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Sue Lloyd-Roberts joined ITN in 1973 as a news trainee, she went on to become the UK's first female video-journalist, reporting alone from the bleak outposts of the former Soviet Union and China. With a 30-year-long career in human-rights journalism, she has travelled the globe and witnessed the worst atrocities inflicted on women. Observing first-handthe war on the female Sue Lloyd-Roberts joined ITN in 1973 as a news trainee, she went on to become the UK's first female video-journalist, reporting alone from the bleak outposts of the former Soviet Union and China. With a 30-year-long career in human-rights journalism, she has travelled the globe and witnessed the worst atrocities inflicted on women. Observing first-handthe war on the female race, she's experienced and interacted with the brave ones who fight back. This is a breath-taking and visceral narrative, interweaving the real-life experiences of the heroines combating gross inequality. It is an examination of how women are treated across the globe: from the pay gap in the UK and the laundries in Ireland, to gender discrimination in Saudi Arabia and female genital mutilation in Africa. In a world where the issues facing women are so disparate, we're facing a war of varying extremities and this has created a breakdown in the feminist discourse. But through her extraordinary and unique experiences, Lloyd-Roberts starts to build a bigger picture with a pervasive perspective. The book delves into our history and takes us on a journey towards the analysis of the state of women's lives in modern-day society. This is a ground-breaking approach to a global problem; anecdotal evidence bridges the gap between different fights and gradually starts to knit together the battles being fought by the starkly different cultures across the world.


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Sue Lloyd-Roberts joined ITN in 1973 as a news trainee, she went on to become the UK's first female video-journalist, reporting alone from the bleak outposts of the former Soviet Union and China. With a 30-year-long career in human-rights journalism, she has travelled the globe and witnessed the worst atrocities inflicted on women. Observing first-handthe war on the female Sue Lloyd-Roberts joined ITN in 1973 as a news trainee, she went on to become the UK's first female video-journalist, reporting alone from the bleak outposts of the former Soviet Union and China. With a 30-year-long career in human-rights journalism, she has travelled the globe and witnessed the worst atrocities inflicted on women. Observing first-handthe war on the female race, she's experienced and interacted with the brave ones who fight back. This is a breath-taking and visceral narrative, interweaving the real-life experiences of the heroines combating gross inequality. It is an examination of how women are treated across the globe: from the pay gap in the UK and the laundries in Ireland, to gender discrimination in Saudi Arabia and female genital mutilation in Africa. In a world where the issues facing women are so disparate, we're facing a war of varying extremities and this has created a breakdown in the feminist discourse. But through her extraordinary and unique experiences, Lloyd-Roberts starts to build a bigger picture with a pervasive perspective. The book delves into our history and takes us on a journey towards the analysis of the state of women's lives in modern-day society. This is a ground-breaking approach to a global problem; anecdotal evidence bridges the gap between different fights and gradually starts to knit together the battles being fought by the starkly different cultures across the world.

30 review for The War on Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    I finished this book yesterday, and I've had to sleep on it. I needed time to think what to say. What I'm going to say about this book, I'm sure has probably been said already, numerous amounts of times. This book contains a series of articles from Sue Lloyd-Roberts, about the catastrophic crimes committed by the male species, to women. This book covers various topics from sex trafficking in Russia, women imprisoned in their own homes in Saudi Arabia, the gender pay gap in the UK, genital mutila I finished this book yesterday, and I've had to sleep on it. I needed time to think what to say. What I'm going to say about this book, I'm sure has probably been said already, numerous amounts of times. This book contains a series of articles from Sue Lloyd-Roberts, about the catastrophic crimes committed by the male species, to women. This book covers various topics from sex trafficking in Russia, women imprisoned in their own homes in Saudi Arabia, the gender pay gap in the UK, genital mutilation and honour killings in India. Sue Lloyd-Roberts was a dedicated journalist, and she travelled to parts of the world where others feared to tread. She had one thing in mind when she made these incredible journey's; To expose the inhumane injustices suffered by women at the hands of men. This book definitely exposes the dark side of society and it is something we can certainly all learn from. What amazes me, is some of these people that commit these horrific crimes try to explain their actions by calling it their "Culture" It's not a culture, it's called ignorance. Dogs are treated better than women in some parts of the world. This book was meant to provoke and open peoples eyes. As a feminist, I was deeply sickened and shocked by the content of this book. I consider myself a strong woman, but to know women have to suffer these atrocities on a daily basis, is truly shocking. Sue Lloyd-Roberts was a fearless and remarkable woman, and I'm thankful that her daughter was able to finish this book and to tell us, the readers what an amazing women her Mother was. Thank you.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Martha

