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How to get good with money, even if you have no idea where to start. The Financial Diet is the personal finance book for people who dont care about personal finance. Whether youre in need of an overspending detox, buried under student debt, or just trying to figure out how to live on an entry-level salary, The Financial Diet gives you tools to make a budget, understand How to get good with money, even if you have no idea where to start. The Financial Diet is the personal finance book for people who don’t care about personal finance. Whether you’re in need of an overspending detox, buried under student debt, or just trying to figure out how to live on an entry-level salary, The Financial Diet gives you tools to make a budget, understand investments, and deal with your credit. Chelsea Fagan has tapped a range of experts to help you make the best choices for you, but she also knows that being smarter with money isn’t just about what you put in the bank. It’s about everything—from the clothes you put in your closet, to your financial relationship habits, to the food you put in your kitchen (instead of ordering in again). So The Financial Diet gives you the tools to negotiate a raise and the perfect cocktail recipe to celebrate your new salary.The Financial Diet will teach you: • how to get good with money in a year. • the ingredients everyone needs to have a budget-friendly kitchen. • how to talk about awkward money stuff with your friends. • the best way to make (and stick to!) a budget. • how to take care of your house like a grown-up. • what the hell it means to invest (and how you can do it).


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How to get good with money, even if you have no idea where to start. The Financial Diet is the personal finance book for people who dont care about personal finance. Whether youre in need of an overspending detox, buried under student debt, or just trying to figure out how to live on an entry-level salary, The Financial Diet gives you tools to make a budget, understand How to get good with money, even if you have no idea where to start. The Financial Diet is the personal finance book for people who don’t care about personal finance. Whether you’re in need of an overspending detox, buried under student debt, or just trying to figure out how to live on an entry-level salary, The Financial Diet gives you tools to make a budget, understand investments, and deal with your credit. Chelsea Fagan has tapped a range of experts to help you make the best choices for you, but she also knows that being smarter with money isn’t just about what you put in the bank. It’s about everything—from the clothes you put in your closet, to your financial relationship habits, to the food you put in your kitchen (instead of ordering in again). So The Financial Diet gives you the tools to negotiate a raise and the perfect cocktail recipe to celebrate your new salary.The Financial Diet will teach you: • how to get good with money in a year. • the ingredients everyone needs to have a budget-friendly kitchen. • how to talk about awkward money stuff with your friends. • the best way to make (and stick to!) a budget. • how to take care of your house like a grown-up. • what the hell it means to invest (and how you can do it).

