counter create hit The Lost Sun - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Lost Sun

Availability: Ready to download

Fans of Neil Gaiman's "American Gods" and Holly Black's "The Curse Workers" will embrace this richly drawn, Norse-mythology-infused alternate world: the United States of Asgard. Seventeen-year-old Soren Bearskin is trying to escape the past. His father, a famed warrior, lost himself to the battle-frenzy and killed thirteen innocent people. Soren cannot deny that berserking Fans of Neil Gaiman's "American Gods" and Holly Black's "The Curse Workers" will embrace this richly drawn, Norse-mythology-infused alternate world: the United States of Asgard. Seventeen-year-old Soren Bearskin is trying to escape the past. His father, a famed warrior, lost himself to the battle-frenzy and killed thirteen innocent people. Soren cannot deny that berserking is in his blood--the fevers, insomnia, and occasional feelings of uncontrollable rage haunt him. So he tries to remain calm and detached from everyone at Sanctus Sigurd's Academy. But that's hard to do when a popular, beautiful girl like Astrid Glyn tells Soren she dreams of him. That's not all Astrid dreams of--the daughter of a renowned prophetess, Astrid is coming into her own inherited abilities. When Baldur, son of Odin and one of the most popular gods in the country, goes missing, Astrid sees where he is and convinces Soren to join her on a road trip that will take them to find not only a lost god, but also who they are beyond the legacy of their parents and everything they've been told they have to be.


Compare
Ads Banner

Fans of Neil Gaiman's "American Gods" and Holly Black's "The Curse Workers" will embrace this richly drawn, Norse-mythology-infused alternate world: the United States of Asgard. Seventeen-year-old Soren Bearskin is trying to escape the past. His father, a famed warrior, lost himself to the battle-frenzy and killed thirteen innocent people. Soren cannot deny that berserking Fans of Neil Gaiman's "American Gods" and Holly Black's "The Curse Workers" will embrace this richly drawn, Norse-mythology-infused alternate world: the United States of Asgard. Seventeen-year-old Soren Bearskin is trying to escape the past. His father, a famed warrior, lost himself to the battle-frenzy and killed thirteen innocent people. Soren cannot deny that berserking is in his blood--the fevers, insomnia, and occasional feelings of uncontrollable rage haunt him. So he tries to remain calm and detached from everyone at Sanctus Sigurd's Academy. But that's hard to do when a popular, beautiful girl like Astrid Glyn tells Soren she dreams of him. That's not all Astrid dreams of--the daughter of a renowned prophetess, Astrid is coming into her own inherited abilities. When Baldur, son of Odin and one of the most popular gods in the country, goes missing, Astrid sees where he is and convinces Soren to join her on a road trip that will take them to find not only a lost god, but also who they are beyond the legacy of their parents and everything they've been told they have to be.

30 review for The Lost Sun

  1. 4 out of 5

    Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies

    This was a beautifully written book with an intriguing concept of a Norse-mythology-based United States, but it was just not fun to read. I didn't find the plot intriguing, I didn't find it interesting, I didn't feel any sense of urgency or excitement. The characters are nice, but to me, it didn't feel like they developed throughout the story at all. I was not attached to them, to me, the characters did not feel like real people to whom I can relate. Great writing and an interesting alternate wor This was a beautifully written book with an intriguing concept of a Norse-mythology-based United States, but it was just not fun to read. I didn't find the plot intriguing, I didn't find it interesting, I didn't feel any sense of urgency or excitement. The characters are nice, but to me, it didn't feel like they developed throughout the story at all. I was not attached to them, to me, the characters did not feel like real people to whom I can relate. Great writing and an interesting alternate world can only do so much towards my enjoyment of a book, the plot and character development is also needed to keep my attention, and this book lacks both of the latter. I'm currently reading a Gossip Girl-type book (of all things!) that I found superior to this one where character development and plot are concerned. I appreciated this book...but I was not entertained by it. I tend to take my mythological reinterpretations rather seriously. Or rather, I often go off on prolonged rage-y expletive-filled rant about how the author completely abused the accuracy of certain myths for their own ends. I have no such complaints with this book. My knowledge of Norse mythology and the Aesir, the Ragnarok, is not the best, but so far, I feel like the gods have been accurately represented and reinterpreted, and I have no problems with how they are portrayed here. The United States of Asgard was very interesting...at first. I was initially intrigued at the concept of it. We are in the current United States, but one based on Norse Mythology, where the gods of the Aesir are alive and living among mortals. Instead of states, we have Kingstates, ruled by a king, with princes. There is a House of Congress; instead of a White House, we have a White Hall. The language spoken is Anglish. The days are Sunsday, Moonsday, Tyrsday, Thorsday, Freyasday, Freysday...etc. The kingstates are renamed, Mizizibi, Nebrasge, Colorada, Montania, Cantuckee, Kansa. We have elves and trolls wandering the wilds and terrorizing those not living in established settlements. Our magazines are Os Weekly, Teen Seer, with articles like “Top Ten Ways to Make Runes Sexy” and “Dating and Prophecy: Things He Doesn’t Want to Hear.” Instead of the NFL, we have National Stoneball. Instead of Carl's Junior, we have Jarl Burger...etc. The gods are living among us, they appear at Congressional hearings, they appear with starlets on their arm at red-carpet events, they have photographic press events! The gods are very active among the people, and that's what makes them so adored and worshiped. "But none of them is so well loved as Baldur the Beautiful. He’s the god of light, and is handsome and golden, strong and funny. At the end of every summer, he dies and his body is consumed in a great bonfire, only to rise again at winter’s end. He gives himself to Hel for six months of every year, but lives harder and more brightly in the time he has with us on earth. He is the only god who dies at all. And that makes him the one most like us." This new world is beautifully woven at first, then it gets cute...and then it gets a little bit grating. It's one thing to build a system based on a mythological system, slapping a new Norse-based name on everything in existence just feels like it's trying too hard, and it got on my nerves more often than not. I would also have liked to know more of the history of the United States of Asgard, too. How did it come into existence? What about the rest of the modern-day world? It is a well-built microcosm of a nation, but it leaves too much unexplained. Soren is the son of a berserker, who went crazy. His father was infamous for going off in a berserker rage and killing 13 people before being killed by a SWAT team himself. Astrid has a famous mother, a seethkona or a seer who has disappeared--or died. Meanwhile, the living god Baldur has disappeared when he should have been reborn, and thus Soren and Astrid join forces in a quest to find him and in doing so, gain a boon from his father, Odin. Both are seeking something, and a boon (a wish) from the Alffather is something to be prized. The beginning was interesting...what follows, is more or less an alternate-universe edition of On the Road, which is to say it's not terribly exciting, despite the premise of a missing god. They travel on the road, mostly the desert-dry landscape of the American Midwest, they meet people, they get into random fights...it was all incredibly dull for me. There was supposed to be character development...I didn't see it. Soren is frustrated and fearful of unleashing his berserker ability. He lives all the time with the knowledge that his father's taint is passed onto him. He knows people regard him fearfully, thinking he might burst into rage at any moment. Soren knows that he is a timebomb waiting to happen...he is really, tremendously angsty about it all the time. Despite all that, I felt that neither his character nor Astrid were relatable, nor did they grow much throughout the events of the book. They are both quite perfect to begin with, besides their internal angst, and that much didn't change at all throughout the book. Soren and Astrid are supposed to have their faults, but to me, they felt much like the omnipresent Norse gods within the book. Unreachable, cold, distant. They are both, for lack of a better description---godly. Their weaknesses are more like a brief attempt at making them relatable, human, but they are both so perfect that they did not feel like your average teenager---albeit those with more unique powers than most, at all. Astrid is a pretty kick-ass character. She is a seether (seer) herself, she's also skilled in swordplay, fighting. She excels in everything. Astrid is just too perfect, and Soren views her as such. His reverence towards her makes Astrid to be such a paragon, and to me, she is an unattainable character, too consummately flawless that she is unreal. I also had a lot of problem with the insta-love. I felt the romance was utterly forced in this book. Literally from the moment their eyes lock, Soren and Astrid feel a connection. They never fight, they never argue. They just acknowledge a connection between their souls, and they accept it. It was so unrealistic, and completely unnecessary for the development of the plot. I would have liked it so much better if they didn't fall for each other so quickly and their feelings escalated so rapidly; their mission could have been built on a background of friendship that grows over time instead of just insta-love. Soren is an idealized male narrator, not a realistic one. "I think my heart stops beating. There are stories of old heroes being born and reborn to discover loves from past lives, to suffer and struggle for them again and again. Sigurd Dragonslayer and the Valkyrie Brynhild, Ivar and Ohther, Starwolf Berserk and Lady Kate. In that moment on the roof of the Spark, I imagine ages and lifetimes pile atop us, spinning us into the pull of destiny." Recommended for fans of Norse mythology and those who enjoy an interesting alternate world, with a patience for slow plot and lack of character development.