    A stunning collection of stories by one of the most prominent video journalists of our time. Before I continue, I should say that there should be a strong trigger-warning on this book. Perhaps it's obvious, but in case it's not, this book covers some of the worst abuses of women across the world - from FGM to sexual violence (in many forms) and honour killings. Strangely, I did not find myself as triggered by this as I do by rape scenes in books; but perhaps that's because it was clear what this A stunning collection of stories by one of the most prominent video journalists of our time. Before I continue, I should say that there should be a strong trigger-warning on this book. Perhaps it's obvious, but in case it's not, this book covers some of the worst abuses of women across the world - from FGM to sexual violence (in many forms) and honour killings. Strangely, I did not find myself as triggered by this as I do by rape scenes in books; but perhaps that's because it was clear what this book was about, rather than being surprised by it in a novel. There are some graphic descriptions, but they are all presented in a factual way, without sensationalism. However, if you are triggered by this kind of content, do not read this book. So, back to the review. Wow. Just, wow. This book ties together stories that Lloyd-Roberts has collected across her decades of work as a campaigning video journalist to form an inarguable picture of how women are derogated and abused across the world. This is such an important work of feminist literature, precisely because it is not presented as feminist literature. This is not a rant by an angry woman (though any woman would be justifiably angry having come face-to-face with the worst examples of humanity) using anecdotes to support her point. This is layer upon layer of facts, evidencing how gender inequality is a global epidemic; not just isolated incidences in a handful of countries. The language Lloyd-Roberts uses is that of a talented, seasoned journalist. It is not sensational or overly emotional, she merely lets the stories and the facts speak for themselves - and boy do they shout from the rooftops. What is alarmingly clear (if we were ever unsure) is that this patriarchal world is forcibly and consistently telling women that their virtue is more valuable than their lives. Whether it's the young women in Saudi Arabia who died after being sent back into a burning building to fetch their headscarves or the women who were worked to death in Irish convents for having children out of wedlock. It's the five-year-old girls undergoing FGM in the Gambia (and others) and the female fetuses being aborted for their gender. Women are consistently imprisoned, abused, and murdered for falling short of misogynistic ideals; while their abusers either go unpunished or are heralded as real men who have done their duty in upholding the ideals of their family/religion/society. In many cases, their abusers are also female; with so many examples of women enforcing the patriarchy because they have no choice, or because they are brainwashed by societies that teach women they are the lesser. Sadly, Sue Lloyd-Roberts passed away before seeing her work published, giving this book a poignancy that it wouldn't otherwise have had. Sue's daughter Sarah not only wrote the introduction, but completed the final chapter about pay inequality in the UK, giving her the opportunity to add more detail about Lloyd-Roberts the mother, as well as the pioneering journalist. Sarah's words were incredibly moving, and her thoughts on the chapter that her mother was never able to finish served as a beautiful example of feminism flowing through generations. We'll never know if Lloyd-Roberts had intended to use modern examples such as Jennifer Lawrence's letter on pay inequality and Laura Bates' Everyday Sexism; but I saw this as the metaphorical torch being passed from one great woman to another. I cannot recommend this book highly enough - it should be mandatory reading for all those working in government and international development as irrefutable evidence of the gender inequality that blights the world. RIP to a great warrior in the war on women.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    I’m sure if you posted the title of this book on Twitter a bunch of people would tell you that there is no war on women. And those people would be wrong. This was the book that Lloyd-Roberts was working on when she died. As such, it is therefore unfinished. A great deal of the information that is covered was also covered by the work that Lloyd-Roberts did for the BBC (and you can easily find these programs on YouTube). The book is focused on British and International cases. In many cases, Lloyd I’m sure if you posted the title of this book on Twitter a bunch of people would tell you that there is no war on women. And those people would be wrong. This was the book that Lloyd-Roberts was working on when she died. As such, it is therefore unfinished. A great deal of the information that is covered was also covered by the work that Lloyd-Roberts did for the BBC (and you can easily find these programs on YouTube). The book is focused on British and International cases. In many cases, Lloyd-Roberts showcases a facet of the war in one place and then applies it also to some communities in the UK. It should be noted that when addressing the interplay with religion, Lloyd-Roberts is careful to place blame on the interpretation of a religion. She covers child brides, forced marriages, rape, trafficking, and the pay gap. She illustrates that the war on women is pretty much worldwide, just taking different forms. But there is also hope as the sub-title indicates, thorough this hope needs the help of others in the global community. This theme starts early with the story of a cutter (FGM) who seeks asylum in the Britain. If any, the book is a call to arms.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Langford

