counter create hit Thirty-six Years in the White House (1902) - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Thirty-six Years in the White House (1902)

Availability: Ready to download

A book of recollections of a personal character that came under Mr. Pendel's attention. It is very interesting and throws many sidelights on the life of the White House. Pendel writes: "In 1861, or 1862, the Metropolitan Police was established by Congress at the Capital, and I made application for and received an appointment on the force. I made the first arrest, with the A book of recollections of a personal character that came under Mr. Pendel's attention. It is very interesting and throws many sidelights on the life of the White House. Pendel writes: "In 1861, or 1862, the Metropolitan Police was established by Congress at the Capital, and I made application for and received an appointment on the force. I made the first arrest, with the assistance of "Buck" Essex. The case was that of a fellow named Grady, one of the English Hill toughs. A roundsman said to us, "Boys, you take a walk down Seventh Street, and if you see anything going on, take a hand in it." Just as we got opposite the Patent Office, this Grady had assaulted, or rather was assaulting, a young fellow with a whip. I went up and grabbed him and put him under arrest, then took him to Squire Dunn's court and preferred charges against him. The Squire was busy writing for some time. When he got through he handed me the paper he was writing, and I was so green at the business I did not know what it was, so said: "What is this, Squire?" He replied, "Why, that is the paper of commitment for this fellow. Take him to jail." "On November 3, 1864, Sergeant John Cronin, Alfonso Dunn, Andrew Smith, and myself were ordered to report at the First Precinct, in the old City Hall, at one o'clock in the afternoon. We supposed we were to be detailed for detective work in New York City on account of the great riot then on there, especially as we were ordered to report in citizens' clothes, to conceal our revolvers, and to be sure to have them all clean and in good order. We arrived at the City Hall, and then were told where we were to go, which was to the President's Mansion, there to report to Marshal Lanham, at that time United States Marshal of the District of Columbia, and a bosom friend of Abraham Lincoln. "These were days that tried men's hearts, and women's, too. Men were falling at the front by hundreds, both in the Union and in the Confederate armies. There was weeping and mourning all over the land. Our nation was trembling with anxiety; we were all hoping that the great strife was over or soon to be. "Marshal Lanham took us upstairs and into the President's office, where we were introduced to him and to his two secretaries, Mr. Nicolay and Mr. Hay, the latter now being Secretary of State. We were then instructed to keep a sharp lookout in the different parts of the house, more particularly in the East Room and at the door of the President's office. " CONTENTS I — Under President Lincoln II — Under President Johnson III — Under President Grant IV — Under President Hayes V — Under President Garfield VI — Under President Arthur VII — Under President Cleveland VIII — Under President Harrison IX — Cleveland's Second Administration X— Under President McKinley XI — Furniture in Executive Mansion Originally published in 1902; reformatted for the Kindle; may contain an occasional imperfections; original spellings have been kept in place.


Compare
Ads Banner

A book of recollections of a personal character that came under Mr. Pendel's attention. It is very interesting and throws many sidelights on the life of the White House. Pendel writes: "In 1861, or 1862, the Metropolitan Police was established by Congress at the Capital, and I made application for and received an appointment on the force. I made the first arrest, with the A book of recollections of a personal character that came under Mr. Pendel's attention. It is very interesting and throws many sidelights on the life of the White House. Pendel writes: "In 1861, or 1862, the Metropolitan Police was established by Congress at the Capital, and I made application for and received an appointment on the force. I made the first arrest, with the assistance of "Buck" Essex. The case was that of a fellow named Grady, one of the English Hill toughs. A roundsman said to us, "Boys, you take a walk down Seventh Street, and if you see anything going on, take a hand in it." Just as we got opposite the Patent Office, this Grady had assaulted, or rather was assaulting, a young fellow with a whip. I went up and grabbed him and put him under arrest, then took him to Squire Dunn's court and preferred charges against him. The Squire was busy writing for some time. When he got through he handed me the paper he was writing, and I was so green at the business I did not know what it was, so said: "What is this, Squire?" He replied, "Why, that is the paper of commitment for this fellow. Take him to jail." "On November 3, 1864, Sergeant John Cronin, Alfonso Dunn, Andrew Smith, and myself were ordered to report at the First Precinct, in the old City Hall, at one o'clock in the afternoon. We supposed we were to be detailed for detective work in New York City on account of the great riot then on there, especially as we were ordered to report in citizens' clothes, to conceal our revolvers, and to be sure to have them all clean and in good order. We arrived at the City Hall, and then were told where we were to go, which was to the President's Mansion, there to report to Marshal Lanham, at that time United States Marshal of the District of Columbia, and a bosom friend of Abraham Lincoln. "These were days that tried men's hearts, and women's, too. Men were falling at the front by hundreds, both in the Union and in the Confederate armies. There was weeping and mourning all over the land. Our nation was trembling with anxiety; we were all hoping that the great strife was over or soon to be. "Marshal Lanham took us upstairs and into the President's office, where we were introduced to him and to his two secretaries, Mr. Nicolay and Mr. Hay, the latter now being Secretary of State. We were then instructed to keep a sharp lookout in the different parts of the house, more particularly in the East Room and at the door of the President's office. " CONTENTS I — Under President Lincoln II — Under President Johnson III — Under President Grant IV — Under President Hayes V — Under President Garfield VI — Under President Arthur VII — Under President Cleveland VIII — Under President Harrison IX — Cleveland's Second Administration X— Under President McKinley XI — Furniture in Executive Mansion Originally published in 1902; reformatted for the Kindle; may contain an occasional imperfections; original spellings have been kept in place.