  2. 4 out of 5

    ♥ Becky 22

    Awesome! I love Norse mythology. So, yay! A book set in Asgard. Totally reading it. Awesome! I love Norse mythology. So, yay! A book set in Asgard. Totally reading it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mitch

    Let me preface this review by saying The Lost Sun hinges on an awkward romance that doesn't work. At all. That said, for a variety of reasons I’ll get into shortly, I absolutely loved this book and definitely consider it to be by far one of the best things I’ve read this year. Most of the time, summaries that draw comparisons to other, more popular authors are way off the mark, but in this case, I think the comparison to Neil Gaiman is not only apt, but warranted, and for those looking for a mor Let me preface this review by saying The Lost Sun hinges on an awkward romance that doesn't work. At all. That said, for a variety of reasons I’ll get into shortly, I absolutely loved this book and definitely consider it to be by far one of the best things I’ve read this year. Most of the time, summaries that draw comparisons to other, more popular authors are way off the mark, but in this case, I think the comparison to Neil Gaiman is not only apt, but warranted, and for those looking for a more mature, thoughtful approach to young adult, Tessa Gratton knocks it out of the park. What I like best is how Gratton has taken the same kind of contemplative writing style that’s the hallmark of some of the best adult books I've read and really made it work here - in a way, The Lost Sun is almost too smart to be a young adult novel. Sure, you can read this like you would any other young adult book, it’s an alternate United States ruled by the Norse Gods, one of their own, Baldur, has been kidnapped, and two unlikely heroes, Soren Bearskin and his friend Astrid, go on an epic road trip to rescue him (almost kind of like Percy Jackson if not for the tone), but I think you’ll end up poorer for it. What really works about The Lost Sun is the way Gratton’s captured the style and feel and wistful tone of a book that’s much older and wiser, through the way Soren and Astrid’s journey - and the Norse Gods they meet along the way - explore the dual roles of faith and fate. The summary mentions a bit of it, Soren’s berserker burden passed from his father, whether he can escape that cycle of violence, and Astrid’s role as a prophetess, but The Lost Sun has so much more depth than that; Soren and Astrid are on completely different pages with their views on their abilities, what roles the Gods play, how much faith to put in the future, how much is up to fate, and it's all rather heavy, but works - I really think Gratton has fashioned this tale that explores just how much faith and fate intertwines to shape each of these characters' worldview in the face of an indeterminable future. The other cool thing is that Gratton really has a handle on the Norse mythology, and then made it her own, but not only that, really in a way that works for the story she’s trying to tell. First of all, the world building I would describe as immersive, Gratton goes all out renaming everything besides LEGOs and burgers, and while it can be distracting to see the alternate spelling of Mississippi or how Odin has injected himself into every aspect of American government, I really liked how everything taken together really gives off a believable alternate US vibe, heck even the reverence everyone affords Baldur. More than that, there’s a lot of Norse mythology scattered throughout I would describe as faithful in spirit, Gratton gets for example Fenrir’s hunger driving the wolf to eat Tyr’s hand (and potentially the sun at Ragnarok) or that Baldur’s the most beloved of the gods, but changes up details to suit her own purposes, in this case using her version of Fenrir to complicate things between Freya and Loki and Baldur’s new identity to delve deeper into the role Gods play in fate. Even Odin’s not immune, becoming a far more capricious and calculating figure that fits well into Soren’s distrust of faith, and it’s how these changes added so much flavor with just the right hint of magic to the world and influenced my reading of the story that makes them so welcome. That said, if The Lost Sun has a weak point, it’s the way the relationship between Soren and Astrid is developed. In other words, in order for the ending to work, you have to believe there is one between them, and then given the book starts with Astrid being the new student and most of the rest occurs over an eight day road trip, sorry, it’s not believable, even if Gratton tried to write it a bit more subtly than flat out instalove. Soren and Astrid are two very subdued characters who I grew to like because of how their attitudes towards the Gods and fate are developed and then seeing their beliefs and expectations play out on their road trip; things like that hint of a triangle with Baldur even only made it awkward, and I didn’t buy the whole him being the god who’s the easiest to humanize excuse for a second (him as a character, yes, especially how his role differs from the other gods, just not Soren's jealousy). Still, while I was troubled by the role of the romance through the story and the way it was written, I was most invested in the journey and Soren’s personal struggles and what all of that says about life and the future and whatnot, which needless to say was for me so compelling I was willing to overlook Soren and Astrid and just go along with the two of them, although, yeah, caution. Despite that weakness, as someone tired of the same old in young adult and wanted something that read a bit more mature but still had relatable characters, The Lost Sun is a real treat. I’m sold.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sana