    I think this is a must read for everyone. It explores the inequality of women on a national and international scale with interviews with such women. Their stories are harrowing and you can't help but to wish to take action and help the women interviewed as well as other women who are in similar circumstances. This book was a real eye opener and explores topics of rape as a weapon, FGM and forced marriage. What really hit me the most was how easily FGM and forced marriages happen in the UK (where I think this is a must read for everyone. It explores the inequality of women on a national and international scale with interviews with such women. Their stories are harrowing and you can't help but to wish to take action and help the women interviewed as well as other women who are in similar circumstances. This book was a real eye opener and explores topics of rape as a weapon, FGM and forced marriage. What really hit me the most was how easily FGM and forced marriages happen in the UK (where I am from) or happen to UK citizens as these are not topics particularly reported on- it made me research policy and current laws on such matters.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mindfully Evie

    One month on after reading this book and I still can't put it into words. I honestly don't think words can even begin to do this book justice. Every word, every chapter, every story, is just as powerful, moving, haunting, and eye-opening as the next. All I can hope is that it reaches more people as EVERYONE needs to read this. It is a book I will never ever forget, nor will I ever forget the name Sue Lloyds-Roberts for all the incredible work she has done.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Laurie Treffers

    This is a book I recommend to people who are still convinced feminism is out of date and unnecessary, feminists of all colour and well, any other human being alive. This book will make you feel anger, shame, grief and sadness. At the same time, it will sparkle a sense of justice in you. The kind that changes systems. Not because of how Lloyd-Roberts wrote this book. She didn't need to write it dramatically. These stories are in themselves so powerful that they almost wrote themselves. From how f This is a book I recommend to people who are still convinced feminism is out of date and unnecessary, feminists of all colour and well, any other human being alive. This book will make you feel anger, shame, grief and sadness. At the same time, it will sparkle a sense of justice in you. The kind that changes systems. Not because of how Lloyd-Roberts wrote this book. She didn't need to write it dramatically. These stories are in themselves so powerful that they almost wrote themselves. From how female fetuses are being systematically murdered in India - leading to a enlarging gap between the male and female population - to Female Genital Mutilation in Egypt and European countries. From rape as a war machine in Congo and Bosnia - a machine not unfamiliar to UN-troops - to worldwide honor killings. Lloyd-Roberts has dedicated her 'testament' to examining all the ways in which women are still suffering from a patriarchal system. She doesn't ask why traditional and religious values are still used to silence and murder women, but perhaps as a journalist, that wasn't her job. Her job was to report. She did, often with her own life at stake. Sue Lloyd-Roberts was a woman as powerful, strong and brave as the women whose stories she told during her astonishing career. And maybe, we should stop asking the why-question behind these patterns all together and just end the massive human rights abuses on women that have been going on way too long under the justification of 'traditional values'.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Faith

