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The Smart Money Woman

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Meet Zuri. She’s living a fabulous life. Great car, gorgeous apartment, well paid job. Meet Zuri. Broken down car, an apartment she cant afford, a job she’s about to lose. What’s a broke girl to do? With her best friends Tami (the flighty fashion designer), Lara (the tough oil and gas executive), Adesuwa (the conservative lawyer), and Ladun (the fabulous housewife), Zu Meet Zuri. She’s living a fabulous life. Great car, gorgeous apartment, well paid job. Meet Zuri. Broken down car, an apartment she cant afford, a job she’s about to lose. What’s a broke girl to do? With her best friends Tami (the flighty fashion designer), Lara (the tough oil and gas executive), Adesuwa (the conservative lawyer), and Ladun (the fabulous housewife), Zuri grows a little, learns a lot and navigates her way to making better financial decisions and building wealth. This book tackles, debt, spending, the consumerist culture of the African middle class, the fear and misconceptions surrounding money and the lack of it, love, friendships, cultural and societal pressures and the roles they play in success. With each chapter comes a Smart Money Lesson, there to help you work your way up the financial ladder.


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Meet Zuri. She’s living a fabulous life. Great car, gorgeous apartment, well paid job. Meet Zuri. Broken down car, an apartment she cant afford, a job she’s about to lose. What’s a broke girl to do? With her best friends Tami (the flighty fashion designer), Lara (the tough oil and gas executive), Adesuwa (the conservative lawyer), and Ladun (the fabulous housewife), Zu Meet Zuri. She’s living a fabulous life. Great car, gorgeous apartment, well paid job. Meet Zuri. Broken down car, an apartment she cant afford, a job she’s about to lose. What’s a broke girl to do? With her best friends Tami (the flighty fashion designer), Lara (the tough oil and gas executive), Adesuwa (the conservative lawyer), and Ladun (the fabulous housewife), Zuri grows a little, learns a lot and navigates her way to making better financial decisions and building wealth. This book tackles, debt, spending, the consumerist culture of the African middle class, the fear and misconceptions surrounding money and the lack of it, love, friendships, cultural and societal pressures and the roles they play in success. With each chapter comes a Smart Money Lesson, there to help you work your way up the financial ladder.

30 review for The Smart Money Woman

  1. 4 out of 5

    Toyin A

    I am usually irritated with books that claim to teach you how to put your money to good use but are downright boring, offer no practical steps and make you feel like demanding a refund of the time and money wasted on a misadventure. I must admit, I had a subconscious bias against this book when I picked it up. Not for any particular reason as I had neither heard of Arese (the author) nor read any of her works but when I realised it was her first book, I decided to schedule it for a book review in I am usually irritated with books that claim to teach you how to put your money to good use but are downright boring, offer no practical steps and make you feel like demanding a refund of the time and money wasted on a misadventure. I must admit, I had a subconscious bias against this book when I picked it up. Not for any particular reason as I had neither heard of Arese (the author) nor read any of her works but when I realised it was her first book, I decided to schedule it for a book review in November. I wish I read the book and made this review sooner. Style: This 146 paged book is divided into 12 chapters with character set in Lagos. If you like Chick Lits like I do, this book follows the same pattern but with a very intelligent twist. At the end of each chapter, Arese defines certain terminologies that are used loosely in a section called “Smart Money Lesson”. Afterwards, she gives her readers a number of simple (but powerful) exercises to understand their starting point and create a road map and action plans to get to their desired financial goal. Don’t be put off by these exercises as they are quite easy. Initially you will think they are basics but these basics are fundamental and provide clarity or confirmation depending on your current financial situation. Plot: It’s a tale of 4 friends who have been keeping up with the Joneses with no clear strategy on how to maintain their lifestyles, set aside emergency funds and trim the excesses. Sometimes it is funny, sometimes you’d sympathise with them and other times, you’d feel like wringing their necks. The not only gives the reader insights on how the ladies got into their financial mess in the first place, it goes the extra step of giving practical strategies on how anyone can implement actions to pay off debts and stay debt free. The story of the protagonist, Zuri, is relatable as many single women get obsessed with turning up at the most expensive weddings/ parties to have their pictures in tabloids/ celebrity magazines and blogs but are neck-deep in debt and hoping for their Knight in shining armour to rescue them. Zuri’s story proves that even if you find yourself in a financial mess, you can get yourself out of it by implementing Arese’s lessons. Recommendation: The book is quite easy to read and it took me a day to finish it (yes, I work gruelling hours but still read this book till the end on day 1 as I simply could not put it down). If you are looking for a book that simply breaks down the fundamentals of living a financially upward life and provided practical steps to do just that, this is a fantastic book to start with.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Olamide Opadokun

