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It was a warm, golden-cloudy, lovable afternoon. In the big living-room at Ingleside Susan Baker sat down with a certain grim satisfaction hovering about her like an aura; it was four o'clock and Susan, who had been working incessantly since six that morning, felt that she had fairly earned an hour of repose and gossip. Susan just then was perfectly happy; everything had It was a warm, golden-cloudy, lovable afternoon. In the big living-room at Ingleside Susan Baker sat down with a certain grim satisfaction hovering about her like an aura; it was four o'clock and Susan, who had been working incessantly since six that morning, felt that she had fairly earned an hour of repose and gossip. Susan just then was perfectly happy; everything had gone almost uncannily well in the kitchen that day. Dr. Jekyll had not been Mr. Hyde and so had not grated on her nerves; from where she sat she could see the pride of her heart-the bed of peonies of her own planting and culture, blooming as no other peony plot in Glen St. Mary ever did or could bloom, with peonies crimson, peonies silvery pink, peonies white as drifts of winter snow.


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It was a warm, golden-cloudy, lovable afternoon. In the big living-room at Ingleside Susan Baker sat down with a certain grim satisfaction hovering about her like an aura; it was four o'clock and Susan, who had been working incessantly since six that morning, felt that she had fairly earned an hour of repose and gossip. Susan just then was perfectly happy; everything had It was a warm, golden-cloudy, lovable afternoon. In the big living-room at Ingleside Susan Baker sat down with a certain grim satisfaction hovering about her like an aura; it was four o'clock and Susan, who had been working incessantly since six that morning, felt that she had fairly earned an hour of repose and gossip. Susan just then was perfectly happy; everything had gone almost uncannily well in the kitchen that day. Dr. Jekyll had not been Mr. Hyde and so had not grated on her nerves; from where she sat she could see the pride of her heart-the bed of peonies of her own planting and culture, blooming as no other peony plot in Glen St. Mary ever did or could bloom, with peonies crimson, peonies silvery pink, peonies white as drifts of winter snow.

30 review for Rilla of Ingleside:

  1. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    "'Is it Rilla my Rilla?' Yeth."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    This is the final book of the Anne series, and deals with the lives of her children. While it's wonderful to see characters evolve into adulthood and have a next generation come to life, the real strength of this book is it's window into the homeland society of rural Maritime Canada during the first World War. It's one of few documentations (even if the characters are fictional) of what women were doing at home during the war, and this setting breathes new life into the end of the series. The This is the final book of the Anne series, and deals with the lives of her children. While it's wonderful to see characters evolve into adulthood and have a next generation come to life, the real strength of this book is it's window into the homeland society of rural Maritime Canada during the first World War. It's one of few documentations (even if the characters are fictional) of what women were doing at home during the war, and this setting breathes new life into the end of the series. The setting also allows Montgomery to challenge readers with darker elements that are often present but less overt in other books. Rilla, Anne's youngest daughter, is a wonderful, spirited character and one of my favorites. In general, Montgomery's work is constantly under-estimated, and the way the books are marketed doesn't help (the flowery script, the swoony illustrations). There are many layers at work in her stories, and some pioneering feminist concepts tucked in between the deep appreciation of nature, the commentary on the stuffy contemporary society of her day, and the delightful, well-drawn characters.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    This is the book that finally severed my relationship with Kevin Sullivan. When Anne of Green Gables: The Continuing Story premiered in the early 2000s, I was shocked to discover that Anne and Gilbert were suddenly time warped to WWI. That's wrong. On so many levels. WWI wasn't Anne's war, it was Rilla's, and Ken's, and Walter's, and that damn dog who turns me into a gushy mess every freaking time I read the last chapter. Rilla -- the youngest child of Anne and Gilbert -- is fifteen (see what I This is the book that finally severed my relationship with Kevin Sullivan. When Anne of Green Gables: The Continuing Story premiered in the early 2000s, I was shocked to discover that Anne and Gilbert were suddenly time warped to WWI. That's wrong. On so many levels. WWI wasn't Anne's war, it was Rilla's, and Ken's, and Walter's, and that damn dog who turns me into a gushy mess every freaking time I read the last chapter. Rilla -- the youngest child of Anne and Gilbert -- is fifteen (see what I mean about the time warp??) and desperately in love with the boy next door. When the world around her crashes and she's forced to grow up quickly, her journey is just as enjoyable as her mother's was in the first three books. The difference is, this is a mature kind of love. Though I devoured the entire series as a seven year old, Rilla of Ingleside is the one that I've worn through with repeated readings as an adult. Simply put, it's perfection. The fact that Kevin Sullivan clearly ignored the fact that this book was written at all is frustrating and, to a reader who considers this book one of the reasons she became a romance writer, downright cruel.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Duane

    I have now read all eight books in the Anne of Green Gables series. Eight books that were an absolute pleasure to read. I like this one almost as much as the 1st one. It's the story of Anne's daughter Rilla, but it is set with the backdrop of World War I which has a huge influence on Anne's family. This story has a more serious tone than the other books but it is a fitting conclusion to a wonderful story.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Rilla of Ingleside (Anne of Green Gables #8), L.M. Montgomery Rilla of Ingleside (1921) is the eighth of nine books in the Anne of Green Gables series by Lucy Maud Montgomery, but was the sixth "Anne" novel in publication order. This book draws the focus back onto a single character, Anne and Gilbert's youngest daughter Bertha Marilla "Rilla" Blythe. It has a more serious tone, as it takes place during World War I and the three Blythe boys: Jem, Walter, and Shirley, along with Rilla's sweetheart Rilla of Ingleside (Anne of Green Gables #8), L.M. Montgomery Rilla of Ingleside (1921) is the eighth of nine books in the Anne of Green Gables series by Lucy Maud Montgomery, but was the sixth "Anne" novel in publication order. This book draws the focus back onto a single character, Anne and Gilbert's youngest daughter Bertha Marilla "Rilla" Blythe. It has a more serious tone, as it takes place during World War I and the three Blythe boys: Jem, Walter, and Shirley, along with Rilla's sweetheart Ken Ford, and playmates Jerry Meredith and Carl Meredith, end up fighting in Europe with the Canadian Expeditionary Force. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و پنجم ماه سپتامبر سال 2012 میلادی عنوان: ریلا در اینگل ساید - سری آن شرلی کتاب هشتم؛ نویسنده: لوسی مود (ال.ام.) مونتگمری؛ مترجم: سارا قدیانی؛ تهران، قدیانی، 1386؛ در 480 ص؛ چاپ دوم 1388؛ چاپ ششم 1392؛ شابک: 9789645361950؛ موضوع: داستانهای نویسندگان کانادایی - سده 20 م ریلا یا «برتا ماریلا»، دختر «آن شرلی» ست و اینبار داستان، روایتگر بخشی از زندگی ایشانست. او در نخستین مهمانی، که به همراه خواهر و برادرانش به آنجا میرود، با «کنت فورد»، کسی که از دو سالگی عاشقش بوده، ملاقات میکند، و با او میرقصد. در همان شب، انگلستان به آلمان اعلام جنگ میکند، و «جم»، یا همان «جیمز بلایت»، همراه «جری مردیت» به جنگ میروند. ریلا در سن شانزده هفده سللگی، سرپرستی کودکی را که پدرش به جنگ رفته و مادرش درگشته را بر دوش میگیرد. ا. شربیانی

