counter create hit The Education of Dixie Dupree - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Education of Dixie Dupree

Availability: Ready to download

In 1969, Dixie Dupree is eleven years old and already an expert liar. Sometimes the lies are for her mama, Evie’s sake—to explain away a bruise brought on by her quick-as-lightning temper. And sometimes the lies are to spite Evie, who longs to leave her unhappy marriage in Perry County, Alabama, and return to her beloved New Hampshire. But for Dixie and her brother, Alabam In 1969, Dixie Dupree is eleven years old and already an expert liar. Sometimes the lies are for her mama, Evie’s sake—to explain away a bruise brought on by her quick-as-lightning temper. And sometimes the lies are to spite Evie, who longs to leave her unhappy marriage in Perry County, Alabama, and return to her beloved New Hampshire. But for Dixie and her brother, Alabama is home, a place of pine-scented breezes and hot, languid afternoons. Though Dixie is learning that the family she once believed was happy has deep fractures, even her vivid imagination couldn’t concoct the events about to unfold. Dixie records everything in her diary—her parents’ fights, her father’s drinking and his unexplained departure, and the arrival of Uncle Ray. Only when Dixie desperately needs help and is met with disbelief does she realize how much damage her past lies have done. But she has courage and a spirit that may yet prevail, forcing secrets into the open and allowing her to forgive and become whole again. Narrated by her young heroine in a voice as sure and resonant as The Secret Life of Bees’ Lily or Bastard Out of Carolina’s Bone, Donna Everhart’s remarkable debut is a story about mothers and daughters, the guilt and pain that pass between generations, and the truths that are impossible to hide, especially from ourselves.


Compare

In 1969, Dixie Dupree is eleven years old and already an expert liar. Sometimes the lies are for her mama, Evie’s sake—to explain away a bruise brought on by her quick-as-lightning temper. And sometimes the lies are to spite Evie, who longs to leave her unhappy marriage in Perry County, Alabama, and return to her beloved New Hampshire. But for Dixie and her brother, Alabam In 1969, Dixie Dupree is eleven years old and already an expert liar. Sometimes the lies are for her mama, Evie’s sake—to explain away a bruise brought on by her quick-as-lightning temper. And sometimes the lies are to spite Evie, who longs to leave her unhappy marriage in Perry County, Alabama, and return to her beloved New Hampshire. But for Dixie and her brother, Alabama is home, a place of pine-scented breezes and hot, languid afternoons. Though Dixie is learning that the family she once believed was happy has deep fractures, even her vivid imagination couldn’t concoct the events about to unfold. Dixie records everything in her diary—her parents’ fights, her father’s drinking and his unexplained departure, and the arrival of Uncle Ray. Only when Dixie desperately needs help and is met with disbelief does she realize how much damage her past lies have done. But she has courage and a spirit that may yet prevail, forcing secrets into the open and allowing her to forgive and become whole again. Narrated by her young heroine in a voice as sure and resonant as The Secret Life of Bees’ Lily or Bastard Out of Carolina’s Bone, Donna Everhart’s remarkable debut is a story about mothers and daughters, the guilt and pain that pass between generations, and the truths that are impossible to hide, especially from ourselves.

30 review for The Education of Dixie Dupree

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shelby *trains flying monkeys*

    DANG IT! GR ATE MY REVIEW!!! (Probably because it only had ten typos instead of the normal twenty) Let's try this again. Set in the late 1960's south, Dixie lives in Alabama with her mom, dad and older brother AJ. Her mom has one of those tempers that can get away from her and Dixie tries her best to not trigger her 'other mom' coming out. Her response was to snatch my arm and her sudden move scared me so bad, the pee I'd been holding let go. It drizzled down my legs, a hot stream of fear, but the DANG IT! GR ATE MY REVIEW!!! (Probably because it only had ten typos instead of the normal twenty) Let's try this again. Set in the late 1960's south, Dixie lives in Alabama with her mom, dad and older brother AJ. Her mom has one of those tempers that can get away from her and Dixie tries her best to not trigger her 'other mom' coming out. Her response was to snatch my arm and her sudden move scared me so bad, the pee I'd been holding let go. It drizzled down my legs, a hot stream of fear, but the mortification I felt as I wet my pants was nothing compared to watching her face become that person I was always watching out for. Like a rabbit with its foot caught in a snare, attempting to free itself, I started jerking on my arm, wanting to get away from her, away from that look. Dixie learns to become an expert liar. She needs to in order to protect her unstable family. Don't judge this ELEVEN year old kid. Yes, I put that age in caps. You have to remember her age. Told in Dixie's viewpoint, you do get the feeling that the families secrets are going to overwhelm them..but kids in the rural south were not told things that pertained to 'adult business.' Then Dixie's mom finally works up the nerve to tell her father that she wants a divorce, she is missing her northern home and states she doesn't love him. He takes that not so well. This is the south by gawds and women stay with their husbands. Then stuff gets even darker, Dixie's Uncle Ray comes to Alabama to stay with the family to 'help out.' I don't want to spoil but get that oven heated up for you to stick your head in while reading this one. I KEED! I KEED! Quit being so dang sensitive! But don't say I didn't warn you about this one. ALL the triggers are gonna get pulled. It's a good one for those of you that have the dark souls like me but I'm saying that it's gonna feel like that day you got gut punched when you are done. You remember that day, don't you? Booksource: Netgalley in exchange for review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cheri