    I finished the book with tears. Tears shed for the millions and billions of women suffering around the world and tears shed because the problem didn't seem to cease despite the effort of so many. But that effort was always outweighed by those who tolerate and contribute to gender inequality. This book is emotional, confrontational and brutally honest. But, there are sparks of hope throughout the book - stories about women who have escaped or have dedicated their life to improving the lives of wom I finished the book with tears. Tears shed for the millions and billions of women suffering around the world and tears shed because the problem didn't seem to cease despite the effort of so many. But that effort was always outweighed by those who tolerate and contribute to gender inequality. This book is emotional, confrontational and brutally honest. But, there are sparks of hope throughout the book - stories about women who have escaped or have dedicated their life to improving the lives of women everywhere. My favourite chapter (though it's difficult to choose) would probably be the chapter of Ireland's Fallen Women and the chapter on India and how it is considered the most dangerous place to be born a woman. It's my favourite because it showed how much hasn't really changed. Ireland - which is supposed to be a developed country with a high quality of life -  has a recent history of beating young women, forcing them into labour and stealing their babies away. India, despite its rapid economic growth and industrialisation is still dealing with the mass rape and mistreatment of young girls. The book reiterates the point that in a lot of countries, cows are more valued and treated better than women. I would have liked to meet Sue Lloyd-Roberts. She sounded like such a brave women filled with so much hope and this sense of justice that not a lot of people have. The last chapter was the most emotional since her daughter finished the book reflecting on the influence her mother had on her and on so much women around the world. I think it's safe to say that she is still heavily influencing women through this book. It is a must-read for everyone! Making a Difference Finishing the book, it seemed appropriate to end this little series with how one can personally change the gender inequality around them. The author dedicated her life to highlighting these issues and bringing the wrong to justice After finishing the book, there is this strong obligation to join the fight FOR women. Personally, being a journalist who reports these issues or a UN lawyer who brings these cruel and merciless people before the court, is perhaps how I want to contribute the the fight.Though unlikely, I really really really really hope and want to see the world without gender inequality - without female genital mutilation, without child marriage, without rape. No doubtedly, this will require A LOT of hard work, and sacrifice but it will all be worth it. How do you want to contribute to the fight for women?  

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ayala Levinger

    A very interesting but also difficult book. not in the language. it is not an academic work. Sue Lloyd-Roberts was a journalist and maker of documentaries and in this book she tells in each chapter about another place and another way women are oppressed in the world. But some of the chapters, especially about rape in India and rape as war weapon include some horrific descriptions of rape and it did not help that I just finish it at the 5 years "anniversary" of the famous rape of Jyoti Singh at d A very interesting but also difficult book. not in the language. it is not an academic work. Sue Lloyd-Roberts was a journalist and maker of documentaries and in this book she tells in each chapter about another place and another way women are oppressed in the world. But some of the chapters, especially about rape in India and rape as war weapon include some horrific descriptions of rape and it did not help that I just finish it at the 5 years "anniversary" of the famous rape of Jyoti Singh at december 16 2012. Even though most of the places described in the book are not the enviroment Sue or I come from it is not a "we the enlightened and them the primitives", she gives the voice to the women from the places she filmed. I did learned some new things (and my TRL grew a bit) but mostly that there is no limit to the creativity of men when it comes to oppressing women, abusing and mutilating them. The last chapter about discrimination in the work place seems not finished in comparison to the others but that has a good reason - Sue died of blood cancer before finishing it. I bet she would include sexual harassment at work and maybe emotional labour in it. so the last chapter was lacking but then the after-words of Her daughter and her employer give it a great closure - it becomes also a kind of biography of Sue who I regret not knowing about her and her work (plan on looking up her docu's)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tristan Sherwin

    This is an extraordinarily, powerful and potent read. Rightly, it will churn your stomach, it will make you cry and scream, it’s stories will haunt your every waking and sleeping moment, and it will positively arouse your anger. In the process, it should also completely overhaul your definition of bravery; the courage and stamina of the women highlighted in this book far outweighs the boast of any form of masculinity. You need to read *The War on Women: And the Brave Ones who Fight Back*. You need This is an extraordinarily, powerful and potent read. Rightly, it will churn your stomach, it will make you cry and scream, it’s stories will haunt your every waking and sleeping moment, and it will positively arouse your anger. In the process, it should also completely overhaul your definition of bravery; the courage and stamina of the women highlighted in this book far outweighs the boast of any form of masculinity. You need to read *The War on Women: And the Brave Ones who Fight Back*. You need to tell your friends about it. We all need to walk with our eyes wide open. —Tristan Sherwin, author of *Love: Expressed*

  10. 4 out of 5

    Oyuttsetsen Bayarsaikhan

    Darkest stories with brightest intentions

  11. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle Winandy

    One of the most disturbing books I ever read. Sue Lloyd-Roberts was excellent in showing the horrors and the type of brutality that women sometimes have to face in certain countries and cultures. At times, I had to stop reading because it was too much; at one point, my reading was interrupted by horrified tears. It is, nonetheless, an essential book for anyone interested in women’s and human rights. It is a valuable work of journalism to understand and incentivise the fight for equality. And it’ One of the most disturbing books I ever read. Sue Lloyd-Roberts was excellent in showing the horrors and the type of brutality that women sometimes have to face in certain countries and cultures. At times, I had to stop reading because it was too much; at one point, my reading was interrupted by horrified tears. It is, nonetheless, an essential book for anyone interested in women’s and human rights. It is a valuable work of journalism to understand and incentivise the fight for equality. And it’s a perfect example of how Sue Lloyd-Roberts was able to touch people’s lives simply by being herself and doing her job. May she rest In peace.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amy Smith