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    This is probably my favorite of the Anne books. I love watching Rilla mature into a young woman, and I think the romance betwen Rilla and Ken Ford is one of the best in kidlit.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Lynn

    Now, I loved Anne. Don't get me wrong, but this book was on another whole level. I ADORED It. The heartbreak of ww1, the grown up Blythe family. . . I just loved everything about it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    E.F.B.

    I started reading the Anne of Green Gables series for the first time in late 2016. Slowly, but surely, I made my way through. I liked some of the books and loved others, but none of them ever quite match the first book, which remained my favorite of them all. Then, along came Rilla. I knew from certain Goodreads friends that it was different from the rest of the books because it's focus is on Anne's daughter rather than Anne herself. What I didn't realize was how very emotional it would be (in a I started reading the Anne of Green Gables series for the first time in late 2016. Slowly, but surely, I made my way through. I liked some of the books and loved others, but none of them ever quite match the first book, which remained my favorite of them all. Then, along came Rilla. I knew from certain Goodreads friends that it was different from the rest of the books because it's focus is on Anne's daughter rather than Anne herself. What I didn't realize was how very emotional it would be (in a good way, actually), because, as the book begins, they are approaching the beginning of WWI. The Great War. In all the previous Anne books, I discovered that there was literally ALWAYS one thing in every book sad enough to make me cry, and I had to learn to brace for it. List of some spoilery sad things, just because: (view spoiler)[ Matthew dying, Anne sitting at Ruby Gillis' bedside and talking about heaven with her as she was dying of consumption, that poor little boy of whom Anne and her friend took a picture and he later died (his dying words to his father were what got me. Wah!), Anne's first baby dying, Captain Jim dying, etc, etc. (hide spoiler)] But this was not the case with Rilla. Oh, no. With Rilla, I WAS CRYING THROUGH THE WHOLE THING. I'm not joking, while there were some lighter-hearted chapters thrown in here and there, in general I could barely get through a single chapter without tearing up at least a little, just from the knowledge of how horrible that time in history was, not to mention seeing what it was like for the characters to live during that time (which I’m sure was extremely realistic given that L. M. Montgomery lived through that time herself), having loved ones going and fighting, not knowing what would happen to them, much less what would happen to the world by the end of the conflict, and being afraid with every phone call that you would be told your loved one wasn’t coming back. This is actually why it took me a full month just to read this book. My main daily reading time is right before bed, but fear of death, actual death, and world war, do not good bedtime reading make, no matter how redemptively the author handles it. It was making me so emotional, I was having trouble sleeping afterwards, and so had to relegate it to daytime reading only. Unfortunately, I don't often get long periods of daytime reading, thus the slow progress. I just wanted to clarify that so no future readers of this review who didn’t see my updates while I read think I took so long because I wasn’t enjoying it, or that it was a difficult read, because I very much did enjoy it, and it was no more difficult to read than the rest of the Anne books. In fact, I’d say it had a lot fewer superfluous scenes in it than some of the other Anne books did, and I don’t remember skimming at all. Had I been on my normal reading schedule, I probably would have had it finished in under two weeks. That said, I’ll get on to the things I liked and disliked. Dislikes: …Not much, and the things I did dislike were more personal nit-picks than anything that took away from my reading experience, but I will mention them for the sake of balance. There was one girl Rilla knew who was a major jerk. The type that, if you’re friends with her, everything’s fine and dandy, but get on her bad side and she’ll treat you badly and try to get everyone else to turn against you, too. Thankfully, she didn’t feature much, but I was extremely annoyed when she (view spoiler)[ told Rilla, right before the concert, that Walter had enlisted, and also tried to make it seem like he had specifically confided in her instead of Rilla. She did this specifically to upset Rilla so she wouldn’t do well in the concert, (hide spoiler)] and I just thought that was the meanest thing. :( The only other things I can think of is that I did sometimes miss getting Anne’s perspective on things. We got glimpses of it here and there, but didn’t spend near as much time in her point of view as we did in other books. Speaking of missing things, I have felt at times that Montgomery had Anne and Gilbert have a few more kids than she, the author, maybe should have. On one hand, she did manage to have the all the children, and many other characters represented at least a little throughout the course of the book. On the other hand, half the Blythe kids got WAY more characterization than the others. Nan and Di especially seemed to just be set dressing in this one. They were off at school most of the time, and even when they were home, they didn’t do much. Shirley got a bit more to do in this book than the last two (I honestly forgot he existed at times, in the last two books), but I never developed any particular attachment to him because all I knew about him was that Susan felt like a mother to him because she’d had to do so much for him when he was first born because Anne got so sick. Then, the only thing I learned about him in this book was that he felt duty-bound to join the war and fly air planes. That’s…kinda it. Had he died I would have been slightly sad for his family’s sake, but I can’t say I would have shed tears. Sorry, Shirley. :/ Likes: Pretty much everything else! While I did miss Anne’s perspective, this is a children’s series, and I understand why Montgomery wanted to focus on the kids again. In this case, Rilla was the baby of the family and had the most growing to do, so I felt that she was a great narrator to choose. She was so frivolous and silly at the beginning of the book and it was wonderful to see her mature and grow so much, but also never become embittered. She was stronger than even she thought she was and rose to the challenges of life again and again. Rilla and Ken. Need I say more? So sweet, so innocent, and it was so cute how Rilla’s lisp would come back around Ken, which just made them more adorable, especially in that very last scene. <3 Susan. Susan was such a “brick” as they called her in the book, and that’s a good thing! So strong through all of it, running up the flag after every victory, yelling at the Kaiser as if he could actually hear her. I think the family was right when they thought, if the Germans made it to Canada, Susan would face them all down and win. XD Such a wonderful lady who helped keep their spirits lifted through it all. The family dynamics. I’ve always loved Anne and Gilbert’s family, even if all the kids weren’t characterized equally. Anne and Gilbert still love each other and seem to have a stable marriage in their 50’s, and they and the kids all love and support each other. Anne and Gilbert never stopped their children from doing the things they felt they needed to do, namely going to fight in the war and helping with the war effort, even when it meant a personal sacrifice for them. I also appreciated how Gilbert handled Rilla bringing her war baby home. He didn’t want the baby to just get shoved off and Anne and Susan, so he challenged Rilla to either take care of it herself or agree to send it to the asylum, all the while knowing that the baby would stay there at Ingleside no matter what, but also knowing that Rilla needed this opportunity to take responsibility and grow from it. Then there was Rilla and Walter’s relationship, which was so wonderful. I love seeing close sibling relationships in books, especially brother/sister, and Rilla’s love for, and confidence in Walter, and the way they confided in each other was so sweet. And then the letter Walter wrote to Rilla before…before…well, you know before what, if you’ve read the book, and I won’t spoil you if you haven’t yet. But, the fact that Walter knew what was coming and that he took the time to send Rilla his love and encourage her to keep fighting no matter what. *eyes watering* Oh, Walter… Dog Monday. WAH! So many tears caused by him. So many poignant moments made even more poignant because of his loyalty in waiting at the train station, and especially how he knew when (view spoiler)[ Walter was gone, and howled all night, mourning him before the family ever got the news. (hide spoiler)] *cries just thinking about it* Not going to get over that any time soon. And then the beauty when he was reunited with his best friend again and…and… *more tears* The analogy of the Pied Piper’s song being the irresistible call to war. Oh boy, did Montgomery ever use that one masterfully. The use of that as foreshadowing in the previous book just made it hit home that much harder in this book, and it was so painful, and yet so beautiful and perfect. I already had great respect for those who fight for good in the armed forces around the world, and this book only served to deepen that respect. To quote the book, “Let us drink to the silent army—to the boys [and these days, the women, too] who followed when the Piper summoned. ‘For our tomorrow they gave their today’—theirs is the victory!” The faith element, again, was present and well used. Even though they at times had doubts, the family kept their faith in God through the whole war, knowing that good would overcome evil, even when it didn’t happen as quickly as they hoped, and Montgomery used this very well to show where the hand of God was at work during the war. To quote Mr. Meredith, I truly do believe there were times when God said to the enemy, “This far. No farther.” And I believe He continues to do that in many conflicts, both global and personal. Gertrude Oliver’s vivid prediction dreams, while not an element I expected Montgomery to use, especially as even the Blythe family didn’t believe in them at first, provided further spiritual depth and poignancy to certain happenings. The way she dreamed before the war started that there was a tide of blood coming that could not be held back. The time when it was feared that that vital city in France would fall, but she dreamed that even in the midsts of the raging storm, there was the French soldier standing strong against the tide and saying, “They will not pass.” And finally, when she dreamed the tide was receding, and the sun would shine again. All so beautiful, so poignant, and all provided some of the most vivid mental images for me while reading the book. This depth of emotion is the biggest reason why Rilla of Ingleside is now tied with Anne of Green Gables as my favorite of the series. I can’t claim it’s overtaken Anne simply from the standpoint that they are such different books, set in such different times in world history, and I truly love them both, just for totally different reasons: I love Anne for its hope, innocence, and determination to find beauty even in the midst of tough circumstances, and I love Rilla for its depth, faith, and a different kind of hope: One that has been through the fire and come out the other side, not untouched, but still strengthened because of what it’s been through. Those are values that mean something to me personally, and for that reason, I am glad to have finally