    NOW AVAILABLE “Childhood is what you spend the rest of your life trying to overcome.” Birdee Pruitt, (Hope Floats) In 1969, Dixie Dupree is an 11 year-old girl living in a small town in Alabama with her parents and AJ, her brother. Lately things aren’t quite like they used to be. Dixie’s father is drinking more, and her mother’s growing unhappiness with her life in Alabama is ever-present, missing her family and the life she had growing up in New Hampshire. The in-laws have never accepted her, nev NOW AVAILABLE “Childhood is what you spend the rest of your life trying to overcome.” Birdee Pruitt, (Hope Floats) In 1969, Dixie Dupree is an 11 year-old girl living in a small town in Alabama with her parents and AJ, her brother. Lately things aren’t quite like they used to be. Dixie’s father is drinking more, and her mother’s growing unhappiness with her life in Alabama is ever-present, missing her family and the life she had growing up in New Hampshire. The in-laws have never accepted her, never made her feel welcome. Dixie’s mother can’t seem to let it go and the more she brings it up, the more Dixie’s father drinks. He feels her slipping away, everything slipping out of his control. The family slowly drifts toward four individuals rather than operating as a family unit. “It occurred to me this was when it had started, when we’d all begun to lose our way with each other. It happened so gradually, none of us saw it coming, until there was nothing left but empty conversations and useless arguments inside a house that had anticipated love, but had only seen sadness.” And then the unimaginable occurs. Until 1969, about the worst thing that has ever happened to Dixie Dupree is getting in trouble for her lies. I’m not sure even Dixie understands why she feels compelled to tell these lies, but she’s lied so much now no one believes her even when she’s telling the truth. When things start going seriously downhill, even when she tries to tell someone else what is happening, she is not believed. Despite this, Dixie is wise beyond her years in her ability to see straight to the heart of some things, but not everything. Your heart will break, as she takes on the guilt that is not hers, should never be hers. Dixie is the kind of child the reader wants to reach into the pages of this story and yank from this life. In parts this is a heavy story, but it’s also filled with love and hope and kindness from some unexpected sources. Written in flowing, deceptively simple prose, the story of Dixie Dupree is one you won’t forget quickly. It covers a wide range of issues, alcoholism, depression, physical abuse, rape, suicide, and more. This is a story with some broken characters; some innocent and some that are just dangerously evil. Told through the voice of Dixie Dupree, which makes all the difference, there is enough goodness and charm to balance this dark but captivating debut novel. Pub Date: 25 Oct 2016 Many thanks for the ARC provided by Kensington Books, NetGalley and special thanks to author Donna Everhart

  3. 5 out of 5

    Esil

    3+ stars. The Education of Dixie Dupree is well done and I liked Dixie, but it's the kind of book I usually avoid. Dixie is 11 years old, living in Alabama with her parents and brother -- and lots of nasty secrets. There is a pervasive tenseness to the story as Dixie tries to figure out what's going on in the adult world around her, and as that world seeps brutally into her reality. (view spoiler)[ I always try to avoid spoilers but for this review I can't avoid them if I want to write honestly 3+ stars. The Education of Dixie Dupree is well done and I liked Dixie, but it's the kind of book I usually avoid. Dixie is 11 years old, living in Alabama with her parents and brother -- and lots of nasty secrets. There is a pervasive tenseness to the story as Dixie tries to figure out what's going on in the adult world around her, and as that world seeps brutally into her reality. (view spoiler)[ I always try to avoid spoilers but for this review I can't avoid them if I want to write honestly about my reaction to this one. After Dixie's father dies by suicide, her mother's brother moves in and sexually abuses Dixie. The scenes are fairly graphic and Dixie's palpable feelings of fear, shame and confusion are pervasive. The light hearted cover and description of this book don't suggest that child sexual abuse is at the heart of the story, but this ends up being the focus of the story. It's a critical and serious issue and I have read my fair share of novels dealing with this topic, but by now I try to avoid them. There's something that doesn't sit well with me when child sexual exploitation -- even if treated sensitively as it is here -- forms the core of a work of fiction. I don't feel entertained or educated or whatever other benefits I usually get when I read a novel. Rather, I feel like a voyeur and I feel shaken. I will read memoirs or other non fiction books dealing with the issue, but fiction just doesn't sit well with me. That's me. I'm not judging people who enjoyed this book. I just wish the blurb was a bit clearer about things to come. (hide spoiler)] My 3+ stars go to the quality of the writing, the southern setting and Dixie's character -- all things that attracted me to the book. But personally I would have skipped this one if I knew what was coming. Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for an opportunity to read an advance copy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    4+ Stars! GREAT debut! Coming October 25th!THE EDUCATION OF DIXIE DUPREE is a page-turning coming-of-age story with a nasty monster, a variety of secrets, subject matters that are pretty tough to take, often difficult to read and still the book is unputdownable.It's 1969 Alabama when we first meet eleven year old Dixie with her annoyingly inquisitive mind and propensity for telling little white lies. When her actions finally catch up with her, when she desperately needs help and guidance, she ca 4+ Stars! GREAT debut! Coming October 25th!THE EDUCATION OF DIXIE DUPREE is a page-turning coming-of-age story with a nasty monster, a variety of secrets, subject matters that are pretty tough to take, often difficult to read and still the book is unputdownable.It's 1969 Alabama when we first meet eleven year old Dixie with her annoyingly inquisitive mind and propensity for telling little white lies. When her actions finally catch up with her, when she desperately needs help and guidance, she can only find solace in the written word....in her diary.Donna Everhart's first novel takes us through the ups and downs of a dysfunctional, and at times, desperate family who commit harmful deeds that will make you cringe, but ultimately leave the reader with a feeling of hope and healing. Definitely look forward to more from DE! Thank you Kensington Books and NetGalley for the ARC!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    This was a very emotional book and I just felt so bad for 11 yr old Dixie throughout the entire novel. This situation made me so angry. I won't say any more regarding the situation for those who plan on reading this book. Thanks to Netgalley and Kensington Books for the ARC This was a very emotional book and I just felt so bad for 11 yr old Dixie throughout the entire novel. This situation made me so angry. I won't say any more regarding the situation for those who plan on reading this book. Thanks to Netgalley and Kensington Books for the ARC

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amy T. - Book lover!