30 review for Thirty-six Years in the White House (1902)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Blair

    Written in 1902, this first-hand account of the Presidents: Lincoln, Johnson, Grant, Hayes, Garfield, Arthur, Cleveland, Harrison and McKinley is a fascinating read. More matter-of-fact as a policeman guarding the President and First Lady than a gossipy epistle. It is a step back into time and truly worth reading. Four stars because it could have developed the stories more and elaborated details. More than a diary or daily log book, but less than a true historical account of the presidents. More Written in 1902, this first-hand account of the Presidents: Lincoln, Johnson, Grant, Hayes, Garfield, Arthur, Cleveland, Harrison and McKinley is a fascinating read. More matter-of-fact as a policeman guarding the President and First Lady than a gossipy epistle. It is a step back into time and truly worth reading. Four stars because it could have developed the stories more and elaborated details. More than a diary or daily log book, but less than a true historical account of the presidents. More of a day-in-the-life of a key person in the White House which spans thirty-six years. Even knowing this, the historical perspective is rare and this book is worth reading.

  2. 4 out of 5

    CoraLee

    Interesting read I enjoyed the private insights into each President's life. A good historical, firsthand, story. The author has a lot to share.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Potocar

    One man's journey through thirty-six years in guarding the White House, its occupants, and interests. He shares intrigues from his interactions--some sobering, some entertaining--with the administrations and families of presidents Abraham Lincoln through William McKinley. It was a fast read and, as an author of historical fiction set around the American Civil War, it gave me some wonderful insights into Abraham Lincoln's character from a very personal perspective.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Helen Sanders

    A delightful book. This was not your typical love letter to the Queen type of book. I learned a few new facts, some of which were not so endearing. She is one tough cookie when she needs to be, even at her age. Also learned that she is witty and quite funny when it is just the family.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gail

    Very interesting This book is interesting for the information it gives. To think Mr. Mendel served all these years under so many Presidents is a remarkable achievement. The stories are not very well written but rather as if he was telling a story to a friend.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    I have an original 1902 copy of this book, and read it for historical interest, hoping for some juicy behind the scenes stories. Sadly, most of it was pretty anodyne stuff, though it was cool to be inside the head of a man who knew Abraham Lincoln and was in the White House through ten Presidents and three assassinations. It's fascinating to read the descriptions of the would be assassins he came into contact with, allowed inside the White House with anybody else who might wish to walk inside. I have an original 1902 copy of this book, and read it for historical interest, hoping for some juicy behind the scenes stories. Sadly, most of it was pretty anodyne stuff, though it was cool to be inside the head of a man who knew Abraham Lincoln and was in the White House through ten Presidents and three assassinations. It's fascinating to read the descriptions of the would be assassins he came into contact with, allowed inside the White House with anybody else who might wish to walk inside. There are also several incidents where, asked to run some errand for the President, the White House was left entirely unguarded, with the only defense a lock on the door. Unfortunately, these stories are presented briefly and matter of factly, and the things I would have been most interested in reading were only mentioned in passing or not at all. Mr. Pendel would have benefited greatly from the modern practice writing the book with a journalist as a coauthor to bring the interesting stories out of him and to get more depth. The fact that that approach was not available to Mr. Pendel is an unfortunate loss to history.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

    It was interesting to learn some tidbits about the presidents that lived in the White House from Lincoln to Roosevelt. Many of the things I learned I had never heard before. I wanted more. It seemed live some of the tales were too short.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Great historical account This is an amazing first person account of the White House from Lincoln to Roosevelt. Incredible stories of serving the presidents especially Lincoln.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carol Burcham

  10. 5 out of 5

    Amourebmsn.com

  11. 5 out of 5

    Diana

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ralph R. Woodworth

  13. 4 out of 5

    Janet Walker

  14. 5 out of 5

    Linda Asher

  15. 4 out of 5

    Judy Stone

  16. 5 out of 5

    SUSAN B. BAILEY

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tim Whalen

  18. 4 out of 5

    Regina

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ruth DiBartolomeo

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bob Medsger

  21. 4 out of 5

    phyllis e. menchey

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jo Wood

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Keefe

  24. 4 out of 5

    Katyacook

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christopher S. Faville

  26. 4 out of 5

    Travis Cox

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gordon Davis

  28. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Cottrell

  29. 5 out of 5

    Esther McCallum

  30. 5 out of 5

    James LaLonde

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.