read these books, and will cherish them always. Content advisory for those who want to know: Due to the heavy themes of world war and personal loss in this book, I would recommend it for readers 12 and up unless, perhaps, a younger reader is particularly mature and not easily upset by such things. Violence: The horrors of war are a big part of this story, but are never described graphically. We only read brief mentions of injury, such as someone was shot in the leg, someone was knocked out by an exploding shell, someone was killed instantly by a bullet, etc. We also read brief mention of how innocent women and children were starving and/or were killed in the war, and how prisoners of war were treated badly, but again, the treatment is not described. One character has a dream in which a tide covers the entirety of the land where she live and when it reaches her doorstep, the hem of her dress is soaked with blood. She later has another dream in which she is standing side-by-side with a French soldier who has a bloody wound in his shoulder, but this wound is not described any more than what I just wrote. Swearing: After hearing news about the killing of women and children overseas, Walter cries out, “Oh God, no!” several times. In the context I wasn’t sure if he was actually crying out to God, or if he was using the Lord’s name in vain. Other than that, the only other “swearing” is the use of “darn” and “darned” which Susan considers swears. Miss Oliver also threatens to swear, wondering if it would help her feel better when she gets so upset over the war news, and several times says something along the lines of, “But don’t you think it would feel good just to say d—” and then Susan cuts her off before she can say whatever word was intended. Romantic content: Nothing sexual to be found here. Only a mild, chaste romance between Rilla and her sweetheart and, one undescribed kiss between them, and a promise that she won’t kiss anyone else while he’s gone, to which she remains true.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    "Before this war is over," he said - or something said through his lips - "every man and woman and child in Canada will feel it - you, Mary, will feel it - feel it to your heart's core. You will weep tears of blood over it. The Piper has come - and he will pipe until every corner of the world has heard his awful and irresistible music. It will be years before the dance of death is over -years, Mary. And in those years millions of hearts will break." At first, everyone is more concerned with "Before this war is over," he said - or something said through his lips - "every man and woman and child in Canada will feel it - you, Mary, will feel it - feel it to your heart's core. You will weep tears of blood over it. The Piper has come - and he will pipe until every corner of the world has heard his awful and irresistible music. It will be years before the dance of death is over -years, Mary. And in those years millions of hearts will break." At first, everyone is more concerned with local gossip than the fact that some "Archduke Ferdinand or other" has been assassinated in a place called Sarajevo, but soon the affairs of the world have intruded into the quiet, peaceful village of Glen St. Mary. "England declared war on Germany today," said Jack Elliot slowly. "The news came by wire just as I left town." And before long . . . "They are calling for volunteers in town, father," said Jem. "Scores have joined up already. I'm going in tonight to enlist." Anne can do little but watch as her oldest son goes to war. ". . . I am determined that I will send my boy off tomorrow with a smile. He shall not carry away with him the remembrance of a weak mother who had not the courage to send when he had the courage to go." And, so the womenfolk put on their brave faces, and begin their busy vigil. There are socks to knit, hastily arranged marriages to plan, and war babies to care for. Rilla, Anne's youngest child, grows from a rather spoiled fifteen-year-old into a caring and responsible young woman. "Our sacrifice is greater than his," cried Rilla passionately. "Our boys give only themselves. We give them." Then Gilbert relates the devastating news that changes so many lives forever . . . I enjoyed this visit into Anne's world, though there is an incident of religious nutjobbery - (view spoiler)[A young boy drowns his kitten in the hopes that his sacrifice will make God bring Jem back home safely. Shudder. But, everyone in the novel seems to think it's a touching gesture. (hide spoiler)] - that I found rather disturbing, and must have managed to block out the other two times I read this book. Thankfully, Little Dog Monday, with his devoted Greyfriar's Bobby stunt, makes up for this, and his story made me sob yet again. This is a wonderful culmination to the series. It is an ending, yes, but somehow Montgomery leaves us feeling that life will go on for this family, even though we no longer get to be a part of it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Now I do know and realise that I am probably going to be seriously offending and angering some if not even rather many readers (and likely also more than a number of Goodreads friends) when I state that I absolutely and utterly despise L.M. Montgomery's Rilla of Ingleside (and quite with every fibre of my being). For while, yes indeed, I do well know that the novel was written not only about WWI but also basically immediately post WWI and that it is and should therefore be considered an object Now I do know and realise that I am probably going to be seriously offending and angering some if not even rather many readers (and likely also more than a number of Goodreads friends) when I state that I absolutely and utterly despise L.M. Montgomery's Rilla of Ingleside (and quite with every fibre of my being). For while, yes indeed, I do well know that the novel was written not only about WWI but also basically immediately post WWI and that it is and should therefore be considered an object (a piece of fiction) of its time and place with its blatant anti-German sentiment and ultra nationalism, as a person of German background who has for one often been bullied and harassed because of her ethnicity and who has for two also read a goodly number of both British and German WWI novels that while definitely overly nationalistic were (are) still not only and simply diatribes of ethnic and cultural intolerance, I really and truly emotionally, personally cannot in any way stand and accept in particular the bigotry and racism against anything even remotely German shown and presented in Rilla of Ingleside by the Blythe Family housekeeper Susan Baker (and actually even more that there is NEVER really ANY type of actual criticism of Susan Baker and her radical hatreds by the author, by Lucy Maud Montgomery, which sadly and frustratingly does make me think that the former, that Susan Baker as a character is likely very much a mirror image of L.M. Montgomery and her own perceptions and attitudes). And sorry, (but actually no, I guess I am not really all that sorry and do stand by my attitude of anger) but whenever I do read (or try to read) Rilla of Ingleside, although the novel is definitely emotionally charged, well written and yes definitely tugs at one's heart especially with regard to Walter Blythe's death in combat and how this affects everyone, emotionally and very much personally, I indeed consider Rilla of Ingleside in many ways, in most ways quite as racist and as nastily intolerant as Montgomery's anti-Native Canadian short story, as her anti First Nations ranting tirade of Tannis of the Flats (which is one of the only L.M. Montgomery pieces of short fiction that I have absolutely and viscerally hated and which I also generally skip when rereading the author's Further Chronicles of Avonlea). And finally, while I would NOT go so far as to not recommend Rilla of Ingleside, I do leave the (I believe necessary) caveat that in my humble opinion, the über-nationalistic tendencies of the novel (and especially the casual acceptance of this by almost everyone, including the author, including L.M. Montgomery herself) do need to be discussed and indeed also condemned. As honestly, especially Susan Baker, she uses throughout Rilla of Ingleside quite the SAME type of rhetoric against ALL Germans that the Nazis just a decade or so later were using against Jews, against Gypsies, basically against anyone not German, and I for one do find this both troubling and offensive (especially since not only the majority of reviewers but sadly also far far too many academic analyses of Rilla of Ingleside seem either completely and blissfully unaware of or would rather ignore and not consider this to be a potential and possible problem and issue). So therefore, while I do from a stylistic point of view and departure (and also I guess to a certain extent from a historic realism point of view) both accept and even grudgingly commend L.M. Montgomery for having with her Rilla of Ingleside penned a both sadly emotional and often beautiful story of love, loss and the home front, I still cannot and will not give more than one star to a novel that is basically full to the proverbial rim with vile hatred and nastiness towards and for me simply because of my ethnicity and background as a German, and especially since Rilla of Ingleside is or at least seems so universally loved and considered acceptable in every way (but honestly and in my own and humble opinion, if or when those readers who absolutely adore Rilla of Ingleside were to peruse a German WWI account with even just some minor and slight vestiges of that same bigotry, nationalism and racial anger presented and featured, they would more than likely lift their heads and rightfully, with justification collectively howl in and with angry protest, even as Rilla of Ingleside and especially Susan Baker's uncritically and even by L.M. Montgomery generally positively shown and depicted viciousness and angry outbursts against anything and anyone even remotely German seem totally alright to and for them).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    It was recently drawn to my attention by a fellow Goodreads reader that the editions of Rilla of Ingleside, for which we had become accustomed, are abridged versions of the original edition that L.M. Montgomery published. Somehow along the way, an abridged edition appeared through an Amercian publishing house and that abridged version became the standard (accidentally). As a result, I was curious to discover what jewels of Rilla of Ingleside I was missing. While, I feel self-satisfied in the It was recently drawn to my attention by a fellow Goodreads reader that the editions of Rilla of Ingleside, for which we had become accustomed, are abridged versions of the original edition that L.M. Montgomery published. Somehow along the way, an abridged edition appeared through an Amercian publishing house and that abridged version became the standard (accidentally). As a result, I was curious to discover what jewels of Rilla of Ingleside I was missing. While, I feel self-satisfied in the knowledge of having truly read the complete version of RofI, I don't think I would have noticed any difference between my 1980s edition and the new complete version had I not known. Nevertheless, my journey with the Blythe family through WWI was still provoking, tearful, and delightful all over again. In addition, the newly discovered and restored version(edited by Benjamin Lefebvre and Andrea McKenzie) includes: a glossary, a brief history of WWI and two war poems written by L.M. Montgomery. Therefore, I do recommend that any L.M. Montgomery fan (or anyone who has not already discovered Rilla of Ingleside) pick up a copy of this edition immediately. It's a book that will add a certain charm to anyone's collection.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Darcy