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Spoiler Alert: I wanted to like this book; I really did. The more I think about it, however, it just makes me angry. The main character, an 11 year old, goes through way too much for the book to end as it does. Everhart writes that Dixie wants to talk to someone but doesn't know whom she can trust. To then deny that she still needs to talk to someone and that at the end, everything is now all "normal" is not only a cop-out, it's just dangerous. Don't send the message that a child, which Dixie is Spoiler Alert: I wanted to like this book; I really did. The more I think about it, however, it just makes me angry. The main character, an 11 year old, goes through way too much for the book to end as it does. Everhart writes that Dixie wants to talk to someone but doesn't know whom she can trust. To then deny that she still needs to talk to someone and that at the end, everything is now all "normal" is not only a cop-out, it's just dangerous. Don't send the message that a child, which Dixie is a child, who undergoes multiple major traumas, if left alone, will just bounce back. There are so many things wrong with this story. An abuser just up and stops abusing. A child who has been nearly killed by her mother is just okay. The same child who has to see her father die from suicide is just okay. That same child who is raped, is now just okay. I originally gave this book three stars, but for some reason, I felt compelled to come back and write this review. My own daughter was molested at a young age. Our believing her, prosecuting the offender, and getting her counseling have been keys to her healing. She could not have known at 11 years old whether or not she was okay. As a matter of fact, we won't know if she's truly okay for a long time. However, it's just so important to get a child some help after a trauma. Everhart makes a point at the end of her novel that "This story shows that not all who are abused end up suicidal, on drugs, or in a therapist's office..." as if ending up in a therapist's office is equal to the negatives of being suicidal or on drugs. Please don't send this message. Getting help for a child who has been traumatized is not a bad thing nor is it something to be ashamed of. Quite the opposite, it's being a responsible parent.

  7. 4 out of 5

    DeB MaRtEnS

    4.0 stars Dixie Dupree's world completely collapses in the year that she becomes eleven years old.With an unstable mother and drinking father reactively exploding or withdrawing from each other or at their children Dixie and her older brother, AJ, and a remote support system in her Dad's Alabama relatives, the household barely copes with its stress. Dixie learns to lie to cover for her mother's physical fury - and the consequences put her in severe jeopardy when she needs people to believe that s 4.0 stars Dixie Dupree's world completely collapses in the year that she becomes eleven years old.With an unstable mother and drinking father reactively exploding or withdrawing from each other or at their children Dixie and her older brother, AJ, and a remote support system in her Dad's Alabama relatives, the household barely copes with its stress. Dixie learns to lie to cover for her mother's physical fury - and the consequences put her in severe jeopardy when she needs people to believe that she truly is in trouble. The novel is gnarly with the patterns of family secrets and hidden grief. No one talks and no one tells. Dixie is the narrator, and her confusion with partial facts and inconsistent information from the adults around her display her vulnerability and growing fear. The emotion is palpable and the suspense is never ending. The Education of Dixie Dupree is, in fact, about Dixie's education. It is her coming of age story among self-centred adults, caught by those who have no boundaries or conscience, of adults stunted by early personal losses and others processing tragedy so deep that they cannot see outside their own fog. The novel directly confronts child neglect, assault and abuse. Also, Dixie embodies resilience, in one of those children helped and determined to help herself. Author Donna Everhart's strong and solid debut novel is sensitive, engrossing and will be a sure hit for fans of Fannie Flag and Diane Chamberlain. Advanced Reader Copy courtesy of Kensington Publishing Corp. via NetGalley Publishing Date: Oct. 25, 2016

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 2.5 stars. For me, this book was just OK. I have some major issues with it. To read the story blurb, this sounds like a typical light read, a coming of age book about an 11 year old girl, some family secrets, maybe some family dysfunction. But as you read it, the book takes a definite dark turn that many readers may not be prepared for. So I'll warn you: this book deals with alcoholism, physical abuse, child physical and sexual abuse, depression, among other issues. And they aren't handled partic 2.5 stars. For me, this book was just OK. I have some major issues with it. To read the story blurb, this sounds like a typical light read, a coming of age book about an 11 year old girl, some family secrets, maybe some family dysfunction. But as you read it, the book takes a definite dark turn that many readers may not be prepared for. So I'll warn you: this book deals with alcoholism, physical abuse, child physical and sexual abuse, depression, among other issues. And they aren't handled particularly well. The author seems to take great delight in describing the physical and sexual abuse in way too much detail. I get it. She wanted us to know just how bad it was. But, and this is a big BUT, the way she handled the ending was absurd! Suddenly everything is hunky dory? No therapy? You wave a magic wand and poof! everything is OK? No explanation for the mother's rages? The mother didn't understand why Dixie didn't tell her about the abuse? Woman, you freaking tried to kill the girl! And made her lie about it! I also get that this takes place in 1969, and thing were different then. Maybe people didn't go to therapy like they do now. But in her author's note, she equates people who go to therapy with those who are suicidal or use drugs. What a disservice to those who seek help! She seems to think that people should just suck it up and get over it. Well, sweetheart, I am over you as an author, if that's your opinion of therapy for sexual abuse victims. So that is my main problem with this book. The characters are OK. Dixie reminds me a bit of Scout from TKAM. The mother I just want to slap. Don't get me started on the abuser. There are some interesting twists at the end but all this is overshadowed by the mishandling of the main plot line. If you don't know anything about the issues in this book, then you may be amazed by this story. If you have any knowledge of these issues, then you'll know she really screwed up in how she handled the ending. A real missed opportunity.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Betty