    Because too many Nigerians peddle themselves as experts in fields they have no business in, I did not have high expectations for this book. After just one chapter, I was sucked in. Arese really knows her stuff. The Smart Money Woman is saturated with wisdom about personal finances that is explained very simply. The book narrates what Zuri is going through and at the end of each chapter are ‘Smart Money Lessons’ and tasks that correlate with Zuri’s stage of financial consciousness. Combining fict Because too many Nigerians peddle themselves as experts in fields they have no business in, I did not have high expectations for this book. After just one chapter, I was sucked in. Arese really knows her stuff. The Smart Money Woman is saturated with wisdom about personal finances that is explained very simply. The book narrates what Zuri is going through and at the end of each chapter are ‘Smart Money Lessons’ and tasks that correlate with Zuri’s stage of financial consciousness. Combining fiction with serious lessons like this was a brilliant move. There is no other way I would have read a book about personal finance. The lessons are very clear and easy to understand, but I did not find the characters very relatable. They were upper-middle class women who splurged constantly on luxury. I do not think they represent the average Nigerian woman, but that didn’t take away from the lessons in the book. It was a little too chick-litty for me, but that’s a personal taste issue. There was also a lot of name-dropping as well as shoddy editing. There were grammatical errors, missing punctuation marks, paper streaks and sub-standard binding issues. A book so good should not have those kinds of issues. On the whole, I think it’s a really good read. It is a thought-provoking book about personal finances, having clear goals (financial and otherwise) as well as recognizing personal skills and knowing how to apply them. I have a lot of respect for Arese for putting this book together, and I would recommend it for anyone at all that wants to manage their finances better.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aisha (thatothernigeriangirl)

    First off, the fact that Ugwu shares these knowledge in fictional form is brilliant. It means she’s aware that self-help books sorta easily lose their appeal and decided to use a better approach. I love that I also enjoyed and learnt a lot from the money advice she offered. I’ll be implementing most of them and I’ll be more intentional with my money. However, a lot of things didn’t sit well with me. For one, there was too much advertisement in this book; from names of people to names of products an First off, the fact that Ugwu shares these knowledge in fictional form is brilliant. It means she’s aware that self-help books sorta easily lose their appeal and decided to use a better approach. I love that I also enjoyed and learnt a lot from the money advice she offered. I’ll be implementing most of them and I’ll be more intentional with my money. However, a lot of things didn’t sit well with me. For one, there was too much advertisement in this book; from names of people to names of products and clothes and names of places; it was too much and lost its appeal really quickly. I get that she probably wanted to hoot the horns of people she found inspiring but she didn’t do it subtly at all. Another thing I didn’t like was the subtle fatphobia. The jokes and comments about fatness was off-putting; “we prevent one another from getting fat so we should prevent one another from getting broke” There are other analogies that could have been used. There was another place where Tshola was teasing Zuri and said he needed to “put off the pound”. Eating and living healthy shouldn’t be done because we are afraid of fatness; it should be done because it’s the right thing to do. Narratives like this one, however subtle, perpetuates fatphobia. Other than that, this book was an interesting read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rokcie Roxcita