    I would have liked this book if it didn't have such shit that's supposed to be romance, a boring ass plot and such undeveloped, fucking annoying characters. This book is built on Norse Mythology. In this world U.S.A, THe United States of Asgard is a world very much like our own U.S.A with Heathen gods that run the world. When Baldur, son of Odin and one of the most popular gods in the country, goes missing, Astrid sees where he is and convinces Soren to join her on a road trip that will take them I would have liked this book if it didn't have such shit that's supposed to be romance, a boring ass plot and such undeveloped, fucking annoying characters. This book is built on Norse Mythology. In this world U.S.A, THe United States of Asgard is a world very much like our own U.S.A with Heathen gods that run the world. When Baldur, son of Odin and one of the most popular gods in the country, goes missing, Astrid sees where he is and convinces Soren to join her on a road trip that will take them to find not only a lost god, but also who they are beyond the legacy of their parents and everything they've been told they have to be. This book was written really nicely but it really didn't capture my attention. It was not fun and interesting to read. It was quite boring and I found myself skipping pages and skimming through stuff. The plot was so boring. I felt nothing but boredom. It was not exciting, it didn't grasp my attention and I was most definitely not eager to turn the pages and find out what's going to happen next. There was no character development. Soren was such a wuss. He literally pissed me off so fucking much. Seventeen-year-old Soren Bearskin is trying to escape the past. His father, a famed warrior, lost himself to the battle-frenzy and killed thirteen innocent people. Soren cannot deny that berserking is in his blood--the fevers, insomnia, and occasional feelings of uncontrollable rage haunt him. So he tries to remain calm and detached from everyone at Sanctus Sigurd's Academy. But that's hard to do when a popular, beautiful girl like Astrid Glyn tells Soren she dreams of him. That's not all Astrid dreams of--the daughter of a renowned prophetess, Astrid is coming into her own inherited abilities. He seriously needed to grow some balls and tell Astrid how he feels. Astrid is your perfect little girl. She is a seether, she is absolutely amazing in fighting and swordplay. I really couldn't connect to any of these characters. She was just flawless and perfect. The romance made me want to puke. Astrid and Soren felt a connection as soon as they looked into each other's eyes. Throughout the story Soren could literally not shut the fuck up about how much he wanted to kiss Astrid. It was really annoying. I hated the slow ass boring plot and the shit characters and shit romance. :)

  5. 5 out of 5

    kari

    I did not like this one. At all. Should have used the 50 page rule and gotten out before I wasted so much time forcing myself to read this book. So, what we have here is insta-love with a side order of I-am-too-dangerous-to-be-with-you. Where have you read this before? Anyone read this type plot before? The difference here is that we are being presented with a different world, although said world is not well-crafted enough or developed enough to be fully understood or even slightly believable. The I did not like this one. At all. Should have used the 50 page rule and gotten out before I wasted so much time forcing myself to read this book. So, what we have here is insta-love with a side order of I-am-too-dangerous-to-be-with-you. Where have you read this before? Anyone read this type plot before? The difference here is that we are being presented with a different world, although said world is not well-crafted enough or developed enough to be fully understood or even slightly believable. The state names are simply silly. Why would the states names even be the same if North America had a completely different history? Nebrasge? Laflorida? If the Norse settled here, why would there be a Canada? Or, rather, a Canadia? Do you get that major difference? Canadia? To show it's a different world? Why wouldn't the Norse have all of North America? And why would there be a state named Washington? Wouldn't the history in which George Washington is a Revolutionary War hero and the "father of our country" not be a part of a Norse, non-England based history? Just a thought. But a thought which for me just got bigger and more irksome the more I read. So, all of the cutesified(Norsified?) place names aside, not much more of this world is explained. I expected lots of interactions with the gods as this is the premise of the story, but nope. They show up mostly at the end, except for Baldur. And the ending is one big stinkball. This is NOT a happy ending, not a hopeful ending, not a satisfying ending. One person being enslaved is NOT a happy ending. It. Just. Is. Not. There are lots of things hinted at, but never fully explained. I don't need everything tied up, but I dislike when I have a big pile of "what about this" left over with no answers. Perhaps that is because this is the first of a series(a series of which I will read no more) and maybe future books will clarify something or anything. I don't know, not going to find out. Not interested. One major thing that just really bugged me. The Native Americans fared no better with the Norse in this world than they did with the British in the real world. Still killed off or shunted onto reservations. Just imagine how much more creative it would have been if, in this culture, the indigenous peoples had an equal footing with the new arrivals. This felt like lazy writing, just can't be bothered to actually address that fact that people were here before the land was "discovered" and how that would have made this country different. The actual story-telling here, the crafting, is bumpy. The story has no flow. It is they we went here, and next we are somewhere else. If this is supposed to be a rollicking road trip, it seriously took a bad detour somewhere. Additionally, all the stories within the story, are mind-numbing making me want to shout just get to the point already. Most of the stories are simply stories just to puff up the tedious storyline which, need I remind you, is simply insta-love and dangerous boy. All of the rest, the search for Baldur, the gods, all of it, is just in support of figuring out how dangerous boy can be with insta-love girl. It isn't anything new or different, although it tries mightily to be. And the story at the heart of it all, why all of this is happening, could have been told in one statement. "This is your destiny." I wouldn't buy it, but the characters in the story would have. There isn't truly any way to make the enslavement of someone palatable, no matter what a wonderful tale you attempt to weave. I think maybe this writer's style simply isn't for me. It's choppy and failed to involve me in the story. In a word, boring.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Maja (The Nocturnal Library)

