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The Lost Plot

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After being commissioned to find a rare book, Librarian Irene and her assistant, Kai, head to Prohibition-era New York and are thrust into the middle of a political fight with dragons, mobsters, and Fae. In a 1920s-esque New York, Prohibition is in force; fedoras, flapper dresses, and tommy guns are in fashion: and intrigue is afoot. Intrepid Librarians Irene and Kai find After being commissioned to find a rare book, Librarian Irene and her assistant, Kai, head to Prohibition-era New York and are thrust into the middle of a political fight with dragons, mobsters, and Fae. In a 1920s-esque New York, Prohibition is in force; fedoras, flapper dresses, and tommy guns are in fashion: and intrigue is afoot. Intrepid Librarians Irene and Kai find themselves caught in the middle of a dragon political contest. It seems a young Librarian has become tangled in this conflict, and if they can't extricate him, there could be serious repercussions for the mysterious Library. And, as the balance of power across mighty factions hangs in the balance, this could even trigger war. Irene and Kai are locked in a race against time (and dragons) to procure a rare book. They'll face gangsters, blackmail, and the Library's own Internal Affairs department. And if it doesn't end well, it could have dire consequences on Irene's job. And, incidentally, on her life...


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After being commissioned to find a rare book, Librarian Irene and her assistant, Kai, head to Prohibition-era New York and are thrust into the middle of a political fight with dragons, mobsters, and Fae. In a 1920s-esque New York, Prohibition is in force; fedoras, flapper dresses, and tommy guns are in fashion: and intrigue is afoot. Intrepid Librarians Irene and Kai find After being commissioned to find a rare book, Librarian Irene and her assistant, Kai, head to Prohibition-era New York and are thrust into the middle of a political fight with dragons, mobsters, and Fae. In a 1920s-esque New York, Prohibition is in force; fedoras, flapper dresses, and tommy guns are in fashion: and intrigue is afoot. Intrepid Librarians Irene and Kai find themselves caught in the middle of a dragon political contest. It seems a young Librarian has become tangled in this conflict, and if they can't extricate him, there could be serious repercussions for the mysterious Library. And, as the balance of power across mighty factions hangs in the balance, this could even trigger war. Irene and Kai are locked in a race against time (and dragons) to procure a rare book. They'll face gangsters, blackmail, and the Library's own Internal Affairs department. And if it doesn't end well, it could have dire consequences on Irene's job. And, incidentally, on her life...

30 review for The Lost Plot

  1. 5 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Another excellent entry in this very enjoyable series. And what a sweet ending. It left me with a smile on my face! I have loved the concept of a hidden library between many different worlds since I read book one and now it is even better because we have dragons! In this book there are a number of dragons doing dragony things and when two adult dragons fight in the air over the Hudson River watch out! I like that the main character is a librarian called Irene. This conjures up a vision of a stuffy Another excellent entry in this very enjoyable series. And what a sweet ending. It left me with a smile on my face! I have loved the concept of a hidden library between many different worlds since I read book one and now it is even better because we have dragons! In this book there are a number of dragons doing dragony things and when two adult dragons fight in the air over the Hudson River watch out! I like that the main character is a librarian called Irene. This conjures up a vision of a stuffy middle aged lady in a twin set. Nothing could be further from the truth as this Irene is young, smart and able to get herself out of all kinds of dangerous situations. She likes dragons too:) A quick check shows me that there is a book 5 in the future some time. I am looking forward to it already.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Melindam

