counter create hit New World Order: A Strategy of Imperialism - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

New World Order: A Strategy of Imperialism

Availability: Ready to download

A sweeping overview of world affairs and, especially having come across the name of William Yandell Elliott, Professor of Politics at Harvard through the first half of the 20th century. Sean found that Elliott had created a kindergarten of Anglo-American imperialists amongst his students, who included Henry Kissinger, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Samuel P. Huntington, and McGeorge A sweeping overview of world affairs and, especially having come across the name of William Yandell Elliott, Professor of Politics at Harvard through the first half of the 20th century. Sean found that Elliott had created a kindergarten of Anglo-American imperialists amongst his students, who included Henry Kissinger, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Samuel P. Huntington, and McGeorge Bundy. Upon further investigation, Sean came to understand Elliott’s own integral role, connecting the modern national-security establishment with the British Round Table Movement’s design to re-incorporate America into the British ‘empire’. Whether that goal was achieved will be left to the reader to decide. However, it cannot be denied that W.Y. Elliott’s life and intellectual history serves to demonstrate the interlocking relationship between academia, government, and big business.


Compare
Ads Banner

A sweeping overview of world affairs and, especially having come across the name of William Yandell Elliott, Professor of Politics at Harvard through the first half of the 20th century. Sean found that Elliott had created a kindergarten of Anglo-American imperialists amongst his students, who included Henry Kissinger, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Samuel P. Huntington, and McGeorge A sweeping overview of world affairs and, especially having come across the name of William Yandell Elliott, Professor of Politics at Harvard through the first half of the 20th century. Sean found that Elliott had created a kindergarten of Anglo-American imperialists amongst his students, who included Henry Kissinger, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Samuel P. Huntington, and McGeorge Bundy. Upon further investigation, Sean came to understand Elliott’s own integral role, connecting the modern national-security establishment with the British Round Table Movement’s design to re-incorporate America into the British ‘empire’. Whether that goal was achieved will be left to the reader to decide. However, it cannot be denied that W.Y. Elliott’s life and intellectual history serves to demonstrate the interlocking relationship between academia, government, and big business.

44 review for New World Order: A Strategy of Imperialism

  1. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    First and foremost, a large thank you to NetGalley, Sean Stone, and TrineDay for providing me with a copy of this book, which allows me to provide you with an unbiased review. In his work that is as thought-provoking as it is full of rhetoric, Stone follows in the footsteps of his father and presents a set of ideas that might lead some to doubt his authenticity. However, with careful arguments and thorough sourcing, the patient and attentive reader might see how he could make his point with ease. First and foremost, a large thank you to NetGalley, Sean Stone, and TrineDay for providing me with a copy of this book, which allows me to provide you with an unbiased review. In his work that is as thought-provoking as it is full of rhetoric, Stone follows in the footsteps of his father and presents a set of ideas that might lead some to doubt his authenticity. However, with careful arguments and thorough sourcing, the patient and attentive reader might see how he could make his point with ease. The crux of Stone's argument is that there has been talk of a New World Order (NWO) for decades and that America (or at least some of its most powerful political figures) have been falling into line, unbeknownst to the general public. This is not the NWO espoused by Bush the Lesser (43), who wanted America to lead the world in an 'us versus them' mentality that aligns with the faux-wrestling that "NWO" brings to mind. Instead, Stone argues that there has long been talk of a World Government with teeth that follows the structure of the British Commonwealth, where the centrality of the governing body is paramount, while a degree of autonomy and sovereignty exists for member-states. Stone argues that there have been Round Tables made up of scholars and political figures for decades, discussing issues like that and that there has been an 'indoctrination camp' where American scholars have been able to go to 'learn and accept these tenets', in the form of Rhodes scholarships to Oxford. While it might seem somewhat far-fetched, Stone presents arguments that FDR, Kissinger, and even Zbigniew Brzezinski (National Security Advisor to President Carter) fell into line with this mentality and long promoted it in speeches and published documents. While the League of Nations and the United Nations fell flat (for reasons best not addressed at length here), this NWO could work and has already made inroads into the America political system. Trade and shared markets have long been a part of the system (the US and Canada, the largest part of the Commonwealth, being integral trade partners while the US and UK have been closely aligned on political and market matters for decades) and the strong ties during WWII and the Cold War period helped solidify the Western Europe/America connection as well. Stone does not profess that the world will be under a single umbrella, or that the encroaching system will force the United States to stand alongside North Korea or Russia as brothers, but that there has long been a neo-imperialism taking place and that America is falling deeper in line. Well argued and thoughtfully presented, Stone is able to deliver his point with some degree of ease. While he says that the book serves the novice who is curious alongside the well-versed academic on the subject, I would venture to say the former might be out of their element with some of the nuanced arguments presented herein. While this is a piece that provokes thinking from the outset, Stone is clear to lay the groundwork for those who seek to use his work and ideas as fodder to show how off the beaten path he might be. While some authors might relish being called 'conspiracy theorists', Stone seems to want his arguments not to fall on deaf ears. In that, he criticises those whose main goal is to toss academic epithets on this work or to call out those who practice psittacism and refuse to open their eyes to what is before them. The text reads fluidly for the most part and is substantiated with numerous citations and examples. While any piece of non-fiction, especially academia, can be spun to suit the writer, I can see some of the points that Stone is making without feeling that I am reaching to comprehend or swallow them. Where I do find myself wondering is in the inherent 'betterness' that comes from American politicians, leaders rather than followers. Alongside that, the newly minted 45th President of the United States has vowed to make it an 'America First' period before the country wakes from its horrible nightmare, leaving the reader to wonder how anything could 'trump' this mindset and see the country or its political elite turn towards something that does not allow the reins of power to rest firmly on Pennsylvania Avenue. All that being said, should Stone have as much credibility in what he says, I cannot help but hope that there is a chance that America will find itself tied to something larger and not entirely in its control, be it a World Commonwealth or some such political monster. It cannot be any worse than the current demon's head atop the political Hydra guarding the palace until at least January 20th, 2021. Kudos, Mr. Stone for providing me with some strong political and historical thinking. I love a good alternate theory and while you might be trying to warn the country of its demise, I applaud the possible future inculcation of a new and world-centric point of view. Just watch the country march in the streets when they find all this out, eh?! Like/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/

