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Winner, John Whitney Hall Book Prize, Association for Asian Studies Winner, BFE Book Prize, British Forum for Ethnomusicology Honorable Mention, Alan Merriam Prize, Society for Ethnomusicology Nuclear power has been a contentious issue in Japan since the 1950s, and in the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, the conflict has only grown. Government agencies Winner, John Whitney Hall Book Prize, Association for Asian Studies Winner, BFE Book Prize, British Forum for Ethnomusicology Honorable Mention, Alan Merriam Prize, Society for Ethnomusicology Nuclear power has been a contentious issue in Japan since the 1950s, and in the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, the conflict has only grown. Government agencies and the nuclear industry continue to push a nuclear agenda, while the mainstream media adheres to the official line that nuclear power is Japan's future. Public debate about nuclear energy is strongly discouraged. Nevertheless, antinuclear activism has swelled into one of the most popular and passionate movements in Japan, leading to a powerful wave of protest music. The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Protest Music After Fukushima shows that music played a central role in expressing antinuclear sentiments and mobilizing political resistance in Japan. Combining musical analysis with ethnographic participation, author Noriko Manabe offers an innovative typology of the spaces central to the performance of protest music--cyberspace, demonstrations, festivals, and recordings. She argues that these four spaces encourage different modes of participation and methods of political messaging. The openness, mobile accessibility, and potential anonymity of cyberspace have allowed musicians to directly challenge the ethos of silence that permeated Japanese culture post-Fukushima. Moving from cyberspace to real space, Manabe shows how the performance and reception of music played at public demonstrations are shaped by the urban geographies of Japanese cities. While short on open public space, urban centers in Japan offer protesters a wide range of governmental and commercial spaces in which to demonstrate, with activist musicians tailoring their performances to the particular landscapes and soundscapes of each. Music festivals are a space apart from everyday life, encouraging musicians and audience members to freely engage in political expression through informative and immersive performances. Conversely, Japanese record companies and producers discourage major-label musicians from expressing political views in recordings, forcing antinuclear musicians to express dissent indirectly: through allegories, metaphors, and metonyms. The first book on Japan's antinuclear music, The Revolution Will Not Be Televised provides a compelling new perspective on the role of music in political movements.


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Winner, John Whitney Hall Book Prize, Association for Asian Studies Winner, BFE Book Prize, British Forum for Ethnomusicology Honorable Mention, Alan Merriam Prize, Society for Ethnomusicology Nuclear power has been a contentious issue in Japan since the 1950s, and in the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, the conflict has only grown. Government agencies Winner, John Whitney Hall Book Prize, Association for Asian Studies Winner, BFE Book Prize, British Forum for Ethnomusicology Honorable Mention, Alan Merriam Prize, Society for Ethnomusicology Nuclear power has been a contentious issue in Japan since the 1950s, and in the aftermath of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, the conflict has only grown. Government agencies and the nuclear industry continue to push a nuclear agenda, while the mainstream media adheres to the official line that nuclear power is Japan's future. Public debate about nuclear energy is strongly discouraged. Nevertheless, antinuclear activism has swelled into one of the most popular and passionate movements in Japan, leading to a powerful wave of protest music. The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Protest Music After Fukushima shows that music played a central role in expressing antinuclear sentiments and mobilizing political resistance in Japan. Combining musical analysis with ethnographic participation, author Noriko Manabe offers an innovative typology of the spaces central to the performance of protest music--cyberspace, demonstrations, festivals, and recordings. She argues that these four spaces encourage different modes of participation and methods of political messaging. The openness, mobile accessibility, and potential anonymity of cyberspace have allowed musicians to directly challenge the ethos of silence that permeated Japanese culture post-Fukushima. Moving from cyberspace to real space, Manabe shows how the performance and reception of music played at public demonstrations are shaped by the urban geographies of Japanese cities. While short on open public space, urban centers in Japan offer protesters a wide range of governmental and commercial spaces in which to demonstrate, with activist musicians tailoring their performances to the particular landscapes and soundscapes of each. Music festivals are a space apart from everyday life, encouraging musicians and audience members to freely engage in political expression through informative and immersive performances. Conversely, Japanese record companies and producers discourage major-label musicians from expressing political views in recordings, forcing antinuclear musicians to express dissent indirectly: through allegories, metaphors, and metonyms. The first book on Japan's antinuclear music, The Revolution Will Not Be Televised provides a compelling new perspective on the role of music in political movements.

39 review for The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Protest Music After Fukushima

  1. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    In "The Revolution With Not Be Televised" which I won through Goodreads/First Reads Noriko Manabe explores the antinuclear sentiment prevalent in Japan since the 1950's that exploded after the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, and found a powerful voice in music because of government constraints on media coverage and public debates. Protest music became an influential and vital antidote to the problem even though over the years musicians have had to mask the wording in their lyrics to cont In "The Revolution With Not Be Televised" which I won through Goodreads/First Reads Noriko Manabe explores the antinuclear sentiment prevalent in Japan since the 1950's that exploded after the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster, and found a powerful voice in music because of government constraints on media coverage and public debates. Protest music became an influential and vital antidote to the problem even though over the years musicians have had to mask the wording in their lyrics to continue to voice their opposition. I am impressed with the references and citations that support this well-developed and enlightening theme as well as the pictures and samples of musical lyrics that enhance interest in a unique and captivating topic. I thoroughly enjoyed reading "The Revolution With Not Be Televised" .

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chip Lechner

    This book was an enjoyable enough read. The author does take a very leftist slant on the reporting of events and mood of the protestors. The groundswell of protest described is very interesting and shows a side of Japan usually hidden from outside view. Japan has had an understandably vocal anti-nuclear faction since the bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima, which has been prevalent in everything from Godzilla movies to the recent protest music explored in this book. I think the book was very well This book was an enjoyable enough read. The author does take a very leftist slant on the reporting of events and mood of the protestors. The groundswell of protest described is very interesting and shows a side of Japan usually hidden from outside view. Japan has had an understandably vocal anti-nuclear faction since the bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima, which has been prevalent in everything from Godzilla movies to the recent protest music explored in this book. I think the book was very well written and informative with ample references and citations.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Mustread

    Listened to New Books in History (Noriko Manabe, “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Protest Music After Fukushima” (Oxford UP, 2015)): http://newbooksnetwork.com/noriko-man... "Noriko Manabe’s new book is a compelling analysis of the content, performance style, and role of music in social movements in contemporary Japan. Paying special attention to the constraints that limit and censor people–both ordinary citizens and musicians–from speaking out…" http://newbooksnetwork.com/noriko-man... Listened to New Books in History (Noriko Manabe, “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Protest Music After Fukushima” (Oxford UP, 2015)): http://newbooksnetwork.com/noriko-man... "Noriko Manabe’s new book is a compelling analysis of the content, performance style, and role of music in social movements in contemporary Japan. Paying special attention to the constraints that limit and censor people–both ordinary citizens and musicians–from speaking out…" http://newbooksnetwork.com/noriko-man...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dave Bensette

    GREAT stuff!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Muhan

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    Maggie-Kate

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