    ".....And if X gives Qing Song the book that lets him get Minister Zhao’s position, then Librarians become tools for hire. They become servants. And they become generally known as allies of the dragons, which means they’re automatically enemies of the Fae. Not to mention that if we support one dragon family or faction, then we make enemies of the others. The Library survives in the middle. We are not on anyone’s side. If X exists and has done what Jin Zhi says they have, then X has just put Libr ".....And if X gives Qing Song the book that lets him get Minister Zhao’s position, then Librarians become tools for hire. They become servants. And they become generally known as allies of the dragons, which means they’re automatically enemies of the Fae. Not to mention that if we support one dragon family or faction, then we make enemies of the others. The Library survives in the middle. We are not on anyone’s side. If X exists and has done what Jin Zhi says they have, then X has just put Librarians in danger across all the alternate worlds." Another fantastic book by Genevieve Cogman in the Invisible Library-series with the extraordinarily ordinary, uncommonly common, exceptionally unexceptional, anti-kickassly kickass (or is it all the other way-round?) Librarian-Heroine, Irene. Irene is pretty much one of the the coolest and smartest heroines I've come across in a book to date without any superpowers as such (and for this particular category I do not consider the use of the "Language" as superpower, "only" a "common", but very handy librarian-tool). In this day and age of special-snowflakes or the-one-and-only-saviours, her ability to get out of predicaments (mostly) on her own by using common sense is practically innovative. :) The only drawback is the Peregrine Vale (alternate-world Sherlock Holmes) does not really feature in the book. :((( Full review to come.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    Real Rating: 4.75* of five The Publisher Says: After being commissioned to find a rare book, Librarian Irene and her assistant, Kai, head to Prohibition-era New York and are thrust into the middle of a political fight with dragons, mobsters, and Fae. In a 1920s-esque New York, Prohibition is in force; fedoras, flapper dresses, and tommy guns are in fashion: and intrigue is afoot. Intrepid Librarians Irene and Kai find themselves caught in the middle of a dragon political contest. It seems a young Real Rating: 4.75* of five The Publisher Says: After being commissioned to find a rare book, Librarian Irene and her assistant, Kai, head to Prohibition-era New York and are thrust into the middle of a political fight with dragons, mobsters, and Fae. In a 1920s-esque New York, Prohibition is in force; fedoras, flapper dresses, and tommy guns are in fashion: and intrigue is afoot. Intrepid Librarians Irene and Kai find themselves caught in the middle of a dragon political contest. It seems a young Librarian has become tangled in this conflict, and if they can't extricate him, there could be serious repercussions for the mysterious Library. And, as the balance of power across mighty factions hangs in the balance, this could even trigger war. Irene and Kai are locked in a race against time (and dragons) to procure a rare book. They'll face gangsters, blackmail, and the Library's own Internal Affairs department. And if it doesn't end well, it could have dire consequences on Irene's job. And, incidentally, on her life... My Review: Quite extraordinary. This is a high-stakes story within the Invisible Library series. Many, many things have changed since book one and in this story the changes truly come home to roost in the attic. Action, excitement, and several passages of astonishing violence are the key drivers of events down surprising channels. It isn't often that I finish a series read, immediately procure the next, and devour that one in a day. I did that for this series because I am besotted with the idea of the Library and its multiverse-trotting spy/burglar/diplomats the Librarians. I am even, if you can believe this!, completely okay with the presence of magic in the series. I know, right?! I who lift my brow, crinkle my nose, draw my lips into a sneer, at the merest whiff of majgickq, actually *approve* of the system invented and presented in this series. It's actually inexplicable to me that I am not having literary hives every time the Language is used and at each Fae sighting. What has happened to me? I'm putting it down to the revolting fact, recently revealed to me, that I share an ancestor with *gag* Tom Cruise *retch*, which blow to my self-esteem causes me spiritual pain. The story in this book is, from the opening scene, one of peril and menace to Irene. She is most often alone to face her adversaries. Kai is, as a developing theme in the series, going to have to learn to take action on his own behalf. Irene's worries that she isn't teaching him the skills she possesses so much as grooming him as her sidekick have been woven through the stories. It's a sign of the character's deeply seated identity, created by a talented and careful author. I buy into the characters's reality in this really quite daft alternative view of reality because Author Cogman spent the time to think through these small moments of self-reflection. The main action takes place in a Prohibition-like New York after Irene and Kai land in the ruins of a library in Boston. Readers of the previous book will appreciate the emotional impact of this venue, and readers in general will share the appalled horrified revulsion that Kai and Irene express at the idea of a soul so bereft of respect as to perpetrate vandalism on a library. (As an aside, I note that Susan Orlean just published The Library Book which non-fictional take on the subject I ended up abandoning as it was too painful to continue reading.) The local mob boss, Giorgio Rossi aka George Ross, has a lady sidekick-cum-enforcer, Lily. Lily knows who, more accurately what, Kai is on sight. That's because Lily is Fae, and despite her chosen position as murderous muscle for the mob, is really the brains of the crime boss's operations. Irene's somewhat bizarre (and wholly unintentional) cover identity as an English crime boss visiting New York to drum up new business piques Lily's interest. Crime boss Irene is hunting a vanished Librarian straight into the clutches of two dragons operating without sanction in this bizarre, lawless New York. They're aiming to win an internal political battle by supplying their dragon queen with a special alternative edition of an ancient Chinese novel. (She's interested in a re-read of this novel, a fondly remembered diverting entertainment from her past. That procuring this book for her amusement causes numerous deaths and a vicious war between her subordinates is...uninteresting.) Irene's hunted Librarian, Evariste, is doing his dead-level best to accommodate one of the dragons by procuring the book because his daughter is being held hostage by the dragon's clever henchman. Kai and Evariste, separated from Irene, go off and procure the desired book...but who receives it and how aren't in the least sure until the moment the event occurs. The climax of the hunt for the book, for Evariste, and for justice (and Justice) takes place in the Court of the Dragon Queen. As always when the extremely Order-centered dragons are involved, there is a price to pay for the lies one tells, and a price to pay for telling the clear, unmuddied truth. Justice and fairness each have their innings, though neither one takes the field in unsullied glory at the end of the proceedings. The guilty...everyone is guilty, that's the nature of the world, the multiverse in fact, but here we mean "those whose actions and inactions caused irreparable harm" by it...suffer, and the wronged are made as whole as Justice can make them. Irene is required to suffer her personal agonies in the search for and service of Justice served to violators of Order. But there is, as there always is, a reason in Author Cogman's relentless and grinding tale of Truth's victims. And it makes the ending of this book so very, very special. I seldom laugh with exuberant happiness as I read endings. That is exactly what happened here. Author Cogman:

  4. 4 out of 5

    Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    After the last books thrilling plot was I eagerly awaiting the next book in this series. The Lost Plot takes librarians Irene and Kai to an alternative world set in 1930s America with gangsters (and dragons). They have to save the life of a librarian who has been caught up in a fight between two dragons. And, Irene and Kai most try to fix this situation since librarians have to stay outside conflicts like this. Now, this book was absolutely alright to read. I love Genevieve Cogman's writing style After the last books thrilling plot was I eagerly awaiting the next book in this series. The Lost Plot takes librarians Irene and Kai to an alternative world set in 1930s America with gangsters (and dragons). They have to save the life of a librarian who has been caught up in a fight between two dragons. And, Irene and Kai most try to fix this situation since librarians have to stay outside conflicts like this. Now, this book was absolutely alright to read. I love Genevieve Cogman's writing style, the humor, and the action and of course the supercool Invisible Library. However, I just want to say that there were two things that just made this book a little less interesting to read and that was that my favorite character, besides Irene, was pretty much absent all through the book. Yes, Vale is not in this book much. Which is perhaps logical since Irene and Kai are in another alt. world than Vale's. However, that doesn't mean that I don't miss him and that I didn't spend the whole book waiting for him to show up. Also, the romantic turn in this book is one that I was not at all thrilled about. I'm not sure I will handle this pairing in the next book. It just feels, not interesting. The plot, for the most part, was good with two dragons competing against each other. Nevertheless, There were moments when I felt that my interest would drop throughout the story. Irene's usually brightened the dull moments with some wisecrack comments or thoughts. However, I must admit that looking back do I realize that my heart was not really there. That the story just barely worked for me. It could be because of the big confrontation in the previous book and the fact that this dragon centralized storyline just didn't do the trick for me. However, I will still read the next book in this series and I do hope to see more of Vane in it. I want to thank Berkley Publishing Group for providing me with a free copy through NetGalley for an honest review!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2018/01/25/... Now that the Invisible Library series has become firmly established, the storylines are just getting better and better. Thematically, The Lost Plot is more mysterious and adventurous, drawing heavily from Dragon vs. Fae politics, and there are also strong attempts to involve as many world-building elements as possible. That said though, I do feel this installment takes a step away from series arc that has been developing f 4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2018/01/25/... Now that the Invisible Library series has become firmly established, the storylines are just getting better and better. Thematically, The Lost Plot is more mysterious and adventurous, drawing heavily from Dragon vs. Fae politics, and there are also strong attempts to involve as many world-building elements as possible. That said though, I do feel this installment takes a step away from series arc that has been developing for the last three books; the plot of this one is a lot more “standalone” than the others, which might make it a good jumping on point for new readers, but of course I would still highly recommend starting from the beginning if you can. The Lost Plot once again follows protagonist Irene Winters, an agent of the secret organization known as the Invisible Library whose members are tasked with traveling to alternate worlds to procure rare books (and yes, sometimes that means stealing them). When the book begins, Irene is offered a business proposal by a mysterious stranger. The would-be client, clearly a dragon, wishes to pay handsomely for her services to obtain a rare copy of Journey to the West, one of Chinese literature’s greatest classics. However, because of the Invisible Library’s official mandate to remain neutral in matters regarding the Dragons and the Fae, Irene’s first instinct is to decline. Only, it turns out that not all Librarians are as responsible as she is when it comes to playing by the rules. From her contact, Irene finds out that one of her colleagues had accepted a similar deal to find the book from another dragon, and if this information were to get out, it could cause some serious conflict with the Fae and possibly spark an all-out war. Unable to walk away now, Irene turns to her apprentice Kai for help, and together they travel to an alternate world reminiscent of 1920’s New York to seek out the Librarian who has put all their futures in jeopardy. The Lost Plot might be them most entertaining book of the series so far. It’s nice to see the story taking full advantage of its premise, making use of the interdimensional library aspect to transport readers to strange new worlds—or, in this case, exploring interesting historical periods. Anything is possible in this series, and this time, Irene and Kai’s adventures take them to a time of fedoras, Prohibition, and tommy gun-toting gangsters. The Roaring Twenties are one of the most iconic decades in American history, and you’ll find all its hallmarks in this novel, from the instantly recognizable fashion styles to the clandestine speakeasies and all that jazz. As if attempting to extract the Library from the middle of a long-standing Dragon vs. Faerie rivalry weren’t enough, our characters also find themselves having to deal with interfering police chiefs and greedy mob bosses who are all trying to get a slice of the action. From beginning to end, this book was non-stop and fast-paced fun. I also liked how this novel featured a dragon-centric storyline, which of course raises some important questions about Kai’s role in the Library. The ending with the courtroom-like setting and suspense was almost more than I could bear. However, as someone who has followed this series since the beginning, I noticed too that the focus has shifted slightly away from the conflicts of the previous novels, with the scope widening to encompass the Invisible Library’s role and exploring its significance in this world. This was something I’d wanted for a long time, so I was quite happy to see The Lost Plot go down this path. That said, there are some trade-offs. Here you will find little development in the areas regarding Alberich or the mystery behind Irene’s parentage, for example, and for those answers, I suppose we’ll have to wait for a future sequel. Vale fans should also be forewarned that he does not feature much in this novel, a point to which I will admit to a twinge of disappointment myself, since I’ve grown to like his character a lot. But oh well, you win some, you lose some. All in all, The Lost Plot was another exciting and satisfying sequel which reminds me once again why I’m glad to be reading this series. There’s a reason why I keep coming back for more. If you’ve been enjoying the mysteries of the Invisible Library and the interdimensional adventures of its agents thus far, then you’ll want to pick this one up too.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carole (Carole's Random Life in Books)

    This review can also be found at Carole's Random Life in Books. I had such a good time reading this book! This is the fourth book in The Invisible Library series and while it tells its own story, I do think that this series is best if read in order. One thing that I love about this series is that each installment can be completely unique and the types of worlds that they visit really has no limits. This was a very strong story that was incredibly entertaining from beginning to end. Irene finds her This review can also be found at Carole's Random Life in Books. I had such a good time reading this book! This is the fourth book in The Invisible Library series and while it tells its own story, I do think that this series is best if read in order. One thing that I love about this series is that each installment can be completely unique and the types of worlds that they visit really has no limits. This was a very strong story that was incredibly entertaining from beginning to end. Irene finds herself in a difficult situation once again. She is approached by a dragon regarding a very important contest for a rare book. The Library does not get involved in dragon politics and must maintain their neutrality so Irene reports the incident to her superiors. Irene is given the assignment of investigating the actions of another Librarian and to find out what is going on with this situation. Irene and Kai find themselves in a New York reminiscent of the 1920s complete with gangsters and other colorful individuals. Irene is in trouble right away once she enters the city and soon finds herself at odds with the local police. She must deal with them along with the local gangsters in addition to figuring out what is going on with the dragons and the other Librarian. This was my favorite book in the series thus far. I was completely charmed by the whole story. I like how Irene is able to think quickly and can seem to get herself out of almost any situation. Kai spent a lot of time away from Irene in this book but we get to see that he is equally capable. I really like both of these characters a lot. They are both willing to make sacrifices if necessary in order to make sure that the right thing is done. Not to mention that dragons play a dominant role in this story which I found really interesting. I would recommend this series to others. I found myself swept away in a wonderfully crafted world filled with a variety of interesting characters. I can't wait to read more of this delightful series! I received an advance reader edition of this book from Berkley Publishing Group via NetGalley. Initial Thoughts This was such a fun book! This installment takes Irene and Kai to New York in a period reminisent of the 1920's complete with gangsters. There wasn't a minute of boring in this book and I was highly entertained the whole time I was reading. Things look pretty dire for a while in this book but it is always interesting to see what Irene can come up with to everyone out of trouble.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Rodrigues