30 review for The Financial Diet

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I want to start this out by saying that I'm a big fan of the Financial Diet on YouTube. In the YouTube context, I find Chelsea and Lauren's voices to be relatable and refreshing. They create listicle-style videos on a variety of financial and lifestyle topics such as "12 side hustles you can do in bed." So I really wanted to like this book and was looking forward to reading this book. However, I'm not sure that that this listicle-style approach translates well to a book, particularly a book that I want to start this out by saying that I'm a big fan of the Financial Diet on YouTube. In the YouTube context, I find Chelsea and Lauren's voices to be relatable and refreshing. They create listicle-style videos on a variety of financial and lifestyle topics such as "12 side hustles you can do in bed." So I really wanted to like this book and was looking forward to reading this book. However, I'm not sure that that this listicle-style approach translates well to a book, particularly a book that is subtitled "A Total Beginner's Guide to Getting Good with Money". This is not a book that would help a 20- or 30-something gain financial literacy. It's a lifestyle book, focused on how to get the lifestyle you aspire to on a budget, how to cope with the fact that some aspirational lifestyles will remain out of reach, and how to feel as though you're doing a good job with your finances. The book is structured in the following way - author Chelsea Fagan relates an example from her life, such as being bad with money in her teens. That is followed by some tips on a particular topic often presented in a graphic format by TFD co-founder Lauren Ver Hage. Each chapter then features interviews with other "experts", such as financial bloggers, design bloggers, fashion bloggers, entrepreneurs, or Chelsea's Mom. People who have successfully attained a certain lifestyle. This book does a good job at talking about the **feelings** associated with not being good at managing a budget, and it has some quick tips, presented in an infographic-format. But it does not define basic or complex financial terms such as diversified portfolios in context. There's a glossary in the back, but that's not enough. This could easily leave a younger / novice reader adrift. The book is not structured in a way to help someone learn in a logical manner. It presents complex financial formulas like calculating what you need to save for a down payment in an overly-breezy way that left me confused. And in some many cases it actually gives bad advice. For example, in an interview with a fashion blogger, the blogger recommends buying an upscale work bag, for example a "3.1 Phillip Lim" bag. (Those bags start at $500+). Or even more disastrously, in an interview with a VP at a bank, "you can buy a house with only 3.5% down". That's a TERRIBLE idea. At one point the book recommends finding a financial sherpa, perhaps not realizing that some people are turning to the book itself to get financial advice. Unlike some of the good personal finance books I've read, the book doesn't direct you to good resources for learning more on particular topics, which would be one way of dealing with topics at a more superficial level in the interest of covering a lot of ground. It should be noted that this book is written specifically for Millennials. While written in a tone of "I was a hot mess" that is relatable, it leans a little bit too heavily on swearing and hot mess stories. At it's best, the book offers a critique of Instagram and Pinterest-lifestyle aspirations, or why we shouldn't all be working 80-hours a week. But at it's worst it leans too heavily on the feeling a young person might have of not being a grown-up, not having one's shit together, relying on Mom for advice. The reason I call this out is because I think that Chelsea is giving other 20-somethings short shrift. I think that 20-somethings are capable of gaining an in-depth knowledge of their personal finances and achieving their personal goals. I think that the author believes this too, but she doesn't serve them by writing this book that lives in the layer of fixing up thrift store furniture so that it's Pinterest-worthy, rather than really digging into the nuts and bolts of how to negotiate the confusing experience of being a first-time homebuyer, or by explaining the mechanics of compound interest rather than just mentioning it in passing. I would strongly recommend Beth Kobliner's book "Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance in Your Twenties and Thirties" as a good alternative to this book for 20-somethings that want to get a strong foothold on their finances early. DISCLOSURE: I was given a free advanced reader's edition to review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ayana R

    I've been a longtime TFD reader and normally I'm actually a fan of Chelsea's writing. That being said, I was very disappointed in this book, and the positive reviews it has been getting in the media. One of my biggest frustrations as a woman who cares about personal finance is how difficult it is to find content that's geared towards women without being infantilizing. All too frequently, personal finance for women is dumbed down to books with pink covers, pretty fonts, and the most basic I've been a longtime TFD reader and normally I'm actually a fan of Chelsea's writing. That being said, I was very disappointed in this book, and the positive reviews it has been getting in the media. One of my biggest frustrations as a woman who cares about personal finance is how difficult it is to find content that's geared towards women without being infantilizing. All too frequently, personal finance for women is dumbed down to books with pink covers, pretty fonts, and the most basic information, rather than information that actually addresses things like how women should be investing differently considering we generally outlive men but take bigger hits to our lifetime net worth with parenting. The TFD book represents the worst of personal finance for women, right down to the millennial-pink cover. There's a lot of aspirational quotes and sad feelz about mismanaging (or lacking) a budget and why we should talk about money (which, to be clear, we should), but the actual useful financial information in the book could be pared down to about a paragraph. The majority of the book's investment advice is pretty ridiculous, considering it's geared at young investors-- low-yield CDs and bonds are extremely conservative, low-return options and the majority of millennials would be seeing far greater returns with slightly more aggressive (but still safe!) options like ETFs. It also barely defines financial terms, is vague on what things like "long-term investments" actually mean, and often provides financial advice that probably works for the Carrie Bradshaws of the world (like buying expensive designer bags for your first job) but not for the average millennial on a budget. In all, this book is less about personal finance for young women and more about how to become the sort of young woman I imagine Chelsea and her social circle generally are-- largely white, largely affluent, largely living in expensive cities, and taking pride in the fact that they have a "budget" but with no desire to actually take charge of their finances by say, learning the difference between Vanguard and Betterment as investing options. There's also something to be said for the lack of diversity in the book's contributors. The majority seem to be Chelsea's former Thought Catalog colleages like Ella Ceron and Stephanie Georgopulos, or Chelsea's mom. Entertaining, readable women, but not who I'd consider experts on personal finance. The vast majority of positive coverage in the media appears to be limited to the fact that this book is uniquely geared towards women, when most financial books are not. Unfortunately, personal finance for women isn't as simple as pink covers and flowery aphorisms-- at least, not for intelligent women. If you're looking for actual financial advice geared towards women, look elsewhere. If all you want to know about money is that budgets are good and savings are nice, this book is for you (but also, consider raising your standards)