    What would it be like if gods were actually around to govern our lives? Can you imagine the United States under the rule of Norse deities? Even if you could, you really don’t have to –Tessa Gratton has already done it with great success. Every person in the United States of Asgard is a devotee of some Norse god, depending on their talents, convictions and just general attitude towards life. They pray to their gods knowing that the deities are real and involved in state affairs. There is no need f What would it be like if gods were actually around to govern our lives? Can you imagine the United States under the rule of Norse deities? Even if you could, you really don’t have to –Tessa Gratton has already done it with great success. Every person in the United States of Asgard is a devotee of some Norse god, depending on their talents, convictions and just general attitude towards life. They pray to their gods knowing that the deities are real and involved in state affairs. There is no need for faith, although they often proclaim it, there is only absolute certainty. However, knowing the gods are real doesn’t necessarily mean that one has to love them. That is the case with Soren. He has nothing but contempt for Odin the Alfather and refuses to worship him or wear his insignia. Soren is unwilling to accept his destiny and become a full berserker. His whole life is focused on avoiding the fate of his father who murdered numerous people in a berserker rage. When winter ends and Baldur the Beautiful fails to rise from the ashes, the world is in an uproar. Talk of Ragnarok terrifies people all over the USA so Odin offers a boon to the person who finds his son and brings him back. Soren, desperate to be free of his legacy and his friend Astrid who wants to find her missing mother, leave school with the intention of finding Baldur. With her seer abilities and his berserker strength, they might just stand a chance. In her distinctive writing style, Tessa Gratton created a remarkable, fascinating and memorable story. Her worldbuilding is imaginative and bold and her sentences a beauty to behold. That’s not to say, however, that her book is without faults. While I appreciate Gratton’s somewhat subdued writing style, I wish she’d approached characterization a bit more openly and freely. As it was, Soren’s voice left a lot to be desired. As hard as I tried, he always remained just out of grasp and I haven’t quite managed to figure him out. By law, Soren is required to have a spear tattoo on his left cheek that marks him as a berserker. He is not allowed to conceal it in any way so when people see it, they respond with open hostility. I admire Gratton for using Soren to explore the position of someone permanently marked as something that is perceived as unwanted and dangerous to society. We have a great many examples of this in our history, be it the scarlet A or the Star of David. Like everything else, the romance in The Lost Sun is beautiful, but subtle. Soren and Astrid are an odd pair, one that would certainly benefit from a lengthy conversation or two, but that is not Tessa Gratton’s style. By the end, I grew attached to both of them and I can’t wait to see how their story will unfold in future installments.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cecelia

    2013 may go down as the year of fantastic world-building. Of course a lot of that is due to what I’ve chosen to read, but I can tell you that Tessa Gratton’s new release The Lost Sun, the first in The United States of Asgard series, will join the parade of really wonderful and exciting new worlds that I’ve discovered this year. I was lured in by the promise of Norse mythology and a Holly Black-like read, and that’s an accurate description. The Lost Sun is the best young adult fantasy I’ve read t 2013 may go down as the year of fantastic world-building. Of course a lot of that is due to what I’ve chosen to read, but I can tell you that Tessa Gratton’s new release The Lost Sun, the first in The United States of Asgard series, will join the parade of really wonderful and exciting new worlds that I’ve discovered this year. I was lured in by the promise of Norse mythology and a Holly Black-like read, and that’s an accurate description. The Lost Sun is the best young adult fantasy I’ve read this year. The United States of Asgard is familiar and yet not at the same time. It’s America if the Norse gods were real, living beings who traveled with European settlers to the New World. It’s a world where magic and soothsaying are commonplace, where trolls live on the edges of civilization, and where the gods are featured in televised rituals at every major holiday. In this world, Soren Bearskin is the teenage son of a disgraced, deceased beserker, and all he wants is to escape his fate. That desperate dream will be challenged by the arrival of Astrid, a girl who lives out her destiny with joy, and the disappearance of Baldur, everyone’s favorite god of light. Soren is a warrior in training, and he spends almost every waking moment controlling his inner beserker rage. He hopes against hope that if he holds the madness at bay long enough, it will leave him – leave him free to pursue a life beyond that assigned to him at birth. This struggle, this wrangling with who he is and why, leaves him a serious, stoic young man, constantly fighting the ripple of battle rage in his blood. That bottling up of what should be a natural part of his nature makes him attractive to Astrid, but it serves Soren as a barrier between himself and anyone he might hurt, leaving him lonely. Soren’s growth throughout the book hinges mainly on the bit-by-bit breakdown of these walls, of learning that holding back may not be the only way forward, and making decisions and sacrifices that demonstrate to him (and others) that he can find an honorable destiny that does not necessarily deny fate. There are other characters, important ones (Astrid! Baldur! etc., etc.), but as Soren’s is the only point of view, the thing I really want to talk about is Gratton’s world-building and writing. Both are, in a word, SUPERB. Regardless of whether you like the story or not (and who, I ask, would turn down a road trip epic with mythology, battles and the fate of the world in the balance? exactly.) the United States of Asgard will pull you in and take you for a ride. The extensive holiday traditions, the just-twisted place names, the characters and stories of the gods and their interplay with human history – these are all part of a richly-imagined landscape that seems entirely real. I expected to turn on the television and see Freya in a cape of feathers, or Odin and his missing eye. I can’t wait to read the next books in the series and discover what Gratton has done next. The Lost Sun was absolutely brilliant. Recommended for: fans of Holly Black, anyone who enjoys twists on mythology and contemporary fantasy, readers who revel in alternate histories and excellent world-building, and those looking for smart, beautifully-written young adult fiction (or any type of fiction, really!).

