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Annie Smith Peck is one of the most accomplished women of the twentieth century that you have never heard of. Peck was a scholar, writer, lecturer, mountain climber, swimmer, oarswoman, horsewoman, splendid conversationalist, and well-trained listener. She was a feminist and an independent thinker who never let gender stereotypes stand in her way. Peck gained fame as the t Annie Smith Peck is one of the most accomplished women of the twentieth century that you have never heard of. Peck was a scholar, writer, lecturer, mountain climber, swimmer, oarswoman, horsewoman, splendid conversationalist, and well-trained listener. She was a feminist and an independent thinker who never let gender stereotypes stand in her way. Peck gained fame as the third woman recorded in history to climb the Matterhorn--not for her daring alpine feat, but because she climbed wearing pants--and would eventually be the first climber ever to conquer Mount Huascaran (21,812 feet) in 1908 and would race Hiram Bingham (the model for Indiana Jones) to climb Mount Coropuna in 1911. A Woman's Place Is at the Top: The Biography of Annie Smith Peck is the first full length work about this incredible woman who single-handedly carved her place on the map of mountain climbing and international relations. Peck marched in suffrage parades, was the president of the Joan of Arc Suffrage League in New York City, became a political speaker and writer before women had the right to vote, and was also a propagandist, an expert on North-South American relations, and an author and lecturer contracted to speak as an authority on multinational industry and commerce before anyone had ever thought to appoint a woman as a diplomat. This empowering biography will give Peck her rightful place in history.


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Annie Smith Peck is one of the most accomplished women of the twentieth century that you have never heard of. Peck was a scholar, writer, lecturer, mountain climber, swimmer, oarswoman, horsewoman, splendid conversationalist, and well-trained listener. She was a feminist and an independent thinker who never let gender stereotypes stand in her way. Peck gained fame as the t Annie Smith Peck is one of the most accomplished women of the twentieth century that you have never heard of. Peck was a scholar, writer, lecturer, mountain climber, swimmer, oarswoman, horsewoman, splendid conversationalist, and well-trained listener. She was a feminist and an independent thinker who never let gender stereotypes stand in her way. Peck gained fame as the third woman recorded in history to climb the Matterhorn--not for her daring alpine feat, but because she climbed wearing pants--and would eventually be the first climber ever to conquer Mount Huascaran (21,812 feet) in 1908 and would race Hiram Bingham (the model for Indiana Jones) to climb Mount Coropuna in 1911. A Woman's Place Is at the Top: The Biography of Annie Smith Peck is the first full length work about this incredible woman who single-handedly carved her place on the map of mountain climbing and international relations. Peck marched in suffrage parades, was the president of the Joan of Arc Suffrage League in New York City, became a political speaker and writer before women had the right to vote, and was also a propagandist, an expert on North-South American relations, and an author and lecturer contracted to speak as an authority on multinational industry and commerce before anyone had ever thought to appoint a woman as a diplomat. This empowering biography will give Peck her rightful place in history.

30 review for A Woman's Place Is at the Top: A Biography of Annie Smith Peck, Queen of the Climbers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Amy Moritz

