad from The Wind in the Willows street racing whenever they can promote fast cars & spare the time. The jokes about the classics are fantastic, too. Someone stole all the punctuation from the final chapter of Ulysses, but very few noticed since not many get that far. The few who did either thought the lack was a stroke of genius or didn't find it any less comprehensible than the rest. The book is rife with characters wandering around causing trouble, but Thursday has enough personal problems of her own & there is some heartache in this otherwise light story. There is a big reveal in this book that wasn't all that surprising, but important. It was barely mentioned, so stay sharp. I expect it will be even more obvious in the next book since it makes a rather pointless character a lot more important & changes things. This is a series written in chronological order so don't read this book first. Start with the first & work forward. It's great as an audio book. Very well narrated by Elizabeth Sastre. Her voice is perfect for Thursday who tells us what happened.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Arnis

    https://poseidons99.wordpress.com/201...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    3rd BOOK IN THE "THURSDAY NEXT" SERIES. THIS REVIEW CONTAINS SPOILERS FOR THE PREVIOUS TWO BOOKS. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED. NO SPOILERS FOR THIS VOLUME (#3) Thursday Next is a war veteran. She has traveled into books. She has worked for Special Ops. She has fought a Supreme Evil Being. Her skills and smarts are legendary. Thursday Next is pregnant. The father, her husband Landon, is dead - eradicated by those Goliath Corporation bastards. They traveled back in time and killed him as a 2-year-old. It's 3rd BOOK IN THE "THURSDAY NEXT" SERIES. THIS REVIEW CONTAINS SPOILERS FOR THE PREVIOUS TWO BOOKS. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED. NO SPOILERS FOR THIS VOLUME (#3) Thursday Next is a war veteran. She has traveled into books. She has worked for Special Ops. She has fought a Supreme Evil Being. Her skills and smarts are legendary. Thursday Next is pregnant. The father, her husband Landon, is dead - eradicated by those Goliath Corporation bastards. They traveled back in time and killed him as a 2-year-old. It's only by sheer luck that Thursday still has their (her's and Landon's) child inside her. Where can she go? Both Special Ops and Goliath are hunting her down. Goliath wants to keep her locked up and run experiments on her, to find out how she can travel in and out of books and how they can exploit that to take over the world. There's only one place where she can be safe from them - inside a book. So Thursday sets up house in a third-rate unpublished detective novel, trying to stay safe through her pregnancy. She misses her husband fiercely. She gets a job working as a Apprentice Jurisfiction Agent. Jurisfiction polices books. They fix misspellings, keep characters from rebelling, help settle strikers, kill Grammasites, etc. etc. Thursday's beloved mentor, introduced in the previous novels, Miss Havisham (from Great Expectations) is helping her become a full agent. Other prominent characters that might seem familiar - Falstaff, Cheshire Cat, Minotaur, Marianne Dashwood, Heathcliff, the Red Queen, and Count Dracula. There are also a bunch of characters from unpublished novels, which is basically Fforde playing off tropes. Fforde has more fun than seems possible. He provides an onslaught of puns and literature jokes. These books are tailor-made to people who love books, reading, and literature. Thursday Next is an AMAZING female character. She is human. Fforde never lingers on her looks, sex appeal, or outfits. She gets sh*t done. She is smart, decisive, quick-thinking, witty, and knows how to use a gun. In this novel she's pregnant - and also running around saving the (book) world. She is very capable and strong-willed. She's great - and not because Fforde is TELLING us she's great, it's just in every action and word of hers. Great job of showing, not telling, Fforde. A great example of a good female character written well by a male author...it CAN be done. I highly recommend this book to people who love literature. Fair warning - if you haven't read the classics (Austen, Poe, Shakespeare, Bronte, Carroll, Stoker, etc. etc.) you will not get some of the jokes. That's the only reason that this didn't get five stars from me. You really have to be well-versed in classic literature to get the full power of what Fforde is doing here. But it's obvious that Fforde is extremely intelligent with an amazing sense of humor. This series, in my opinion, is better than HITCHHIKER'S GUIDE because it is just as funny, but also has high stakes and makes you feel for the characters. P.S. There is a great, subtle Stephen King reference on page 79 that cracked me up.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stela

    More and more disappointing, this series. The whole story sounded like an enormous and finally quite annoying backstage gossip. I think I've had enough of Thursday Next.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Eaton