  8. 4 out of 5

    Elevetha

    I'm not sure what I was expecting. I don't know; it's hard to explain how I felt about it. I loved it and I didn't care and then I was flapping my hands like a crazy girl and then I was disappointed and then it was over. It started out with Insta!love/attraction by page 5 and I had this dread that I would hate it; hate the romance, hate the story(which was really very boring up till 1/4 of the way in), hate the writing. But I was wrong. The writing, if nothing else, while not the best pacing or ch I'm not sure what I was expecting. I don't know; it's hard to explain how I felt about it. I loved it and I didn't care and then I was flapping my hands like a crazy girl and then I was disappointed and then it was over. It started out with Insta!love/attraction by page 5 and I had this dread that I would hate it; hate the romance, hate the story(which was really very boring up till 1/4 of the way in), hate the writing. But I was wrong. The writing, if nothing else, while not the best pacing or characterization and all that, is quite pretty. The romance is actually rather sweet and if maybe there was some moments I was "Okaaaaaaay, Soren, we get it, you like Astrid", they can be pushed mostly aside because they do have a lovely friendship that was more of a deal than their budding romance(or so it seemed to me). And the characters do come a long way from page one. I though I might do a section on each of the characters because that would be cool and there's quite a lot to say if only I knew how to but no. Not today. Probably not ever. AND THEN THERE WAS BALDUR. THIS GUY. BEST PART.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    adore Tessa Gratton. I just don't know what else to say except that. She is a master storyteller and every single book I pick up that has been written by her I am enthralled immediately and find myself just lost in whatever world she has created. In the past few weeks I have been kinda stuck in this bubble where all I read are books that have heavy Greek and Norse mythology throughout and I have to say after reading several books The Lost Son is by far my favorite. I have always loved Greek myth adore Tessa Gratton. I just don't know what else to say except that. She is a master storyteller and every single book I pick up that has been written by her I am enthralled immediately and find myself just lost in whatever world she has created. In the past few weeks I have been kinda stuck in this bubble where all I read are books that have heavy Greek and Norse mythology throughout and I have to say after reading several books The Lost Son is by far my favorite. I have always loved Greek myth so when this new Norse myth popped up I was intrigued. I am very new to Norse mythology, but it didn't take me long to find myself captivated by the world and stories. The author does a wonderful job retelling the important stories and I appreciated this because like I said I am new to this stuff and if she hadn't explained certain things I would have been lost. This story is about a boy Soren and his struggle to not be overtaken by the frenzy and a girl Astrid who might hold the key to not only teaching him how to contain the beast but also the key to finding the missing God Baulder the Beautiful. Soren and Astrid go together to find the missing God and when they discover him with no memory of his past lives they know something is wrong. Thus begins their adventure into finding out what fate has in store for them. Soren and Astrid were amazing characters. I love how Ms.Gratton weaves romance into her stories, it is never forced and by the end of the story you can feel how her characters feel for each other. Every touch, every look, and glance just warmed my heart and I found myself sighing with happiness throughout this book. I never do that, but I just couldn't help it with this book. The romance isn't the only amazing thing about these characters. They were strong together and a part, they never backed down from what they believed in, and they accepted what was thrown at them. Brilliant! Vider and Baulder were great characters as well. I really enjoyed reading about both of them and I really hope they play a part in the sequel. Vider especially since I want to know more about her and her backstory. From what I can tell Norse myth might be the next big thing and if it is then I am so glad I read this book first before it really blows up. Tessa Gratton has created a wonderful world that will definitely stand out among the crowd. I am always completely blown away at how she can capture my attention with just a few words and with this book she grabbed my attention and even after finishing it she still has it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    The world was so real, the characters so deep, the adventure so gripping. It is the world any fan of norse mythology would love to live in. Soren and Astrid are intriguing and intricately complicated teenager characters both with ill-fated parents who's shadows linger over them and both struggle to work out if such histories are a blessing or a curse. Their adventures and quest across this alternative United States is full of detail and precious moments between each other and such moments become The world was so real, the characters so deep, the adventure so gripping. It is the world any fan of norse mythology would love to live in. Soren and Astrid are intriguing and intricately complicated teenager characters both with ill-fated parents who's shadows linger over them and both struggle to work out if such histories are a blessing or a curse. Their adventures and quest across this alternative United States is full of detail and precious moments between each other and such moments become even more powerful when great figures from norse mythology become involved when the 'Sun God' does not rise as expected. Their journey reveals a landscape where trolls haunt natural parklands and where Loki-kin travellers roam and trade. Yet fate has in so many small and yet significant ways linked the two together that when faced with a possible future apart both will fight against it, even if it means fighting the Gods themselves. The plot is amazing and full of twists and turns and we learn as much about Soren and Astrid as they learn and grow closer together throughout their travels which only makes us care about them more and more. The last third is full of so many surprises that it really does shock the reader as each new challenge is faced and makes for a truly dramatic ending. The only flaw I have with this book and it is more of a personal opinion is the way Tessa has amalgamated Freya, goddess of war and love, also head of the Valkyries, with Hel and the Prophetess. It does work for the plot (I won't say where) but as a person who has read a lot on the Gods it just felt like stretching the mythology a bit too much. Either way if you have teenagers who are getting bored with vampires, werewolves, angels, or other supernaturals then this is the book for them. It is new, it is refreshing and incredibly exciting to read. Can't wait for the next book in this amazing world. Tessa has brought the Aesir back to life in the same way Bernard Cornwell resurrected the power and fame of the historical vikings. She is my new favourite Norse Fantasy writer alongsie Joanne Harris, Betsy Tobin, AK Morgen, Ingrid Paulson and TG Ayer. Can't recommend this one enough.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jessica {Litnoob}

    This story is one that I was excited for a while to start and I'm glad I did. The idea of an alternate United States that's not only run but completely interstates with a religion but that religion being the acceptance and worship of the Norse gods is so interesting. They touch on how the gods effect everyday life, how they came to America, the colonization of the land and fighting the natives. Plus trolls and elves and a host of other beings clearly stripped right from the mythology. It's such This story is one that I was excited for a while to start and I'm glad I did. The idea of an alternate United States that's not only run but completely interstates with a religion but that religion being the acceptance and worship of the Norse gods is so interesting. They touch on how the gods effect everyday life, how they came to America, the colonization of the land and fighting the natives. Plus trolls and elves and a host of other beings clearly stripped right from the mythology. It's such an interesting world and Soren is such an interesting lead. A man of color who doesn't fit into his role he's destined for? Who should serve Odin but feels like he doesn't belong? He's so complex and so well written. This is a slow burn book very character driven so bear that in mine if you prefer loads more action sequences. But I highly recommend.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Parker

    Reading this book was my undoing. I don't usually cry, and boy howdy, did I cry. Read it. Just. You won't regret it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ivy

    This was an interesting book. United States of Asgard. Hmmmm.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Matilda