    Let me tell you what's cool -- finding these great biographies written about some pretty kickass women you probably never heard of. A few years ago, I discovered two about Gertrude Ederle, the first woman to swim the English Channel. Then there was a great read about Belva Lockwood, the first woman to run for president, even before women had the right to vote. (Seriously, go read these books.) Now enter Annie Smith Peck. I had never heard of her until this book found its way into my mailbox at wor Let me tell you what's cool -- finding these great biographies written about some pretty kickass women you probably never heard of. A few years ago, I discovered two about Gertrude Ederle, the first woman to swim the English Channel. Then there was a great read about Belva Lockwood, the first woman to run for president, even before women had the right to vote. (Seriously, go read these books.) Now enter Annie Smith Peck. I had never heard of her until this book found its way into my mailbox at work. (One of the perks of working at The Buffalo News is having the book editor throw review copies in your mailbox hoping you will read and review them. My review for the paper was filed this morning. Just FYI.) I'm not a "climber" but a hiker and outdoorswoman and was intrigued by this biography of the "Queen of the Climbers." She also is dubbed by the author as "Queen of the Late Bloomers." Annie climbed her first big peak, the Matterhorn, when she was 45 years old. Peeps, there is hope for me yet. Hannah Kimberley did a fantastic job researching Annie's letters and journals to salvage her life story from the footnotes of history. More a history read than an adventure read, Kimberely does a great job presenting the life of Annie and putting her in the context of her time. Peck always knew she didn't want to marry or raise a family. (This was at the turn of the 20th century my friends.) She pursued higher education at a time when college and post-graduate work was largely closed to women. Unsatisfied with her limited options, mostly teaching, she worked her way onto an archeological dig in Greece and returned to the U.S. to travel doing a lecture tour. She noted people were interested in her hobby of climbing and so she began to hustle to find her way to the top of peaks. She would hustle for money to finance her expeditions, attempt the climb, then return to the U.S. to write articles and lecture on it. She repeated this often. Annie was always hustling. Always broke. Always trying to prove her worthiness as a climber, a scholar and an expert on Pan-American relations. She had plenty of critics and plenty of fans. At times she seemed too concerned about what people thought of her, but then again, don't we all fall into that trap. But in the end, I'm inspired by Annie's gumption, her willingness to live her life on her own terms, and to forget about the artificial limits we put on ourselves because of our age or gender. Quotes from the book: "Annie was not only the 'Queen of the Climbers' as her new lecture placards now advertised, but she also happened to be queen of the late bloomers. By now, she had learned with certainty, much to her family's chagrin, that age was nothing but a number." "Oh, how I longed for am an with the pluck and determination to stand by me to the finish!" "I had always hoped Huascaran would prove to be the highest mountain in the western world, but now it seems that Aconcagua is highest. But anybody can climb that. It's just a walk. No cliffs. No glaciers." "A woman who has done good work in the scholastic field doesn't like to be called a good woman scholar. Call her a scholar and let it go at that. Taking the figures given for Mount Huascaran by the triangulation, I have climbed 1,500 feet higher than any man in the United States. Don't call me a woman mountain climber." "Miss Peck, the Mountain Climber ... This is a title that Annie would wrestle with throughout her life, as it gave no credit to her scholarly pursuits, political contributions or her other accomplishments." "She was viewed as a climber who had 'little sympathy for those who did not share her ambition.' ... These assessments are also true. However, many climbers and explorers of the time were described in this manner, although as men, they were celebrated rather than chastised for their unyielding determination to get to the top."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    I was a goodreads giveaway winner of this book. I had never heard of Annie Smith Peck but was glad I got the chance to learn more about his interesting woman. Annie was born in 1850. she was an athletic tomboy her whole childhood. Annie was one of the first women to attend University of Michigan. after graduating she was interested in travelling the world and climbing the highest mountains. She fought against the chauvinists who did not think a woman should be climbing mountains and in pants no I was a goodreads giveaway winner of this book. I had never heard of Annie Smith Peck but was glad I got the chance to learn more about his interesting woman. Annie was born in 1850. she was an athletic tomboy her whole childhood. Annie was one of the first women to attend University of Michigan. after graduating she was interested in travelling the world and climbing the highest mountains. She fought against the chauvinists who did not think a woman should be climbing mountains and in pants no less! I found it interesting how this woman found ways to raise the funds to travel around the world getting teams together and trying to climb to the top. This book writes of her success and failures trying to climb the mountains. She earned money from magazines by getting money funded and writing about her experience in their magazines. it was amazing to me how much mountain climbing cost getting the money to travel to the country, hiring a team of professionals the equipment etc. I give her credit for trying a sport mostly men did back in the late 1800s and early 1900s. No big surprise she was also a suffragette! Interesting book about a brave lady.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah R

    I really enjoyed this, although I did not find Annie Peck to be a very likeable person overall. But I had to admire her spirit and I also found her very balanced views on women's equality refreshing (she was very egalitarian). She was independent and outdoorsy in a culture where most women still were not, even amongst the suffragette movement.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Karyl

