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While many books explain the how of bitcoin, The Internet of Money delves into the why of bitcoin. Acclaimed information-security expert and author of Mastering Bitcoin, Andreas M. Antonopoulos examines and contextualizes the significance of bitcoin through a series of essays spanning the exhilarating maturation of this technology. Bitcoin, a technological breakthrough While many books explain the how of bitcoin, The Internet of Money delves into the why of bitcoin. Acclaimed information-security expert and author of Mastering Bitcoin, Andreas M. Antonopoulos examines and contextualizes the significance of bitcoin through a series of essays spanning the exhilarating maturation of this technology. Bitcoin, a technological breakthrough quietly introduced to the world in 2008, is transforming much more than finance. Bitcoin is disrupting antiquated industries to bring financial independence to billions worldwide. In this book, Andreas explains why bitcoin is a financial and technological evolution with potential far exceeding the label “digital currency.” Andreas goes beyond exploring the technical functioning of the bitcoin network by illuminating bitcoin’s philosophical, social, and historical implications. As the internet has essentially transformed how people around the world interact and has permanently impacted our lives in ways we never could have imagined, bitcoin -- the internet of money -- is fundamentally changing our approach to solving social, political, and economic problems through decentralized technology.


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While many books explain the how of bitcoin, The Internet of Money delves into the why of bitcoin. Acclaimed information-security expert and author of Mastering Bitcoin, Andreas M. Antonopoulos examines and contextualizes the significance of bitcoin through a series of essays spanning the exhilarating maturation of this technology. Bitcoin, a technological breakthrough While many books explain the how of bitcoin, The Internet of Money delves into the why of bitcoin. Acclaimed information-security expert and author of Mastering Bitcoin, Andreas M. Antonopoulos examines and contextualizes the significance of bitcoin through a series of essays spanning the exhilarating maturation of this technology. Bitcoin, a technological breakthrough quietly introduced to the world in 2008, is transforming much more than finance. Bitcoin is disrupting antiquated industries to bring financial independence to billions worldwide. In this book, Andreas explains why bitcoin is a financial and technological evolution with potential far exceeding the label “digital currency.” Andreas goes beyond exploring the technical functioning of the bitcoin network by illuminating bitcoin’s philosophical, social, and historical implications. As the internet has essentially transformed how people around the world interact and has permanently impacted our lives in ways we never could have imagined, bitcoin -- the internet of money -- is fundamentally changing our approach to solving social, political, and economic problems through decentralized technology.

30 review for The Internet of Money

  1. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    Useless I bought this book, because the work of people like Nick Szabo, Vinay Gupta and Vitalek Buterin is spread all over the Internet in blogs and YouTube videos, whereas this author, also known to be very technically knowledgeable on bitcoins, cryptocurrency and blockchain, compiled all of his lectures into a book with an audio format you could listen to while making breakfast. Unfortunately he doesn't share any real knowledge in these lectures. It's just like a really mediocre TED X lecture Useless I bought this book, because the work of people like Nick Szabo, Vinay Gupta and Vitalek Buterin is spread all over the Internet in blogs and YouTube videos, whereas this author, also known to be very technically knowledgeable on bitcoins, cryptocurrency and blockchain, compiled all of his lectures into a book with an audio format you could listen to while making breakfast. Unfortunately he doesn't share any real knowledge in these lectures. It's just like a really mediocre TED X lecture about 'all of the exciting possibilities' that goes hours over the original 15 minutes allotted to it. Most of these lectures are available on YouTube for free. I'd strongly recommend watching a few before wasting money on this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    George

    "The Internet of Money" by Andreas M. Antonopoulos is a solid introduction to the phenomenon of Bitcoin and other decentralized digital currencies. Antonopoulos explores the social, historical, political, economic, and philosophical dimensions of decentralized currencies. This short book began as a series of presentations - most of which can still be seen via videos on the Internet. I recommend this book to anyone interested in exploring many of the implications of decentralized currencies. "The Internet of Money" by Andreas M. Antonopoulos is a solid introduction to the phenomenon of Bitcoin and other decentralized digital currencies. Antonopoulos explores the social, historical, political, economic, and philosophical dimensions of decentralized currencies. This short book began as a series of presentations - most of which can still be seen via videos on the Internet. I recommend this book to anyone interested in exploring many of the implications of decentralized currencies. Rating: 4 out of 5 stars Notes: Audiobook: Narrated by: Stephanie Murphy Length: 4 hours and 8 minutes  Unabridged Audiobook Release Date: 2017-05-02 Publisher: Merkle Bloom LLC