    I love these books. This is a rare situation where each book in the series is better than the last. What begins as a straightforward action adventure story becomes more of a mystery that is not easily solved. Dragon politics has taken a nasty turn, and evidence points to the involvement of a librarian, violating their neutrality pledge. Irene and Kai must find this rogue librarian and try to restore balance, but must do so without the institutional cover of the library; if they are discovered, th I love these books. This is a rare situation where each book in the series is better than the last. What begins as a straightforward action adventure story becomes more of a mystery that is not easily solved. Dragon politics has taken a nasty turn, and evidence points to the involvement of a librarian, violating their neutrality pledge. Irene and Kai must find this rogue librarian and try to restore balance, but must do so without the institutional cover of the library; if they are discovered, they're on their own. The setting is a slightly more dramatized version of prohibition-era America, with powerful mob bosses, weakened police departments, and entirely too many guns everywhere. Once again, even though Irene and Kai have some level of what could be considered magical abilities, their main asset is their cleverness and bravery. My only complaint is that there is not nearly enough Inspector Vale in this book. He is delightful. received via Netgalley I apologize for the weak review, but man, having a newborn is SO MUCH WORK. <3

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    Update: 3.5 stars. Still really good, but it feels slightly different from the other books in the series. Though I loved the progression in Irene and Kai's relationship! I'm so excited for this! There's now a cover for it, and the title has been revealed! The summary is intriguing: "Their fourth adventure takes our intrepid pair of Librarians to a 1930s-esque Chicago. Prohibition is in force, fedoras, flapper dresses and tommyguns are in fashion, and intrigue is afoot. Irene and Kai find themselves Update: 3.5 stars. Still really good, but it feels slightly different from the other books in the series. Though I loved the progression in Irene and Kai's relationship! I'm so excited for this! There's now a cover for it, and the title has been revealed! The summary is intriguing: "Their fourth adventure takes our intrepid pair of Librarians to a 1930s-esque Chicago. Prohibition is in force, fedoras, flapper dresses and tommyguns are in fashion, and intrigue is afoot. Irene and Kai find themselves in a race against time (and dragons) to procure a rare book whose discovery could have serious political repercussions for Kai's people - and whose loss could have dire consequences for Irene's job. Oh, and also possibly for her life . . ." (Source)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Wanda

    2019 Re-read When life gets complicated, my reading needs simplify. Ms. Cogman’s Invisible Library series had seen me through a challenging week of no running water and cat care duties. Ah, the dragon intrigue volume! This is where the rubber meets the road for Irene and Kai. Not to mention whether the Invisible Library will be able to maintain it’s neutrality. Plenty of mysterious happenings, complete with gangsters and over-head dragon duels. This is the “diplomacy is hard” volume too. As Irene 2019 Re-read When life gets complicated, my reading needs simplify. Ms. Cogman’s Invisible Library series had seen me through a challenging week of no running water and cat care duties. Ah, the dragon intrigue volume! This is where the rubber meets the road for Irene and Kai. Not to mention whether the Invisible Library will be able to maintain it’s neutrality. Plenty of mysterious happenings, complete with gangsters and over-head dragon duels. This is the “diplomacy is hard” volume too. As Irene notes at one point, “And there was another elephant in the room. There were so many elephants in the room that it was getting positively crowded.” Ms. Cogman, I will read as many of these adventures as you choose to write. I hope there are plans for several more, as this is too good a fantasy world for me to abandon it happily. Original review: I admit I am very much a fan of Irene Winters and the Invisible Library series. So much so that I will actually be purchasing a copy of this, book 4, to become part of my Nursing Home Collection (all those books that will make the transition with me to said nursing home when the time do come). I read too damn fast—The Lost Plot went by much too quickly. It is action-packed, putting Irene in many tight spots, between gangsters, plotting dragons, and unpredictable fae assassins. Luckily, she and Kai have been through several of these rodeos before and they are pretty good at judging what their partner will do. The ending, while obviously leading us on towards book 5, was nearly perfect! I know that I’ve previously been a fan of Irene + Vale, but after book 4, I am really shipping Irene and Kai. It’s a woman’s prerogative to change her mind! Ms. Cogman, bring on book 5! And could I be lucky enough that you are planning more?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    4.5 stars. Possibly the best yet! Really enjoyed the dragon politics and the visit to Prohibition America.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Overmark

    Just as we´re getting used to books gone missing, it is happening to Librarians as well … And, “who ´re you gonna call …? Irene!” After an installment # three which showed a wee bit weak in the storyline, Genevieve Cogman (and Irene) is doing a worthy come-back. Lots of action, intrigue and fight-to-the-end-for-honor takes place in Chicago and New York during prohibition at a pace only fit for well-shaped dragons. When we previously came to believe that the Dragon race were the upholders of Order Just as we´re getting used to books gone missing, it is happening to Librarians as well … And, “who ´re you gonna call …? Irene!” After an installment # three which showed a wee bit weak in the storyline, Genevieve Cogman (and Irene) is doing a worthy come-back. Lots of action, intrigue and fight-to-the-end-for-honor takes place in Chicago and New York during prohibition at a pace only fit for well-shaped dragons. When we previously came to believe that the Dragon race were the upholders of Order, as opposed to the Chaos of the Fae, it now turns out we were maybe not told the full story. There are rotten apples in politics everywhere, dragon kingdoms included, and it is up to Irene to navigate very delicately not to compromise the neutrality of The Library. A well written forth episode in the life of Irene the Librarian, who will escape the monsters in the prologue …