    As a rather sedentary stay-at-home mom, I'm hard pressed to explain why I'm so fascinated by people who manage extreme physical achievements. Maybe it's because I'll never do them, I don't know. But I continue to devour anything and everything about mountain climbing, especially on the highest peaks. Annie Smith Peck was born in Providence, Rhode Island, in 1850, and spent her childhood there. This small tidbit added a lot to my enjoyment of Peck's story, as I currently live near Newport, and I As a rather sedentary stay-at-home mom, I'm hard pressed to explain why I'm so fascinated by people who manage extreme physical achievements. Maybe it's because I'll never do them, I don't know. But I continue to devour anything and everything about mountain climbing, especially on the highest peaks. Annie Smith Peck was born in Providence, Rhode Island, in 1850, and spent her childhood there. This small tidbit added a lot to my enjoyment of Peck's story, as I currently live near Newport, and I was reading this book as my family and I visited Providence for the day (I meant to try to find where her house had stood, but we got distracted and left before I remembered). Reading about her climbing College Hill and attending First Baptist Church (which has *the best* church signs) really brought her to life for me. It surprises me how these folks managed to climb any of these mountains at all with the primitive equipment available to them. No polar fleece, no high-tech fabrics, no chemical hand warmers, no calorie-dense food, no tanks of oxygen. Just wool (and many layers of it!), chocolate, and alcohol stoves. It's a wonder to me that Peck never suffered any catastrophic frostbite injuries, though some of her parties did. A few reviewers have pointed out that it seemed as though Peck mooched her way through life. I don't think that's how she wanted to live her life, but as a gentlewoman she had very few options for earning money available to her. She tried to make her living as an author and a lecturer, but she was never paid as much as a man would be. She tried to get sponsorships, but as a woman, she wasn't always taken seriously. Even her own brother wouldn't advance her any money because he disapproved that she hadn't chosen to marry and have children and be a proper Victorian housewife. So she always had to beg her friends to help her out, but near the end of her life, she apparently made good on all those loans thanks to an estate she was left by a cousin, which I don't believe a moocher would have done. As fascinating as Peck's life was, at times Kimberley's writing got in the way. It is at times dull and uninspiring, and reading becomes a slog until the next interesting thing happens. I did enjoy how much first-person material Kimberley used because it really brought the person that Peck was to life. The next time I'm in Providence, I hope to visit Peck's gravestone and thank her for being such a trailblazer, not just in mountain climbing, but in being a bad-ass woman who never took no for an answer, and who fought strenuously for the right of women to vote. We all owe her a great deal.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joanna Kafarowski

    Trailblazing American mountaineer, educator, suffragist and journalist Annie Smith Peck (1850-1935) is the subject of the aptly named “A Woman’s Place Is At the Top A Biography of Annie Smith Peck, Queen of the Climbers” (St. Martin’s Press, 2017) by Hannah Kimberley. During her lifetime, Peck’s claim to fame was her ascent of the Matterhorn at age forty-five, although the attention she gained as a result was due to the fact that she was wearing pants rather than the amazing athletic feat itself Trailblazing American mountaineer, educator, suffragist and journalist Annie Smith Peck (1850-1935) is the subject of the aptly named “A Woman’s Place Is At the Top A Biography of Annie Smith Peck, Queen of the Climbers” (St. Martin’s Press, 2017) by Hannah Kimberley. During her lifetime, Peck’s claim to fame was her ascent of the Matterhorn at age forty-five, although the attention she gained as a result was due to the fact that she was wearing pants rather than the amazing athletic feat itself. At the age of sixty, she scaled Mount Huascarán in Peru and continued to climb into her eighties. Given full access to Peck’s letters, artifacts and ephemera, Kimberley’s work is a fascinating and comprehensive investigation of Peck’s life as an unconventional pioneer.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sugarpuss O'Shea