  3. 5 out of 5

    Johan Nguyen

    The author must be a poymath to write such an outstanding book that can totally change people’s perspective about money. A must-read in a near-decentralized world

  4. 5 out of 5

    ron btdtbttsawio

    This is a very engaging book that is based on a series of lectures which can be found on youtube. The author eloquently and enthusiastically compares bitcoin (which he considers a disruptive technology) with other disruptive technologies such as the automobile, electricity, the internet, and others. Just as those emerging technologies had to fight the popular misconceptions (for example, why would you buy and drive a car on a muddy road full of potholes with nowhere to buy gas, when you can use a This is a very engaging book that is based on a series of lectures which can be found on youtube. The author eloquently and enthusiastically compares bitcoin (which he considers a disruptive technology) with other disruptive technologies such as the automobile, electricity, the internet, and others. Just as those emerging technologies had to fight the popular misconceptions (for example, why would you buy and drive a car on a muddy road full of potholes with nowhere to buy gas, when you can use a horse), bitcoin has to fight all the negative hype associated with the concept of the internet of money. I think this author, and others, are correct. We are in the middle of a very disruptive but positive technology. Bitcoin and other altcoins are going to change the whole concept of banking. Billions of unbanked people around the world can now be their own bank with nothing more than a cheap cell phone. They can send money around the world almost instantly. There are no banking hours or bank service fees or frozen accounts. Money (altcoin) will be programmable. There will be smart contracts, micro transactions and governments can’t pressure financial institutions to shut down organizations they don’t like (as the American government did to wikileaks). Oddly, the author doesn’t explain the blockchain in this book. A blockchain is just a financial ledger but is probably the most important ingredient of altcoins. For more info about the blockchain and bitcoin, look on youtube for a series of short videos by Amanda B. Johnson. She does a great job of explaining it. Also check out ‘bitcoin 101, the blackboard series’ by James D’angelo and of course the author's videos.

  5. 5 out of 5

    C. Scott

    Very good. If you're interested in Bitcoin or blockchain this is a great place to start learning. Antonopoulos does a nice job knocking down a lot of the critiques you'll hear about Bitcoin as simply flash in the pan or a tulip-frenzy bubble. The author has a real knack for reaching back in history to find relevant metaphors for understanding the kind of potential that Bitcoin represents. The concept of infrastructure inversion in particular was very eye opening for me. As Antonopoulos Very good. If you're interested in Bitcoin or blockchain this is a great place to start learning. Antonopoulos does a nice job knocking down a lot of the critiques you'll hear about Bitcoin as simply flash in the pan or a tulip-frenzy bubble. The author has a real knack for reaching back in history to find relevant metaphors for understanding the kind of potential that Bitcoin represents. The concept of infrastructure inversion in particular was very eye opening for me. As Antonopoulos describes, when cars initially came on the scene they were using infrastructure built for horses. Dirt roads and no street signs meant early cars were always getting stuck in the mud and crashing. People pointed at this as proof that cars would never catch on. But over time infrastructure was built for cars. Horses could still use paved roads, but so could skateboards and scooters and all other manner of conveyance that were impossible to imagine before the infrastructure inversion. A similar phenomenon happened with the internet. Early internet depended on phone lines and infrastructure built for voice communication. Once infrastructure for internet was built we got Youtube and Goodreads and all the things that were impossible to imagine before the infrastructure inversion. So it goes with bitcoin. We are unlikely to tap the full potential of bitcoin and blockchain until the infrastructure inversion happens. But once it does, watch out! Great stuff.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Luis Michel