    I was surprised to see how many people didn't like this one as much as the first two. Personally, I loved it. Interestingly though, before I launched into the Thursday next books, I had already read the 1st 2 of Fforde's ' Nursery Crimes series, which intersects loosely with the book world setting of this 3rd novel, and for me a large part of the reading pleasure here was in the cleverness of that intersection, And so perhaps that has some impact upon the way I read the book. Like the previous 2 I was surprised to see how many people didn't like this one as much as the first two. Personally, I loved it. Interestingly though, before I launched into the Thursday next books, I had already read the 1st 2 of Fforde's ' Nursery Crimes’ series, which intersects loosely with the book world setting of this 3rd novel, and for me a large part of the reading pleasure here was in the cleverness of that intersection, And so perhaps that has some impact upon the way I read the book. Like the previous 2 in the series, The Well Of Lost Plots is, if nothing else, a light-hearted romp (and yes, I do apologise for the cliche,) in this one Jasper Fforde is clearly having fun with, and exploring fully, the potential of both the characters and world he's created. For the reader with a keen eye for wordplay, passing interest in science, literature, and crime writing, and a healthy sense of the absurd, this book ticks all the boxes. Or, at least, it did for me.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten McKenzie

    Utterly delightful! Loved every page. It might have helped somewhat if I'd known originally that this was the third book in the series, but that didn't impact my enjoyment of the story. I felt the plot was utterly original, and the characters, and the sub plots, and the Grammersites... If you love reading, then this is the series for you. My imagination was blown away by the author's creative imagining of what happens inside of Well of Plots, and the likely graveyard of discarded verbs and nouns. Utterly delightful! Loved every page. It might have helped somewhat if I'd known originally that this was the third book in the series, but that didn't impact my enjoyment of the story. I felt the plot was utterly original, and the characters, and the sub plots, and the Grammersites... If you love reading, then this is the series for you. My imagination was blown away by the author's creative imagining of what happens inside of Well of Plots, and the likely graveyard of discarded verbs and nouns. Once again, this book was so delightful, I'm fairly annoyed that the local library (where I'm currently staying), doesn't open again until tomorrow morning! I want to read more by this author! Note: It only took this long to read because I'm away on holiday, and when I first checked this book out of the local library to read back in October, I didn't finish it before I had to return to Auckland. So I've read it in two parts!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Honor

    I seem somewhat doomed to find series via a book somewhere in the middle. I'm sure it happens to everyone, but it -feels- like it happens to me a bit more often. So... Except for people who find it accidentally, who'd read a review of this book? Likely someone who's interested in perhaps reading it... Who, I'd guess, would be someone who's already read the first two. So, this review's probably useless. None the less.... This book (as I'm sure is true for the rest of the series) is meant as I seem somewhat doomed to find series via a book somewhere in the middle. I'm sure it happens to everyone, but it -feels- like it happens to me a bit more often. So... Except for people who find it accidentally, who'd read a review of this book? Likely someone who's interested in perhaps reading it... Who, I'd guess, would be someone who's already read the first two. So, this review's probably useless. None the less.... This book (as I'm sure is true for the rest of the series) is meant as something of a reader's book... Not casual, "I read two or three novels a year" readers... But Readers. If I could italicize or use bold face here, I would. By extension, since I imagine so many decent writers are Readers, it's also meant to be a Writer's book. It's filled with inside jokes about plot development, scene construction, dialog conventions, exposition, character development, and so on. Since it also takes place in "the book world" - the alternate dimension that fictional characters inhabit both while working and while "off duty" - there is also -loads- of business, name dropping, and inside jokery about other books. The problem with this is that... Well... Have you ever been playing around with a group of friends who all saw the same film or read the same book as yourself, and all felt somewhat similar about it, and you go off on this big long tear about the possible interaction of the characters and what might have been and how -hilarious- that might have been? And, since you were in that group, and high on laughter, in that special way that laughter has of making everything else seem a little more funny... By the end of it, you're all in tears, laughing at just about -anything- but... If you showed it to a stranger, or could even view it yourself a month later without the benefit of having been there, it might not be nearly so compelling. So... I felt that a lot of the references to other books were a bit... Overdone. The quick references in passing, I enjoyed very much. a few lines with Rudyard Kipling's Painted Jaguar in the elevator... Quite nice. Bits of conversation between Shakespeare's Beatrice and Benedick were simply brilliant in the authenticity they carried over. But, for me, the anger management session with all the characters from Wuthering Heights, working through their seething hatred of Heathcliffe just seemed to drag on, and on, and on... All told, I'm happy I read it, and I will read the others when the opportunity arises... I just wish the author would keep the inside jokes quick and to the point.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hank