    Ok so I loved Loved Loved this book but upon trying to write a review I came up short as how could I review something I loved so much without A) Gushing my head off B) Stating random things I liked about the book but making the review really bad C) Stopping anyone wanting this book by a bad review So I decided to go with Gifs (which I have been doing a lot recently...) So as I was saying this book was amazing. If this book was food This is what would have happened: The mythology was amazingly placed i Ok so I loved Loved Loved this book but upon trying to write a review I came up short as how could I review something I loved so much without A) Gushing my head off B) Stating random things I liked about the book but making the review really bad C) Stopping anyone wanting this book by a bad review So I decided to go with Gifs (which I have been doing a lot recently...) So as I was saying this book was amazing. If this book was food This is what would have happened: The mythology was amazingly placed in, not shoving us full of information yet still keeping us interested. It built this whole new world of both America and Asgard.... Which Included both old and new and its done stunningly. I approve Now I loved Soren the main character he was struggling with his destiny of being a berserker warriors know for being amazing in battle and winning. He’s scared he will succumb to the battle fever like his father did and not be able to stop killing- even innocent people. Overall he did go on a bit but I could understand why he was going on with him so I felt it slide. Astrid the love interest I liked also! She was looking for her mother and she was strong and she and Soren were great together. I loved when she took his fight for him as he wouldn't be able to do it with succumbing and Soren wasn’t like “No you cannot you’re a girl.” It was adorable. I was like go them and their Adventure!! (finding Baldur the missing Sun who dissapeard on national Tv... and then some other things) (slight spoiler nothing big) And when they found Baldur (it isn't a spoiler....not really happens with in 100 pages) I was : As he was hot....and awesome.... I liked him.... I hope we see more of him.... without clothes Soren and Baldur bromance/friendship was amazing I was like: The whole adventure was just : The one thing that left me going..... Was the romance (This isn’t spoilers but it does change how you will look at the main couple in the book if you do read this book..... not in a bad way but it just alters your opinion slightly) Now upon reading it the romance seems alright. Yes a bit sudden and a bit fast but it was built up nicely and the ending of the whole book depends on this love.(view spoiler)[ As we have Astrid and Soren being split up which I found tragic yet I loved it! They still get to see each other on 4 days of the year.... but if they had only been good friends by the end of this it would of been as heart breaking as they were in love (hide spoiler)] .... but when you’re looking back you realise this book takes over 7 ish days ....and Soren and Astrid haven’t met before the first day... So yeah it is kind of Insta-love but not the obvious kind more like the sweet kind... But yeah I loved the ending (that’s meant to be an evil grin) So overall the book was amazing : GO BOOK! So yeah this is my review of the lost Sun...which as I have said I loved.... I would totally get this book it was amazing you will love it if you like mythology and adventures... Overview of the review. Favourite character: Baldur... Favourite ship/couple: (there is only really one in this book) Soren and Astrid Best line: “My power is a dance. I am its partner, not its slave.” Best part( beginning, middle or end): All of it was amazing but the end was just fricking EPIC. Character who needs to die. Like now. : Cannot tell you as I will spoil YOU! Reaction to end: OH my ... THIS SO FRICKING AMAZING.... WHENS THE NEXT ONE OUT.... I LOVED THAT ENDING....IT WAS SO SWEET ( IF NOT A BIT SAD) Summing up the book in three words: Fan-Fricking-tastic , Loved, Amazing Percentage: 94%

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    The Lost Sun came very close to being thrown into my DNF pile, but I managed to trudge through it....barely. I'm a huge fan of mythology, although I'm not as familiar with Norse legends and myths. This is a book that should have worked for me. Instead, it was a huge letdown. To put it bluntly, the world-building in this book needed a "hel" of a lot more attention. The characters live in some alternate version of American society called the United States of Asgard, which is a land inhabited by Nor The Lost Sun came very close to being thrown into my DNF pile, but I managed to trudge through it....barely. I'm a huge fan of mythology, although I'm not as familiar with Norse legends and myths. This is a book that should have worked for me. Instead, it was a huge letdown. To put it bluntly, the world-building in this book needed a "hel" of a lot more attention. The characters live in some alternate version of American society called the United States of Asgard, which is a land inhabited by Norse gods and goddesses. We aren't told how or when this happens and you could argue that this book is a work of fiction, so I should just go along with it. Believe me, I tried. Asgard is divided into "kingstates" which I would assume are ruled by a king or royalty of some sort. Kings are alluded to, but remain unnamed. We know there are wealthy politicians who hold power, but there's no mention of nobility or royalty. The closest described are the gods and goddesses. Are these the "kings" that rule? Perhaps. Again, we don't know for sure and your guess is as good as mine. The United States of Asgard also has a lawspeaker, a President and a Congress. Are you still following me? Good, because it only gets more confusing. We are also given a long list of geographic locations within Asgard which sound vaguely familiar, territories referred to as Nebrasge, South Lakota, Vertmont, Colorada, Cantuckee, Missoura, Mishigam, and Canadia. Oh, and the White House is now the White Hall and students study Anglish instead of English. Now I know that if I want to write a story set in a mythical land, all I need to do is insert or delete a letter from a word that already exists and then the world-building is done for me. I don't need to do any work whatsoever to describe the setting or how this world came to be. For example, I could write a story about the fae who are forced to live among humans in futuristic Europe, let's say in the territories of Frunce and Germano. The names explain themselves - I don't need to specify anything else about why the fae are there. It simply exists. The end. From a linguistic perspective, The Lost Sun was extremely painful to read. The vocabulary is so distracting that I found myself more focused on locating ridiculous word choices rather than caring about what happens to the characters in the story. I won't even comment about the quest Soren and Astrid set for themselves or how every action they take was determined by fate. You could randomly pick a page in the book and the odds are good that you will find the word "destiny" or "fate" stamped on it. This theme is not exactly subtle, nor is the idea that Soren and Astrid are meant for each other. I'm sorry, but this book lacked execution and it just doesn't work for me. So disappointing. Rating: 1 1/2 Stars