    This is a great introduction to the esoteric magic internet money. If you don't know what bitcoin is or if you know the basics but want to know more, Mr. Antonopoulos gives us great analogies and information to help us understand the concept and the implications of this technology. I gave it 4/5 because, due to the nature of the book (separate conference talks compiled together), at times I found it a bit repetitive in the beginning of each chapter. From the moment I became aware of bitcoin as a This is a great introduction to the esoteric magic internet money. If you don't know what bitcoin is or if you know the basics but want to know more, Mr. Antonopoulos gives us great analogies and information to help us understand the concept and the implications of this technology. I gave it 4/5 because, due to the nature of the book (separate conference talks compiled together), at times I found it a bit repetitive in the beginning of each chapter. From the moment I became aware of bitcoin as a thing I never saw beyond the currency value until I watched and read Mr. Antonopoulos insights and learn what this technology implies and the posibilities that it offers. There is no going back.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Laurent Michiels

    Using analogies with earlier technological disruptions such as automobiles and the Internet, the book explains a rather complex concept in layman's terms. I particularly liked the chapter 'Currency as a Language' (which takes a more philosophical view on currencies) and 'Bitcoin Design Principles' (about skeuomorphic design problems associated with Bitcoin). Do however not expect an in-depth analysis of the underlying technology or applications. In addition, it's true that the book sometimes Using analogies with earlier technological disruptions such as automobiles and the Internet, the book explains a rather complex concept in layman's terms. I particularly liked the chapter 'Currency as a Language' (which takes a more philosophical view on currencies) and 'Bitcoin Design Principles' (about skeuomorphic design problems associated with Bitcoin). Do however not expect an in-depth analysis of the underlying technology or applications. In addition, it's true that the book sometimes repeats itself because some topics come back in a handful of talks; but this didn't bother me too much. After all, repetition makes ideas stick. Also, the fact that a quote is repeated and italicized on almost every page does not improve the reading experience. In sum, I think Andreas did an extremely good job at what he intended to do -- that is, to make a broad audience excited about Bitcoin. As he puts it: "Bitcoin is a bit like an onion. You have to unwrap it. As you unwrap it, you find one more layer." Let's continue peeling that onion!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Skyler Jokiel

    A great collection of talks that will get you excited about blockchain!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    An essential read in 2018 - as the world of "money" is being turned on it's head by crypto currencies like Bitcoin in this once in a generation event, Andreas does a wonderful job of explaining using metaphors based on the "money" systems we are used to and when such metaphors are not applicable. Interesting format - it's a summary of talks he's done. I also strongly suggest watching his talks on video, his passion really comes through.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Salman Ansari

    This will change the way you think about Bitcoin, money, and its potential to totally change the way our global economy works. I’m definitely gonna need to read this a few times. NOTE: This is just a collection of his talks, so if you prefer video those are all available on YouTube. I just like being able to read and highlight etc... though I may end up watching all the talks anyway. I started highlighting which talks to watch in the book, before realizing I was just highlighting them This will change the way you think about Bitcoin, money, and its potential to totally change the way our global economy works. I’m definitely gonna need to read this a few times. NOTE: This is just a collection of his talks, so if you prefer video those are all available on YouTube. I just like being able to read and highlight etc... though I may end up watching all the talks anyway. I started highlighting which talks to watch in the book, before realizing I was just highlighting them all...incredible content.

  11. 4 out of 5

    BLACK CAT

    Amazing! Bitcoin, the internet of money! Well-written, funny and super-informative. Some key concepts: Trustless: evaluate rules without human intervention and be trusted without humans. Independent validation of the blockchain - self-verifying system. Personless: autonomous financial entity with no human ownership. The blockchain: Platform with trust functions.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Michal Takac

    Worth every penny Very good introduction to bitcoin alsp useful for people that do understand what bitcoin is, but do not understand what bitcoin isn't and how it will eventually change the lives of the people.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mehrsa

    This is just really strong koolaid for the already drunk on bitcoin. He clobbers straw man argument after straw man argument and calls everyone who isn't convinced bitcoin is the answer to all of the world's problems a luddite.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Victor Garcia

    Very easy read and great for anybody wanting to get into the crypto space. Mainly for newcomers, if you've been into crypto for a while you'll just blaze through the book. Entertaining read nevertheless, love Andreas' analogies and metaphors.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Ito