    It was with great relief and disappointment that I finally closed the last volume of the Anne series. I'm afraid I found this volume a colossal bore. Rilla, cute as she is, was not featured as prominently as the title would suggest; nor was her love story. Set during WWI, Rilla of Ingleside chronicles the entire duration of the war and how it effected those in Canada. By the time they made it to 1918 I was praying for the war to end so the dang book would end. The scenes hardly varied. It was a It was with great relief and disappointment that I finally closed the last volume of the Anne series. I'm afraid I found this volume a colossal bore. Rilla, cute as she is, was not featured as prominently as the title would suggest; nor was her love story. Set during WWI, Rilla of Ingleside chronicles the entire duration of the war and how it effected those in Canada. By the time they made it to 1918 I was praying for the war to end so the dang book would end. The scenes hardly varied. It was a continuous dull poetic procession of Rilla crying in Rainbow Valley, writing about the war in her journal or in letters to the boys on the front, Walter, the poet-phrophet turned soldier blathering on about his cowardice, and women sitting around sewing and discussing the war. I guess Montgomery must have thought Susan, the Blythe's 60-year-old housemaid, was quite a provocative character, because she kept up a steady flow of opinions on the war and their stupid cat that made me want to poke my eyes out. I've noticed that Montgomery is better at character sketches than she is at prolonged character development, and like many of the books in this series, part of the problem is that it focused on random happenings with random neighbors that I cared little about. A few thoughts on Anne. About halfway through the series I realized that Anne was receding into motherhood and becoming nothing but a stolid matronly figure amongst more spirited beings. Once she enters motherhood she isn't allowed to dream, to write, to be funny or fanciful. She becomes sentimental and adored as a mother, but almost completely unrecognizable as the Anne we know and love. I suppose this is the product of the Victorian age - proper women don't dream beyond the confines of their domestic sphere and once Anne is firmly planted in her homely sphere, well, adventures of any kind are out of the question. Maybe what we love about Anne just doesn't translate into adulthood. A child who talks too much is cute and bright. An adult who won't shut up is annoying. A young girl's romantic longings are charming, but they don't exactly have a place in a married woman's life. And Gilbert, the hero of our romance, becomes about as exciting mushed peas. I'm glad I finished the series, but I desperately wish this series had ended with a more satisfying book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    2017 update: The more I've read this, the more I appreciate the metaphors, every day life of each characters, descriptions, laughter, and tears throughout. This book will never grow old for me. It's a dear friend :) *** This is the most amazing, sweetest, heart-wrenching books I've read in my life. I've read it at least ten times (maybe more ;)) and I love it every. single. time. This is a book that can be enjoyable read on its on, but it is ever so much better if you've read the whole series. So 2017 update: The more I've read this, the more I appreciate the metaphors, every day life of each characters, descriptions, laughter, and tears throughout. This book will never grow old for me. It's a dear friend :) *** This is the most amazing, sweetest, heart-wrenching books I've read in my life. I've read it at least ten times (maybe more ;)) and I love it every. single. time. This is a book that can be enjoyable read on its on, but it is ever so much better if you've read the whole series. So read the whole series...and then just sigh with happiness, true bliss, when you read this one. Why I LOVE about this book: -The characters are whimsical and delightful. L.M. Montgomery explains simple ordinary things as hilarious and interesting. She makes you smile and cry with one sentence. -Susan. She is my all time favorite character. Her mockery of the war and the leaders of the country made me smirk more than once. And then when daylight savings time is put into place she is adamant that it is against the Bible. Her love of Shirley, her devotion to the Blythes, and her stern ways make you simply want to hug her. She's so down to earth. -I'm afraid all my loves are the characters themselves. Walter Blythe should get his own review. He makes me want to soooob....He is amazing. My heart wrenched for him. He hated the war, but duty came first. Duty because it was the right thing to do. Sigghhh. -Kenneth Ford. Such a handsome fellow...and I especially like him because he is the son of the Ford's (whose love story is introduced in Anne's House of Dreams). I love how he calls Rilla, Rilla-my-Rilla. On this same note...I LOVE the scene when he has came to tell Rilla goodbye and Susan starts chatting about when she spanked him. I just died!!! And he is so serious and grim, but wants to burst out laughing the whole time. -And Rilla. I love how she learns to do her part for the war effort. And how she learns to love the little baby from the soup tureen. Yes, she is a character full of mistakes, but oh so dear. And her lisp. Hehe. I LOVE the last two sentences in the book and I quote them all the time (oh the calamity of lisping at the worst of times!!): "Is it Rilla-my-Rilla?" "Yeth," said Rilla. -The setting. I have fallen in love with the World War 1 setting (probably because of this book)! Instead of showing the men fighting, it focuses on those left at home. Other thoughts: -There are a couple swear words, but not more than a half of dozen. The middle is a little slow with all the fellows gone, but not enough to bore me, especially when Susan's around ;) There is a brief kiss in the middle of the book, but it's sweet and not detailed at all. One thing I would have liked is for the book to never end. I heartily LOVE LOVE LOVE this book. I review does not do justice to it. Go grab a copy and then fall in love with it too ;)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Britany