    Dixie Dupree’s observations about her life and the people in it create a vivid world that is sometimes funny, sometimes agonizing, that always feels very real. She finds that life can be ugly, even brutal, and she faces it all with incredible strength and resilience. There’s no gentle way to tell such a story such as this and still have it ring true. In this magnificent debut novel, Everhart writes with gritty realism and shines a harsh light on the ugliness of abuse. This isn’t an easy read some Dixie Dupree’s observations about her life and the people in it create a vivid world that is sometimes funny, sometimes agonizing, that always feels very real. She finds that life can be ugly, even brutal, and she faces it all with incredible strength and resilience. There’s no gentle way to tell such a story such as this and still have it ring true. In this magnificent debut novel, Everhart writes with gritty realism and shines a harsh light on the ugliness of abuse. This isn’t an easy read sometimes, but stories that deal with abuse shouldn’t be easy to read. They should make the reader feel intensely uncomfortable and empathetic towards the character that suffers through it. The Education of Dixie Dupree absolutely does this. Being told through the eyes of a child makes it even more poignant and, in the end, triumphant. Dixie Dupree, with her spirited tenacity and courage, is going to linger in my mind for quite some time. I received an advance review copy of this book courtesy of Netgalley and Kensington Books in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Barbara White

    I was fortunate enough to read an advance copy of this powerful, important debut that mixes southern charm with the darkest side of family life. The best part is the amazing voice of 11-year-old Dixie Dupree, who is wise beyond her years, but still sees everything as a feisty like girl. She's one tough cookie--despite everything that happens to her. I love Dixie, especially when she's trying to figure out the definition of white trash. This novel tackles difficult subject matter but is ultimatel I was fortunate enough to read an advance copy of this powerful, important debut that mixes southern charm with the darkest side of family life. The best part is the amazing voice of 11-year-old Dixie Dupree, who is wise beyond her years, but still sees everything as a feisty like girl. She's one tough cookie--despite everything that happens to her. I love Dixie, especially when she's trying to figure out the definition of white trash. This novel tackles difficult subject matter but is ultimately hopeful. It's sure to generate serious book club discussion.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sherry Hoffcastel

    I'll start by saying that I think the writing itself is brilliant. The fact that Ms. Everhart kept me glued to this story well into the 1am hour is a testament to her talent. That said, like so many others here I was disillusioned by her choice of a cover. Not one to judge based on appearances I'll let that one slide. What bothers me more than anything is the pretty, well written bow she tacked on as her ending. As a survivor of childhood abuse I was almost insulted at how easily she swept every I'll start by saying that I think the writing itself is brilliant. The fact that Ms. Everhart kept me glued to this story well into the 1am hour is a testament to her talent. That said, like so many others here I was disillusioned by her choice of a cover. Not one to judge based on appearances I'll let that one slide. What bothers me more than anything is the pretty, well written bow she tacked on as her ending. As a survivor of childhood abuse I was almost insulted at how easily she swept everything about Dixie's life back into place. I can't relate to everything Dixie suffered and I can't speak for other survivors but my recovery was not that simple. Perhaps there are people in the world who go through such an extreme amount of trauma unscathed. I haven't met any and I think it's extremely ambitious to lead readers to believe that life actually gets better after suffering from the kind of horrors Dixie was subjected to. I believe that if a writer is going to delve into the subject of childhood abuse it must be done with honesty, respect, and integrity for sensitive readers. I could be wrong or alone in my perception but I feel like Ms. Everhart did the world a major disservice by wrapping things up so clean and sparkly. The reality is that clean-up is often more painful and messy than the abuse itself. I would have much more respect for this author if I saw a bit more elbow grease in her ending.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn in FL

    Donna Everhart is definitely a cut above the most writers being published today. This is my third book that I have read and I was rewarded with an interesting and timely story with dynamic characters facing realistic but nonetheless daunting situations. I found Dixie Dupree, the story's young narrator, engaging and I connected to her experiences and concerns. Her trauma's cause her to grow stronger emotionally and see that her pain impacts others. Her compassion grows as she learns that much of Donna Everhart is definitely a cut above the most writers being published today. This is my third book that I have read and I was rewarded with an interesting and timely story with dynamic characters facing realistic but nonetheless daunting situations. I found Dixie Dupree, the story's young narrator, engaging and I connected to her experiences and concerns. Her trauma's cause her to grow stronger emotionally and see that her pain impacts others. Her compassion grows as she learns that much of life is more about how you react and grow than focusing on the grief. Her mastery over her early challenges are encouraging to the reader and allows the reader to reframe societies response. There are some very sensitive issues addressed in the story and it may be triggering to sensitive readers. Though one would hope that the reactions both in the family and the legal system would be as helpful as demonstrated, this is rarely the case in real-life for many. That's okay, the message of the story is more important than its realism. I think this is a terrific cautionary tale for all parents, particularly mom's of young children.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Carole

    A southern coming of age story as told by 11 year old Dixie. She has a habit of telling lies, and so she is afraid to tell a secret that no one will believe. It was difficult to read as it involves sexual abuse. Dixie does find love and compassion towards the end of this book. All in all, I thought the ending was good, and it was a book worth reading.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lolly K Dandeneau

