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On the nights of July 16 and 17, 1942, French police rounded up eleven-year-old Joseph Weismann, his family, and 13,000 other Jews. After being held for five days in appalling conditions in the V�lodrome d'Hiver stadium, Joseph and his family were transported by cattle car to the Beaune-la-Rolande internment camp and brutally separated: all the adults and most of the child On the nights of July 16 and 17, 1942, French police rounded up eleven-year-old Joseph Weismann, his family, and 13,000 other Jews. After being held for five days in appalling conditions in the V�lodrome d'Hiver stadium, Joseph and his family were transported by cattle car to the Beaune-la-Rolande internment camp and brutally separated: all the adults and most of the children were transported on to Auschwitz and certain death, but 1,000 children were left behind to wait for a later train. The French guards told the children left behind that they would soon be reunited with their parents, but Joseph and his new friend, Joe Kogan, chose to risk everything in a daring escape attempt. After eluding the guards and crawling under razor-sharp barbed wire, Joseph found freedom. But how would he survive the rest of the war in Nazi-occupied France and build a life for himself? His problems had just begun. Until he was 80, Joseph Weismann kept his story to himself, giving only the slightest hints of it to his wife and three children. Simone Veil, lawyer, politician, President of the European Parliament, and member of the Constitutional Council of France--herself a survivor of Auschwitz--urged him to tell his story. In the original French version of this book and in Roselyne Bosch's 2010 film La Rafle, Joseph shares his compelling and terrifying story of the Roundup of the V�l' d'Hiv and his escape. Now, for the first time in English, Joseph tells the rest of his dramatic story in After the Roundup.


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On the nights of July 16 and 17, 1942, French police rounded up eleven-year-old Joseph Weismann, his family, and 13,000 other Jews. After being held for five days in appalling conditions in the V�lodrome d'Hiver stadium, Joseph and his family were transported by cattle car to the Beaune-la-Rolande internment camp and brutally separated: all the adults and most of the child On the nights of July 16 and 17, 1942, French police rounded up eleven-year-old Joseph Weismann, his family, and 13,000 other Jews. After being held for five days in appalling conditions in the V�lodrome d'Hiver stadium, Joseph and his family were transported by cattle car to the Beaune-la-Rolande internment camp and brutally separated: all the adults and most of the children were transported on to Auschwitz and certain death, but 1,000 children were left behind to wait for a later train. The French guards told the children left behind that they would soon be reunited with their parents, but Joseph and his new friend, Joe Kogan, chose to risk everything in a daring escape attempt. After eluding the guards and crawling under razor-sharp barbed wire, Joseph found freedom. But how would he survive the rest of the war in Nazi-occupied France and build a life for himself? His problems had just begun. Until he was 80, Joseph Weismann kept his story to himself, giving only the slightest hints of it to his wife and three children. Simone Veil, lawyer, politician, President of the European Parliament, and member of the Constitutional Council of France--herself a survivor of Auschwitz--urged him to tell his story. In the original French version of this book and in Roselyne Bosch's 2010 film La Rafle, Joseph shares his compelling and terrifying story of the Roundup of the V�l' d'Hiv and his escape. Now, for the first time in English, Joseph tells the rest of his dramatic story in After the Roundup.