    This book is amazing! it speaks to young (and not so young) African women on money. How to make it, how to spend it and most importantly how to invest it. It is written as a novel with breaks of advice and assignments. When I started reading it I thought Zuri(the main character) was quite the dumb slay queen but as I read further I realized Zuri is most of us. I am not doing the book justice with this review because I am not explaining it well but if you are a lady(or hey a man) and you are Afri This book is amazing! it speaks to young (and not so young) African women on money. How to make it, how to spend it and most importantly how to invest it. It is written as a novel with breaks of advice and assignments. When I started reading it I thought Zuri(the main character) was quite the dumb slay queen but as I read further I realized Zuri is most of us. I am not doing the book justice with this review because I am not explaining it well but if you are a lady(or hey a man) and you are African then this book is a must. You might think you have your money matters in check but if you aren't saving and investing towards a long term and short term goal then you need this book. If you don't have an emergency fund(or if you don't know what that is) then you need to read this book. If you still think entrepreneurs are the only people who can make money or invest then you need to read this book. If you are in debt, READ IT! hell if you have a free afternoon read. Take my word for it and read it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tobi Nifesi

    I GAVE UP. I tried. I really did. I tried to get past the first few chapters of this book. I just couldn’t. From a literary perspective, this book failed me. It was hard to read. The author penned this down like she was writing in a journal or a group chat. Nevertheless, I’m sure there’s some substance in there. The author understands the financial struggles of the average millennial and offers some pretty good advice every now and then. I just didn’t have it in me to sift through the rubbles - I GAVE UP. I tried. I really did. I tried to get past the first few chapters of this book. I just couldn’t. From a literary perspective, this book failed me. It was hard to read. The author penned this down like she was writing in a journal or a group chat. Nevertheless, I’m sure there’s some substance in there. The author understands the financial struggles of the average millennial and offers some pretty good advice every now and then. I just didn’t have it in me to sift through the rubbles - that is her writing style - and reach for the substance within.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mobola

    I started reading the acknowledgements and found myself finishing up Chapter 3 not long after, I was so sucked in. It is not your typical "educational" or inspiring book, so impressed with how relatable and informative it is! Every young woman needs to read this, the earlier the better. I wish this came out years ago.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bajen

    This book! The format it is written in is genius and the take away from it is life changing, for me at least. This is a book I look forward to going back to. Life changing I tell you. Get it! Read it!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Yewande Oyebo

    The story line isnt amazing but i love the fact that its a finance book you just cant put down!! Amazing book. I felt like a changed person after reading!!

  9. 5 out of 5

    izzy

    Meet Zuri, earning what is super high for a young woman in Nigeria today Yet she is in serious debt mostly due to impulsive spending We learn how to cut our spending and invest (not just save ) money in this one Very good book

  10. 5 out of 5

    M1ssb3rry

    I have learned so much I’m actually getting a money journal and I have read this book at a perfect time just when I was thinking about investing in stocks and real estate.... 🤔

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mace

    Once you get the rather tedious story-line which, for me, was completely unrelatable and a tad bit tacky, you will absolutely LOVE the money lessons. These lessons are pure gold. Clearly Arese knows her stuff when it comes to finances. I particularly loved the focus on women and Arese's attempt at addressing the gender-specific challenges women face when it comes to our attitude towards money, finances and building wealth. I would put up with the story just to keep reviewing these nuggets.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Morohunfayo

    Cool story BUT it teaches you how to save money! Something we all need to learn how to do! Was definitely intrigued!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nneka Ngene

    Storyline was hella weak, but I love how she tied financial literacy into it. Lots to think about.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Carole Joshua

    This is a book that I'd urge every lady out there to read. The book contains real life lessons that no one will ever sit down to explain them to you. As ladies we've always believed that money matters is a man's job. Well, that's not the case. Its time we take charge and change our mentality.. It is a good book. I wouldn't mind reading it again and again.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Akinmulewo Adebola

    The fact that you’d feel like you’re reading a non-fiction book the entire time is what makes this book a killer. I stayed glued to it the entire time. The characters are so relatable as regards to each financial stories. I enjoyed myself the entire time and that’s how you can tell a good book!!!!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Neelam Babul