  2. 4 out of 5

    Trevor Durham

    A book that gave me exactly what it wanted- more questions. For the first time in my life I may check a non-fiction book's sources. Cannot recommend anything historical at a higher caliber than Stone's thesis.

  3. 4 out of 5

    R.D. Gennari

    Sean Stone puts forth a compelling narrative into the world of the Global Control Systems. Understanding the connection between the national security establishment of America and the British 'Round Table', Stone just might have opened our eyes to a sequence of events leading towards an uncanny re-union. A must read not simply for the proponent of esoterica, but for those interested in an alternate view of our history.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Aggie

    What some of have thought for a long time is presented cleanly and in a non-hysterical way (you know how the websites do it, right? That's how we become "conspiracy theorists." Learn the history of the phrase, how it's used and moving forward what to keep in mind. A book you'll be safer for having read. know how to protect yourself from being discredited by being prepared with historical information.). Worth the time: thought -provoking. Thank you to NetGalley for the ARC.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mary Hartshorn

    I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I really enjoyed this book and was very fascinated with the massive amounts of information and references given by the author. From the beginning I started getting goosebumps with the implications of this book. How one man was able to influence the thoughts and beliefs of a few individuals, who then moved on to become very powerful and influential people themselves. The Rhodes Will and Testament is very diabolical and I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I really enjoyed this book and was very fascinated with the massive amounts of information and references given by the author. From the beginning I started getting goosebumps with the implications of this book. How one man was able to influence the thoughts and beliefs of a few individuals, who then moved on to become very powerful and influential people themselves. The Rhodes Will and Testament is very diabolical and insidious with its planning and implementation. The possibilities of what the New World Order has done, still has to do, and all the things they would be capable of is both mind-boggling and extremely terrifying. There is so much great information in this book, that if there was one thing I learned from reading it, it would be don’t believe everything you are told. Conduct your own research until you are satisfied with the information you find before moving forward. I recommend this book!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alex Cruceru

  7. 4 out of 5

    Pharaøn Pharaøn

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jeff DeRiso

  9. 4 out of 5

    Duško Đukanović

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sean Stone

  11. 4 out of 5

    ed heard

  12. 5 out of 5

    Leonard Parker

  13. 4 out of 5

    Αργύρης

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Adams

  15. 4 out of 5

    Meumsomniatis Catasterismi

  16. 4 out of 5

    Princess Persia

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tess

  18. 5 out of 5

    pplofgod

    The majority of the book is interesting enough, but it would probably be much better if the conspiracy gobbledygook was removed. In fact, it would come close to an almost materialist analysis of imperialism. Sadly it comes off as a type of "third position" (yet anti-fascist?) analysis of the world. Moreover, the afterword was... almost incoherent, and filled with transphobia towards the end. All in all, what else would one expect from basically another Alex Jones wannabe? His father's films are The majority of the book is interesting enough, but it would probably be much better if the conspiracy gobbledygook was removed. In fact, it would come close to an almost materialist analysis of imperialism. Sadly it comes off as a type of "third position" (yet anti-fascist?) analysis of the world. Moreover, the afterword was... almost incoherent, and filled with transphobia towards the end. All in all, what else would one expect from basically another Alex Jones wannabe? His father's films are higher quality than this book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hugh Stevens

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hany

  21. 5 out of 5

    شجاعت عباسی

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lorrie Moss

  23. 5 out of 5

    Liz

  24. 4 out of 5

    Irene Schnabel

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shea Az

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sati

  27. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Bradley

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Reader

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dolli

  31. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Minto

  32. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Obrien

  33. 5 out of 5

    Dayna

  34. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

  35. 4 out of 5

    Etan

  36. 5 out of 5

    S.

  37. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

  38. 5 out of 5

    Pam

  39. 4 out of 5

    Malcolm Kates

  40. 5 out of 5

    Michael Chance

  41. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Wise

  42. 5 out of 5

    Tara

  43. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  44. 4 out of 5

    Edward Pissmeoff

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.