  3. 5 out of 5

    vanessa

    This was beautifully designed and it did get me to start thinking about putting a budget together, automating payments, and starting to pay off my student loans. At first it even had me laughing along with the "I don't have my shit together, I'm such a mess" humor, but that style got repetitive and gimmicky after a while. I also thought some parts were more necessary and important than others (do people really need a book to tell them what kitchen supplies to buy? or staples every young woman This was beautifully designed and it did get me to start thinking about putting a budget together, automating payments, and starting to pay off my student loans. At first it even had me laughing along with the "I don't have my shit together, I'm such a mess" humor, but that style got repetitive and gimmicky after a while. I also thought some parts were more necessary and important than others (do people really need a book to tell them what kitchen supplies to buy? or staples every young woman should have in her wardrobe?) - I would've rather heard more about budgeting, credit, homeownership, investments, and that sort of thing. I would only recommend this to millennials.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Natalie K

    If this book were simply useless to me, I could have given it two stars. I know it's marketed towards young women who don't know much about money. And that's fine, because there are people who don't know much and everyone's got to start somewhere. I get that. What made me give this book one star (i.e. the lowest rating allowedI'd give it negative stars if I could!) was how some of the information was just plain wrong. Like criminally wrong. So wrong that if you followed it, other poor fellow If this book were simply useless to me, I could have given it two stars. I know it's marketed towards young women who don't know much about money. And that's fine, because there are people who don't know much and everyone's got to start somewhere. I get that. What made me give this book one star (i.e. the lowest rating allowed—I'd give it negative stars if I could!) was how some of the information was just plain wrong. Like criminally wrong. So wrong that if you followed it, other poor fellow unfortunate readers, you'd find yourself in deep trouble. The first major error I'm going to talk about comes in chapter 5. Do not, do not, DO NOT ever buy a house with a down payment of less than 20%. One of the so-called "experts" "interviewed" (I use both those terms, experts and interviewed, loosely) says you can put 3.5% down for your house. NO. Do not ever do that. PMI (private mortgage insurance) will eat you alive. Your finances will be so messed up it isn't even funny. I will note that other reviewers pointed this out, too, so it makes me feel a bit better that this mistake did not go unnoticed. The next, and in some ways more egregious error (because you probably start investing before buying a house) occurs in chapter 2, the chapter about investing. This quote is so misguided that it's obvious the author, Chelsea Fagan, has zero idea what she's talking about: Explore other low-risk investment options, such as mutual funds and index funds. Just so everyone knows, I do have investments in the market. They are all in mutual funds, some of which happen to be index funds. But let's get one thing clear here: mutual funds are diversified investments because the fund invests in a multitude of assets (usually stocks, bonds, or some combination of the two). They are not low-risk investments! Let's say that again for all the Chelsea fans out there who might just descend upon me for attacking their idol. MUTUAL FUNDS ARE NOT LOW-RISK INVESTMENTS! Sure, some of them are. But diversification does NOT equal low risk. One of the funds I'm in has lost a ton of money since I invested. It's also known for its volatility, so I'm holding on to it. You probably wouldn't know this from this book, but mutual funds are intended to be long-term investments. How do I know all of this? I work in the finance industry (like in an actual financial institution—I'm not some random "personal finance blogger," a field I will point out has zero barriers to entry and no credentials required*) and I have a masters degree in finance. Trust me, I know what I'm talking about. Chelsea Fagan does not. That one little sentence I quoted above frustrates me so much because someone who doesn't know much about investing could read that, go out and buy a mutual fund, then lose money they couldn't afford to lose because they assumed it was a "low-risk investment" that they couldn't lose money on. It should be criminal to make statements like that, especially in a book that is allegedly, you know, a personal finance book. I'm all for women learning more about money, finance, investing, etc. but ladies, with all due respect, we're better than this! This book, and the blog Chelsea writes (I have read my fair share of posts on that website), are so dumbed down as to be useless. I'm not saying we ought to be learning how to apply Taylor series to derivatives (I briefly learned that in grad school, then promptly forgot it all because I literally never need to use that knowledge). But we are better than this. There are a plethora of personal finance blogs and books out there that are way more deserving of your time than this rubbish. If you're a total beginner, Ramit Sethi's I Will Teach You to Be Rich is a good start (disregard everything he says about scholarships, though, as it's completely unrealistic and wrong). If you really want to up your game and learn a ton, The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America's Wealthy is amazing. It can be a bit dry at times, but if you read it and understand it, you'll be better off than 99% of American adults today. This review is getting long, so I'll have to stop ranting. And I haven't event touched on the level of profanity in this book—was there really a need for multiple f-bombs EVERY SINGLE CHAPTER?? I also question whether a personal finance book needs chapters on home decor, cooking, and romance, not to mention references to that insipid TV show Sex and the City. Seriously, people, that show is over and done with and sucked anyway. Let's just move on. *Note: There's nothing wrong with being a personal finance blogger per se, as long as you actually know what you're talking about!