    “I liked her soft voice in my ear, but I had a grasp of this whole situation better than her. I envisioned me and Mama like a glass dropped on the floor, broken into millions of fragments, impossible to put back into any semblance of what we’d been, albeit not perfect to start with.” Childhood is something some of us survive through a miracle but with war wounds. For Dixie Dupree, she is going to get an education no child should ever be exposed to, be so many are. Running a bit wild in Alabama wi “I liked her soft voice in my ear, but I had a grasp of this whole situation better than her. I envisioned me and Mama like a glass dropped on the floor, broken into millions of fragments, impossible to put back into any semblance of what we’d been, albeit not perfect to start with.” Childhood is something some of us survive through a miracle but with war wounds. For Dixie Dupree, she is going to get an education no child should ever be exposed to, be so many are. Running a bit wild in Alabama with her brother AJ, wary of her mother and father’s declining marriage, Evie has sharpened her tongue on countless lies. Lies for fun, some just because, but most for survival. She may have dirty knees and be a bit of a savage at play, but what child isn’t? Family can be brutal, and for this little spitfire heroine trying to navigate the adults in hers is like swallowing poison. Why is her beautiful broken mother so sad? Why is Daddy drinking too much? Dixie seems to infuriate her mother just by being her natural self. Her mother won’t stop yearning for her old life with her own family back in New Hampshire, and Dixie wonders why? Why did she marry Daddy knowing it meant living in Alabama if she hates it so much? The family in New Hampshire are strangers to Dixie and her brother, and it’s strange considering how much her mother claims to miss them. Why does her mother never seem to fit in with her in-laws? As the fighting escalates everyone in town seems to know, and have their own opinion of the sort of folks her kin is. Maybe her exaggerations force her mother’s hand sometimes. Maybe she is just a bad kid but how can she not want to stir the pot with her mother ? Dixie is torn between resentment and hungry want of motherly love and comfort. When terrible things happen, she begins to wonder if she is white trash, even if the meaning is lost on her, it won’t be for long. When her father takes off, she feels some of the blame is on her shoulders and when Uncle Ray (her mother’s flashy brother) arrives to ‘save the day’ Dixie becomes a skeleton of sorts in her own family’s closet, unearthing the buried secrets all the adults have kept. It costs so much to have a full belly and stability. When she needs help, even her brother thinks she’s full of nothing but lies, but the silence can’t last forever. The things happening to Dixie are overlooked, and one has to wonder how the adults are culpable. From the novel’s start, they step in but not enough. Her mother’s own torturous mind forces Dixie to fight for herself, but how to do that with so much clever manipulation coming from every direction? Broken adults are aplenty, and the brutality of the past is like a parasite for future generations. Where does it end? Dixie is a child the reader wants to rescue. It’s a heavy story, it is disturbingly hard to read. Not lighthearted and yet Dixie is sunshine anyway, the sort of kid that can’t contain her spirit- even if it puts her in the path of danger. She will have to be brave if she hopes to solve her problems, and get answers to the questions her family seems to dodge. Beautiful and wounding. Release Date: October 25, 2016 Kensington Fiction/Coming of Age (https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com/) feel free to visit my blog

  15. 5 out of 5

    HoopoeGirl

    This is one of those rare instances where I wish the book summary gave more plot information than it did. Had I known what Dixie's education was about, I would never have picked up this book. The story was engaging at the start, with strong similarities to Scout in To Kill A Mockingbird. I was enchanted with Dixie's voice and the rich depiction of the southern setting. But then Uncle Ray appeared. How can you feel anything but skeezy being forced into a voyeuristic narrative of abuse? This was ce This is one of those rare instances where I wish the book summary gave more plot information than it did. Had I known what Dixie's education was about, I would never have picked up this book. The story was engaging at the start, with strong similarities to Scout in To Kill A Mockingbird. I was enchanted with Dixie's voice and the rich depiction of the southern setting. But then Uncle Ray appeared. How can you feel anything but skeezy being forced into a voyeuristic narrative of abuse? This was certainly not the growing up tale I expected from a book compared to Secret Life of Bees. Very disappointing and abhorrent to read. While the novel is very well written, I wouldn't recommend it to anyone. Why Everhart chose this specific topic to focus on is a mystery to me. Hardly the coming of age mother-daughter story I'd ever want to share with my daughter.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marleen