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alex Cantone

    (Irene) looked around the room they were standing in one last time. It was stacked full of westerns from A-658. The covers were festooned with lurid pictures of stern-jawed cowboys, rearing horses and women falling out of bodices. She hoped she never had to go anywhere like that. Horses weren’t one of her enthusiasms… In a universe where worlds are dominated by the forces of order (dragons) and chaos (the fey), the Invisible Library holds the balance of power through remaining impartial, its oper (Irene) looked around the room they were standing in one last time. It was stacked full of westerns from A-658. The covers were festooned with lurid pictures of stern-jawed cowboys, rearing horses and women falling out of bodices. She hoped she never had to go anywhere like that. Horses weren’t one of her enthusiasms… In a universe where worlds are dominated by the forces of order (dragons) and chaos (the fey), the Invisible Library holds the balance of power through remaining impartial, its operatives traverse to distant worlds via libraries to return ancient tomes to the library for safe keeping, stacks of books forming “wards” against evil, and invoking the Language for use against mortals, animals, inanimate objects or their surroundings. Irene Winters is librarian-in-residence in Victorian London, with her apprentice, Kai, youngest son of the Dragon King of the Eastern Ocean (Ao Guang). In The Lost Plot she is summons to the library for a covert mission: the chief advisor of the (dragon) Queen of the Southern Lands has been assassinated and two candidates are vying to be appointed his successor: Jin Zhi and Qing Song. To prove their worthiness, each has to seek a rare book to bring to the Queen, without breaking the rules of engaging outside help. But Irene learns that one of the librarians has gone missing, after reaching the library then returning to one of the worlds. How he got there in the first place is shrouded in mystery. With only a short timeframe, the world to which Irene and Kai traverse in search of the missing librarian is 1930’s Boston where prohibition, bootlegging and speakeasy’s reign supreme. Their plans are soon thrown into turmoil, first by gangsters, then the police. ‘I can pay, you know,’ Irene offered. She was trying to work out who these men were working for. Were they Qing Song’s minions, random gangsters, specific gangsters, or undercover police? So many enemies, so little time. Readers are often asked to suspend belief but Genevieve Cogman’s books make it easy. What I like most is they are ORIGINAL, not some rehashed fairy tale or Greek legend. The characters are well-described from their clothes to their moods and proclivities, there is a hint of romance between the main characters without overpowering the story. Throughout the narrative is littered with self-effacing humour as Irene uses her wits and powers of the library to evade or stay one step ahead of the opposition. She jumped for the hole in the ceiling, grabbing hold of it and, with some gasping and straining, she pulled herself up and through. Her old gymnastics coach might give her a few marks for effort, but would take several thousand off for lack of elegance. The middle is a bit muddled, but as the chase reaches its climax with a battle between dragons, Irene muses: She occasionally daydreamed about being the sort of character in a story who could faint and leave everyone else to sort things out. But that wasn’t going to happen. I suggest starting with the earlier ones, but each story is complete in itself.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Robin (Bridge Four)

    3.5 prohibitive stars Every book the in the invisible library series is a story in and of itself. You almost don’t even have to read them in order and from what I can see so far you could maybe even get away with skipping one and then jumping back in at a later point so far. I say this because I think that is why I don’t have a stronger emotional connection to the characters yet. It feels almost like a new story every time starting from scratch than a series where you are building from book to bo 3.5 prohibitive stars Every book the in the invisible library series is a story in and of itself. You almost don’t even have to read them in order and from what I can see so far you could maybe even get away with skipping one and then jumping back in at a later point so far. I say this because I think that is why I don’t have a stronger emotional connection to the characters yet. It feels almost like a new story every time starting from scratch than a series where you are building from book to book. Irene and Kia need to find a librarian who might have gotten in a little over their heads and is using their Library skills to get involved with Dragon politics. This is bad since the Library is supposed to remain neutral and thus stays out of all of that. We are transported to a roaring 1920s world during prohibition to look for the Librarian in question and a book in the middle of this mess. I enjoyed that it was just Kai and Irene in this book. I like Vale but I’m really pulling for Kia in a who gets Irene situation at the moment. Vale is a great Sherlock Holmes type of character but, well, he isn’t a dragon so….*shrugs* #teamkai all the way here. Still it is all Kia all the time in The Lost Plot and there will be some consequences if they get caught by the Dragons since Irene and Kia’s relationship could be frowned upon too. I also like the world that we land in with all the gangsters, dirty cops, speakeasies and tommy guns. It is a very parodied up version of the time I think. It’s light and fun and after some of the seriousness of the last book The Lost Plot is almost like a filler read or a short story off to the side. There is one big development off at the end but for the most part there is really no movement on any of the bigger plots surrounding the Library or Irene. After the reveals of the last story I was hoping to follow up on a few of the twists involved. I really want to meet Irene’s parents and shouldn’t Irene possibly talk to her superior about a few of the bombs dropped by the Libraries #1 most wanted? Irene kissed Vale in the last book and Kia said they would talk about their future but there is never a conversation and well Vale was out of the entire picture in this story so there is nothing there either. I like the stories but I’m longing for some personal relationship developments to happen sometime. Sooner rather than later would be preferable. It will be interesting to see what happens in the next book since it looks like Irene, Kia and Vale will be featured and working together.

  14. 5 out of 5

    All Things Urban Fantasy

    Review courtesy of All Things Urban Fantasy. The Invisible Library series consistently provides an entertaining and enjoyable reading experience. I love Irene and Kai, and I love the concept of the Library. While THE LOST PLOT felt like a side quest to the main, overarching plot of the series (no super evil librarians in sight here, or questions answered from previous books), it was still a great deal of fun to read. THE LOST PLOT was full of danger around every corner for Irene and Kai, and I can Review courtesy of All Things Urban Fantasy. The Invisible Library series consistently provides an entertaining and enjoyable reading experience. I love Irene and Kai, and I love the concept of the Library. While THE LOST PLOT felt like a side quest to the main, overarching plot of the series (no super evil librarians in sight here, or questions answered from previous books), it was still a great deal of fun to read. THE LOST PLOT was full of danger around every corner for Irene and Kai, and I can honestly say I felt a little stressed out at times, trying to figure out how Irene was going to talk her way out of certain situations. She remains as capable and creative as ever, though, something that I very much appreciate about her character. Plus, she gets to play a lady gangster in a 1920s-esque New York, how badass is that?! This book, while it felt a little like a detour from the main plot of Alberich trying to destroy the Library, still developed Irene and Kai as characters and developed their relationship in a way I was not really expecting. While they didn't get as much page time together as I would have liked, and I'm not 100% sure I love the way the relationship is going, I still liked the resolution at the end of the book. All in all, THE LOST PLOT is an excellent installment in The Invisible Library series. This book also would work well as a stand alone, so readers new to the series could definitely jump in here without needing too much backstory. However, I do recommend the series as a whole! Sexual content: Kissing