    DNF at 70% The title is supposed to be a description of the location of most of the book. Lost plots and generic characters abound, unfortunately what it really describes is the book itself. Overly clever, steeped in literary geekdom and lame, in your face, characterizations. Not much to like about this book even Thursday was a miss. 2 stars for a few scattered funny moments and Thursday's gran.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    *****3.5***** This is an interesting continuation of Thursday's story. Now, she's living in the Book World, planning to stay and rest for a year until she has her baby, when she'll return to the Outland and continue trying to bring Landen back. The beginning of the book moves verrrrry slowly. Some of the conflicts that will come to a head at the end of the book are introduced, but they are just blurbs at first. Most of the "action" consists of Thursday meeting and interacting with other *****3.5***** This is an interesting continuation of Thursday's story. Now, she's living in the Book World, planning to stay and rest for a year until she has her baby, when she'll return to the Outland and continue trying to bring Landen back. The beginning of the book moves verrrrry slowly. Some of the conflicts that will come to a head at the end of the book are introduced, but they are just blurbs at first. Most of the "action" consists of Thursday meeting and interacting with other Jurisfiction members and the characters in the book she's living in, Caversham Heights. The "conflicts" she encounters with Grammasites and a giant cat named Big Martin are quickly resolved within the chapter they're introduced. An ongoing subplot with two Generics is interesting--Thursday names them ibb and obb, and they are boring and characterless until they begin school and start to take on names and personalities. While this is entertaining, it's not exactly a novel. The main thread that continues from beginning to end and that actually is a conflict, and one that continues from the earlier books, is Thursday's dream encounters with Aornis, Acheron's younger sister, who wants to avenge her brother's death. She's a mnemonomorph, someone who can go into people's memories, creating a mindworm, and change their memories of life events, even removing the memories completely. She and Thursday battle in Thursday's dreams several times, and Granny Next visits the Book World to help her granddaughter through this significant trial. Finally, several suspicious deaths occur, mostly towards the middle of the novel, and that story line builds until the end, where it becomes the other major conflict. I enjoyed this book because it's about books. If it weren't for the allusions and the humor, I would have lost interest. The end does pick up, though, and it becomes more like the first two novels in the series, which are filled with action, even to the point of being convoluted with various plots and subplots. They were cups of coffee with double shots of espresso. This book, by comparison, is a cup of herbal tea with a slight hint of flavor at the back. Still, I liked it enough to want to move on to book four, eventually. I'm curious what will happen when Thursday returns to the Outland, and honestly, I really want to know what is going to happen with Landen! I recommend this book only to fans of the first two, although you could start here and wouldn't be missing much. The important parts of earlier books are actually rehashed quite well in this third book of the series, so you could get into the Book World and its characters without missing much. I did keep forgetting who other characters were, especially the Jurisfiction agents, mostly because I read the second book so long ago, but it didn't matter. The action and resolution of the conflict spoke for themselves. As a side note, with some modifications, I think that UltraWord would be a great reading system! Fforde's imagination is unparalleled. He makes these books fun because he thinks of things that any reader could think of or wish for, but he actually puts them into words and creates a novel from them. It's impressive but also, again, very fun!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Vegan