    For the first half of this book, thoughts about how some parents shouldn’t have children, crossed my mind. Take Dixie’s mother, Evie, for instance, she’s so wrapped up in her own unhappiness and secrets, she doesn’t see how this affects her children, especially her 11 year old daughter. First off, Dixie, who’s a very imaginative girl, takes up lying as a hobby to battle her own insecurities with what’s happening at home: her mother’s moods and her father’s increasing drinking. Then something tra For the first half of this book, thoughts about how some parents shouldn’t have children, crossed my mind. Take Dixie’s mother, Evie, for instance, she’s so wrapped up in her own unhappiness and secrets, she doesn’t see how this affects her children, especially her 11 year old daughter. First off, Dixie, who’s a very imaginative girl, takes up lying as a hobby to battle her own insecurities with what’s happening at home: her mother’s moods and her father’s increasing drinking. Then something tragic happens with Dixie’s Dad, and Evie doesn’t even think of explaining this to her children. Being left in the dark is disturbing for both Dixie and her brother A.J., in varying degrees. But that’s only the beginning of the misery and horror that will overcome this family, because when Evie’s brother, Uncle Ray, travels from New Hampshire to visit, in order to help his long lost sister in Alabama, he turns out to be a predator and child molester and he has set his sights on Dixie. (Indeed, creepy). Ultimately, like the author said in her acknowledgments, this is about a child’s resilience and I felt that very strongly. Dixie is an amazing child, and her intelligence and strength is what makes her get past these traumatic events. I have to say that the author did a good job, because the writing was very fluid and the story well told; if a little slow at times. The differences in ways of living and mindsets between the South and North are quite remarkable. This story is set in the late sixties, but I think the different in attitudes and the taboos have not changed much. There are times when children are shut out of grown-ups conversations that is acceptable, and there are times when it does more harm than good. I was a bit skeptical about the veracity of the treatment of child abuse victims in the sixties – did things really happen like that? For instance, that ER exam of Dixie in New Hampshire; I’m not sure that‘s how it would’ve happened in the sixties with so much assistance and support. I have my doubts - but kudos, if it did. I’m glad that in the end, Evie, Dixie’s mother was openhearted and honest, which helped in Dixie’s coping with her trauma, I’m sure. Warning to readers: This is book about child abuse and is at times thoroughly unsettling and graphic.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    When I review a book, I don't feel like it is necessary for me to tell you what the book is about. That is what the synopsis is for, and the publisher does a far better job than I do, believe it. What I feel my purpose is when I write a review is to tell you why you SHOULD read the book, or sometimes, why you SHOULDN'T. When I write a review, I am giving you my honest impression. I try to convey how the book made me feel, if I enjoyed reading it, and if I would recommend it to anyone else. With When I review a book, I don't feel like it is necessary for me to tell you what the book is about. That is what the synopsis is for, and the publisher does a far better job than I do, believe it. What I feel my purpose is when I write a review is to tell you why you SHOULD read the book, or sometimes, why you SHOULDN'T. When I write a review, I am giving you my honest impression. I try to convey how the book made me feel, if I enjoyed reading it, and if I would recommend it to anyone else. With this being said, I just want you to know that The Education of Dixie Dupree by Donna Everhart is a book that you shouldn't pass up. This book is an incredibly powerful coming of age story that totally overwhelmed me emotionally. It isn't one of those books that give you that warm fuzzy feeling as you read it - instead it literally knocks you on your ass. The subjects presented aren't always pretty and they are not packaged that way either. There is no quiet way to address them, and there shouldn't be. Sometimes an author has to get your attention. And Donna Everhart has that down to a science. This is a story of a family . A REAL family. One that is made up of imperfect people in less-than-ideal situations. It is a book that doesn't promise a happy ending. It will break your heart at times. But you will remember this book. Believe me, you will. My two favorite books of all times besides To Kill A Mockingbird are books just like this one. They are The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd and Saving CeeCee Honeycutt by Beth Hoffman. These are books that will remain on my bookshelf although the rest of my library is now digital. They are books that I cherish and talk about frequently, and ones that I highly recommend. Now, I have another book that will be sitting on that shelf as well, and it is this one. So please take the time to read the book's description and decide for yourself if you think this would be something you would be interested in. I read some reviews that call the book "predictable", but I honestly didn't feel that way. How can you predict a child's reaction to things they don't truly understand. Even if they seem wise beyond their years, they are still children. Dixie will remain in my memory for a long time to come. Just like Scout, Lily and CeeCee do. I would like to thank the author, the publisher and NetGalley for giving me the privilege of reviewing this amazing book. It would make a fantastic book club read, and an amazing movie. I really hope you give it a try.

  18. 5 out of 5

    AJ Blythe

    I readDonna Everhart's debut "The Education of Dixie Dupree" yesterday. I won an ARC, but Donna didn't ask me to comment - it was just so good I have to share. I couldn't put it down. My family were left to fend for themselves while I read! From page 1 Donna sucked me in. Donna's writing flowed beautifully and 11 year old Dixie was an easy character to like/sympathise with. I don't usually read books on such heavy topics, but through Donna's great storytelling she managed to address a range of i I readDonna Everhart's debut "The Education of Dixie Dupree" yesterday. I won an ARC, but Donna didn't ask me to comment - it was just so good I have to share. I couldn't put it down. My family were left to fend for themselves while I read! From page 1 Donna sucked me in. Donna's writing flowed beautifully and 11 year old Dixie was an easy character to like/sympathise with. I don't usually read books on such heavy topics, but through Donna's great storytelling she managed to address a range of issues (including depression and abuse) in a way that was organic to the story, not thrust upon the reader, and deal with them in a forthright way. I didn't find the topics overwhelming which is why I usually avoid them (I don't go near Jodi Picoult for example). Alabama is completely foreign to me being from Australia and all, but Donna brought it to life. I'm not sure whether it is the southern setting, or the young protag, or the heavy subject matter but when I was reading this it reminded me of "To Kill a Mockingbird". Ironically, a few pages after I thought of TKAM her main character reads it. For everyone who has pre-ordered, you aren't going to be disappointed.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    “The education of Dixie Dupree” is a fearless novel. The protagonist is a plucky eight-year-old girl who narrates the story. Wise beyond her years, she navigates her precarious childhood by being perceptive and brave. The novel takes place in Alabama, and there is the homespun charm of Southern novels woven in the story that helps offset the horrifying subject matters. Author Donna Everhart holds no punches. She tackles serious issues affecting powerless children. Dixie is a strong character. Eve “The education of Dixie Dupree” is a fearless novel. The protagonist is a plucky eight-year-old girl who narrates the story. Wise beyond her years, she navigates her precarious childhood by being perceptive and brave. The novel takes place in Alabama, and there is the homespun charm of Southern novels woven in the story that helps offset the horrifying subject matters. Author Donna Everhart holds no punches. She tackles serious issues affecting powerless children. Dixie is a strong character. Everhart shows that childhood can be overwhelming to the strongest of children. Yet, some of these children find their way through, by the grace of God. This has been compared to “To Kill a Mockingbird” and I agree. This novel holds weighty subject matter.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Deanne Patterson