  5. 4 out of 5

    steph

    Eh. I enjoyed the pictures more than the content. It's geared towards millennial women so it is very Instagram and Pinterest worthy in regards to layout/color/pictures. It has a few good tips in it (for example Chelsea says to save in 3 different accounts - one emergency fund you can easily access, one investment fund that can be liquidated if needed and then a long investment fund all of which I personally agree with) but overall it talks down to the reader. And yes I understand this is a Eh. I enjoyed the pictures more than the content. It's geared towards millennial women so it is very Instagram and Pinterest worthy in regards to layout/color/pictures. It has a few good tips in it (for example Chelsea says to save in 3 different accounts - one emergency fund you can easily access, one investment fund that can be liquidated if needed and then a long investment fund all of which I personally agree with) but overall it talks down to the reader. And yes I understand this is a beginner's finance book but still. I do not think a financial book needs a chapter on How to Be Your Own Italian Grandmother (food) or a chapter on decorating tips for your apartment/house (though the chapter on how to talk to your significant other/friends about money is good).

  6. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Worth it just for the discovery of The Woks of Life website for recipes right up my alley. Having already watched all of The Financial Diets YouTube videos, and reading Broke Millennial by Erin Lowry, theres not a whole lot new in this book for me, but it was still really well done, cute, and easy to get through, and I definitely took more notes on things to change or look into for the future. Worth it just for the discovery of The Woks of Life website for recipes right up my alley. Having already watched all of The Financial Diet’s YouTube videos, and reading Broke Millennial by Erin Lowry, there’s not a whole lot new in this book for me, but it was still really well done, cute, and easy to get through, and I definitely took more notes on things to change or look into for the future.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Karina

    Rating: 4 Stars ★★★★ I've been following The Financial Diet Youtube for a year and they make really great and very informative videos about saving money/finance! Highly recommend it, so when I discovered they had a book, I just had to pick it up! The Financial Diet is not only informative, but easily explores different elements to finance, offers advice for different areas of life (personal, career, home, relationships, budgeting etc.) for those who aren't exactly sure where to start. I've been Rating: 4 Stars ★★★★ I've been following The Financial Diet Youtube for a year and they make really great and very informative videos about saving money/finance! Highly recommend it, so when I discovered they had a book, I just had to pick it up! The Financial Diet is not only informative, but easily explores different elements to finance, offers advice for different areas of life (personal, career, home, relationships, budgeting etc.) for those who aren't exactly sure where to start. I've been thinking more about my personal finances and felt this would be a resource for me because I was already familiar with their channel. The whole time I was reading this I was taking notes because there's just a lot this book offered me to think more about budgeting, investing in yourself, and a lot of other great tips! There's a lot of great quotes that stuck with me as I read and this book gave me a lot more to think about in terms of finances. I lowered my rating for a couple reasons: 1. I found some chapters weren't relevant to me personally, for ex. Home buying, Cooking: that chapter was mostly recipes that really didn't interest me & for people who need some kitchen/cooking tips (I get by pretty well, so it just skimmed this chapter). 2. I felt there was additional/more specific topics the author could have explored more of like in the Youtube channel. 3.The pacing was pretty good for the amount of pages it was, I just wish the personal excerpts at the beginning of each chapter were a little shorter. *It also includes links to downloadable lists featured in the book which was nice & a glossary!*