    Oh Rilla-my-Rilla. This series has had its ups and downs, but this one was worth all the pain. This book was perfection. Told from Rilla Blythe's point of view in diary format, we start in early 1914 and she is carefree, frivolous and worried about what hat she'll wear to the dance. Enter the assassination of Franz Ferdinand and suddenly Ingleside finds itself ensconced in WW1. This book had everything I need and never knew I wanted from this series. Completely takes the cake for my absolute Oh Rilla-my-Rilla. This series has had its ups and downs, but this one was worth all the pain. This book was perfection. Told from Rilla Blythe's point of view in diary format, we start in early 1914 and she is carefree, frivolous and worried about what hat she'll wear to the dance. Enter the assassination of Franz Ferdinand and suddenly Ingleside finds itself ensconced in WW1. This book had everything I need and never knew I wanted from this series. Completely takes the cake for my absolute favorite "Anne" book. I laughed, I cried, and I couldn't get enough from these characters. Rilla really stepped up to the plate with her antics and the raising of her war-baby Jims. This book found a very harsh reality in that all the boys enlisted and poor Dog Monday sat at the train station waiting for his soldier to return. I even loved the awful Mr Hyde (the cat!)- and Susan sealed her fate in my heart. If you haven't made it this far in the series, do yourself a favor and go pick this one up right now (I'm serious... what are you waiting for?)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Katelyn Buxton

