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Neuroteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education

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Teachers are brain changers. Thus it would seem obvious that an understanding of the brain - the organ of learning - would be critical to a teacher's readiness to work with students. Unfortunately, in traditional public, public-charter, private, parochial, and home schools across the country, most teachers lack an understanding of how the brain receives, filters, consolida Teachers are brain changers. Thus it would seem obvious that an understanding of the brain - the organ of learning - would be critical to a teacher's readiness to work with students. Unfortunately, in traditional public, public-charter, private, parochial, and home schools across the country, most teachers lack an understanding of how the brain receives, filters, consolidates, and applies learning for both the short and long term. Neuroteach was therefore written to help solve the problem teachers and school leaders have in knowing how to bring the growing body of educational neuroscience research into the design of their schools, classrooms, and work with each individual student. It is our hope, that Neuroteach will help ensure that one day, every student -regardless of zip code or school type--will learn and develop with the guidance of a teacher who knows the research behind how his or her brain works and learns.


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Teachers are brain changers. Thus it would seem obvious that an understanding of the brain - the organ of learning - would be critical to a teacher's readiness to work with students. Unfortunately, in traditional public, public-charter, private, parochial, and home schools across the country, most teachers lack an understanding of how the brain receives, filters, consolida Teachers are brain changers. Thus it would seem obvious that an understanding of the brain - the organ of learning - would be critical to a teacher's readiness to work with students. Unfortunately, in traditional public, public-charter, private, parochial, and home schools across the country, most teachers lack an understanding of how the brain receives, filters, consolidates, and applies learning for both the short and long term. Neuroteach was therefore written to help solve the problem teachers and school leaders have in knowing how to bring the growing body of educational neuroscience research into the design of their schools, classrooms, and work with each individual student. It is our hope, that Neuroteach will help ensure that one day, every student -regardless of zip code or school type--will learn and develop with the guidance of a teacher who knows the research behind how his or her brain works and learns.

30 review for Neuroteach: Brain Science and the Future of Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Although there are some good research-based ideas included, my background in Neuroscience couldn't handle how the concepts were watered down to the point of being almost inaccurate. I also feel like the descriptions of current teacher method and mindset were almost insulting to the professional field. None of the teachers at my school are so blind to the mindset of the students, or unaware of the challenges of fostering lasting learning. There are pedagogical techniques that contradict some of t Although there are some good research-based ideas included, my background in Neuroscience couldn't handle how the concepts were watered down to the point of being almost inaccurate. I also feel like the descriptions of current teacher method and mindset were almost insulting to the professional field. None of the teachers at my school are so blind to the mindset of the students, or unaware of the challenges of fostering lasting learning. There are pedagogical techniques that contradict some of the Do's and Don'ts of this book that are nonetheless reasonable, effective and research based. (There is still open debate in peer-reviewed research about some of these concepts, such as the effectiveness of lecture techniques.) Yes, teachers must understand how the brain works, but then they must apply this knowledge in context with proper synthetic understanding, not blindly follow a checklist from a mass market paperback.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kevin McShane

    This is a must read for all teachers and school leaders. It is a brilliant introduction to the world of Mind, Brain, and Education work that can truly bring education into the 21st century and prepare students for the world they will inhabit, not the one their grandparents did. There are so many practical tips for teachers here!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Emma Ford

    Loved reading about the brain and how it works. I have incorporated some of the practices into my classroom as well as my life!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Very informative! I’ll be changing some of my teaching practices based on the research in this book. I also found this book very validating, many of the practices that I believe in are proven to be good for the brain!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amber Scott