    “Sue wanted us to see different wars of our time, many of them being fought by, and against, women. She fought with them, and for them, until the very end.” This book was difficult to read and one that will stay with me for a long time. A powerful book that shares stories of injustice faced by women across the world, from Ireland and Argentina, to Russia and India. It is told through Sue Lloyd-Roberts brave research as a journalist as she travels to many places that most of us would not go. She w “Sue wanted us to see different wars of our time, many of them being fought by, and against, women. She fought with them, and for them, until the very end.” This book was difficult to read and one that will stay with me for a long time. A powerful book that shares stories of injustice faced by women across the world, from Ireland and Argentina, to Russia and India. It is told through Sue Lloyd-Roberts brave research as a journalist as she travels to many places that most of us would not go. She was determined to share the stories of women’s lives that needed to be told - a remarkable woman who gave a voice to those who had none.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sara Marsden

    The best nonfiction book I’ve ever read. It’s an important look at the injustices women face all over the world. It’s heartbreaking but brilliant. Please please read it

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kayleigh

    I can't find the right words to say how much I enjoyed this book. Each chapter left me in awe when learning how so many woman across the world are treated in such a disgusting way in a male dominated society. I couldn't put the book down. Very much a page turner!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rhona Lattka

    I cried a lot. So much respect and support for sue and her work. Eye opening and fantastically written. Highly recommend

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    A harrowing but essential read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Naadirah

    I cannot recommend this book enough. Sue writes beautifully telling the most interesting, heart breaking stories women have had to endure and continue to endure around the world. We've all heard about the issues women face in India and Saudi Arabia, but I was dumbfounded to learn about the involvement of UN peace keepers in human trafficking. It is also astounding to me that even today, some women are fighting for their basic human rights, and have to question their existence in the world. Hearin I cannot recommend this book enough. Sue writes beautifully telling the most interesting, heart breaking stories women have had to endure and continue to endure around the world. We've all heard about the issues women face in India and Saudi Arabia, but I was dumbfounded to learn about the involvement of UN peace keepers in human trafficking. It is also astounding to me that even today, some women are fighting for their basic human rights, and have to question their existence in the world. Hearing these stories makes me feel immensely privileged of the life I have lived, and at the same time it makes me angry, as I should not have to feel privileged for the rights even human being should receive. There is a paragraph in the book that I still cannot stop thinking about. 'I want to scream when I hear him use the word 'tradition' by way of explanation. How many crimes are being committed in the name of tradition the world over? Why, as human kind grows better informed, globalized and apparently more knowledgeable, does the reverence for outdated and inexplicable tradition persist, flouting reason and even the law?' Ultimately, that is what this book does. It makes you think, it makes you feel, and most importantly it makes you want to do something about it!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Salomé Esteves

    This is, without a doubt, one of the best books I have haver read. I cried my way through it, constantly facing the unbelievable stories of women across the globe. As a white European woman, I know I am quite privileged, but "The War on Women" showed me how much on my freedom I daily take for granted. This book was a shower of reality and a punch in the stomach; some of the chapters were particularly difficult to digest and often led to nights of troubled sleep. I can't stop thinking about these This is, without a doubt, one of the best books I have haver read. I cried my way through it, constantly facing the unbelievable stories of women across the globe. As a white European woman, I know I am quite privileged, but "The War on Women" showed me how much on my freedom I daily take for granted. This book was a shower of reality and a punch in the stomach; some of the chapters were particularly difficult to digest and often led to nights of troubled sleep. I can't stop thinking about these women and how it is traditionally accepted that they suffer throughout their existence and how disposable their lives are to so many communities. My heart broke with this book, but maybe it needed breaking. Maybe we all need to learn something. From now on, I'll recommend "The War on Women" to every woman and man I can.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Esme Kemp