    I thought for a good portion of this book that I would have to rate this one three stars, because for some reason it didn’t grab me. (Which was odd, since it has the highest stakes of any Green Gable book yet!) It was only after the midway point that I really became invested in it, and when I did it packed a tremendous emotional punch. I’m not sure what changed. Maybe I finally warmed to Rilla? A certain character’s death may have done it too. Or maybe I got into the rhythm of the story. I thought for a good portion of this book that I would have to rate this one three stars, because for some reason it didn’t grab me. (Which was odd, since it has the highest stakes of any Green Gable book yet!) It was only after the midway point that I really became invested in it, and when I did it packed a tremendous emotional punch. I’m not sure what changed. Maybe I finally warmed to Rilla? A certain character’s death may have done it too. Or maybe I got into the rhythm of the story. Whatever the case, I ended up enjoying it far more than I thought I would!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Allison (The Allure of Books)

    This is a stand-out in the series for me, I love Rilla. If Dog Monday doesn't make you cry, I don't know what will. He breaks my heart every time.

  17. 4 out of 5

    R.F. Gammon

    Heartbreaking and beautiful. One of the few fiction books out there in World War I, and so worth it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    The final book in the Anne of Green Gables series makes a solemn capstone to an amazing run. My Dad bought me these books when I was little on the condition that I read all of them, and I've just now fulfilled that promise. Covering the duration of World War One, this book, along with Anne's House of Dreams, is definitely one of the saddest in the series. Yet these two books give the characters of Anne and her children, including the title character, her youngest daughter Rilla, a more rounded The final book in the Anne of Green Gables series makes a solemn capstone to an amazing run. My Dad bought me these books when I was little on the condition that I read all of them, and I've just now fulfilled that promise. Covering the duration of World War One, this book, along with Anne's House of Dreams, is definitely one of the saddest in the series. Yet these two books give the characters of Anne and her children, including the title character, her youngest daughter Rilla, a more rounded feel. The story left me with a sense that the soul can bear a lot more suffering than any of us usually think it can. There is something terrible in that, since the last thing any of us want to experience is more suffering, but also something hopeful, since it helps us to understand that we can live through it and have a sense of happiness again. Maybe not the same unburdened happiness that we used to have--but happiness nonetheless. Although the book dragged in parts (as I'm sure real life did in those times as people waited desperately for word of their loved ones at the western front), any book that so unapologetically forces me to read it in two days and makes me cry deserves five stars.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Celeste

    Full review now posted! I DID IT! I actually managed to read all the way through the Anne of Green Gables series, all 8 books worth. They’re not long books, and 8 might not sound like very many, but these are still technically classics and that would a good bit of classic reading in a row. While the books weren’t all as wonderful as the first, none of them were bad and I feel like reading the series in its entirety was worthwhile. Out of all of the books, this last one was probably my least Full review now posted! I DID IT! I actually managed to read all the way through the Anne of Green Gables series, all 8 books worth. They’re not long books, and 8 might not sound like very many, but these are still technically classics and that would a good bit of classic reading in a row. While the books weren’t all as wonderful as the first, none of them were bad and I feel like reading the series in its entirety was worthwhile. Out of all of the books, this last one was probably my least favorite. It was much more solemn than those preceding it, as it took place during the First World War. Getting a view of the war from the Canadian Homefront, and through the eyes of Anne’s youngest daughter as she’s on the cusp of womanhood, was very different and definitely interesting. We don’t often give much thought to how wartime affects life for those left behind at home after the soldiers ship out, especially those in countries outside our own that don’t see any fighting on their own soil. Rilla, Anne’s youngest, has her life radically altered just as she enters her fifteenth year. She’s a fun-loving girl who loves to laugh, and has no desire to plan for the future. The night of her first “grown up” party ends with the announcement that war has been declared in Europe. Before she can wrap her mind around what’s happening, every young man in her life is gone, fighting a war on foreign shore. Rilla has to grow up. She rises to the occasion and becomes a young woman that the whole community can be proud of. As with all the books, there are still funny situations. Rilla adopts a little war-baby, and her efforts with him add some much needed levity. There was also a faithful little dog who refused to leave the train station until his master came home from the war, which was a heartwarming addition. But as I said earlier, there was a solemnity to this book not present (as often) in the others due the addition of war into the plot. Montgomery did a very good job of capturing the tension and strain of those who have to stay home and just wait on news, and a masterful job of showing characters who have to bridge the divide between mourning and moving on with their lives. I’m very glad that I can now say that I’ve read the Anne of Green Gables series in its entirety. I think it’s helped me develop a classic habit, which I’m going to do my best to maintain by always having some classic I’m reading, even if I’m only reading a chapter or two a day in addition to the other books I’m reading. It was a practice in endurance, but I feel like it paid off!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jazzy [ jazbooked ]

    EEP OH BOI. This was so lovely, you guys. There are so many things... so many feels... *happy sigh*

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    (view spoiler)[As it turns out, I couldn't have put this down even if I wanted to (not for lack of moments where I wished I'd never started this series, so there'd be no crying over beloved characters meeting an untimely death. At one point, I put down my Kindle shouting "The end!"). And yet, I couldn't stop reading. Through heartbreak and all. I suspected it would be Walter. I just. I knew it. All the signs pointed in his direction, and even if they hadn't, I knew he wouldn't survive this if (view spoiler)[As it turns out, I couldn't have put this down even if I wanted to (not for lack of moments where I wished I'd never started this series, so there'd be no crying over beloved characters meeting an untimely death. At one point, I put down my Kindle shouting "The end!"). And yet, I couldn't stop reading. Through heartbreak and all. I suspected it would be Walter. I just. I knew it. All the signs pointed in his direction, and even if they hadn't, I knew he wouldn't survive this if only because he was my favourite. (I mean, I would've been just as devastated if one of the other boys had died, of course. BUT STILL. WALTER.) He was the one who didn't like people causing each other pain and suffering, he was the sensitive soul who never wanted to get caught in any of that. The fact that I cried over Captain Jim's death a few books ago seems so completely ridiculous in light of this. Clearly, I am just not meant to handle these kinds of things. But Rilla-my-Rilla...I adore you. I could write so much more about everything I loved, but the short of it is I loved it all. (hide spoiler)] This was an absolutely superb ending to the series, and I am heartbroken. This review makes little sense. I don't care.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    This was a heartwarming book and though it took me a while to get through it was definitely a worth while read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    kris