  8. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    An extension of the finance blog of the same name, The Financial Diet is a beautifully designed guide to money for millenials. I really appreciate how both on the blog and in the book, there is an understanding that money is the underlying framework of our entire lives and so the book looks at how your relationship with money is connected to your career, personal style, diet, home, and many other aspects of your lifestyle.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Olsen

    Informative, but I wish some of the chapters had gone more in depth. Clearly geared at someone who has no idea what to do with money (i.e. first step: open a 401k) and not as much someone who has the initial bases covered and is looking to go to the next level (like investing). BUT I really loved the chapters on careers and relationships, both had great advice. And I also appreciated their stance that being good with money isn't about depriving yourself, but about knowing where your money is Informative, but I wish some of the chapters had gone more in depth. Clearly geared at someone who has no idea what to do with money (i.e. first step: open a 401k) and not as much someone who has the initial bases covered and is looking to go to the next level (like investing). BUT I really loved the chapters on careers and relationships, both had great advice. And I also appreciated their stance that being good with money isn't about depriving yourself, but about knowing where your money is going and spending it with intention. So you CAN have your avocado toast and eat it too...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chanda

    I liked the first part of this book, about making a budget and investing for retirement. I assumed the rest of the book would offer a deeper dive into those useful topics, but instead it gave pretty surface advice from a privileged standpoint. I skipped the part about Sex and the City, which seemed irrelevant. Overall, not a complete waste of time, but I skimmed most of it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Krissy

    I received an ARC of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review...and here it is! This book didn't "click" with me. This book was absolutely written with a Millennial reader in mind. The first indication that this wasn't the book for me was when I read that the author, Chelsea Fagan, had a "tendency to blow thousands of dollars a month on eating out." My response? "Whoa, who has THOUSANDS of dollars A MONTH to spend on food?!" The second indication that this wasn't I received an ARC of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review...and here it is! This book didn't "click" with me. This book was absolutely written with a Millennial reader in mind. The first indication that this wasn't the book for me was when I read that the author, Chelsea Fagan, had a "tendency to blow thousands of dollars a month on eating out." My response? "Whoa, who has THOUSANDS of dollars A MONTH to spend on food?!" The second indication that this wasn't the book for me was the casual use of swear words. Lots of "F-word"s and "S-word"s used for emphasis (?). I do use some coarse language when speaking, myself, but I felt that it was unnecessary, distracting, and superfluous here. I did come away with a few nuggets of truth here, my favorite being "Money doesn't buy you happiness...it buys you comfort, security and options." I also liked the idea, from the author's mom, to "keep your spice rack full, and your garlic basket fuller." I wouldn't necessarily read any of this author's other books, nor would I visit her website. Sorry.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Before reading this, I had expected to finish this book being a lot more knowledgeable about finance and stuff. It didn't quite live up my expectations though. The quotes are cheesy and I feel like i'm reading a blog, not a book. I don't think this book was meant for college students like me, more for young adults out of school. Nonetheless, this book did a decent job of introducing me to some financial terms and things to keep in mind for the future. Also, back to the "this book is basically a Before reading this, I had expected to finish this book being a lot more knowledgeable about finance and stuff. It didn't quite live up my expectations though. The quotes are cheesy and I feel like i'm reading a blog, not a book. I don't think this book was meant for college students like me, more for young adults out of school. Nonetheless, this book did a decent job of introducing me to some financial terms and things to keep in mind for the future. Also, back to the "this book is basically a blog printed" thing, it's not super informative. It has snippets of information like you would find from clicking on internet links here and there, but nothing really entirely in-depth. There was a section about cooking and I totally get that, cooking saves money. But, around 10 pages were taken for recipes. Maybe I don't like Italian food, or like... basically, if I wanted to learn to cook, i'd look at a cookbook.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emily Dean