30 review for After the Roundup: Escape and Survival in Hitler's France

  1. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    This book tells the story of Joseph Weismann's escape from the roundup of French Jews in 1942 in Paris. 13, 152 Jews were imprisoned in the Vélodrome d'Hiver stadium for five days without food or water, then sent on to French internment camps and ultimately to Auschwitz, where they were killed. Weismann, 11 at the time, escaped from the French internment camp and was one of only a couple of children to survive. The book details the roundup, his escape, and his long struggle to survive afterwards This book tells the story of Joseph Weismann's escape from the roundup of French Jews in 1942 in Paris. 13, 152 Jews were imprisoned in the Vélodrome d'Hiver stadium for five days without food or water, then sent on to French internment camps and ultimately to Auschwitz, where they were killed. Weismann, 11 at the time, escaped from the French internment camp and was one of only a couple of children to survive. The book details the roundup, his escape, and his long struggle to survive afterwards. The story feels more immediate and relevant than ever today. Partly because Marine Le Pen recently once again denied French responsibility (although French authorities organized the roundup, French police conducted it, and it was French authorities, not the Nazis, who insisted that children be rounded up with their parents). But also because the adult Jews rounded up were not French-born, but immigrants and refugees: Polish, German, etc. (their children were generally not considered citizens either). Some had been in France for 10-20 years, but the Vichy official who had them rounded up called them vermin, and after the war he actually argued that he deserved praise for rounding them up rather than French-born Jews. In the current climate in the US, where immigrants, especially undocumented ones, are increasingly demonized, all this felt very close to home. But what of the story itself? Well, it is splendidly written. Joseph brings his child's voice and child's way of thinking vividly to life. I saw his parents and felt his love for them; I saw the traits that made him a mischievous child and gave him the energy and restlessness to escape once his parents were taken from the camp. His voice is direct, unflinching, vivid, evocative, and searing. In many ways the most heartbreaking part of this book is how grim his story is AFTER the escape: the indifference or hostility of the people from whom he asks help, his mistreatment at the hands of the families who shelter him (when paid to do so, and clearly only because they are paid), and the anti-Semitism he encounters even after the war (his long battle to have his citizenship recognized; the army's initial refusal to take him, etc.). There are people who help him too, but they were much more rare than I would have predicted. That he managed to live a full and rich life made me joyful for his sake, but he does not present his life as "inspirational." He is clear about the intense loneliness and despair he felt, and about how many survivors were driven to suicide by similar despair. I read this in French, but I strongly urge English speakers to read this new translation. It's worth your time.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This story was amazing, actually not a story, real life during the Holocaust. This book relates the experiences of a young boy who was torn apart from his family and managed to escape a concentration camp. This book was so detailed, including feelings, sights and sounds that made it seem real and come alive. Unfortunately his mother, father and both sisters were murdered in Auschwitz. This book is very powerful which reminds me of The Diary of a Young Girl, the story of Anne Frank and a child's This story was amazing, actually not a story, real life during the Holocaust. This book relates the experiences of a young boy who was torn apart from his family and managed to escape a concentration camp. This book was so detailed, including feelings, sights and sounds that made it seem real and come alive. Unfortunately his mother, father and both sisters were murdered in Auschwitz. This book is very powerful which reminds me of The Diary of a Young Girl, the story of Anne Frank and a child's experiences during this horrible time in history. But unlike Anne Frank, this author managed to escape and go on to live his life. It was so courageous and miraculous that a young child had the wherewithal to find a way to escape and see it through and that despite the evil of the Nazis he survived. It's the will to live that this author experienced that despite the horrors he experienced he managed to go on and carve out his life. I like how this book doesn't just end after his escape, you are able to find out how he made it through, found people who were like family and how his experiences shaped his life. If all this were not amazing enough, I admire this author for having the courage to face the tough memories and go back to those times in his old age. He was able to, in a manner of speaking, attempt to confront the memories and try to come to terms with what happened to him and his family. With this book and relating his experiences to others he helps to make sure people never forget and realize that we can absolutely never have something like this happen again.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    When he is eighty, Joseph is made to see the good it will do for others to hear about the horror his life became in France in 1942. Born in France in 1931 to parents who lived in France after leaving a neighboring country twenty years earlier, he and his family were condemned by the Vichy government and Hitler because they were Jews not born in France. Think about it. What if you were herded into unsanitary and foodless arenas because of your religion and the fact that you or your parents were b When he is eighty, Joseph is made to see the good it will do for others to hear about the horror his life became in France in 1942. Born in France in 1931 to parents who lived in France after leaving a neighboring country twenty years earlier, he and his family were condemned by the Vichy government and Hitler because they were Jews not born in France. Think about it. What if you were herded into unsanitary and foodless arenas because of your religion and the fact that you or your parents were born in Wisconsin instead of, say, Texas. The conditions were horrible, parents separated from children who didn't know where parents were or that they, too, would be shipped off to the camps. Obviously Joseph escaped and suffered in other ways even after liberation, and much of that is related as well. This biography is excellent and most of it is written from the perspective of that young person. What a monumental task! Equally monumental was the task faced by translator Richard Kutner in transforming the original French, complete with idioms from sixty years ago! And don't forget how well J Clark Allison audio interpreted the writing without getting overly dramatic or doom and gloom. Fantastic! I won the audio in a giveaway. These things happened. Never Forget.