    Great primer on Bitcoin Andreas created a great, informative book on where money stands past, present and future. Bitcoin and it’s blockchain are the first of its kind to become a real cryptographically secure content type for money, which may be mankind’s most commonly traded type of resource. Who knows what kind of applications will be created in the future utilizing the transparency and seamless technology of the blockchain for business, governments, public use and others. I would recommend Great primer on Bitcoin Andreas created a great, informative book on where money stands past, present and future. Bitcoin and it’s blockchain are the first of its kind to become a real cryptographically secure content type for money, which may be mankind’s most commonly traded type of resource. Who knows what kind of applications will be created in the future utilizing the transparency and seamless technology of the blockchain for business, governments, public use and others. I would recommend The Internet Of Money to all audiences.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Artiom Karsiuk

    An excellent book on the evolution of the automotive industry, electricity and the Internet. Oh yeah, and... Bitcoin. I mean, I realize that this book was just a compilation of Andreas' talks, but he really likes drawing parallels between the three and cryptocurrency: it came to a point where [midway through the book] I felt like at rock concert, reciting "the lyrics" word-for-word, when it came to his examples of the universal doubts/ridicule accompanying the development of automobiles, adoption An excellent book on the evolution of the automotive industry, electricity and the Internet. Oh yeah, and... Bitcoin. I mean, I realize that this book was just a compilation of Andreas' talks, but he really likes drawing parallels between the three and cryptocurrency: it came to a point where [midway through the book] I felt like at rock concert, reciting "the lyrics" word-for-word, when it came to his examples of the universal doubts/ridicule accompanying the development of automobiles, adoption of alternating current and the emergence of the Web. But the point itself is valid - those three technologies really did "sneak up" on humanity and paved the way for a fundamentally new society. Even though the book completely avoided delving into the technical aspects of blockchain technology and offered no breakdown of how cryptocurrencies actually work or what is Bitcoin "mining", it did offer a lot of interesting characteristics that distinguish Bitcoin from other forms of money: • Anonimous We live in a World where "Big Brother" is becoming less of a fictional concept and more of a daily part of life after the NSA scandal. Every transaction, every financial decision we make has a record stored on some server. Cryptocurrencies grant you freedom from financial institutions and the ever-watchful eye of the government. Sure, that's what makes it attractive to criminals, but what technology isn't? Anonymity isn't a daily necessity, but needs to be an option if I want to donate to an institution, organization or public figure of my choice without prejudice, but can't if the recipient was blacklisted by a financial institution (i.e. VISA and WikiLeaks). Maybe I need anonymity to buy a giant black dildo or an anal plug, for fuck's sake: no shame in letting you freak flag fly! • Unbannable You're a dictator or an elected official and don't like Bitcoin? Want to implement a countywide ban? Well, tough noogies: you can't. You can transfer cryptocurrencies via any form of internet browser, Skype, telephone, telegraph, postal pigeons or smoke signal. You don't need a bank or an account: you can write down your keys on a piece of paper or store it on a button mobile phone (no smartphone needed). • Accessible Maybe you don't have a bank account, a passport, an ID card or just don't want to pay the high transaction fees - you can still have some Bitcoin on you. You don't need to have any documents to start a wallet and own Bitcoin. You may be a African farmer with no bank branch in a hundred mile radius and your local currency can be worth less than the paper its printed on due to inflation, but you can still have transactions between people with dirt-cheap cellphones and one signal bar. That easily explains Bitcoin spreading in Third World countries. This wasn't a mindblowing book, but it was informative for a novice like me. I'm not qualified to comment on whether cryptocurrencies are economic bubbles, but if they are not, its fun to have a front-row seat to the emergence of the next generation of money. We went from barter to sea shells, to gold, to gold-backed pieces of paper, to just pieces of paper, to plastic and now, to a "coin" that's actually the farthest thing from a physical coin.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dustin