    This is one of those books which has a story within it that teaches great lessons to the reader. I enjoyed reading Zuri's story and her transformation from a woman who limited knowledge in respect of managing and her finances. Desirous of improving her financial literacy, she embarks on a journey of controlling and managing her finances. The lessons I acquired from this book are immensely powerful and practical.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mwongeli

    I liked the lessons about money matters. Very relevant as I had started thinking about finances and my future. I really did not like the mention of designers that are "really good but affordable." She was covertly advertising their products. Unfortunately for the author and her designer friends, the brands she's advertising may really be lost on those of us who are not Nigerian. She mentioned a lot of designer products, which I could not relate to. Saying "designer shoes" or "expensive" or "tren I liked the lessons about money matters. Very relevant as I had started thinking about finances and my future. I really did not like the mention of designers that are "really good but affordable." She was covertly advertising their products. Unfortunately for the author and her designer friends, the brands she's advertising may really be lost on those of us who are not Nigerian. She mentioned a lot of designer products, which I could not relate to. Saying "designer shoes" or "expensive" or "trendy" would have been just fine. This also means that the book will lose its relevance when it comes to future Nigerian readers (those of us who are not Nigerian can't relate now much less in the future) since there will be different designers at that time. To get the enormity of the financial situations she was talking about, I had to find out how the Kenyan shilling matches up to the Naira, otherwise a lot of things could have been lost on me. The story was not all that great, and that's okay. I did not even expect the book to be based on a story in the first place. I do have to say that the characters of Zuri's friends were poorly developed. I think that their different money situations, if she expounded more on them, could have resonated with others who are unlike Zuri. All in all, this is a great start for books tackling finance issues as far as the African woman is concerned. Looking forward to more stuff like this especially on women that are not upper middle class or in the corporate world.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Queensly

    This book follows the story of Zuri who, because of her reckless spending, finds herself with a mountain load of debt with no assets or savings. She then begins a journey to redeem her financial standing by going on a juice cleanse of sorts. The lives of her friends and their money issues are also thrown in as well and made reference to throughout the book. I enjoyed the approach the author used, I.e, utilising fiction with key lessons and I sure did learn a few tricks to track my finances. Howe This book follows the story of Zuri who, because of her reckless spending, finds herself with a mountain load of debt with no assets or savings. She then begins a journey to redeem her financial standing by going on a juice cleanse of sorts. The lives of her friends and their money issues are also thrown in as well and made reference to throughout the book. I enjoyed the approach the author used, I.e, utilising fiction with key lessons and I sure did learn a few tricks to track my finances. However, I personally do not think the average Nigerian woman would be able to relate with the characters in the book as all of them seem to fall under upper middle class. Furthermore, I understand that the writer has a relationship with all the people that gave comments at the beginning of the book but I found the covert advertising of the products they offered a little too much like the tactics used in Jenifa 3 (the third part of a Nigerian comic trilogy) Asides the above stated issues and a few editing errors, this book will be a good read for a fresh female graduate and women at different stages of their career.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kesha K.

    First off, let me say that I love the cover. However, I was a tad bit confused at first. I thought this book was a self-help guide until I realized that it was a combination of a novel with financial advice thrown in. I understand what the author was doing. It just didn't work for me. The author seemed to use the naira loosely and not consistently and so; as an American reading, I had a tendency to forget which system she was referring to and at times cost didn't make sense. The novel is largely First off, let me say that I love the cover. However, I was a tad bit confused at first. I thought this book was a self-help guide until I realized that it was a combination of a novel with financial advice thrown in. I understand what the author was doing. It just didn't work for me. The author seemed to use the naira loosely and not consistently and so; as an American reading, I had a tendency to forget which system she was referring to and at times cost didn't make sense. The novel is largely based on Zuri, whose reckless spending has put her in financial straits. The author somehow manages to add Zuri's friends' financial problems into the mix as well. Overall, I think this novel lacked the thought out structure that could have made it a good read. Maybe breaking down each friend's problems (and providing references at the end) would have kept the novel flowing better. Or just telling the story and have an accompanying financial guide would have been better. All in all, it just didn't work.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Nyasha