  4. 5 out of 5

    David

    Fascinating true story of the roundup of French Jews by Gendarmes who then turned them over to the Nazis for deportation to Auschwitz. The author, Joseph Weismann, his parents, and his two sisters were included in the roundup. He was 11 years old at the time. They were all held with thousands of other Jews at facilities in France temporarily before most of them were sent east. Joseph became separated from his family and was frantic to rejoin them. When he became suspicious of the whole operation Fascinating true story of the roundup of French Jews by Gendarmes who then turned them over to the Nazis for deportation to Auschwitz. The author, Joseph Weismann, his parents, and his two sisters were included in the roundup. He was 11 years old at the time. They were all held with thousands of other Jews at facilities in France temporarily before most of them were sent east. Joseph became separated from his family and was frantic to rejoin them. When he became suspicious of the whole operation, he joined with another boy, also named Joseph, and escaped before the next shipment. The rest of the book follows Joseph on the run, in and out of various orphanages and foster homes for the rest of the war. How he survived and built his own family after the war as well as how he dealt with his emotional demons with the loss of his family made this book hard to put down.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    Listened to this book. I love listening to the holocaust stories because when I read the books, I never know how to pronounce a lot of the words. But, I do look up the spelling of the land marks and cities. Anyway, this is about a boy who was taken away from his family and out into a children’s camp by Paris. I hadn’t heard of the camp before. He actually escaped!!! I’m so proud of him. He had a rough life for many years after. Learning his whole immediate family was in Auschwitz and died had to Listened to this book. I love listening to the holocaust stories because when I read the books, I never know how to pronounce a lot of the words. But, I do look up the spelling of the land marks and cities. Anyway, this is about a boy who was taken away from his family and out into a children’s camp by Paris. I hadn’t heard of the camp before. He actually escaped!!! I’m so proud of him. He had a rough life for many years after. Learning his whole immediate family was in Auschwitz and died had to be horrible. I hate what the Nazis did. So so so sickening. I’m obsessed with the survivor stories. We can never let this happen again.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Bracciante

    This is the harrowing account of how 11 year old Joseph Weismann survived the round up of the Jewish residents of Paris July 16-17, 1942 after becoming separated from his family who later perished in Auschwitz. His story of survival is told in the vernacular of the boy who experienced it and you can feel both the cruelty and the kindness that he was shown. This is an outstanding first person account of one of history's greatest nightmares that must never be forgotten.

  7. 4 out of 5

    William

    A story of escape and survival that continues after the war -- a welcome addition to a story that gives us more of the life of an 11-year-old who lost almost everything.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Wilbur Z

    Emotioal Excellent well written very emotional . Very difficult not to feel the emotional pain. This could be required reading in high school history

  9. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

    A Remarkable Story The writer and translator have chronicled the remarkable events of an eleven year old's survival during the French roundup of Jews in Paris in 1942. However, the story flows like a novel complete with suspense and emotion.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joan Rachchoki

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Hayes

  12. 5 out of 5

    Abigail Reiner

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mary Yamaguchi

  14. 4 out of 5

    Barb

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Grafmeyer

  16. 5 out of 5

    judi christensen

  17. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Ciborowski

  18. 5 out of 5

    Janey Bush

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Turner

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stacey OBrien

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ana

  22. 5 out of 5

    Maria Yurasek

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gogi

  24. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Jones

  25. 5 out of 5

    Annette Vogelsang

  26. 4 out of 5

    Doug Twa

  27. 5 out of 5

    Coral

  28. 5 out of 5

    Becky Bushong

  29. 5 out of 5

    PATRICIA RARING

  30. 4 out of 5

    Robin Hamblin

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