    I slogged through most of the first fifth or so of this book; I preferred Thursday in her real world of the first two books. I was concerned that this third book wouldnt be as enjoyable as Id expected it would be. I ended up loving it though, and laughed as much as I did while reading the first two books, and cared as much about Thursday and certain other characters as much as well. This book was kind of all over the place more than the first two books in the series, but there were so many I slogged through most of the first fifth or so of this book; I preferred Thursday in her “real” world of the first two books. I was concerned that this third book wouldn’t be as enjoyable as I’d expected it would be. I ended up loving it though, and laughed as much as I did while reading the first two books, and cared as much about Thursday and certain other characters as much as well. This book was kind of all over the place more than the first two books in the series, but there were so many wonderful tidbits. One of my favorite was the explanation for the difference between the American vs. British spelling of words ending in or and our, such as labor vs. labour. I was distressed by the elimination of one character, but assume I’ll have many others to enjoy in the remaining books in the series. I’m one of those readers that reads absolutely every word on & in a book, and this is one book where some of the “extras” are part of the book and part of the fun. I’m really enjoying this Thursday Next series by Jasper Fforde. He’s a genius.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    There's something in me that wants to dislike these books, but I just can't. They are both absurd and ridiculously clever, and stuffed full of jokes that only a gramma(rfan) could love. I appreciate that Fforde explodes the formulae of every genre he skewers, refusing to return his characters to the starting block for the next book. I sometimes find everything a little too clever and self-congratulatory, and the quotes that start the chapters irritate me with their look-ma-no-exposition There's something in me that wants to dislike these books, but I just can't. They are both absurd and ridiculously clever, and stuffed full of jokes that only a gramma(rfan) could love. I appreciate that Fforde explodes the formulae of every genre he skewers, refusing to return his characters to the starting block for the next book. I sometimes find everything a little too clever and self-congratulatory, and the quotes that start the chapters irritate me with their look-ma-no-exposition exposition, but some tiny detail usually comes along to redeem the book again. Fun stuff.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sandi

    I jumped right into "The Well of Lost Plots" after finishing "Lost in a Good Book". I think I'm ready for some other reading for a while. "The Well of Lost Plots" was a pretty interesting book, and it was fun. But, there wasn't a lot of plot to it and it jumped around a lot. Once again, Thursday's primary problem remains unresolved. I hope it gets taken care of in the next volume. Oh, and I think I need to read "Great Expectations".