    Rilla Blythe is very happily 15 (GOING ON 16) when the world goes to war in 1914 and she comes into her own between watching her brothers and neighbors march off to battle, adopting a war-baby, organizing the local Junior Red Cross, and doing her best to keep the faith. 1. I'M NOT CRYING: I'VE JUST BEEN CUTTING ONIONS. (I'M MAKING A LASAGNA—FOR ONE.) 2. For as period-specific that this book is, there is something timeless about its story all the same. That sensation of worry and tension and Rilla Blythe is very happily 15 (GOING ON 16) when the world goes to war in 1914 and she comes into her own between watching her brothers and neighbors march off to battle, adopting a war-baby, organizing the local Junior Red Cross, and doing her best to keep the faith. 1. I'M NOT CRYING: I'VE JUST BEEN CUTTING ONIONS. (I'M MAKING A LASAGNA—FOR ONE.) 2. For as period-specific that this book is, there is something timeless about its story all the same. That sensation of worry and tension and growing accustomed to it and working around it and surviving even in the face of devastation and loss and mourning. And it's powerful, especially with the Centennial Commemoration of Armistice Day. The world changed and seeing the familiar, friendly world of Anne Shirley melting into the devastation of a century that saw global war is...haunting and hard. 3. WALTER BLYTHE. 4. GODDAMNED DOG MONDAY. 5. Further violence towards cats tho; Montgomery why must you do me dirty like this. 6. I very much want Gertrude Oliver's book because her caustic cynicism/optimism blend was so relatable and honest and ME. 7. This complaint is going to seem silly because this book is clearly Rilla's book (which I wouldn't change for anything; I think the story transitioning to the next generation is probably the only way to end Anne's series), BUT: I missed Anne Blythe nee Shirley in this. She is, in some ways, a stranger, the old married matriarch of the Ingleside home. And there are moments that attempt to remind us that she's still very much Anne of Green Gables underneath it all, but those moments felt sloppy and unearned. (Don't even get me started on Susan interrupting most of those moments. I mean, there is literally one scene where she stands at the foot of "Mrs. Dr. dear"'s bed to announce some war news!! I MEAN I COMPLAIN CONSISTENTLY ABOUT THE LACK OF KISSING IN THESE BOOKS BUT WHAT FURTHER EVIDENCE DO YOU NEED THAT THE HOUSE OF BLYTHE HAS APPARENTLY GIVEN UP ON MORE THAN KISSING??? HERE I MOURN.) (Truly and honestly: I think a book truly about "old married Anne Shirley" would be kind of fantastic??) Also read: 2006

  24. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    YAWN.... Honestly, I have lost patience with this series. I think the straw that broke the camel's back was when Marilla's death is merely glanced over in one...count it, ONE...sentence. I want to hear about Avonlea. I miss the romance and the scenery and the people of Avonlea. This is no longer the Anne of Green Gables series, it is the "Anne's Kids and their Friends" series. Perhaps it's because I neglected to read these stories when I was younger, sort of in the same way I really can't YAWN.... Honestly, I have lost patience with this series. I think the straw that broke the camel's back was when Marilla's death is merely glanced over in one...count it, ONE...sentence. I want to hear about Avonlea. I miss the romance and the scenery and the people of Avonlea. This is no longer the Anne of Green Gables series, it is the "Anne's Kids and their Friends" series. Perhaps it's because I neglected to read these stories when I was younger, sort of in the same way I really can't appreciate Newsies because I never saw it in those pre-pubescent years when every little girl has a crush on every boy in the film. I do however still love the A of GG movies...and the soundtrack, which I highly recommend.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kat Leache

    My faaaaavorite Anne book--it focuses on her youngest child, Rilla, and it's set during WWI (the series is set in Canada, who entered the war with England, so it was a much longer and painful ordeal for them than for the US). Rilla is a silly young 15 year old when the war begins--by the end she's an amazing and strong woman. This book is wonderful! I'm regularly tearing up on my lunchbreak reading this one.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    What made the Anne series so enjoyable was that Anne was a very three-dimensional character. She had spunk, she was stubborn, she was whimsical, she knew how to love and she knew what loss was. Rilla is not a three-dimensional character, or at least not to the same extent that her mother was. It's been ages since I read these books, and maybe I'd enjoy this one more if I were to read it again as an adult, but by the time I get through Anne of Ingleside, I'm so entirely fed up with the series What made the Anne series so enjoyable was that Anne was a very three-dimensional character. She had spunk, she was stubborn, she was whimsical, she knew how to love and she knew what loss was. Rilla is not a three-dimensional character, or at least not to the same extent that her mother was. It's been ages since I read these books, and maybe I'd enjoy this one more if I were to read it again as an adult, but by the time I get through Anne of Ingleside, I'm so entirely fed up with the series that I can't be bothered to continue.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    'Rilla of Ingleside' is my favourite of the 'Anne' series, it's even better than the internationally-beloved 'Anne of Green Gables'. That's my opinion, anyway! It features Rilla [short for Marilla:], Anne and Gilbert's youngest daughter, and her trials throughout WWI, when two of her brothers and the young man she cares for go off to war. Poignantly written, never dismissing hardship, heartbreak, love, and the more common of adolescent strifes such as rivalries and embarassments, 'Rilla of 'Rilla of Ingleside' is my favourite of the 'Anne' series, it's even better than the internationally-beloved 'Anne of Green Gables'. That's my opinion, anyway! It features Rilla [short for Marilla:], Anne and Gilbert's youngest daughter, and her trials throughout WWI, when two of her brothers and the young man she cares for go off to war. Poignantly written, never dismissing hardship, heartbreak, love, and the more common of adolescent strifes such as rivalries and embarassments, 'Rilla of Ingleside' relaxes me everytime I read it and often makes me wish that if I were a fictional character, that I'd be her.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michele