  15. 5 out of 5

    Maria Dimitrova

    Buddy read over at BB&B The Invisible Library is one of those series that get better with each new instalment. The style evolves, the story gets better and the characters develop over time. In the beginning both Irene and Kai were a bit two-dimensional but over the last 3 books they've fleshed out into genuine sentient beings. I particularly like the change in Irene, whos whole priority system has changed now that she has some real meaningful connections with other beings. I blame Vale for that c Buddy read over at BB&B The Invisible Library is one of those series that get better with each new instalment. The style evolves, the story gets better and the characters develop over time. In the beginning both Irene and Kai were a bit two-dimensional but over the last 3 books they've fleshed out into genuine sentient beings. I particularly like the change in Irene, whos whole priority system has changed now that she has some real meaningful connections with other beings. I blame Vale for that change most of all even if he played little role in this book. Despite him missing for pretty much the entire book, I could feel his influence every time Irene doubted her motives and chose to help her fellow librarian instead of thinking only about the Library's reputation. And that ending... well let's just say I have high hopes for the next book relationship wise. I do hope we'll get more of Vale in the next one though. I did miss him.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    Anybody who loves books simply must love Irene Winters and the Library. In this fourth installment of The Invisible Library, Irene once again finds herself tangled in a mess. The setting? 1920s America. The players? Two dragons who are keen to steal a book and win a place of honor in their court. What follows can only be madness and mayhem, as well as all the delights followers of Cogman’s series have come to expect in these books. I would like to preface the rest of my review by confession a gra Anybody who loves books simply must love Irene Winters and the Library. In this fourth installment of The Invisible Library, Irene once again finds herself tangled in a mess. The setting? 1920s America. The players? Two dragons who are keen to steal a book and win a place of honor in their court. What follows can only be madness and mayhem, as well as all the delights followers of Cogman’s series have come to expect in these books. I would like to preface the rest of my review by confession a grave mistake. I have never read The Invisible Library. Or any of the books in this series. When I requested this ARC, I was short-sighted enough to miss the part where it said “fourth installment”. I want you all to know I am going into this review with no background whatsoever, because context is important. Ready? I will admit, it took me a little while to get into the swing of things.  The Language, for example, drove me bonkers until Amanda from Literary Weaponry explained to me that it was all well and covered in books 1-3 (again, I would like to repeat shame on me for requesting book 4).  Once the plot was well and running and we were in the 1920s, I was completely on board.  I always turn into the most obnoxious person about period books, so of course I found myself cross-referencing the internet to see if landmarks truly existed.  If anyone is wondering - Genevieve Cogman does her homework. She has perfectly and brilliantly captured the Big Apple in the Jazz Age, right down to prohibition and women's rights. It's not just the 1920s she gets right, however.  We start in a rainy mansion surrounded by vampires, and that is properly dreary and troublesome.  Followed up by the Library, which has a sense of dusty paranoia, all the settings are unique and striking.  And the dragon realms are truly fantastic. Irene is brilliant. A particular highlight of this book was Irene getting up on a podium and lecturing about the evils of alcohol to stall for time.  It's an amazing, hilarious scene and it's just such an excellent example of Irene's resourcefulness.  Loved it.  Irene is boisterous and clever, a perfect companion to Kai's cautious and reserved dragon personality.  Really, I couldn't be more pleased.  She's like Rey from Star Wars, like Elizabeth Bennett from Pride and Prejudice, and you really can't help but to love her. Of course, not every book is perfect.  Compared to Irene's shenanigans, I found Kai's scenes fairly flat.  And that is unfortunate, because in the middle of the book Kai is actually following the proper storyline while Irene's episodes are filler.  Is there something wonderful that makes fans fall for Kai in previous books?  I was not entirely impressed. Did I like it? You know what? Yes, yes I did. I really thought at the beginning I was going to end up hating it, but instead I got looped into Irene’s shenanigans. It was absolutely not what I was expecting. I was also at a disadvantage, not reading the previous books, but with a little suspension of disbelief and acceptance of the fantasy elements, I'm not sure that impacted my read.  I think it's safe to say anyone could pick up The Lost Plot and be enchanted by it.  I'm definitely going to add the first book on to my TBR, because I am now invested enough in Irene Winters that I want to know her whole story.

  17. 4 out of 5

    ☕️Kimberly

    Vampires, fae, and dragons all give Irene fits in The Lost Plot. Two dragons are tasked with a quest. The one who completes it gains favor with the Queen, and the one who does not faces a disgrace that will require sacrifice to atone.  When a new Librarian finds himself tangled up in their quest to retrieve a book, Irene and her young dragon apprentice Kai must travel to an alternate 1920s New York to save him and protect the Libraries neutrality. Once again, Cogman pulled me in as we traveled t Vampires, fae, and dragons all give Irene fits in The Lost Plot. Two dragons are tasked with a quest. The one who completes it gains favor with the Queen, and the one who does not faces a disgrace that will require sacrifice to atone.  When a new Librarian finds himself tangled up in their quest to retrieve a book, Irene and her young dragon apprentice Kai must travel to an alternate 1920s New York to save him and protect the Libraries neutrality. Once again, Cogman pulled me in as we traveled to this alternate world with gangsters, flapper dresses, and prohibition to face a ruthless dragon determined to win. From magic to worldbuilding Cogman holds me spellbound every time I step into the Invisible Library series. I love the idea of alternate worlds. Some are filled with chaos and others order. I can just picture the portals through libraries and the great library itself. A trip to security was fascinating as the inner workings of the library itself are still quite a mystery. Each piece of knowledge we gain in the series is a treat. I enjoy spending time with Irene Winters.  Her ability to access situations, devise plans and tapdance in high court never cease to amaze me. I loved meeting the Dragon Queen and pictured an Alice in Wonderland type court. I kept waiting for someone to shout, "Off with her head!" We see some development between Kai and Irene. I wouldn't call it a romance, and it is just a side thread to their friendship and partnership. I picture Irene with a much stronger, older man like a certain detective on Baker Street perhaps. Only time will tell. This review was originally posted at Caffeinated Reviewer

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth McCoy

    All evidence points to this being a great book. [/in-joke]