  17. 5 out of 5

    Belles

    SO CREATIVE!! I love this book and I love this series. ♥

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    In this third book, Thursday Next goes for a small holiday in a poorly written and unpublished novel in the Well of Lost Plots within the Book World. While there, she ends up joining the Book World police (Jurisfiction) as an apprentice to the Dickens Great Expectations character Mrs Haversham. As in the previous two novels, this one if full of funny dialogues and meetings with characters from some of the great classics (Dickens, Brontë and Verne are just a few). The books really revolves around In this third book, Thursday Next goes for a small holiday in a poorly written and unpublished novel in the Well of Lost Plots within the Book World. While there, she ends up joining the Book World police (Jurisfiction) as an apprentice to the Dickens Great Expectations character Mrs Haversham. As in the previous two novels, this one if full of funny dialogues and meetings with characters from some of the great classics (Dickens, Brontë and Verne are just a few). The books really revolves around the making of literature; whereas Outlanders (ie we in the real world) think that authors are the creators of books, all in the Book World know that without the Generic Characters (who can be shaped into any personality type a plot would need), the Backstory Workshop, the holesmiths who fix holes in narratives, grammaticists who chase down grammacites and mispeling vyruses, Rage Control Meetings for the characters to prevent books such as Wuthering Heights from imploding, there would be no books. Add to this the Villains and Monsters (including a Minotaur that runs amok and a quite sentimental Count Dracula) and you understand the need of the Book World police (Jurisfiction). All in all the book is very entertaining for all its details and originality. However, the details are sometimes at the expense of the plot, which was something that book 1 and 2 suffered from too. I still highly recommend the series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    Absolutely amazing. I'm convinced that Fforde is one of the most brilliant authors writing fiction today. The Well of Lost Plots, rather than being more of the same from the world of Thursday Next and Jurisfiction, is something fresh, still original, never boring, and simply... fabulous. I adore this series for so many reasons... not the least of which being that it, much like Harry Potter or Abarat, is too often viewed as a children's book when it (and the others) are really nothing of the sort. Absolutely amazing. I'm convinced that Fforde is one of the most brilliant authors writing fiction today. The Well of Lost Plots, rather than being more of the same from the world of Thursday Next and Jurisfiction, is something fresh, still original, never boring, and simply... fabulous. I adore this series for so many reasons... not the least of which being that it, much like Harry Potter or Abarat, is too often viewed as a children's book when it (and the others) are really nothing of the sort. The Well had plenty of violence and sadness scattered throughout. Sad moments in a fictional book about fictional characters are quite strange, somehow. Strange, but not bad. In this volume, the idea of the Nursery Crimes series is introduced, and I can't wait to give them a whirl, too. I expect just as much joy from that series as from Thursday Next and her pseudo-autobiography. Fforde has become a very important member of my beloved authors list... possibly even right up there beside Stephen King... and that's saying a lot.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Thursday Next leaves her strange version of Swindon behind to take a sort-of maternity leave in the Bookworld. As part of the character exchange program she finds herself in the poorly written book Caversham Heights. But whilst she's in Bookworld she still has duties to attend to, whether that be an Alice in Wonderland trial, helping Miss Havisham run anger management groups in Wuthering Heights or try and work out what's wrong with the new book operating system UltraWorld. It's an interesting Thursday Next leaves her strange version of Swindon behind to take a sort-of maternity leave in the Bookworld. As part of the character exchange program she finds herself in the poorly written book Caversham Heights. But whilst she's in Bookworld she still has duties to attend to, whether that be an Alice in Wonderland trial, helping Miss Havisham run anger management groups in Wuthering Heights or try and work out what's wrong with the new book operating system UltraWorld. It's an interesting move to completely leave the parallel universe Swindon behind here but I thought it was excellent. It really expanded the idea of Bookworld and had lots of clever things to say about writing books. This is world-building on a bonkers scale, including many borrowed characters and books (although some of those are fictional too). The best thing about this book is how it plays with literature, even more so than the previous books. Thursday Next spends time in Sense and Sensibility, Wuthering Heights and even Shadow The Sheepdog. Not to mention all the famous characters she meets like the Cheshire Cat, Captain Nemo, the Minotaur and various nursery rhyme characters. It really is well-populated with characters and concepts from a range of fiction. At the same time though, this does just about manage to have a coherent plot. It's not entirely obvious at the start and it's essentially a mystery as people keep dying in apparent accidents. Jurisfiction and Thursday investigate but it appears it's an inside job... I am enjoying this series more and more as I read my way through it. This book is even more creative, bonkers, clever and funny than it's excellent predecessors.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    Books about books/reading are my favourites. And there is some amazing imagination at work here. Unfortunately, the book didn't really click with me. I wanted to like it but it took me ages to read it. And I felt like a small child watching Shrek - I noticed that there are heaps of references and jokes that I just didn't get because I do not know all the books mentioned. There are so many outstanding ideas in this book but knowing there is a joke I just don't get is frustrating in itself and Books about books/reading are my favourites. And there is some amazing imagination at work here. Unfortunately, the book didn't really click with me. I wanted to like it but it took me ages to read it. And I felt like a small child watching Shrek - I noticed that there are heaps of references and jokes that I just didn't get because I do not know all the books mentioned. There are so many outstanding ideas in this book but knowing there is a joke I just don't get is frustrating in itself and when I feel like this on every other page, I get fatigued. I really want to love this book and I am very sad that I didn't.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    Just got this one and had to read it right away. I was going to wait, as I still haven't read Lost in a Good Book, but I picked it up just to look through it and I couldn't put it down. I'm not even sure really why I like this series so much. Maybe just because it is so different. Or maybe it's all the Lewis Carroll stuff. But it was really good and I'm anxious to read more in this series.

  23. 5 out of 5

    ✘✘ Sarah ✘✘ (former Nefarious Breeder of Murderous Crustaceans)

    Thrusday Next's wacky adventures in the BookWorld continue, a brilliant book!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Aphelia