    Made me fucking depressed and angry about the fact women are just under valued and second class citizens in literally every single country. No hyperbole. Do not read if you’re already feeling hateful towards state of affairs. I have issues re westernised / colonialism and video journalism but need to work through my feelings in regards to this book. Final chapter on sex inequality in the UK is wildly naive, white centric and bare inappropriate, but I understand why it was cathartic and necessary Made me fucking depressed and angry about the fact women are just under valued and second class citizens in literally every single country. No hyperbole. Do not read if you’re already feeling hateful towards state of affairs. I have issues re westernised / colonialism and video journalism but need to work through my feelings in regards to this book. Final chapter on sex inequality in the UK is wildly naive, white centric and bare inappropriate, but I understand why it was cathartic and necessary for her daughter to finish it for her mum. Unfortunately, that chapter serves to undermine all chapters that preceded it (that at least attempt to centre the narratives of young girls and women from Kashmir to DRC) it in its white centric and basic naivety it ends up sounding like a GSCE English paper Why Are White Women Underpaid. Discuss. (12 marks).

  20. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Anyone who thinks feminism is not necessary in the modern world should read this book. Anyone who thinks women are complaining about nothing should read this book. Anyone who thinks the war on women only happens in "far away places" should read this book. Anyone who thinks the war on women is only perpetrated by "people who are not like me" should read this book. Actually, everybody should just read this book before they say anything about women or feminism.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alfred Nobile

    This was a series of articles about the atrocities and crimes against women; as a man I'm sorry to say commited by the male of the species. Covering various issues such genital mutilation, the separation of mothers from their babies in so called civilised Ireland. The imprisonment of women in the prison of the home in Saudi Arabia and the sex trade in Russia and Eastern Europe etc. This is but a few of the crimes perpetrated against one half of the world's population against the other. A must re This was a series of articles about the atrocities and crimes against women; as a man I'm sorry to say commited by the male of the species. Covering various issues such genital mutilation, the separation of mothers from their babies in so called civilised Ireland. The imprisonment of women in the prison of the home in Saudi Arabia and the sex trade in Russia and Eastern Europe etc. This is but a few of the crimes perpetrated against one half of the world's population against the other. A must read by everyone, male or female, who consider themselves human beings. I urge all to read this; especially if you are male.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Forsyth

    This was in many ways a very depressing book! But very well written. It is just astonishing that having campaigned and fought for equality for so many years so many women around the world are still enduring subjugation at the hands of men. For anyone looking to get an overview of the conditions and lives women lead across the world I would highly recommend this book. It is very well written and the last chapter packs an emotional punch.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sue Black

    Everyone should read this book. Want to know what life is like for women across the world? This book tells you in a way that makes it compulsive and highly interesting reading. I can't recommend it enough. What an absolute tragedy that Sue Lloyd Roberts is not around to tell us more, thank goodness her daughter was able to finish writing the book and show us what a fabulous woman her mother was.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    READ THIS. incredible stories, excellent writing, and admirable author.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Niamh

    My rating has kind of gone up and down over the last few days, but the more that I think about this book and the stories within it, the more impressed I am by it. So I'm going to stick with four stars, purely because I did genuinely enjoy it and it was super interesting. This non-fiction book explores the lives of women across the world who are suffering at the hands of patriarchy, government, tradition and basically men, but how they are fighting back against the injustices that they've been op My rating has kind of gone up and down over the last few days, but the more that I think about this book and the stories within it, the more impressed I am by it. So I'm going to stick with four stars, purely because I did genuinely enjoy it and it was super interesting. This non-fiction book explores the lives of women across the world who are suffering at the hands of patriarchy, government, tradition and basically men, but how they are fighting back against the injustices that they've been oppressed with for the last several hundred years. We're taken between several different global situations, from FGM in the United Kingdom and Africa, to sex trafficking of Eastern European girls across Europe, to the Egyptian Revolution in 2011 and the role of women within it, Saudi Arabia and women being allowed to drive, to the gender pay gap in the UK. There was the potential for this book to become macabre or depressing. We would read it and just think that everything was awful and despite the advancements that women had made, there was still a long way to go. But, Sue Lloyd Robert's writing is so optimistic and sparse, as oxymoronic as that sounds, that we do actually feel hopeful about these ongoing wars between women and the restrictions placed against them. Lloyd-Roberts, who was a journalist that covered a huge number of global events during her time as a reporter, unfortunately died before the book could be completed, and it is finished by her daughter. I think these pages are perhaps the least developed because they're simply throwing figures at us about the gender pay gap in the UK. In comparison to the rest of the stories that we're told, the pay gap seems like such a...trivial issue? I'm sure there was something that she was going to say that affected our society in a deeper sense than just women getting paid less, but from the book, I just kind of thought that its message was 'yay, at least we're not getting killed'. This is a definite read for anyone who is interested in feminism- particularly intersectionalism (as we should all be)- and how we as a community and gender can support those who are struggling against a much stronger insistence of patriarchy than we are. I really enjoyed it and I think anyone with an interest in current affairs will too.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Josh Rawlinson