    I didn't care so much for the story line of the book when I started. It seemed very cliche, stereotypical and very much centered on Nigerian life so I had a hard time relating to it. However, the lessons were gold! The book was an eye opener for me as a young woman professional who hasn't put so much thought into navigating personal finances. The book is written in a way that makes the topic of finances for young women important but given a story line that doesn't make the issue daunting.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ewuranna

    So many money lessons to learn especially for the young woman (man too i guess). A must read for every young African woman: It will help shape your money mindsets including savings, acquiring assets, spending habits and so many others. It will get you to set some new financial goals and take active steps to achieving them. And it's the most engaging smart money book i've seen; something an African woman can easily relate to.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Pauline

    Aside some typos i enjoyed this book. It opened my eyes to the need to save and also invest in order to get better return on the investments. Also, every penny being saved must be for the achievement of a clearly set out goal or achievement. Very interesting and informative book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Oduenyi

    Page Turner. Profound wisdom presented in a simple way I enjoyed reading this book. It's revolutionized my way of thinking. I'm excited about this next chapter of my life

  24. 5 out of 5

    Temi Adefioye

    First finance book that doesn't just point out why one's finances are the way they are but also gives practical examples of how to get out of debt (at least the Nigerian way)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Coded Reader

    This is the ultimate financial guide that you need to grow your money / spend wisely, any eye opener for me to be able to spend wisely.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Madeline Wilson-Ojo

    The Smart Money Woman by groundbreaking author, Arese Agwu was a book I picked up hoping to learn a few lessons from. However I only had to read the first few pages of the sample I’d downloaded before I realised that I had chanced upon a life changing literary masterpiece. The text introduces us to Zuri, a young professional Lagosian female, supposedly living her best life; she has a good job, rents her own apartment in no other neighbourhood but Lekki, and has a girl gang of equally stylish and The Smart Money Woman by groundbreaking author, Arese Agwu was a book I picked up hoping to learn a few lessons from. However I only had to read the first few pages of the sample I’d downloaded before I realised that I had chanced upon a life changing literary masterpiece. The text introduces us to Zuri, a young professional Lagosian female, supposedly living her best life; she has a good job, rents her own apartment in no other neighbourhood but Lekki, and has a girl gang of equally stylish and successful female friends. But underneath the surface, she is really a struggling woman unable to pay her bills, at loggerheads with her landlord, and riding on the cusp of becoming laid off. The question is, how will Zuri overcome her monetary woes and come into a life of financial freedom? This is the incredible journey the reader embarks on with Zuri as she peels back the layers of facade she has built for herself and deals with the core of her money problems. What sets this book apart is the fact that the chapters of the story are intercepted with reflective “Smart Money Lessons” and real exercises that can be immediately implemented. This allows the reader to enjoy the narrative as well as learn in a practical way. If you follow the lessons as you progress through the book, you could potentially transform your life by the time you reach its conclusion. How ingenious? As an avid lover of African literature, I was excited at the fact that the story is set in Lagos, Nigeria. There are several references made to modern Nigerian societal norms, from the aspiration to find a sugar daddy to the constant pressure to spend plenty nairas on a different aso-ebi each week. This book is basically a literary version of Nollywood – with more than one valuable lesson to learn! What becomes glaringly obvious is that many of the money woes that Lagosians, and by large many African face are underpinned by cultural and societal norms. Why is it as Africans, we feel an immense pressure to constantly keep up appearances? Why is it a taboo to be seen in the same outfit at more than one function? Aside from Zuri who is dealing with her own wahala, we also meet other characters fighting their fair share of trouble. Cue Adesuwa, na correct babe wei dey earn plenty money...the only problem is she is married to the philanderer of all philanderers; the habits of her underachieving, cheating husband plunges her further into the bottomless pool of debt. Or what about Ladun, a wonderful housewife, dedicated to her family, but without any of her own dough? In the words of Lara, one of Zuri’s friends, “society and culture sells young African girls the lie that marriage is the financial security they should aspire to”. But for every Adesuwa or Ladun, there is also a “head-screwed-on” kinda woman, with her business and finances together. Meet Ijeoma the super networker, or Omosede the investment worker. Together, the different characteristics of these financially stable women (and others) are an accumulation of the one financial powerhouse of a girl boss that we should all aspire to be. My favourite character (aside from Zuri of course!) is Tsola, Zuri’s love interest and the voice that would trigger Zuri’s journey to financial freedom. His instructions to “write down what your perfect day would look like”, to me was the catalyst for Zuri’s life changing journey. He is firstly introduced as a very hostile and impatient character, but as you flick through the pages, you come to find that im be correct guy! Every good story needs a bit of romance, but Zuri’s and Tsola’s love story isn’t one of frivolity. Ladies, I think we have a lot to learn from this partnership. Receiving gifts and being treated to dinner is nice, but your man should also be invested in helping you to better yourself! My biggest takeaway from this is that in a world where everyone wants to quit their 9 to 5 and venture into entrepreneurship, not all is called to be a business woman. But rather, whether a nine-to-fiver or a business woman, the important thing is to have a entrepreneur’s mentality. I.e: manage your salary, investments and side hustle like a boss! In other words, get your shit together! Can you tell that I really enjoyed this book?! Ha! Honestly, it was written with sass and simplicity so even the most lay woman can understand it and begin to make changes. If you are looking for a life changing read, peppered with a bit of sassy, sexy wahala, then The Smart Money Woman is the one. Thank you sister Arese for providing financial literacy to thousands of African Women!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ilana