    Debut author Donna Everhart does an excellent job with this book. Coming of age story of Dixie Dupree. At 11, Dixie is an accomplished liar, taught by her mother. She survives the unthinkable by a monster. Shows the resilience of the human spirit she will survive. I could not put this down and Dixie's story will not soon be forgotten! Debut author Donna Everhart does an excellent job with this book. Coming of age story of Dixie Dupree. At 11, Dixie is an accomplished liar, taught by her mother. She survives the unthinkable by a monster. Shows the resilience of the human spirit she will survive. I could not put this down and Dixie's story will not soon be forgotten!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    I certainly give kudos to the author for not being afraid to honestly tackle the subject matter of this book, or to shy away from giving the reader some of the horrifying details, most of which I'm sure were as difficult for everyone to read as they were for me. When we first start teaching students in elementary school how to write an interesting story that will engage the reader, one of the major things we teach them is to show, not tell. And show is what this author did, in passages that made I certainly give kudos to the author for not being afraid to honestly tackle the subject matter of this book, or to shy away from giving the reader some of the horrifying details, most of which I'm sure were as difficult for everyone to read as they were for me. When we first start teaching students in elementary school how to write an interesting story that will engage the reader, one of the major things we teach them is to show, not tell. And show is what this author did, in passages that made my stomach turn, my eyes water, and my anger rise. They were hard to get through. But not all books are going to be happy, or pretty, or fun. Some books are going to be dark or serious and talk about real life issues. Like really awful things that happen all the time to kids everywhere, every day. These issues need to be written about and read because they make us think, or they open our eyes up to things we didn't know about, or know enough about. They make us hurt and get angry, and maybe that anger will lead us into dialogues with others to raise awareness and to figure out ways we can help to bring more attention to the issue. So for that reason books like this one are the kinds we all need to read sometimes, even though we would rather close our eyes instead.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    This book was not what I expected from Amazon’s Best Books’ review or from the blurbs on the bookjacket. I was mightily disappointed. Dixie is the 11-year-old narrator who suffers a childhood with an unpredictably abusive and argumentative mother, a drinker of a father, and the threat of their divorce. She clings to a few good memories, praying fervently for a permanent return of the good life she believes her family once shared. When the imagined good life disintegrates, a new abuser enters the This book was not what I expected from Amazon’s Best Books’ review or from the blurbs on the bookjacket. I was mightily disappointed. Dixie is the 11-year-old narrator who suffers a childhood with an unpredictably abusive and argumentative mother, a drinker of a father, and the threat of their divorce. She clings to a few good memories, praying fervently for a permanent return of the good life she believes her family once shared. When the imagined good life disintegrates, a new abuser enters the picture. Under duress, and thinking she is protecting the status quo, Dixie lies about her abuse, then to her detriment becomes a persistent tale teller. Her feelings and experiences are overlooked and ignored by adults deeply absorbed by their own poor choices, judgments, and disappointments. Important information is consistently withheld from Dixie and her older brother, who wonder for ages why they can’t visit their father in the hospital and why their mother left her beloved home in New Hampshire to come to an Alabama she hates. “Don’t ask me that now” and “It’s not important for you to know that” and “I can’t deal with those questions” are Mom’s typical responses. And such is the essence of the entire plot of “The Education of Dixie Dupree”: abuse, lies, secrets, horrors, losses, fears. Yes, there were pleasant interludes, but on the whole this tale of an appalling childhood was not much fun to read. Dixie was highly touted in reviews as resilient, courageous, and captivating, something I just didn’t see — maybe because I found the ending quite shocking. It was neat, tidy, and happy, a quick, spontaneous healing for all, no therapy required. Those who accepted the conclusion without question might be tempted, however, to credit Dixie’s spirit. As for me, I didn’t buy it and I didn’t like it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Writer's Relief

    “My diary was my best friend until I gave it up as key evidence against Uncle Ray.” So begins the narrative of Dixie Dupree, a tough-as-nails girl coming of age in 1969 rural Alabama. Dixie’s parents, Charles and Evie, fight constantly. Charles wants nothing more than to make his wife happy, and Evie longs to be back in New Hampshire, where she grew up. A series of tragic circumstances bring Evie’s brother, Uncle Ray, into the family’s life. Although Uncle Ray is generous in his financial assista “My diary was my best friend until I gave it up as key evidence against Uncle Ray.” So begins the narrative of Dixie Dupree, a tough-as-nails girl coming of age in 1969 rural Alabama. Dixie’s parents, Charles and Evie, fight constantly. Charles wants nothing more than to make his wife happy, and Evie longs to be back in New Hampshire, where she grew up. A series of tragic circumstances bring Evie’s brother, Uncle Ray, into the family’s life. Although Uncle Ray is generous in his financial assistance, his help will come at a cost to young Dixie. The novel is told from Dixie’s point of view, and author Donna Everhart shows a strong gift for voice. At eleven years old, Dixie is stubborn, smart, precocious, and a bit of a smart aleck. By no means is she cutesy or precious, as many child narrators are—this is a girl who will have no qualms throwing red clay dirt in your face if you cross her. But she is also vulnerable and heartbreaking, giving her character an astonishing amount of depth. She never feels less than real as you read her story. Through Dixie’s voice, we also get a clear, vivid portrait of the other characters, such as her older brother AJ and her unsettlingly charismatic Uncle Ray. However, the most fascinating relationship in the book belongs to Dixie and her mother, Evie. Their powerful arc goes from animosity to finding a common ground in the darkest of circumstances. Everhart’s narrative is well-paced and compelling, but there are also graphic depictions of sexual assault that make it difficult to read at times. At the end of the day, The Education of Dixie Dupree is a story of resiliency and survival.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    In Donna Everhart's debut novel, we meet 11 year old Dixie Dupree in 1969. Dixie lives in Alabama with her parents and her older brother. Her home life is very unstable - her dad drinks too much and her mom is very unhappy in Alabama and longs to return to her home in New Hampshire. In order to try to make sense of her life, Dixie keeps a diary and it becomes the only place that she can share her deepest thoughts and questions about her life and her family without worrying about her mother's ang In Donna Everhart's debut novel, we meet 11 year old Dixie Dupree in 1969. Dixie lives in Alabama with her parents and her older brother. Her home life is very unstable - her dad drinks too much and her mom is very unhappy in Alabama and longs to return to her home in New Hampshire. In order to try to make sense of her life, Dixie keeps a diary and it becomes the only place that she can share her deepest thoughts and questions about her life and her family without worrying about her mother's anger and punishment. She also copes with her life by telling lies and her family has learned not to believe much that she tells them. So when a situation occurs that really needs to be shared with her mother, she keeps it to herself because she knows that no one will believe her. This novel covers several very difficult subjects to read about but they are subjects that need to be addressed and discussed. This in a remarkable book told by an 11 year old girl who is trying to figure out her family and her life. Dixie is a character that I won't forget. Thanks to Edelweiss for a copy of this book for a fair and honest review.