    I heard about this book after discovering Chelsea on YouTube and watching some of her videos on finance. I had just finished reading "You are a Badass at Making Money" by Jen Sincero and I was looking for a more practical approach at managing my finances while I still had the positive energy flowing. What I wanted was a book with very specific resources for beginner's, budget examples and suggestions on how to begin changing spending habits. What I got was a cookbook, advice from wealthy I heard about this book after discovering Chelsea on YouTube and watching some of her videos on finance. I had just finished reading "You are a Badass at Making Money" by Jen Sincero and I was looking for a more practical approach at managing my finances while I still had the positive energy flowing. What I wanted was a book with very specific resources for beginner's, budget examples and suggestions on how to begin changing spending habits. What I got was a cookbook, advice from wealthy "celebrity" contributors, and Pinterest worthy pull quotes in a souped up coffee table book. The book was a casual enough read that I gave it a two-star rating instead of a one-star because it wasn't a total waste of time. In fact, I was at least inspired to start a budget (not like I actually know how to put one together no thanks to this book). I was even enjoying this book for the most part until I stumbled upon the chapter that discussed money in relationships and I had to sit through a whole chapter of Sex and the City references. I kid you not the author debates whether she is a Samantha or a Charlotte for a paragraph in terms of her spending and saving money. I can't believe we are in 2018 and we still have to make Sex and the City analogies to make a point to women. It's like other women don't know how to relate to other women if they're not putting in terms of an early 2000's sitcom. I don't get it at all. I couldn't even focus on the advice being given in this chapter because of it's cringe worthy opening. Not to mention I'm single and I'm not trying to navigate anyone else's financials except my own right now. Not only did I skip past the romance chapter, but I flipped through the recipes too. I know better than anyone that spending money out on food is expensive and we should all eat at home to save but the recipes were of no interest to me. I'm a vegetarian and most of the meals contained meat so I lost interest pretty fast. I also didn't care for the fashion advice or a lot of the other gendered advice in this book. I guess I'm on the look out for something more fact-based and tangible and not so much an urban outfitters coffee table book. I've also decided in a way, to break-up with Chelsea and TFD on YouTube. I've just decided I have much different outlooks on money and the life I'd like to live. It's nothing personal, I just think after reading this I'd be better to find people who inspire me. I loved hearing about Chelsea's background having been fired in countless positions in her early 20's and working minimum wage jobs until she found her passion and I think she's easy to relate to for the most part. However, towards the end of the book she kind of shit on some ideals that made me not like her as much. After reading Sincero's work I'm very much a believer in making your life what you want it to be and not having limited beliefs about your life. That being said, I kind of turned on Chelsea when she called bullshit on inspirational sayings such as, "Follow your dreams". "Empty inspirational sayings are one of the most dangerous things a young ambitious woman can encounter because they don't just make you feel like you're failing to live up to your truest potential, they make you feel like your'e an asshole for failing." Also this.... "I dream medium with my money because I know what goals are realistic for me and what behaviors are realistic for a flawed human like myself." The second quote is so full of negative, limiting thoughts it made me sad just reading it. My point is, maybe I'm naive and still believe in the power of thought and positive thinking. But me? I don't dream medium with anything and I don't think of myself as a flawed human. I don't feel like I'm failing when I hear people say "follow your dreams". I feel like an empowered young woman who has the power to change my life and others and so after reading the last couple of chapters of this book I decided that I will look elsewhere for advice because it's not a great fit for me and Chels.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie Sugia