  19. 4 out of 5

    Milou

    This is yet another great continuation of a wonderful series. Cogman has created such a fascinating world, with endless possibilities... and in exploring this further she never disappoints. This time around we travel to New York in the 1930s, complete with mobsters, guns, booze and dragon politics. In all her stories so far Cogman draws on the cliches, but still managing to create an unique world out of them. In doing this she makes the setting instantly recognizable but still incredibly interest This is yet another great continuation of a wonderful series. Cogman has created such a fascinating world, with endless possibilities... and in exploring this further she never disappoints. This time around we travel to New York in the 1930s, complete with mobsters, guns, booze and dragon politics. In all her stories so far Cogman draws on the cliches, but still managing to create an unique world out of them. In doing this she makes the setting instantly recognizable but still incredibly interesting. And as always, Irene is a wonderful main character. She is brilliant and kick ass, being able to get herself out of any tricky situation using a combination of common sense, wit, daring, persuasion/the Language or just well aimed foot. In this story she gets to shine as a crime lord... something she does suspiciously well. The only thing stopping this from getting the full 5 star rating is the relatively tame climax compared to the epicness that was book three. But dragons... Another point of note which might disappoint is that we see very little of the Fae, and also Vale doesn't really feature in this book. But dragons. Overall, this book is fast paced, action packed and just a lot of fun. If you have not started this series yet, do yourself a favour and pick up The Invisible Library as soon as you can. By the way, did I mention dragons? 4.5*

  20. 5 out of 5

    Terri Wino

    3-1/2 stars. Another entertaining entry in this series. I enjoyed the time period this one took place in, as it is more "modern" times than previous books. It felt like there was more action throughout this book, rather than in spurts here and there. This made the story move along at a quicker pace. I also enjoyed that Kai and Irene were separated during a lot of the story; showing the reader how industrious each had to be to get themselves out of sticky situations without the benefit of relying o 3-1/2 stars. Another entertaining entry in this series. I enjoyed the time period this one took place in, as it is more "modern" times than previous books. It felt like there was more action throughout this book, rather than in spurts here and there. This made the story move along at a quicker pace. I also enjoyed that Kai and Irene were separated during a lot of the story; showing the reader how industrious each had to be to get themselves out of sticky situations without the benefit of relying on each other. However, a big part of these books, for me, is the chemistry between Irene and Kai and just how well they do work together, so I hope future installments return to the formula I have grown used to. Based on the ending of this book, it appears there will have to be some changes made in the parameters of Kai and Irene's interaction, and I am very curious as to how the author will handle this.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Oda Renate

    WE HAVE A COVER AND A TITLE. I REPEAT WE HAVE COVER ! AND TITLE! EEEKKK! Sooo beautiful.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    I love these books so much 😍 Irene goes total Columbo at the end of this one too. Brilliant stuff.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sahitya

    This book was on all of my anticipated books lists of 2018 last year but I just lost track of it among all the other hyped novels, but I'm so glad I finally got the chance to get to it. Though I didn't plan this as part of my Five Star Readathon, I thought this would be a perfect book for the "Old Anticipated Book" challenge and it did not disappoint. It's so much fun to see Irene in her element again. She is so calm, cool, collected and resourceful - it's just damn impressive. Her quick thinking This book was on all of my anticipated books lists of 2018 last year but I just lost track of it among all the other hyped novels, but I'm so glad I finally got the chance to get to it. Though I didn't plan this as part of my Five Star Readathon, I thought this would be a perfect book for the "Old Anticipated Book" challenge and it did not disappoint. It's so much fun to see Irene in her element again. She is so calm, cool, collected and resourceful - it's just damn impressive. Her quick thinking in extremely tricky situations is always a delight to read and I love how she takes charge and everyone automatically listens to her, because she is just that assertive. Despite getting into all kinds of trouble, there is never any question that she is loyal to the Library but I admire that she still tries to make sure there is as less collateral damage as possible. But in this book, we also see a vulnerable side to her, especially when she sees the destruction of an entire library in Boston or while she is struggling with PTSD from the fiery ending of The Burning Page. It was nice to see that despite her confident persona, she is still human. While the original trilogy was mostly about Irene and Kai trying to steal books and simultaneously dodging the all powerful rogue Librarian, this book finally gives us a better insight into the dragons - how their worlds and courts work, the various rulers and their politics and how best to deal with them. Pitting Irene against two competing dragon lords made for a very exciting story, because I really wanted to see how she was going to outmanuever them all. The setting of the story in 1920s Jazz and Prohibition Era America was a masterstroke - I love the descriptions of Boston and New York and the style and culture of the people. Having dragons, fae and librarians mixed up with police and gangsters made the whole ride quite thrilling. And I have to mention, Irene makes for an excellent badass mob boss. Irene's relationship with Kai also goes through a lot in this book. Her struggle to remain neutral and not favor the dragons, while also finally acknowledging that she did indeed care for him was done really well. After all that happened in the first trilogy, I thought we would never see their relationship progress beyond friendship, but was I glad to be dismissed of that notion. This is one of the slowest burn ships you will ever read and I have to give it to the author that even now, at the end of the fourth book, she only gives us a possibility but no confirmation. I really hope we'll see more progress on that in the next installment. I really did miss Vale a lot in this book and I wish the 5th book will have more of the three of them. This is an excellent series of books that any avid reader in love with the written word and a penchant for adventure will enjoy. And I'm even more excited because I got approved for the ARC of the next installment The Mortal Word and I'm ready for some more adventures.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. *minor spoilers* 3.75 stars Hmmm...so this was the fourth instalment of The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman and whilst I did really enjoy this book (it was witty and all very prim and proper), I didn't love it (like I did the first two). I think the main reason for this was because there were quite a few characters who I love which didn't feature in this book at all :( For example: the Sherlock Holmes-like Peregrine Vale, the charming yet slightly creepy fae, Lord Silver, and yes, ev *minor spoilers* 3.75 stars Hmmm...so this was the fourth instalment of The Invisible Library series by Genevieve Cogman and whilst I did really enjoy this book (it was witty and all very prim and proper), I didn't love it (like I did the first two). I think the main reason for this was because there were quite a few characters who I love which didn't feature in this book at all :( For example: the Sherlock Holmes-like Peregrine Vale, the charming yet slightly creepy fae, Lord Silver, and yes, even the very sinister, flesh-wearing Alberich was missing (just a note: I do not LOVE Alberich) but I really wanted an arch nemesis in the book and we didn't get one. I didn't feel as tense whilst reading this book as I have with the others where quite a few gruesome murders occurred nor did I feel a strong attachment to the new characters in this book (Qing Song, Jin Zhu, Hu, Lily, George Ross, Evariste.) They were all a bit 'meh' and I didn't feel as though enough of their backgrounds were explored. I would have preferred a more in-depth insight into Lily's background as she would have been a very interesting character; however, she remains George's gun-wielding moll without much substance. As for Qing Song and Jin Zhu - they are both dragons who are rivals in a competition to become the Queen of the Southern Lands' new ambassador since the previous one has been assassinated, and their task is to retrieve a book all about dragon politics. Hence Irene and Kai's arrival in 1920s America. I did enjoy the description of prohibition America and the conversations which ensued between the various mobsters (ooh, and I loved how Irene escaped from Captain Venner!) but I just didn't feel as excited or invested as I did with Venice (location in The Masked City). I definitely do think the absence of certain characters affected my overall enjoyment of The Lost Plot. I was really disappointed Vale and Lord Silver didn't make an appearance and I hope Cogman's next instalment focuses on them. A lot. The Lost Plot was all about the dragons so I want the next book to be Sherlock Holmes meets Fae Lord! Hopefully my Christmas wish will come true!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Loves Books and tea