  25. 4 out of 5

    MetLineReader

    I'm still not sure what to say - am reeling from this book. Thought it was going to be a coming of age tale, but it's much much darker than that. From the outset you know that one of the characters has been up to no good, but once that character arrives there's an impending sense of doom... The writing felt believable but I felt a growing sense of unease and just wanted that part of the book to be over. I didn't 'enjoy' it at all - not that you would, but I just rushed through. Due to the discom I'm still not sure what to say - am reeling from this book. Thought it was going to be a coming of age tale, but it's much much darker than that. From the outset you know that one of the characters has been up to no good, but once that character arrives there's an impending sense of doom... The writing felt believable but I felt a growing sense of unease and just wanted that part of the book to be over. I didn't 'enjoy' it at all - not that you would, but I just rushed through. Due to the discomfort - which is probably the hallmark of a good writer - I am giving this 3 stars. An interesting read but no real wow factor except in the closing pages which were far too rushed.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Renea Greathouse

    This book indicates it's for young adults and that fact gives you a false sense of security. Had one of my young adults read it, the momma bear in me would have come out. Graphic descriptions of incest is what ruined this story for me. I read your "interview" about why you added it in the story. My 13 YEAR OLD DOESN'T NEED TO READ THAT FILTH. This book indicates it's for young adults and that fact gives you a false sense of security. Had one of my young adults read it, the momma bear in me would have come out. Graphic descriptions of incest is what ruined this story for me. I read your "interview" about why you added it in the story. My 13 YEAR OLD DOESN'T NEED TO READ THAT FILTH.

  27. 4 out of 5

    BookNightOwl

    Did not know what I was getting myself when I decided to read this book. A really tough book to read. Warning ⚠️ contains a lot of difficult material. This is something different then I normally read but enjoyed the writing style and the story. Really loved reading from a 11 year old point of view and that this story took place in the late 1960's. Will continue to read from this author. Did not know what I was getting myself when I decided to read this book. A really tough book to read. Warning ⚠️ contains a lot of difficult material. This is something different then I normally read but enjoyed the writing style and the story. Really loved reading from a 11 year old point of view and that this story took place in the late 1960's. Will continue to read from this author.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dawnny

    A touching, deeply moving story. Have tissues.True Southern Lit that made me weep but compelled me. I love all books. This one cuts deep. Novels N Latte

  29. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    This debut novel has an attractive cover and a late 1960s Alabama setting. And it is a coming of age story, though not the cheery one that the cover suggests with its sunshiney yellow. From the first chapter’s handover of the titular Dixie’s diary to a lawyer, the dark overtones are quickly made evident. Dixie’s relationship with her mother is complicated, and this book then backtracks to when it all started – with a lie that led to more lies. The trauma of Dixie’s childhood escalates beyond her This debut novel has an attractive cover and a late 1960s Alabama setting. And it is a coming of age story, though not the cheery one that the cover suggests with its sunshiney yellow. From the first chapter’s handover of the titular Dixie’s diary to a lawyer, the dark overtones are quickly made evident. Dixie’s relationship with her mother is complicated, and this book then backtracks to when it all started – with a lie that led to more lies. The trauma of Dixie’s childhood escalates beyond her contentious relationship with her abusive mother, to the suicide of her father, to the horrors inflicted by her uncle and then topped off with the burden of a secret regarding her own brother… it’s all so dark that it is a wonder that the book even tries to strike such a hopeful tone at the end. It’s a lot of family drama all in one book… and really doesn’t make any of the adults look good at all… I definitely think that this would spark a lot of interesting discussion amongst a book club, but considering how dark it is, it may not be a good fit for every book club… It is a bit predictable, too, but more in the way that the worst things imaginable are almost consistently what happens. The real disconnect with the content and the cover, I think may cause some readers problems, too. It really does seem to hint at a much lighter coming of age story, not one that is more nightmarish and horrifically predictable.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carla Johnson-Hicks

    Set in the late 1960's south, Dixie lives in Alabama with her mom, dad and older brother AJ. Her mom has one of those tempers that can get away from her and Dixie tries her best to not trigger her 'other mom' coming out. Her mom is not happy living where she has no friends and her inlaws only tolerate her. Dixie learns to become an expert liar. She needs to in order to protect her unstable family. The story is told from Dixie's viewpoint, and the voice of this eleven year old comes through loud Set in the late 1960's south, Dixie lives in Alabama with her mom, dad and older brother AJ. Her mom has one of those tempers that can get away from her and Dixie tries her best to not trigger her 'other mom' coming out. Her mom is not happy living where she has no friends and her inlaws only tolerate her. Dixie learns to become an expert liar. She needs to in order to protect her unstable family. The story is told from Dixie's viewpoint, and the voice of this eleven year old comes through loud and clear. When Dixie's mom finally gets the courage to tell her husband that she want to go home to New Hampshire, disaster strikes. Then Uncle Ray comes down to help out his sister. Dixie is the kind of child the reader wants to reach into the pages of this story and yank from this life. This is a sad story at points, but it’s also filled with love and hope and kindness from some unexpected sources. It is written in flowing, deceptively simple prose and covers a lot of issues: alcoholism, depression, physical and sexual abuse, rape, suicide, and more. This is a story with flawed characters both innocent and others evil. There is enough goodness and charm to balance this dark but captivating story. I enjoyed the story told by Dixie, but did not enjoy some of the content. I recommend this story to anyone who enjoys family drama with a dark side.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.