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Keeping Black Boys Out of Special Education

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This critical analysis looks at the disproportionate number of African American males in special education. Arguing that the problem is race and gender driven, questions covered include Why does Europe send more females to special education? Why does America lead the world in giving children Ritalin? Is there a relationship between sugar, Ritalin, and cocaine? and Is there This critical analysis looks at the disproportionate number of African American males in special education. Arguing that the problem is race and gender driven, questions covered include Why does Europe send more females to special education? Why does America lead the world in giving children Ritalin? Is there a relationship between sugar, Ritalin, and cocaine? and Is there a relationship between special education and prison? More than 100 strategies to help teachers and parents keep black boys in the regular classroom, such as revising teacher expectations, increasing parental involvement, changing teaching styles from a left-brain abstract approach to a right-brain hands-on approach, redoing the curriculum, understanding the impact of mass media, and fostering healthy eating habits.


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This critical analysis looks at the disproportionate number of African American males in special education. Arguing that the problem is race and gender driven, questions covered include Why does Europe send more females to special education? Why does America lead the world in giving children Ritalin? Is there a relationship between sugar, Ritalin, and cocaine? and Is there This critical analysis looks at the disproportionate number of African American males in special education. Arguing that the problem is race and gender driven, questions covered include Why does Europe send more females to special education? Why does America lead the world in giving children Ritalin? Is there a relationship between sugar, Ritalin, and cocaine? and Is there a relationship between special education and prison? More than 100 strategies to help teachers and parents keep black boys in the regular classroom, such as revising teacher expectations, increasing parental involvement, changing teaching styles from a left-brain abstract approach to a right-brain hands-on approach, redoing the curriculum, understanding the impact of mass media, and fostering healthy eating habits.

30 review for Keeping Black Boys Out of Special Education

  1. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Mattmiller

    Really wanted to love this one, as I do think it is an issue in special education today: black males are certainly over-represented in special ed. Unfortunately, I had too many issues with this book, to enjoy it. I didn't love the writing itself (it jumped around, among other issues). I also often found myself wondering how much the author actually knows about education, and special education. There might be some places in the country that are so far out of compliance and breaking laws that migh Really wanted to love this one, as I do think it is an issue in special education today: black males are certainly over-represented in special ed. Unfortunately, I had too many issues with this book, to enjoy it. I didn't love the writing itself (it jumped around, among other issues). I also often found myself wondering how much the author actually knows about education, and special education. There might be some places in the country that are so far out of compliance and breaking laws that might prove some of these anecdotes accurate, but I feel like often this book is using outliers as the norm. Schools giving out medication without parents permission? (Not to mention a doctor's prescription?) Please tell me that's not really happening! I also understand that this book refers to "special education" mostly to mean self-contained classrooms, which is not all of what special education is. I feel like this author also contradicts himself at times. I hear him saying how black boys are over-identified partially because they are so low in reading. Then he recommends individualized instruction and major reading support for these boys, so they can get caught up. To some, that is what special education is. (Again, I think part of this issue is that he is meaning self-contained classroom for 2+ hours per day, which is not what would happen in most schools.) Again, there are plenty of valid points about how we can make general education fit more students and not just the cookie cutter students, and there are some great suggestions on how to engage black boys, and all students, but so much to me was just so out there, outliers being called the norm, data that I'm not sure is correct, and issues being raised in a way that I feel are so accusatory it's hard to push through. I'm also not sure who the target audience for this book is. I read it as a special education teacher (although, unlike what is implied in this book, I don't qualify students myself- at the point they come to me they have already been found eligible for services. Although, I am involved in the intervention process...) I can see certain parts of this book being good for special education and general education teachers, as there are classroom recommendations. All of a sudden, however, there would be things like, don't like children drink cow milk. I certainly have no control over kids' nutrition/food habits (although it's recommended I include that in the IEP?!) So some parts I suppose are for parents, and some for teachers? Overall, there might have been a couple of tidbits from this book I will carry with me, but overall it fired me up more than it drew me in, which I think is unfortunate. I would love to read another book on this topic, and what we can do about the disproportionate number of black boys in special education.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lady Jane

    Although I agree with the premise and some of the ideas presented by Kunjufu, there are many problems with this book and I cannot recommend it. The book is not professionally presented. The reference notes are not a full bibliography and the index is very limited. References in the text are not well introduced or discussed, leading the text to have a choppy feel. Often references and even quoted passages are presented without enough context for the reader to follow the author's argument. On furt Although I agree with the premise and some of the ideas presented by Kunjufu, there are many problems with this book and I cannot recommend it. The book is not professionally presented. The reference notes are not a full bibliography and the index is very limited. References in the text are not well introduced or discussed, leading the text to have a choppy feel. Often references and even quoted passages are presented without enough context for the reader to follow the author's argument. On further investigation, I found that although this is a publisher who publishes other works, it also seems to be founded and/or run by Kunjufu, so in a sense this is a self-published work without the benefit of an editor who could have helped clear up some of these deficiencies. Within the text one of his repeated recommendations is for a program this is available through his own website, which seems like a cheap attempt at self-advertisement. Kunjufu does not discuss or acknowledge the connection. Added to these presentation and writing problems, Kunjufu seems to be drawing on experiences in education from decades ago and has little to no real contemporary experience. For example, he talks about 'ditto' sheets, a very dated term. He also seems to think that the special education experience means taking students completely out of the classroom, which is not typical today. The author also brings his own religion into the book and recommends that every African-American household should have a Bible. Given all of these problems, it is very difficult to take this book seriously as an academic piece making serious recommendations for improving our schools.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly OutspokenMom

    An excellent read and a must have for all African-American families. The book guides parents and others in our community on ways to navigate through a system that is not geared for the positive growth and development of our children. It gives us positive ways to overcome this system without condemning the system itself. Dr. Kunjufu is to be congratulated for producing another valuable tool for African-American families.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Richard Williams

    It is a good read for those not in education. Those with and education background will find the book is stating the obvious, repetitive and written at a very basic level. The book fails to dig deep into the issues facing African American students and their disproportionate rates of being transitioned into special education.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tanya

    Wonderful Book, The special education system can work but it is out to get some of our young men. As a parent with a young man that the system tired to put through the pipeline this book speaks value, but I refused to allow it to happen to my child. If your child needs help get it but know your rights and your right as a parent.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Luppino

    It's ok. Some interesting information. Mostly assertions without reference, sometimes contradicting within one sentence. Made me think once or twice. Also not that old but already pretty out of date. Strange.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    I was a little disappointed by the racial undertones this writer infused throughout this book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Denise Ervin

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Chiver

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rosalyn Johnson

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jermaine

  12. 4 out of 5

    S

  13. 4 out of 5

    Debra D.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

  15. 4 out of 5

    Isaac Norris

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dale

  17. 4 out of 5

    Oscar Del S├ębastien

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rita Platt

  19. 5 out of 5

    Diamond Emelda

  20. 4 out of 5

    Isabel Bozada-Jones

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Trisha

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  23. 4 out of 5

    Billie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey Boldt

  25. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Melvin Euring Sr.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andre

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ski Chills

  30. 5 out of 5

    Charles Carlies

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