    This book, or rather collection of transcripts, helps us understand bitcoin at a broad level. It's not the nuts and bolts explanation of how bitcoin works, which means that this is a great introduction for the non-specialist. Mr. Antonopoulos does an excellent job of using metaphor and historical examples to illustrate the potential of this new technology. If you want to understand bitcoin in layman's terms, check this out. Einstein said that if you can't explain it simply, you don't know it well This book, or rather collection of transcripts, helps us understand bitcoin at a broad level. It's not the nuts and bolts explanation of how bitcoin works, which means that this is a great introduction for the non-specialist. Mr. Antonopoulos does an excellent job of using metaphor and historical examples to illustrate the potential of this new technology. If you want to understand bitcoin in layman's terms, check this out. Einstein said that if you can't explain it simply, you don't know it well enough. It's clear that Andreas understands bitcoin very well. As a footnote, if you're interested in exploring bitcoin in detail, check out Mastering Bitcoin, by the same author. It's freely available (with his permission) on GitHub: https://github.com/bitcoinbook/bitcoi...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mark Hillick

    This book summarises a set of lectures over the last few years excellent introduction by Andreas. It serves as a guest introduction into Bitcoin, but more so on the philosophical side of things and where Bitcoin fits into the (financial) world. Thought-provoking and greatly encourages the reader to learn more about Bitcoin. The biggest benefit of the book is that it truly makes Bitcoin accessible to the lay-person.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Fleming Slone

    Great overview of the possibilities that Bitcoin and blockchain technology make possible. Andreas is a true visionary.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Klajdi

    This is not a book about Bitcoin. This is a book about today’s society, access to finance and freedom of communication and participation.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Giedrius

    This book is a collection of transcripts from most famous public talks Andreas Antonopoulos has given. When it comes to cryptocurrencies and Bitcoin Andreas is quite a visionary. So it was fascinating to see how key points of Andreas' talks evolved as Bitcoin got more and more traction. From the very basic concepts and use cases to question of scaling the technology behind Bitcoin. In every talk, the author uses clear and understandable analogies and historical references to prove his point. The This book is a collection of transcripts from most famous public talks Andreas Antonopoulos has given. When it comes to cryptocurrencies and Bitcoin Andreas is quite a visionary. So it was fascinating to see how key points of Andreas' talks evolved as Bitcoin got more and more traction. From the very basic concepts and use cases to question of scaling the technology behind Bitcoin. In every talk, the author uses clear and understandable analogies and historical references to prove his point. The problem for a reader is that obviously, Antonopoulos reuses his best points in some of the talks, so it can become a bit repetitive. The main takeaways from the book: The main problem why people do not understand Bitcoin because it is very hard to describe using existing experience (physical money). People failed at first when they tried to explain cars from the perspective of railroads and horses.We had the Internet of Information, now we're witnessing the birth of the Internet of value. People always freaked out during the shift of monetary system.Bitcoin is not a currency, payment network or banking system. It is a platform that guarantees certain trust functions. Currency is just an app running on Bitcoin network. Since very old times money has provided trust function and that's why it became one of the first uses for Bitcoin.Who issued the currency will no longer be relevant, who uses it will become the main factor. Most likely there will me meta-currency which will have the purpose to aggregate the value of all the cryptocurrencies.Design metaphors are extremely powerful but they can also be extremely dangerous when misapplied (e.g. wallet concept in Bitcoin).Credit cards are broken by design because the token itself is a secret key. While BTC transaction can be transmitted using completely insecure way (e.g. even smoke signals or carrier pigeons)The value should not be mistaken for medium (infrastructure) or control over it. There are smart networks with dumb devices and dumb networks with smart devices. Cryptocurrencies are the latter one. They encourage innovation at the edge. Bitcoin is going to win because it is open in a world of thinkers and innovators.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Meh. Andreas M. Antonopoulos is supposed to be an expert on the technical aspects of bitcoin, but there was no actual technical information in this book. At no point is there any detail on what exactly a blockchain is, how it works, etc. The book is a compilation of short talks Antonopoulos has given over the years and they almost all sound like a cross between an inspirational TED talk and a marketing pitch. Yes. we get that bitcoin has lots of potential. Yes, we get that it's a potential Meh. Andreas M. Antonopoulos is supposed to be an expert on the technical aspects of bitcoin, but there was no actual technical information in this book. At no point is there any detail on what exactly a blockchain is, how it works, etc. The book is a compilation of short talks Antonopoulos has given over the years and they almost all sound like a cross between an inspirational TED talk and a marketing pitch. Yes. we get that bitcoin has lots of potential. Yes, we get that it's a potential paradigm changer. But chances are that anyone who picked up this book already knew this and is looking for something more than glib metaphors and comparisons to early adoptions of other revolutionary technologies. The one part I did enjoy was a critique near the end of the terrible design of Bitcoin and the systems around it, trying to make it sound like a traditional bank. Using metaphors in the naming and design of things should help people understand what the new thing is. To borrow from an internet meme, if I describe a skunk as a "fart squirrel" then you can probably safely assume it's something that looks and acts similar to a squirrel but smells really bad. This description sets accurate expectations in your mind. But all the terminology around bitcoin utterly fails at this. By trying to make it sound like the kind of currencies and banks we already know, the folks who designed all these terms are actually making everything way more confusing. Because Bitcoin is not a coin, or even a currency really, it's more like a platform. A crytocurrency wallet does not act like a wallet in any way, it's more like a keychain. Bitcoin ATMs are not at all like bank ATMs, and are designed to mimic the minimal explanation fast transaction models of bank ATMs, which is the last thing that they should be doing when Bitcoin requires a lot of explanation for most people and does not have any kind of pre-existing relationship with a financial provider, which is what ATMs are based on. So, some very valid and well expressed points here on the failure of design around this new technology. But overall, if you're interested enough in cryptocurrency to buy and read this book, you probably won't find much in it that's any news to you.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mike Siegel