    Re-read as part of the #thursdaysareforthursday Instagram read along with @booksandfrogs "'The Well of Lost Plots is where we interface the writer's imagination with the characters and plots so that it will make sense in the reader's mind. After all, reading is arguably a far more creative and imaginative process than writing; when the reader creates emotion in their head, or the colors of the sky during the setting sun, or the smell of a warm summer's breeze on their face, they should reserve as Re-read as part of the #thursdaysareforthursday Instagram read along with @booksandfrogs "'The Well of Lost Plots is where we interface the writer's imagination with the characters and plots so that it will make sense in the reader's mind. After all, reading is arguably a far more creative and imaginative process than writing; when the reader creates emotion in their head, or the colors of the sky during the setting sun, or the smell of a warm summer's breeze on their face, they should reserve as much praise for themselves as they do for the writer - perhaps more.'" ~ Akrid Snell (48) Tired of running for her life, pregnant Thursday Next joins the BookWorld's Character Exchange Program, going to live in an unpublished detective story deep in The Well of Lost Plots. She only intends to stay for a year - long enough to have the baby and figure out a way to bring Landen back. But the characters in the run of the mill "Caversham Heights" turn out to have feelings too; upset that their book is due for demolition, they want Thursday's help saving them from being reduced to text for recycling. Detective Jack Spratt takes Thursday's advice and attempts to go against his stereotypical "loner workaholic alcoholic" stereotype in an effort to improve the story's rating. Meanwhile, Thursday's peace is interrupted by the arrival of two Generics who come to board on her flying boat while they attend St. Tabularasa's and try to figure out their personalities. The boat is crowded, as Pickwick and her egg are nesting, and the indomitable blue-gingham clad Granny Next arrives via mysterious means to help Thursday remember Landen, as Thursday's mind and memories (the only place eradicated Landen now exists) are under attack from Aornis Hades. Thursday continues her apprenticeship with the delightfully cantankerous Miss Havisham while trying to solve a series of Jurisfiction murders, and tracking down a rouge Minotaur. The BookWorld is abuzz with the long awaited introduction of UltraWord, which will make reading a feast for the senses. But something isn't right and if UltraWord is introduced, there will be Terrible Consequences. I really enjoyed learning more about The Well of Lost Plots, especially the marketplace and The Text Sea (featured in a great colour illustration in the front of this edition). My favourite book yet in the series! Very much looking forward to reading the next one.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joulez

    Onto book 3 I went. There is something about this series of books that is just an easy kind of read but keeps you entertained all the way. I can't really remember the last time I enjoyed a series of books so much as this, I love all the little subplots being interwoven in each book and how you end up with more answers, but then even more questions at the end of each one. I enjoyed this book so much, learning more about the Bookworld, how you make up the generics and just quite literally seeing a Onto book 3 I went. There is something about this series of books that is just an easy kind of read but keeps you entertained all the way. I can't really remember the last time I enjoyed a series of books so much as this, I love all the little subplots being interwoven in each book and how you end up with more answers, but then even more questions at the end of each one. I enjoyed this book so much, learning more about the Bookworld, how you make up the generics and just quite literally seeing a character grow and develope. I think this one focused a little less on Thursday and more on the world creation and it got bigger with every chapter I read. You were learning something new each chapter, a new bit of the Bookworld, of course there was still the 'bad guy' part of the book which was quite interesting. To have a villian that can alter memories, take memories away without you even realising that is scary, especially when Thursday doesn't even realise its happening. It is awful, with very strong remants of what can happen in the real world. So yeah this part struck a cord with me this time, I felt for Thursday throughout trying to retain her memories. Of course not only was there that fight, but there was also the mystery of who was killing who. I have to admit sometimes in books having two major themes running in one book can get quite confusing, quite tiresome, but this didn't, am not sure how the author did it, but there was no crossover. No confusion over which line you were following, it was very clear and I was able to follow with no problems. I jumped straight onto book 4 last night and I can't wait to find out what happens in it, also this author is fast becoming an author I would definitly buy from regardless of what they had written. There is a certain writting style that the author has got and it's just lovely to read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ashley *Hufflepuff Kitten*

    For as excellent a narrator as Emily Gray is (she's fantastic and I adore her), methinks I shall switch solely to paperback for the remainder of this series. It's been awhile since I looked at the first two and I'm too lazy to grab them off the shelf and check but this volume in particular had plenty of footnotes, thanks to the many Footnoter Phone conversations, and I don't believe they were included in the reading of the text. So while I truly didn't miss anything, I felt like I was, if that For as excellent a narrator as Emily Gray is (she's fantastic and I adore her), methinks I shall switch solely to paperback for the remainder of this series. It's been awhile since I looked at the first two and I'm too lazy to grab them off the shelf and check but this volume in particular had plenty of footnotes, thanks to the many Footnoter Phone conversations, and I don't believe they were included in the reading of the text. So while I truly didn't miss anything, I felt like I was, if that makes sense. And there's so much wordplay being tossed around that it seems this is a better series for visual reading rather than audio reading. Anyway. I spoiled myself for Gran (damn it) but the next book involves Hamlet! YES. And I may detour into the Nursery Crime books before picking up #5. I'm considering curating an absurdist-escapist-whimsical GR shelf too - between this series and Gail Carriger's body of work, they make books great fun.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Shellenbarger