    I’ve lost a great deal of respect for men, and gained a new found admiration for women and their strength. This book is a testament to women all over the world, the struggles they went through and still go through, and how they manage to carry on when most of us would’ve given up! Whilst reading, I felt my self get angrier and angrier at the turn of every page, that as a society we not only allow such circumstances to occur, but also buy into them, and cover them up when suited; and I can’t even I’ve lost a great deal of respect for men, and gained a new found admiration for women and their strength. This book is a testament to women all over the world, the struggles they went through and still go through, and how they manage to carry on when most of us would’ve given up! Whilst reading, I felt my self get angrier and angrier at the turn of every page, that as a society we not only allow such circumstances to occur, but also buy into them, and cover them up when suited; and I can’t even to begin to express my disgust into how much religion has played a part in the abuse of women, there is no place for it in the 21st century (not that there ever was a place for it). This is a read necessary for all.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Be warned, if you read this book it will leave you feeling sick, depressed, angry and hurt. The war on women is real, it is every day, it is now. It is waged by society, by our governments, by men AND women. It would be wrong to characterise this war as being waged solely by men. It is women who perform FGM, it was the female religious orders who ran the Magadelene laundries. Even now in Ireland women are arguing against a woman’s right to bodily autonomy and adequate medical care in pregnancy. Be warned, if you read this book it will leave you feeling sick, depressed, angry and hurt. The war on women is real, it is every day, it is now. It is waged by society, by our governments, by men AND women. It would be wrong to characterise this war as being waged solely by men. It is women who perform FGM, it was the female religious orders who ran the Magadelene laundries. Even now in Ireland women are arguing against a woman’s right to bodily autonomy and adequate medical care in pregnancy. However, it is clear that men and male dominated political systems are also responsible. In the year in which we celebrate 100 years of (some) women getting the vote, it is a stark reminder of the reality of women’s experience in the world.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rose

    As a woman you read this and slowly get angrier and angrier with everything that women all over the world still have to put up with, mainly stemming from the close minded attitudes of men who wish to maintain power. Makes me realise just how lucky I am and how ignorant I’ve been to these problems, some of which I had no idea still happened. But there is hope, behind the initial anger comes a pride in the woman fighting back and an urge to help them. I urge everyone to read and feel inspired to h As a woman you read this and slowly get angrier and angrier with everything that women all over the world still have to put up with, mainly stemming from the close minded attitudes of men who wish to maintain power. Makes me realise just how lucky I am and how ignorant I’ve been to these problems, some of which I had no idea still happened. But there is hope, behind the initial anger comes a pride in the woman fighting back and an urge to help them. I urge everyone to read and feel inspired to help.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Vysh

    It is very easy to read in terms of the words and the sentences but very hard to read in terms of how emotionally harrowing some of the subject matter is. Reading the actual interview excerpts from the women featured in this book makes it difficult to be subconsciously numb to the statistics and accounts given and instead actually recognise that these are real suffering people and that the issued aren't just "third world" issues and actually can take place in your neighbourhood. Very much reccom It is very easy to read in terms of the words and the sentences but very hard to read in terms of how emotionally harrowing some of the subject matter is. Reading the actual interview excerpts from the women featured in this book makes it difficult to be subconsciously numb to the statistics and accounts given and instead actually recognise that these are real suffering people and that the issued aren't just "third world" issues and actually can take place in your neighbourhood. Very much reccomend!!!!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Anouk

    A nuanced, well-written overview of some of the most pressing issues affecting women worldwide. It’s clever in always relating back to the UK: this shit happens here too and it needs to stop. Fantastically angry read. graphic rape warning triggers for basically all chapters though. Just so you know what you’re getting into.

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