    It's not quite a "book", it's a series of lectures Andreas has done throughout the years. I enjoyed each one and his enthusiasm for the potential of crytpocurrencies and Bitcoin is infectious (and logical). My one knock on the book is it tends to repeat itself. Not just with concepts, but the same exact words. Volume II is great but same thing, many repeats from Volume 1. This book is a great primer on Bitcoin. It's for "everyone". You don't need to have a background in computer science or It's not quite a "book", it's a series of lectures Andreas has done throughout the years. I enjoyed each one and his enthusiasm for the potential of crytpocurrencies and Bitcoin is infectious (and logical). My one knock on the book is it tends to repeat itself. Not just with concepts, but the same exact words. Volume II is great but same thing, many repeats from Volume 1. This book is a great primer on Bitcoin. It's for "everyone". You don't need to have a background in computer science or finance. Andreas explains how Bitcoin works, where it came from, currency in general, the problems it faces today, how these problems are similar to problems the internet faced in the its early days and much more. Andreas' ability to address each fear and critique of Bitcoin by using precedents of other currencies and technologies allowed me to understand Bitcoin on a better level. Andreas does a great job breaking down the history of money and currency. His explanation that currency is a language resonated with me. Did you know it took over 400 years for paper money to be truly adopted? Did you know "money" predates writing, the wheel and more? Andreas knows his stuff and has a great way to explain it. Search his name on youtube and check out some of his speeches. This book is simply a collection of those speeches.

  24. 5 out of 5

    KNCHNGL

    Context: I was first half serious about bitcoin back in 2013, when it was hovering around the US$600-700 mark. Opening an account was a pain in the ass, so I stopped halfway. Incessant coverage over the last couple months finally prompted me to spend some focused time on trying to understand the hype a bit better. Liked: If mainstream news and blog coverage can be summarized as Bitcoin 101, and properly researched, academically referenced well-written white papers as Bitcoin 201, then this would Context: I was first half serious about bitcoin back in 2013, when it was hovering around the US$600-700 mark. Opening an account was a pain in the ass, so I stopped halfway. Incessant coverage over the last couple months finally prompted me to spend some focused time on trying to understand the hype a bit better. Liked: If mainstream news and blog coverage can be summarized as Bitcoin 101, and properly researched, academically referenced well-written white papers as Bitcoin 201, then this would be Bitcoin 301. It's on the 3rd level, because it manages to paint a plausible picture of what the distant future can be with widespread bitcoin technology adoption. It's almost a futurism book. Disliked: It's a 100% pitch. Totally unbalanced. But such is the nature of a persuasive talk, convoluted into book format. For the opposing view, I suppose we have regular "vanilla" news coverage. Conclusion: Worth a read, if you're tired of recycled bitcoin content on who got rich, recent price swing volatility, same old same old. The book is a refreshing take of what all the hype might really mean in the future. After all, Mr. Antonpopoulos is a teaching fellow at the University of Nicosia for the MsC of Digital Currencies program.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rutger