    Aimed to offer women from Nigeria inspiration and support in pursuing and managing their financial dreams, this book by the owner of the website Smart Money Africa, Arese Ugwu, appeals every woman, especially those from areas where their status and achievements are not yet equally considered with men. The Smart Money Woman is the story of Zuri, a gifted woman working in the investment sector going through times of financial hardship only because she was unable to plan her budget and balance her Aimed to offer women from Nigeria inspiration and support in pursuing and managing their financial dreams, this book by the owner of the website Smart Money Africa, Arese Ugwu, appeals every woman, especially those from areas where their status and achievements are not yet equally considered with men. The Smart Money Woman is the story of Zuri, a gifted woman working in the investment sector going through times of financial hardship only because she was unable to plan her budget and balance her spending. At the end of each chapter, there are some short financial advices and a couple of exercises that will help you to track your expenses, think about the right savings and investments and prioritize your debt payment. 'People with bad debt habits will typically go into debt buying things their income cannot support', like for instance, 'items that don't appreciate in value and most likely can't cover the cost of the debt over time'. There are a lot of ideas that any of you can consider from tomorrow on, for improving the financial situation, like, creating a plan for emergencies - around 9 months that can be covered in terms of rent and main necessities, in case of unemployment - setting financial goals for the year, put your money at work, by buying portfolios and investing in land or real estate. 'The most successful people are the ones who are able to articulate what they want for their lives. Success is deeply rooted in having a solid plan that is tailored to what you want'. Interesting are also the remarks and observations about the role of some women appearing in the story in the family. Some are just hunting for a rich husband, some are the real breadwinner but not officially acknowledged so, by fear of not affecting the social status of the man. Some are just advised to downplay their achievements in order to be more attractive. Although not very widespread, such mind settings can be encountered once in a while in some societies outside the African world as well. The book is well written and has many interesting ideas that can help you advance your business or your financial independence. Disclaimer: Book offered by the publisher in exchange of an honest review