  16. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Rich, intense, and *amazing*. This has some of the best worldbuilding I've read in a fantasy novel for a long time. It isn't just that this is an alternate world, with the Norse gods interacting with everyday life; the whole culture feels authentically different because of it. I love the representations of the gods themselves, and their different followers. I love Fenris Wolf as a perpetually hungry, dangerous teenage girl. I loooooove the gorgeous, atmospheric writing, which really feels epic i Rich, intense, and *amazing*. This has some of the best worldbuilding I've read in a fantasy novel for a long time. It isn't just that this is an alternate world, with the Norse gods interacting with everyday life; the whole culture feels authentically different because of it. I love the representations of the gods themselves, and their different followers. I love Fenris Wolf as a perpetually hungry, dangerous teenage girl. I loooooove the gorgeous, atmospheric writing, which really feels epic in a way that recalls the Norse sagas. But most of all, I love the two main characters, Soren and Astrid. Their romance is a subplot, not the main plot; but oh, by the end, this was such a deeply, deeply romantic book. And the ending was SO good. I really loved this book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sharon L

    I got the CD from a friend, my first attempt at Audio-Book, and I can say this one is just not for me. Now, please don't misunderstand, from the little time I listened to the Audio I can tell the writing is beautiful and the the world is interesting enough. It seems like something I'd enjoy reading. but since I'm very sensןtive to sounds and voices I have to admit that the readers voice just gets on my nerves especially when he do the dialogues or wispher in a low voice. Then again, This is my I got the CD from a friend, my first attempt at Audio-Book, and I can say this one is just not for me. Now, please don't misunderstand, from the little time I listened to the Audio I can tell the writing is beautiful and the the world is interesting enough. It seems like something I'd enjoy reading. but since I'm very sensןtive to sounds and voices I have to admit that the readers voice just gets on my nerves especially when he do the dialogues or wispher in a low voice. Then again, This is my first try at Audio books, and I know nothing about them and haven't heard anyone else for comparsion. so this is my opinion alon. I shall patiently wait until I get my hands on another format. :)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    I particularly enjoyed the narrator in this book. Soren had a complex internal conflict that was so clearly developed. I actually liked all of the characters, and that is a true rarity! The world building was engaging, and the way the author introduced aspects of Norse mythology without info dumping was pretty impressive. It was nicely paced to create the feel of a quest, and I appreciated how it had goals that were met along the way so that I wasn't left waiting foreverlong for an event to happ I particularly enjoyed the narrator in this book. Soren had a complex internal conflict that was so clearly developed. I actually liked all of the characters, and that is a true rarity! The world building was engaging, and the way the author introduced aspects of Norse mythology without info dumping was pretty impressive. It was nicely paced to create the feel of a quest, and I appreciated how it had goals that were met along the way so that I wasn't left waiting foreverlong for an event to happen. I thoroughly enjoyed the book, and I don't have a single complaint. I think that my high school students would also enjoy this book, and I like the way that students of both genders can find something that will engage them. I'm adding it to my high school classroom library wishlist.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    As a history and mythology geek of the highest order, I nearly squeed. I have an irrational fear that this could go very wrong, but I will pray that it is as awesome as I hope. EDIT: TITLE CHANGE. WHAT DOES THIS MEAN. [image error] Also: Okay. That summary. Sounds way too Perseus Jackson to me. Please don't be a rip off, I will be so disappointed. EDIT #2 Niiiiiiice cover. As a history and mythology geek of the highest order, I nearly squeed. I have an irrational fear that this could go very wrong, but I will pray that it is as awesome as I hope. EDIT: TITLE CHANGE. WHAT DOES THIS MEAN. [image error] Also: Okay. That summary. Sounds way too Perseus Jackson to me. Please don't be a rip off, I will be so disappointed. EDIT #2 Niiiiiiice cover.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gabriela

    United States of Asgard? :D This cover... United States of Asgard? :D This cover...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amy Plum

    What a fabulous book. Loved the world building and mythology, and what an amazing main character: a teenage berserker. Can't wait to read Book 2!!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Petra

    3,5 stars

  23. 5 out of 5

    Hazel West

    Thoughts on the Overall Book: I've been waiting for this book to come out for a while; I just loved the thought of a "United States of Asgard" and modern day Berserkers and all that. I'll admit that this book wasn't exactly what I thought it would be, but I'm not disappointed either, in fact, I think I actually ended up liking it better because of it. Cover--Yea or Nay: Despite the fact there is a character impersonator on the cover, I really like it. I think it's lovely, and the boy actually doe Thoughts on the Overall Book: I've been waiting for this book to come out for a while; I just loved the thought of a "United States of Asgard" and modern day Berserkers and all that. I'll admit that this book wasn't exactly what I thought it would be, but I'm not disappointed either, in fact, I think I actually ended up liking it better because of it. Cover--Yea or Nay: Despite the fact there is a character impersonator on the cover, I really like it. I think it's lovely, and the boy actually does look like Soren, or at least how I pictured him, and, okay, I love angsty pictures, I really do. And then the trees in the background and how it's shiny... Characters: While Soren wasn't probably the most stand out hero I have ever read about, I liked him, and he was a good protagonist. He had a quiet strength, and I loved how he was a 'reluctant berserker'. It made him more compassionate, which was obviously the author's aim (view spoiler)[ but I also appreciated the fact that in the end, he came to terms with his berserking, and came to realize it wasn't the worst thing in the world, and that he wasn't going to be like his father. I think I would have lost some respect for him if he had still wanted to be rid of the berserk in the end (hide spoiler)] Likewise Astrid was a wonderful female character. She was quiet, and sweet, but did what she had to, and can even fight if called to do so. I really liked her. Baldur the Beautiful I ended up liking a lot more than I thought I would. In fact, there were moments when he was just endearingly innocent, but then others when he was so sharp that he was really a cool character. And the fact that he and Soren were sworn-brothers was awesome, as always I totally love camaraderie in any sense ;) My favorite character, though, was Vider. She was just totally awesome, and I can't really place why. I think it's because she was younger that made her so awesome, because if she had been the same age as Soren and Astrid, there would have probably been tension of a possible love triangle *blurg* but instead she was just like a younger sister, and I also appriciated how Soren treated her with respect and never belittled her because she was younger. I really wish she had been in the book more! The gods and goddesses were cool too, even though we didn't get to see a whole lot of them. I liked how they translated into the modern era. The only character I didn't really care for was Glory (view spoiler)[ Fenris Wolf (hide spoiler)] because I never like characters like her, so it's not really personal, but... I guess it kinda is. The Romance: I'm still trying to figure out if I should class Soren's and Astrid's relationship as insta-love, but I think I finally came to the conclusion in the negative. If there hadn't been another bond between them besides just attraction, then yes, it would be way too fast, but because they are attracted to each other for other reasons, I was okay with it. Plus they never let it get in the way of their mission although their love obviously plays a role in the ultimate outcome of the story. But apart from that, I liked them together; Soren needed someone gentle, and sweet to keep him grounded and Astrid was just the kind of girl I would have picked for him. Writing Style: While I'm not a fan of first person present tense, after a while, I kind of forgot about it. It's not jerky, and it flows well enough so it wasn't distracting once I got interested in the story enough for me not to notice it anymore. I might have been more bothered by it if I hadn't already been familiar with Tessa Gratton's writing, so that might have helped a bit. Apart from that, her writing is very good, the way she creates worlds was awesome. What I loved most about her description of "New Asguard" was that it was so integrated into the book, and fit into normal daily life, that there was such an ease of description. The world was revealed to the reader a little at a time, so there was no major dump of detail like some fantasy novels have, which is one reason I am not a huge fan of high fantasy. I think that's why I like Urban Fantasy so much is because it's based off a world we know and can relate to and the way Norse legend and culture fit into our daily lives in "The Lost Sun" made it seem like it could totally work. What surprised me about the story itself was that it was definitely a character driven story, whereas I thought when I started it that it might be more plot driven. I was actually pleased with that, and thought it made the book work even better, so one was not focusing just on the world the author had created but on her characters and their journey and growth, for it's also a definite coming of age story. The plot itself is a little slow and is kind of just one long road trip, the action really doesn't pick up until the last quarter, so I can understand where this might not be a book for everyone, and if you're looking for something like a Norse Percy Jackson, this is not it, and you'd probably be disappointed. But if you enjoy character driven novels, which I do, because tons of awesome action can never replace one good character, then this is a book that will be thought-provoking, and might even have you looking inside yourself a little bit. I wouldn't really go so far as to quite call it inspirational, but in a way it was. It was about being true to yourself, but also about sacrifice. Again, it was not what I expected when I started it, but I liked it more for that reason. Accuracy/ Believability: Not applicable, though I thought Norse lore worked well in modern day, and there are a lot of fun things for the people who know the legends in here as well. Problems/What bothered me: No problems. If I hadn't been so caught up with the characters, I might have complained about a the slowish pacing, but in all honesty, it's a surprisingly quick read and is engaging enough not to need much more action than it has. Conclusion: 4 stars. I enjoyed it a lot. I'm actually rather curious, however about how the series will progress. This story, to me, ended on a rather final note, so I'm interested to see whether the author will continue the series with the same characters, or whether she'll just use different characters in the same world. Either way, I look forward to reading more about New Asguard. Recommended Audience: Boy or girl read older teens and up due to interest level and some themes. Readers who like urban fantasy more character driven than plot driven and hardcore fans of Norse myth should read this.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Devann