    Collection of speeches by Andreas Antonopoulos, one of the better known bitcoin evangelists. He is a true believer in bitcoin's promise. His constant internet analogy is both a weak and a strong case against bitcoin; on the one hand, yes the internet became a slow-moving world conquerer and bitcoin seems to follow a similar pattern; on the other hand, historicism is a poor tool: Bitcoin is not the same as the internet, the forces and challenges are different. Bitcoin might fail over issues the Collection of speeches by Andreas Antonopoulos, one of the better known bitcoin evangelists. He is a true believer in bitcoin's promise. His constant internet analogy is both a weak and a strong case against bitcoin; on the one hand, yes the internet became a slow-moving world conquerer and bitcoin seems to follow a similar pattern; on the other hand, historicism is a poor tool: Bitcoin is not the same as the internet, the forces and challenges are different. Bitcoin might fail over issues the internet didn't fail over. If you compare bitcoin with 5 years ago, it's been an astonishing success. The odds against it were insane. Back then who saw its potential? A few techies and some ancaps -- but no more. Yet, here we are. Bitcoin is now valued near 3000$, and Goldman Sachs & JP Morgan write about bitcoin in their future forecasts! Still, to get bitcoin where the internet is in 2017, or even in 2000, is a long way off. It might never get there. Antonopoulos makes some great points overall, he's absolutely correct about people bitching about scaling. I have no doubt programmers will keep finding ways to scale. If you doubt that, check your smartphone. You can now watch, read and stream unlimited amounts of movies, series, books and music, at top-notch speeds everywhere for under 50$ a month (& falling). But inventiveness goes two ways: I'm also sure criminals will keep finding ways to make bitcoin users' lives horrible with all sorts of hacker tricks. It's one thing if your email or Facebook gets hacked; it's another thing if your money gets stolen. And while a non-government issued currency sounds cool to me, I also think it doesn't sound so cool to governments who want to control currency. They haven't yet tried -- but some day they will try. Governments might not be able to ban bitcoin use or bitcoin users, but they will get tough on vulnerable intermediaries like exchanges, companies, organizations and media figures. Anyway, after reading this book I looked up Andreas on YouTube, he's still doing his speeches. Still fighting the good fight. Good for him! (And us.)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Thappa

    A good overview of the "why" behind the cryptocurrency revolution. The book is essentially a tidied-up version of various speeches he has given over the years. Because of this, the overall theme of the book is that Bitcoin is here and isn't going away and each talk explains why that is important across a variety of different dimensions (the unbanked, permissionless innovation, etc.). The key take-aways from the book are: 1) Bitcoin is a protocol just like TCP/IP and is the first network centric, A good overview of the "why" behind the cryptocurrency revolution. The book is essentially a tidied-up version of various speeches he has given over the years. Because of this, the overall theme of the book is that Bitcoin is here and isn't going away and each talk explains why that is important across a variety of different dimensions (the unbanked, permissionless innovation, etc.). The key take-aways from the book are: 1) Bitcoin is a protocol just like TCP/IP and is the first network centric, protocol-based form of money 2) Bitcoin allows anyone to access and build on top of the "pipes." This seems related to Taleb's idea of antifragility and how brittle things become when we try to battle harden everything 3) With cryptocurrency, possession is 10/10 of the law 4) All bitcoin nodes are equal and the only thing that matters is whether you can pay a sufficient fee to use the network resources (to alleviate any tragedy of the commons type problems) Recommend to anyone looking to motivate themselves to learn a bit more about the space.