    I knew what to expect going into this book, from inadvertently reading summaries. Even if I hadn't, the Pied Piper foreshadowing in Rainbow Valley, gave this last book's big development away. Even so, it was very moving. I read it during a flight and cried like a lunatic the whole plane route. Being mostly familiar with U. S. History, it was interesting to see the war from a Canadian perspective. Susan's view on Woodrow Wilson and his love of "notes" was hilarious. It makes me wish that I knew what to expect going into this book, from inadvertently reading summaries. Even if I hadn't, the Pied Piper foreshadowing in Rainbow Valley, gave this last book's big development away. Even so, it was very moving. I read it during a flight and cried like a lunatic the whole plane route. Being mostly familiar with U. S. History, it was interesting to see the war from a Canadian perspective. Susan's view on Woodrow Wilson and his love of "notes" was hilarious. It makes me wish that Montgomery could have written one during World War II as well. I'd like to know what Susan would say of FDR and to see how PEI would have reacted to events leading up to the bombing of Pearl Harbor. It was interesting that women only got the right to vote during the war and only women with husbands and sons could vote at that! Despite the sexism at the time, I find Montgomery's women to be quite equal and independent thinkers, even young Rilla, the only one of the Blythe children who, seemingly, lacks ambition. It's also notable that the family did not judge "sissy" Walter, even if some of his school mates did. His sensitivity was a derivative of Anne's, but many societies would not appreciate or tolerate it. Given the bullying that leads to suicide and murder so often in American schools these days, the Ingleside perception of Walter seems quite topical. What Walter said in his last letter, about it being harder for him to return than to die in battle, was another prescient moment on his part. He knew that the memories of what he had seen -- done, would be overwhelming for him. It hinted at the post-traumatic stress syndrome that is acknowledged (but still not fully appreciated) today. What would certainly never fly in today's world is Bruce's drowning of the cat, to ensure Jem's safe return home. Everyone thought his gesture was "wonderful, wonderful". Rilla pointed out that he'd have to learn you could never bargain with God, but not one character ever criticized what he did to the poor cat! Of course, cats have been abused in stories for decades, but usually by naughty boys, not "good" ones. I found that episode both shocking and droll. When Walter and Faith rode pigs down the street, Gilbert jokingly objected on behalf of the swine, but he said not a word in defense of Bruce's drowned cat! Montgomery certainly knows how to personify animals when she wants, but in this instance she wasn't concerned with feline feelings. I loved the ending, but found myself wondering just why Ken Ford had taken two weeks to contact Rilla after arriving home. I concentrated on his face scar and told myself maybe he was healing from injuries and did not want to communicate with her until he could stand face to face in good health, but I'm not sure. I know his concentration was on the war, but his diffidence was frustrating. The poor girl didn't even know where she stood for 4 years. The lines that stood up and had me tearing long after the book was closed were Anne telling Susan to set the table for everyone, even the dear lad whose chair must always be vacant. Susan answered that it was not likely she'd forget to set his plate and I cry even now just typing about it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kirsty

    Rilla of Ingleside is number 619 upon the Virago Modern Classics list, and is another addition to the children’s literature which the publishing house is introducing to a whole new generation of readers. This particular L.M. Montgomery novel is recommended for those from the age of nine onwards. Rilla of Ingleside, first published in 1921, is the last book in Montgomery’s famous Anne of Green Gables series, and can be read as a standalone book. It takes place when title character Anne Shirley is Rilla of Ingleside is number 619 upon the Virago Modern Classics list, and is another addition to the children’s literature which the publishing house is introducing to a whole new generation of readers. This particular L.M. Montgomery novel is recommended for those from the age of nine onwards. Rilla of Ingleside, first published in 1921, is the last book in Montgomery’s famous Anne of Green Gables series, and can be read as a standalone book. It takes place when title character Anne Shirley is an adult with her own grown-up children, almost all of whom have flown the nest. The only one who remains within her care is her youngest daughter, fourteen-year-old ‘high-spirited’ Rilla. Just as Rilla’s life is at the height of her enjoyment, it is announced that Britain has declared war on Germany, and will be fighting for the full four years of the First World War. This affects Rilla more than she imagines at first, and serves to alter her landscape entirely: ‘… as her brothers go off to fight in the Great War and Rilla brings home an orphaned newborn baby in a soup tureen, she is swept into a drama that tests her courage and will leave her changed forever.’ Rilla of Ingleside starts in a charming way – ‘It was a warm, golden-cloudy, lovable afternoon’ – before it introduces the character of Susan Baker and the historical context which the story is set against: in the newspaper, she sees that ‘some Archduke Ferdinand or other had been assassinated at a place bearing the weird name of Sarajevo, but Susan tarried not over uninteresting, immaterial stuff like that; she was in quest of something really vital’. The historical details have been set out in such a way that they are easily accessible to Montgomery’s intended younger audience. Each child reader, whilst being swept into the story, is sure to learn a lot from the novel. Montgomery is an incredibly perceptive author, always ensuring that her readers are able to see exactly what she imagined a particular person, scene or setting to look like. In their entirety, her characters are wonderfully drawn, and their differences help to make them distinct beings. Throughout, Montgomery’s writing is gorgeous; it feels as though she set out to weave a spell of enchantment each and every time she sat down to write. Rilla of Ingleside is a lovely story on the whole, and the storyline which has been crafted fits its historical setting very well indeed.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Laurence R.

    I'll never be able to express just how much I love LMM's writing... She is, and will always be, my favourite author. This is a new favourite of mine in this series. Nothing could ever replace Anne’s heart, but for the first time, this book meant so much to me. I read all the audiobooks in a few weeks only, so I was as invested in the story as I could possibly be. Therefore, I cried many, many times while I was reading this one. The hard reality of WWI seemed to be so well described that I I'll never be able to express just how much I love LMM's writing... She is, and will always be, my favourite author. This is a new favourite of mine in this series. Nothing could ever replace Anne’s heart, but for the first time, this book meant so much to me. I read all the audiobooks in a few weeks only, so I was as invested in the story as I could possibly be. Therefore, I cried many, many times while I was reading this one. The hard reality of WWI seemed to be so well described that I experienced pain along with the characters I know and love. I’d definitely recommend reading the entire series because this is a beautiful ending.

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