    This 3-star rating is honestly mostly for the world-building and the absolutely amazing potential this book contained ...that ultimately went to waste on the truly sub-par characters and plot. I really liked the idea of this world where the Norse were the ones to colonize the Americas, and I think the author did an excellent job of thinking about which things would change due to that and which would be more or less the same. Sometimes it did get a bit annoying with all the random name / spelling This 3-star rating is honestly mostly for the world-building and the absolutely amazing potential this book contained ...that ultimately went to waste on the truly sub-par characters and plot. I really liked the idea of this world where the Norse were the ones to colonize the Americas, and I think the author did an excellent job of thinking about which things would change due to that and which would be more or less the same. Sometimes it did get a bit annoying with all the random name / spelling changes for common things / places but it more or less made sense and I think it was a really interesting idea. Also liked the bit at the beginning where we met some Christians living in New Asgard and there was some stuff kind of comparing Baldur to Jesus and honestly I wish the book had focused more on the religious aspect of it all because I eat that shit up but instead we got ... Instalove! To-dangerous-for-you-male-love-interest! A plot that is both boring AND convoluted! Look, I just DID NOT CARE about literally ANY of the characters. I guess that's probably harsh of me but they all felt more like caricatures than real people and the instalove was just baffling. Also the ending was just like ...what??? Honestly I wish the gods had played a bigger part in the story because I feel like it would have made it more interesting, but I understand that she was trying to make this more about the ordinary people of New Asgard instead. Unfortunately it was all just fairly bleh and because of that I don't think I'll be continuing with the series since it looks like the same characters do stick around for the whole thing.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    first read in 2014 and given 2 stars (not sure why I was so mean). listened to audiobook in 2018, 3.5 stars. it's a road trip story with Norse gods, teens with special abilities, friendship and love. I'm far more likely at this point to get books 2 and 3 which I never did after reading it in 2014. sadly, the library still doesn't have them so I'll need to buy, but at $5 each it's not bad for an e-book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Greer

    A berserker and a seer unite on a quest to find the Lost Sun, Baldur The Beautiful, the God of the Sun. The God that rises from his ashes to be reborn again every year. This is the first year that the Sun God did not rise again on his feat day. In the United States of Asgard the Norse Gods rule, They sit upon the House of Congress and the Valkyrie rule along side the chosen president. Each citizen is a son or daughter of a god that they have given allegiance too. Soren the berserker son of Odin A berserker and a seer unite on a quest to find the Lost Sun, Baldur The Beautiful, the God of the Sun. The God that rises from his ashes to be reborn again every year. This is the first year that the Sun God did not rise again on his feat day. In the United States of Asgard the Norse Gods rule, They sit upon the House of Congress and the Valkyrie rule along side the chosen president. Each citizen is a son or daughter of a god that they have given allegiance too. Soren the berserker son of Odin and Astrid the Seer daughter of Freya band together with a daughter of Loki to return Baldur to the only place that will restore him to his Sun God status, but in doing so it could also destroy the bonds they have made. I give this book 5 stars, great writing style the characters were wonderful and the use of Norse Mythology set in a modern day republic was a wild concept.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    I loved the concept of this book (a Norse version of the US where the gods are very real and very present) and in general, the world building was really working for me. I just wish that the story hadn't been saddled with a dull romance between two characters who had zero chemistry and are impossibly in love with each other after something like a week of actually interacting with each other.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lulu (the library leopard)

    rating removed until further notice

  29. 4 out of 5

    cathy (polluxreads)

    DNF @ page 47. I'm sorry but this book was really boring and Soren and Astrid weren't convincing main characters (at least the part I read.) It just wasn't a modern enough take for me.

  30. 4 out of 5

    CJ

    I reviewed this under a different version, the one with the bad cover.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.