  27. 5 out of 5

    ybk

    Antonopoulos is an evangelist for Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency (he is not a sole advocate of Bitcoin only; he thinks there will be millions of different coins in the future) who understands (obviously) the technology very well and explain to the non-technical audience (including myself) very well. One of his good historical argument from this book, which is combined of his public speeches (that means you could watch all of them on YouTube), juxtaposing how the new technology such as cars adopted to Antonopoulos is an evangelist for Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency (he is not a sole advocate of Bitcoin only; he thinks there will be millions of different coins in the future) who understands (obviously) the technology very well and explain to the non-technical audience (including myself) very well. One of his good historical argument from this book, which is combined of his public speeches (that means you could watch all of them on YouTube), juxtaposing how the new technology such as cars adopted to public - especially to media when it first introduced. Cars weren't welcome to public. Plus, there was no infrastructure for cars so it moving on the dusty road designed for horses. From time to time, the infrastructure was building up and everyone got benefits out of it - and this is how he sees the current situation of Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency. A good book with valuable insights. Worth reading.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Janne

    Book is summary of talks by Andreas M. Antonopoulos. With four hours of your times (if you read about 30 pages per hour), you’ll understand this technology that has been confusingly named Bitcoin. Internet of Money as a book: - Defines what Bitcoin is and what it isn’t. - Gives examples of the impact of this technological change like transitioning from horses to cars, or from gas to electricity. - Compares how this technology performs and differentiates against the old techonology and Book is summary of talks by Andreas M. Antonopoulos. With four hours of your times (if you read about 30 pages per hour), you’ll understand this technology that has been confusingly named Bitcoin. Internet of Money as a book: - Defines what Bitcoin is and what it isn’t. - Gives examples of the impact of this technological change like transitioning from horses to cars, or from gas to electricity. - Compares how this technology performs and differentiates against the old techonology and infrastructure that is currently being used in the mainstream. - Gives ideas on what human needs this technology has potential to solve and ponders about the potential of this technology. I highly recommended the book for anyone who understands that we are living in imperfect world and wants to challenge the status quo of doing things.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Akhil Holden

    I would give this one more than 5 stars if it were mathematically possible. This book is a must read for the entire human race. Fascinating stuff about the future of our planet. Cryptocurrencies are out there and they are not going away - Gilfoyle, Silicon Valley. Amazing take on why blockchain technology will disrupt the most corrupt and powerful centralised institution: Finance. People say Bitcoin is a digital currency. It is not. 92% of fiat transactions occur digitally. In that sense fiat is I would give this one more than 5 stars if it were mathematically possible. This book is a must read for the entire human race. Fascinating stuff about the future of our planet. Cryptocurrencies are out there and they are not going away - Gilfoyle, Silicon Valley. Amazing take on why blockchain technology will disrupt the most corrupt and powerful centralised institution: Finance. People say Bitcoin is a digital currency. It is not. 92% of fiat transactions occur digitally. In that sense fiat is also a digital currency. The main differentiation is that Bitcoin is a technology that is secure, peer-to-peer and driven by consensus algorithm proof of work. Peer to peer payments is just one faucet of this technology. Let's unleash the innovation and disrupt the banks. (The same banks that have done just two innovations in last 70 years - credit cards and ATMs)

  30. 4 out of 5

    Franklyn Gonzalez

    I was looking for more insight on blockchain and bitcoin inside this book. It felt like I was listening to the "idea" behind The Internet of Money. It fits the title and the topics discussed. Examples from the technology used in the past and how people are afraid of this new "idea" coming out of nowhere. People still reject this idea to this day. The idea of internet money. It just doesn't make sense. Some of this reminds me of previous podcast episodes I've listened to. People have rejected the I was looking for more insight on blockchain and bitcoin inside this book. It felt like I was listening to the "idea" behind The Internet of Money. It fits the title and the topics discussed. Examples from the technology used in the past and how people are afraid of this new "idea" coming out of nowhere. People still reject this idea to this day. The idea of internet money. It just doesn't make sense. Some of this reminds me of previous podcast episodes I've listened to. People have rejected the idea of a loaf of bread as food at one point! This book serves as a nice reminder that new ideas are hard for people to adapt or accept as a part of life. But it wasn't what I was looking for as far as an in depth talk on cryptocurrency, code, and blockchain.

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