    If Alice in Wonderland was written about a policewoman from an alternate 1980's Britain and had less of an LSD trip vibe and more of a literature geek thing going on, and there was some murder involved, you'd ALMOST have a frame of reference for this extremely weird book in Jasper Fforde's already EXTREMELY weird Thursday Next series. Frankly, he outdid himself; it's a fantastically imaginative and thoroughly amusing story, but you're definitely down the rabbit hole the whole time with no clue If Alice in Wonderland was written about a policewoman from an alternate 1980's Britain and had less of an LSD trip vibe and more of a literature geek thing going on, and there was some murder involved, you'd ALMOST have a frame of reference for this extremely weird book in Jasper Fforde's already EXTREMELY weird Thursday Next series. Frankly, he outdid himself; it's a fantastically imaginative and thoroughly amusing story, but you're definitely down the rabbit hole the whole time with no clue what's going to happen next.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lulufrances

    One of the most genius and inventive series Ive come across. Anyone loving bookish stuff and language is bound to love Jasper Ffordes writing - I just cackle so much to myself while reading. A lovely sight (and sound) indeed, but youll now when you read for yourself. Thursday Next, what a queen! One of the most genius and inventive series I‘ve come across. Anyone loving bookish stuff and language is bound to love Jasper Fforde‘s writing - I just cackle so much to myself while reading. A lovely sight (and sound) indeed, but you‘ll now when you read for yourself. Thursday Next, what a queen!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Richter

    If you have a robust knowledge of British Literature and a working knowledge of the constructs of the novel, this is the novel for you. Once again Jasper Fforde's protagonist Thursday Next is thrown into a literary adventure that includes the Cheshire Cat, a Dodo and an Out of Print Explorer who is trying to sell his adventures on the sly in the Well of Lost Plots. The audio is narrated by Emily Gray who does a fine job in voicing the vast numbers of characters . On to the next Thursday Next If you have a robust knowledge of British Literature and a working knowledge of the constructs of the novel, this is the novel for you. Once again Jasper Fforde's protagonist Thursday Next is thrown into a literary adventure that includes the Cheshire Cat, a Dodo and an Out of Print Explorer who is trying to sell his adventures on the sly in the Well of Lost Plots. The audio is narrated by Emily Gray who does a fine job in voicing the vast numbers of characters . On to the next Thursday Next book, Something Rotten.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Smartarse

    I started The Well of Lost Plots still high on my post-Lost in a Good Book excitement. Unfortunately, this time I didn't manage to immerse myself into the fictional world of Thursday Next. The story picks up right where its prequel left off: Thursday's arrival in the unpublished, sub-par murder mystery, unlikely to ever see the light of printing. As part of the so-called "Character Exchange Program", our heroine is temporarily replacing the main character's side kick. To be fair, certain aspects I started The Well of Lost Plots still high on my post-Lost in a Good Book excitement. Unfortunately, this time I didn't manage to immerse myself into the fictional world of Thursday Next. The story picks up right where its prequel left off: Thursday's arrival in the unpublished, sub-par murder mystery, unlikely to ever see the light of printing. As part of the so-called "Character Exchange Program", our heroine is temporarily replacing the main character's side kick. To be fair, certain aspects of Thursday's daily life, provided quite a bit of amusement: - pondering the lack of breakfast in literary works - introducing generic characters to sarcasm - attempting to 'sneakily' rewrite the dreadfully boring story of the unpublished manuscript "from within" - ... and explaining her non-fictional status ad-nauseam Yet, when it came to Thursday's Jurisfiction duties, things got extremely tedious: - fighting grammasites (by means of a Christmas carol chock full of irregular verbs) - getting roped into illegal plot-device dealings (random severed heads are a mong the most valuable commodities) - attending Jurisfiction meetings Literature buffs may enjoy them, but for my rather "unsophisticated" tastes, it was just very confusing. As in the previous book, the main story thread took its sweet time to announce its appearance, which irked me just as much this time. In an attempt to jump start my reading speed, I switched to the audiobook, but it didn't help either. I got even more confused, and ended up listening to the same 3 chapters multiple times. At least the narrator's impression of various characters was enjoyable, so I might try listening to (parts of) the sequel. Score: 3/5 stars My constant confusion caused by all the name-dropping and inner jokes, made for a very annoying reading experience. I suppose if you're well-read you'll find this book a real gem. Otherwise, you will probably feel guilty for not reading enough. Or is that just me? ============================================ Review of the 2nd book: Lost in a Good Book Review of the 4th book: Something Rotten

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