    This book should be subtitled: How to Mooch Your Way Through Life. Granted, if Annie Peck were born a man, she'd be mentioned in the same breath as Robert Peary, John Muir, Robert Underhill, & Edmund Hillary. Instead, she had virtually no money and still managed to climb some of the highest mountains in South America, primarily without the luxury of trained guides. I still don't know how she did it. in 1908, when she was 58, Annie climbed the Huascarán-the 4th highest mountain in the Western Hemi This book should be subtitled: How to Mooch Your Way Through Life. Granted, if Annie Peck were born a man, she'd be mentioned in the same breath as Robert Peary, John Muir, Robert Underhill, & Edmund Hillary. Instead, she had virtually no money and still managed to climb some of the highest mountains in South America, primarily without the luxury of trained guides. I still don't know how she did it. in 1908, when she was 58, Annie climbed the Huascarán-the 4th highest mountain in the Western Hemisphere. (I know people who cannot climb a flight of stairs at 58!!) She climbed her last mountain at age 82. EIGHTY-TWO!! She was also a fierce Suffragette, and an unofficial ambassador for Pan-American relations. She lectured & wrote several books & newspaper articles about her many exploits, which is how she financed her climbs / travels. For such a fascinating, kick-ass woman, this biography just didn't seem to do her justice. I just can't put my finger on it, but this book should've been a can't-put-down-page-turner. Instead, it just felt flat and felt more like a slog to get through. Such a shame, because if this biography was as exciting as Annie's life was, Hollywood would be clamoring to tell this fascinating woman's story.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Viktoria

    I very much appreciated Annie's biography. What a tenacious and accomplished woman, especially so in the years when women were expected to be mostly home makers! She was not only an amazing mountain climber, and an accomplished academic, writer, and lecturer; but she was also a pioneer in fundraising and promotion. Had she lived today she would have been an ambassador, but in her days the appointment of a woman was not an option. Had she been a man she would have been incredibly successful - as I very much appreciated Annie's biography. What a tenacious and accomplished woman, especially so in the years when women were expected to be mostly home makers! She was not only an amazing mountain climber, and an accomplished academic, writer, and lecturer; but she was also a pioneer in fundraising and promotion. Had she lived today she would have been an ambassador, but in her days the appointment of a woman was not an option. Had she been a man she would have been incredibly successful - as a woman she was accomplished, but not appreciated enough, and not awarded the academic, political, and financial success she deserved. The first half of the book was very interesting, but somewhat academic. I almost abandoned it at that point, thinking that I've got the idea about Annie. Luckily, I persisted, and found the second half of the book so much more interesting that I wasn't able to put it down. Excellent job by Hannah Kimberley, bringing a historical figure to life so vividly!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Francis

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The lack of a significant other, the disgruntled porters, and the injured guides seem to support the theory that extremely driven people tend to focus so much on her goal, but obliterate anything and anyone in her way. On the other hand, a suffragist, who believed that a woman can perform a task equally well as a man, must have expected her crew to perform at the same exceptional level as she did. It has a been an educational read for me. Not only did I learn about a pioneering climber that I can The lack of a significant other, the disgruntled porters, and the injured guides seem to support the theory that extremely driven people tend to focus so much on her goal, but obliterate anything and anyone in her way. On the other hand, a suffragist, who believed that a woman can perform a task equally well as a man, must have expected her crew to perform at the same exceptional level as she did. It has a been an educational read for me. Not only did I learn about a pioneering climber that I can look up to, I also learned about the era in which she grew up. Hannah Kimberley painted a vivid picture of the women’s suffragist movement and their struggle. The train around the country, the forced feeding through nostril, etc were inspirational and shocking. I wish there were more content on the actual climbs, because I was foremost drew to the book by the alpinist title.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Well, now I know much more about the history of women mountain climbers. This book was a bit of a slog through the minute details of Annie Smith Peck's life. It was interesting to a degree at which point I just wanted to finish the book just to be finished. The information about her other pursuits was far more interesting to me so I was compelled to actually finish the book. She was a suffragist and a prolific author though I know not whether her writing was good, and a lecturer. Constantly scro Well, now I know much more about the history of women mountain climbers. This book was a bit of a slog through the minute details of Annie Smith Peck's life. It was interesting to a degree at which point I just wanted to finish the book just to be finished. The information about her other pursuits was far more interesting to me so I was compelled to actually finish the book. She was a suffragist and a prolific author though I know not whether her writing was good, and a lecturer. Constantly scrounging for money until two years before her death at age 84, hers was a remarkable story of internal fortitude and drive and progressive thought especially as it related to women's rights. The book read a bit like a dissertation from which it may have had its start.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Valerie Brett