    I had the opportunity to meet Glenn in Bethesda in June 2019 while attending his conference. As a new school year gears up tomorrow morning, I decided this book was my final "summer read". 1. Teaching is hard. There is no way around that - and if you find that way - you need to find your 'zone of proximal discomfort". 2. This book isn't going to make you the BEST TEACHER EVER. However - it provides insight on how the brain works and provides opportunities for you to reflect on your own practice a I had the opportunity to meet Glenn in Bethesda in June 2019 while attending his conference. As a new school year gears up tomorrow morning, I decided this book was my final "summer read". 1. Teaching is hard. There is no way around that - and if you find that way - you need to find your 'zone of proximal discomfort". 2. This book isn't going to make you the BEST TEACHER EVER. However - it provides insight on how the brain works and provides opportunities for you to reflect on your own practice and set goals for yourself. I think this line said it best: "MBE research-informed strategies for teaching and learning will get you so far, but you have to run the last leg of this relay race yourself". 3. This book makes me want to be a better teacher - and in the end, I believe we all want to be better at our jobs. 4. Read it. Either love it or hate it, but your brain will be changed in the end. That's neuroplasticity baby!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Required reading for my new teaching position, and I was actually glad of it. It reinforced everything I read in "The Teenage Brain", with more studies and specific information targeted to teachers rather than a generalized parent manual, and again, will be a super helpful reference to explain my teaching choices moving forward.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mark Lenz

    One of the best books about teaching I’ve read in recent years. Presents current research in brain science with teaching practice, and is essential for debunking teaching myths (even pedagogy I was taught in college) and enlightening teachers on the best research-backed pedagogy

  8. 5 out of 5

    Peter Carpenter

    Book 27 of 70 of 2019: For anyone who loves everything having to do with teaching and the brain: this book is for you! The intersection between neuroscience and education has always been a fuzzy one. But Whitman and Kellaher do an amazing job spelling out how the brain works; and the case for having teachers engage in professionally orchestrated professional learning. Knowing how the brain works not only increases a teacher’s efficacy when teaching; but it offers students a path of insight into Book 27 of 70 of 2019: For anyone who loves everything having to do with teaching and the brain: this book is for you! The intersection between neuroscience and education has always been a fuzzy one. But Whitman and Kellaher do an amazing job spelling out how the brain works; and the case for having teachers engage in professionally orchestrated professional learning. Knowing how the brain works not only increases a teacher’s efficacy when teaching; but it offers students a path of insight into learning that will help them retain what they’ve learned. A must read for educators and educational leaders!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carmen Rubino

    The authors are educators who went in pursuit of a vibrant learning community. They learned about how the brain processes information and developed frameworks for thinking about and implementing education. Overall, the book had information which reminded me of good instructional practices and gave me a place to begin developing others. There were some elements of research, specifically how memory is encoded and retrieved, which were not addressed as specifically as I had hoped. However, if you a The authors are educators who went in pursuit of a vibrant learning community. They learned about how the brain processes information and developed frameworks for thinking about and implementing education. Overall, the book had information which reminded me of good instructional practices and gave me a place to begin developing others. There were some elements of research, specifically how memory is encoded and retrieved, which were not addressed as specifically as I had hoped. However, if you are looking for a book to promote reflection and directions of change, I recommend this one.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Syd Lindblom

    Watered-down, condescending psychology that assumes that teachers know nothing previous to reading this book. Maybe it should have taken its own advice and assessed its students’ knowledge before teaching. No immediately applicable practices (that are new, I guess...) or ways of assessing your own teaching. Loved one part that referred to “the decades since you have been in college.” Bitch, it’s been 5 years. Maybe I’m just the wrong audience.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    An absolutely fascinating must-read for all teachers. I have already implemented some of the research-backed suggestions and it has made a world of difference for my middle schoolers. I am going to use a lot of the ideas in the book to plan my course to be developmentally appropriate for 6th, 7th and 8th graders, who all need different supports. I am excited to get started.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jim Leesch

    Should be required reading for anyone wishing to call themselves an education professional. Particularly important to administrators.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alana

    Hands down the best teaching-theory book I've read in a long while! Will be referring every teacher who breathes to this one.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Cernak

    You don’t need to be a teacher to read this book. This introduction to neuroscience has been a game changer for the way I view education.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    If you are a teacher, get this book and read it now! Here is how we should be approaching our pedagogy...there is so much wisdom and helpful direction in the book based on MBE ideas. Excellent!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ivan Beeckmans

    The material is interesting enough, but as a teacher I knew much of what was contained. A bit repetitive and if someone wanted a good summary, Appendix Two: Self Reflection Tool, would do the job.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    All teachers should read this.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kendra Hanzlik

  19. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Pratt

  20. 5 out of 5

    L Melvin

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lyssie

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tim Scholze

  25. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  26. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Zabrusky

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michael Russell

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Phillips

  29. 4 out of 5

    Scott Milam

  30. 4 out of 5

    christine salvo

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