    This is the fourth book in the hugely enjoyable and entertaining Invisible Library series and in this instalment Irene and Kai must travel to an alternate prohibition era New York to rescue a librarian who has involved himself in a competition between two dragons... As usual this was a fun and fast paced read with lots of banter between the characters and laugh out loud moments and after four books I have really grown to love the characters. Even though I was disappointed not to see more of Vale This is the fourth book in the hugely enjoyable and entertaining Invisible Library series and in this instalment Irene and Kai must travel to an alternate prohibition era New York to rescue a librarian who has involved himself in a competition between two dragons... As usual this was a fun and fast paced read with lots of banter between the characters and laugh out loud moments and after four books I have really grown to love the characters. Even though I was disappointed not to see more of Vale and Silver in this book there were some lovely scenes between Irene and Kai and I am looking forward to reading the next book in the series and would recommend this if you're looking for a new series to binge read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Another thriller! This actually felt as if it could be the end of the series. Or not. I think I'd be ok with it ending here.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Richter

    This series just gets better. Irene and Kai are put in harms way as they are sent on a mission to find a possible Librarian who has broken the rule of staying out of Dragon politics.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Beth The Vampire

    *ACTUAL RATING 3.5 STARS* I’ve had to have a long think about this one. This series has had highs and lows, with The Masked City a massive disappointment after the joys of the first book in the series, and then returning with a vengeance with The Burning Page. The settings of these books is what makes them, and in a Library where you can enter any number of alternate worlds, the possibilities are endless. The setting for The Lost Plot is 1920s America during prohibition. Great, huh? My main problem *ACTUAL RATING 3.5 STARS* I’ve had to have a long think about this one. This series has had highs and lows, with The Masked City a massive disappointment after the joys of the first book in the series, and then returning with a vengeance with The Burning Page. The settings of these books is what makes them, and in a Library where you can enter any number of alternate worlds, the possibilities are endless. The setting for The Lost Plot is 1920s America during prohibition. Great, huh? My main problem was that the entire wider world was almost ignored. Previously, Irene had become enmeshed in the world around her, but I felt that this book could have happened anywhere, at anytime. It was mostly overlooked, other than small things that Irene giving a speech at a pro-prohibition rally, and how Irene had to dress, but otherwise I felt very disconnected from it. Previously the worlds have been so lovingly described, but here it was just kind of…abandoned. While the book did focus on Irene’s duty as a Librarian, which involves stealing books particular to a world’s time and place, the context was very different. See, there are Fae and Dragons on the sides of chaos and magic, respectively. The Library remains neutral. The story was very heavily focused on Dragon politics, and two members of the royal family fighting over a book they were tasked to retrieve. Despite rules that say the Dragons cannot seek outside help, of course they break them, and hire someone from the Library, thereby breaching its neutrality. Irene was tasked with tracking down the Librarian involved, against her own peril, and trying to prevent a universal incident. It’s not that the story is bad, not at all, but it is so big it takes up everything else. There is no time for world building, no time for the Library; it’s all about politics. And then it took a convenient incident at the end to really resolve everything. The twist was not actually that surprising either. This is also the first time in all of the books so far that Irene has not been in scenes and they are from the point of view of her apprentice, and Dragon royalty, Kai. It stood out a lot because Irene is the protagonist, and the narrative (while third person) is told with her flare, her personality, and it fell flat when Kai took over, because the narrative could not be the same. Because the characters split up, the reader needed to know what both of them were doing, but it came at the expense of how the whole book was written. There is so much about this series that I love. The idea of the Library is just pure magic, and I love Irene as a charcter. The Language (used by Librarians to change perceptions and alter the world around them) was not overly used…although it can be a convenient out at times. Kai and Irene’s relationship is really sweet and believable, based on respect and faith, not physical attraction and that unbelievable love that makes you roll your eyes. I just think the story was convoluted, focused too much on politics, and the world building really did get left behind.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Runalong

    This felt very leaden and had an awful habit of explaining what Irene was going to do then doing what Irene planned to do. It felt tired and repetitive But the ending breaks up the format a LOT and we find out a lot more about the Dragons. The next book bizarrely is my favourite to date

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mary Catelli

    Book 4 of the Invisible Library series. Spoilers ahead Irene tries to get a book in a fair book exchange, and finds herself in a lair of vampires. Extricating herself, she meets up with a dragon who tries to make a deal. And notes this was carefully timed to ensure that Kai would not be with her. When Kai returns early, he can tell her some things, but exposes her to danger because now the other dragon knows. Consequences touch on Irene's mysterious past, taking the train from Boston to New York, Book 4 of the Invisible Library series. Spoilers ahead Irene tries to get a book in a fair book exchange, and finds herself in a lair of vampires. Extricating herself, she meets up with a dragon who tries to make a deal. And notes this was carefully timed to ensure that Kai would not be with her. When Kai returns early, he can tell her some things, but exposes her to danger because now the other dragon knows. Consequences touch on Irene's mysterious past, taking the train from Boston to New York, appropriate attire, a newspaper account of a master hypnotist, Irene's losing her voice, a lot of bath-tub gin, a fae not involved in their problems intentionally, a copy of The Journey to the West, an unexpected daughter, a dead mentor, and more.

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