    Annie is not a likable person, and the writing in this is at times engaging, at others, dull regurgitation. I enjoyed this book and also did not. I felt the same way about Annie as I did about the book. Her determination and her untimely outrage at people holding her back for being a woman were admirable and inspiring. Her life as a total mooch made her annoying. I realize that people do not need to be likable; and, women more often than men are not allowed to be unlikable. So, I'm glad this bio Annie is not a likable person, and the writing in this is at times engaging, at others, dull regurgitation. I enjoyed this book and also did not. I felt the same way about Annie as I did about the book. Her determination and her untimely outrage at people holding her back for being a woman were admirable and inspiring. Her life as a total mooch made her annoying. I realize that people do not need to be likable; and, women more often than men are not allowed to be unlikable. So, I'm glad this biography exists, and that I read it. My major criticism of this book is that it begins much too late, when Annie is on the cusp of her teens (!). The preface, in which the author situates herself, is great.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    Normally I enjoy biographies and was excited that this one had the added bonus of being about a kick-ass woman...However, it ended up being just so-so and got to be very repetitive. I also did not like the author's writing style; I understand that she was trying to make it more digestible and that it was based on her research, but I found it annoying that she wrote it as if she were there ("It was snowing on a January morning in 1867 as Annie awoke, and would continue to snow throughout the day. Normally I enjoy biographies and was excited that this one had the added bonus of being about a kick-ass woman...However, it ended up being just so-so and got to be very repetitive. I also did not like the author's writing style; I understand that she was trying to make it more digestible and that it was based on her research, but I found it annoying that she wrote it as if she were there ("It was snowing on a January morning in 1867 as Annie awoke, and would continue to snow throughout the day..."). All that being said, Annie Smith Peck was an extraordinary woman who was definitely ahead of her time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Pat Kamuf

    I never knew about Annie Smith Peck before. Since the libraries were closed due to the pandemic this book was loaned to me from my niece. It is a very detailed account of her various climbs of mountains in South America, and her struggles because she was a woman in a male dominated "sport". She wrote about these endeavors in various books. The part the I liked the best was toward the end when she joined the movement for women to vote! She was a character and before her time. An interesting read I never knew about Annie Smith Peck before. Since the libraries were closed due to the pandemic this book was loaned to me from my niece. It is a very detailed account of her various climbs of mountains in South America, and her struggles because she was a woman in a male dominated "sport". She wrote about these endeavors in various books. The part the I liked the best was toward the end when she joined the movement for women to vote! She was a character and before her time. An interesting read to me for that part.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jill Poulsen

    I definitely enjoyed reading this book. I probably should have given it another star. But I felt it lacked some academic punch. I wanted a little more information on the historiography on Peck. At the end I wanted to be able to say I learned something besides just the facts surrounding her life. How did her life influence our country, the women's movement, exploration, international relations? I just needed the author to take us a few more steps, make a few more connections, and unpack the infor I definitely enjoyed reading this book. I probably should have given it another star. But I felt it lacked some academic punch. I wanted a little more information on the historiography on Peck. At the end I wanted to be able to say I learned something besides just the facts surrounding her life. How did her life influence our country, the women's movement, exploration, international relations? I just needed the author to take us a few more steps, make a few more connections, and unpack the information she shared with us.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amy Banks

    The story about Annie Peck is an interesting one but the biographer included too many details that led me to skim over parts of the book. I’m not sure if the author was trying to prove how much she knew about Annie or wanted to reflect all of the hours of research she did but it unfortunately left this reader confused and bored more than not. Overall, Annie was an amazing woman and I’m glad I learned about her.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Bookman

    I love learning about women who broke barriers and DID something. Annie is a fascinating woman and this biography is nicely done. Yes, some sections got a little slow (as do all biographies in my opinion) and I am always curious how accurate any biography can really be. But I enjoyed the read and the knowledge, and am intrigued enough to learn more.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    This book tells the unknown story of a powerful feminist and mountain climber Annie S. Peck. It is a biographical sketch of her life and what she accomplishes as well as the struggles she faces. It is a very intriguing story that needs to be told more. However, it is a little wordy and includes too much detail sometimes which makes it a little slow moving.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    This book reminded me that even though women may not have the physical strength that men have, they have a different sort of strength, single mindedness, perseverance, and courage that is sometimes lacking in men. I had never heard of Annie Smith Peck before, it makes me wonder how many other astounding women are lost in the annals of American history.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    This book was incredibly well written and well though out. I will admit that I often get bored reading biographies but this one held my interest. While Annie seemed like someone who would irritate the hell out of me, she did some amazing things throughout her lifetime and I can’t believe I hadn’t ever heard of her until I stumbled upon this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Gillman