  28. 5 out of 5

    Whitlaw Tanyanyiwa Mugwiji

    Money is a difficult subject to broach. Especially for many of us, who were brought up in families, where money was a conversations for adults. A conversation that was riddled with tension and stress because on the most part, money could not meet the family ends. This book is a multiple of conversations over that difficult subject called money. Conversions with oneself, with one's partner, one's family and one's friends. Conversations all of us need to have, in order to improve each other's atti Money is a difficult subject to broach. Especially for many of us, who were brought up in families, where money was a conversations for adults. A conversation that was riddled with tension and stress because on the most part, money could not meet the family ends. This book is a multiple of conversations over that difficult subject called money. Conversions with oneself, with one's partner, one's family and one's friends. Conversations all of us need to have, in order to improve each other's attitude towards money. As the author says, "developing a wealthy mindset requires the understanding of the concept that the way you spend, invest and manage ten naira is the way you will spend, invest and manage ten million naira. I enjoyed the story and more importantly the financial lessons at the end of each chapter. In my humble opinion, the characters and the story, though interesting, were not fully developed. A short coming that arises perhaps due the fact that the author started with practical lessons in mind and then had to fit the story into the lessons. The target audience of the book, if African, young and female. But I believe, people outside the author's target audience can read and profit from this book because the rules of Money, have no gender, ethnicity, or class. The book's lessons are simple yet very profound. This is because financial wisdom in most cases is just common sense. Unfortunately, a majority of us do not live according to this common sense. I recommend this book to teenagers, young adults, and anyone who wants to improve their attitude towards money.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Magrt Aniam

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Let's face it, no one really loves financial self help books unless they are really depressed or actually need advice. I don’t and that’s why I kept off reading this book for months. As an economist, I treat financial advice with a yardlong stick. But I was pleasantly surprised by Smart Money Woman. Arese Ugwu drummed up a pretty informative book carefully weaved into an everyday story with practical lessons throughout. I know this is meant to be a book review, but the financial lessons therein Let's face it, no one really loves financial self help books unless they are really depressed or actually need advice. I don’t and that’s why I kept off reading this book for months. As an economist, I treat financial advice with a yardlong stick. But I was pleasantly surprised by Smart Money Woman. Arese Ugwu drummed up a pretty informative book carefully weaved into an everyday story with practical lessons throughout. I know this is meant to be a book review, but the financial lessons therein are more important than my petty personal feels. So let’s get into it. Zuri is the epitome of success, I mean, even I want to be her when I grow up (who am I kidding, am grown). But she has it all- a promising career, a salary to die for, a posh two-bedroom uptown, a wardrobe collection with the latest brands and occasional cocktails with her girlfriends ever so often. Then why is she evading her landlord, her car still stuck at mechanics and she’s buying an outfit for a wedding of a girl she’s met twice. Yes, Zuri is broke, regardless of an annual basic tax-free salary of 7.2 million naira and no family obligations. Read the 7 most important lessons I learnt from the book- http://fortheloveofallthingsf.com/sma...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Hajara

    T H E S M A R T W O M A N M O N E Y ✨ WHERE ARE ALL MY MONEY GOING?! Lol yeah that's always what I asked myself whenever I'm broke and I think I'm earning the money that when I wasn't employed I though half the amount will sustain me for the month, but guess what there's that popular saying "more money, more problem". But wait what if you prioritise your spending? What if you invest money? What if you know your long-term and shirt-term goals?! These and more are the things I learnt from 'The Smar T H E S M A R T W O M A N M O N E Y ✨ WHERE ARE ALL MY MONEY GOING?! Lol yeah that's always what I asked myself whenever I'm broke and I think I'm earning the money that when I wasn't employed I though half the amount will sustain me for the month, but guess what there's that popular saying "more money, more problem". But wait what if you prioritise your spending? What if you invest money? What if you know your long-term and shirt-term goals?! These and more are the things I learnt from 'The Smart Money Woman' . . . . This book teaches women how to become their own bosses, how to be in control of their money. Let you be the one controlling the money and not the other way round. Just because so and so are rocking designer shoes and bags every month doesn't mean you should live that lifestyle even if you can afford it. KNOW YOUR PURPOSE. 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 I gave this book 4 stars. Read The Smart Woman Money now and see how you can save money. I wish I read it earlier. You need some pen and a book for this!

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