    Annie S Peck was a really interesting woman with a really interesting story, but I found so much minutae in the details that it was actually hard to follow along, just lists and lists of minor people that muddied the story. I also would have loved more historical context as well, as opposed to a straight recitation of facts

  20. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    Annie Peck was a professor, lecturer, writer, mountain climber, suffragist and expert on Latin America around the turn of the 20th century. This is a fascinating biography about an underdog who single-mindedly pursued the life she wanted at a time when very few opportunities existed for women outside of domestic circles.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Teresa

    I heard an interview with the author on NPR, so i requested the book from my local library. An interesting read. Although I love history, I don't read too many biographies. I found this one a bit tedious. Are they all like this? But what an amazing woman and what an amzing insight into the time period.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    I picked this book up in the biography section of my local library. I enjoyed reading it and enjoyed the way the author told the story. Annie Peck sounds like she had an adventurous spirit and was way ahead of her time. This is an amazing story and well worth reading.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Eunice

    excellent book. well researched.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mike Wigal

    A rather remarkable biography of a woman largely forgotten. Hard to imagine climbing mountains in South America in the early 20th century, especially as a woman in that male dominated society.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    Interesting story, I guess. Not a very appealing protagonist; certainly had very limited people skills. The author's writing skills are not great.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Cassie Dishman

    This little known book is truly fascinating and wonderful. An easy read that will keep you eagerly turning the pages.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    I’ve reached page 100 and am putting this one down. The writing has little artistry or flair, and the mechanics were often off. Wrong prepositions, misplaced adverbs, redundancy, and forced and awkward vocabulary abound. The most jarring thing was the verb tenses, often glaringly incorrect as the time perspective of the narration shifted. There is little control of the writing. There were also many typos. Just a few examples: -“One more reason she did not want to return Providence was that the face I’ve reached page 100 and am putting this one down. The writing has little artistry or flair, and the mechanics were often off. Wrong prepositions, misplaced adverbs, redundancy, and forced and awkward vocabulary abound. The most jarring thing was the verb tenses, often glaringly incorrect as the time perspective of the narration shifted. There is little control of the writing. There were also many typos. Just a few examples: -“One more reason she did not want to return Providence was that the face of Annie's hometown and her connections to it were changing.” -“must have scoffed at the end of his letter when he recommend to her that she should…” -“leaving Peck’s biographical materials with Valentino family…” -“However, Annie had no such goal, and quickly came to the realization that she lacked a plan for the future. While Annie helped Will with his classes at Brown and assigned him to read the same works she was reading at home, including Macaulay, Milton, Dryden, and Bunyan’s ever-popular Christian allegory, The Pilgrim’s Progress. Will followed suit…” Samples of the writing: “I came across an audio interview of Polk [...] [next sentence:] walking down the street in her neighborhood when she came across a travel-worn steamer trunk [...] [next paragraph:] I came across listings for Peck materials for sale [...] [next sentence:] asked him how he came across the materials.” “Annie, with her natural vehemence, defended Macaulay with all her might and main, and Phebe’s large brown eyes snapped with rage as she disclaimed all of Macaulay’s arguments, saying that the writings of ‘England’s greatest historian’ were ‘all bosh.’” “Now Annie had only her brothers left. The Peck family hardly bled sensitivity all over one another: Ann Peck passed on her old Yankee culture to her children, and her stoicism had become habitual for all of them. After that time in her twenties when she cried over Will Kellen, except for a couple more occasions when she “shed a few tears,” Annie never cried again.” As presented here, ASP’s life is mildly interesting, but the clumsy and uninspired writing made it difficult for me to enjoy this.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amy Kerr

  29. 4 out of 5

    Riya

  30. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

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