    "Saving money isn't about depriving yourself. It's about deciding you love Future You as much as you love Today You." It's been a few months since I finished reading this book and life has been super hectic lately, that's why I'm writing this review 2 months late 😂. I'll try my best to write this review based on what I remember about this book. Since I'm now in my mid-20s, I'm slowly becoming more aware about my finances and wanted to get better at managing my money. To be honest, I used to be "Saving money isn't about depriving yourself. It's about deciding you love Future You as much as you love Today You." It's been a few months since I finished reading this book and life has been super hectic lately, that's why I'm writing this review 2 months late 😂. I'll try my best to write this review based on what I remember about this book. Since I'm now in my mid-20s, I'm slowly becoming more aware about my finances and wanted to get better at managing my money. To be honest, I used to be really bad at managing my money because back when I was a lot younger, I didn't know the hardship of earning money 😂😂. Now that I've worked for almost 5 years, I'm being a lot more mindful about where I spend my money. Back in my college days, I would buy more than 10 books in a month without any consideration. And now, I didn't even buy a single book in more than 6 months 😂. It was a pretty life-changing decision (a hard one, too), but I was able to save a lot of money because of that. And so when I discovered this book, I was immediately interested and decided to pick it up. I was hoping to learn a lot of things that will help me to get better with money. For the most part, I really enjoyed this book and was able to note some of the financial principles that I wanted to implement on my own life. The book also included a lot of adorable illustrations that makes it a lot more interesting. However, there are also some parts that I wasn't able to relate to because they're things that are only applicable in the United States; while on the other hand, I'm living in an entirely different continent where some things work differently 😂. But as I've said, I still really enjoyed the majority of this book and just decided to skip some parts that seems irrelevant for me. "The way we live today dictates everything about the kind of life we will have tomorrow, and even though this cliché was a painful one for me to accept, a dollar not wasted is just as good as a dollar earned." "You can't be on a financial diet unless you force yourself to confront the nutrition facts of your spending habits, no matter how gruesome they might be that first time you take a look around your transaction history." In this review, I'll share parts of this book that I find interesting. The first one, is the tips on How to Get Good with Money in a Year; the tips consists of creating a budget, building an emergency fund, doing a credit card checkup, adding another source of extra income, etc. This book also reminded us about the importance of having a budget tracker—which is something that I've done since March 2015 and have definitely felt the benefit of using it (that's why I kept doing it for years). Budgeting tracker is used to track all source of income, expenses, and the amount of leftover money that remains. There's also an additional resource for this book that includes budgeting questions that helps us reflect on our purchases and look back on how we've spent our money. This part definitely made me rethink my mindset about spending money and how I'm able to manage it better in the future. Cait Flanders also offered some good financial strategies; one of them is pausing before making any purchase (which I've tried to do for several years and has saved me from a lot of impulsive buying). There's also food category that talks about home cooking—a few recipes are included in the book, but I decided to skip this part since I don't really cook 😂. But the interesting part for me was the list of Essential Kitchen Tools that we might need and also the necessary herbs, seasonings, and pastes, to have at home. I also learnt about this in a book on minimalism and I think this list will be so useful for me in the future when I have my own home. 😊 On that note, there's also a chapter on home; which included a list of Essential Tool Kits you need to have in a house. I really like the mindset shared in this chapter; it teaches me not to be too focused on things looking nice so that it'll suits the ideal home in our head. That was quite a hard pill to swallow for me because I do have my own imagination about how my home should look like. But now after reading this book, I'm trying to compromise and focus more on fitting into the budget so that I can reach a bigger financial goal in the future."I'd like to own property someday, so sacrificing on rent now and not paying for things I can't afford is a fair exchange. Being smart about when and where I invest in furniture or decor, and accepting that I can't have everything nice all at once, is just part of the mentality I have to adopt, but that doesn't mean I can't enjoy where I am at the present moment."Another really interesting chapter is about the issue of money in relationships. I was especially excited to read this one because I know that money is a sensitive issue in any kinds of relationships—a romantic one, in friendship, and even in families. Over the past thirty years, money has also been either number one/tow cause of divorce. This book also offered some helpful tips for working out a money issue in any relationship, which I obviously highlighted and saved for future needs 😂. The last topic that I'll mention in this review is about having realistic dreams. This book went a little bit against the idea of 'follow your dreams', because sometimes doing so requires a lot of resources—which includes money. I really like how the author suggests that we should dream medium; which means that we should strive for a dream within our means and gradually grow from there. Overall, as you can see from the length of my review, I enjoyed many parts of this book. The writing was fun to read and I really like the mindset and principles that are shared by the author and other experts involved. For those of you who are just starting to learn about managing your finances, this book is a pretty light read that can get you started. I wish an Indonesian writer would publish a book similar to this so that everything will be more relatable for me personally. (Maybe it has been published and I just didn't know it yet 😂). I'm really eager to look for other books that touches on financial topics such as this one because I feel like I still have a lot to learn! 😆"Pop culture may have led us to believe that life should be a series of champagne brunches, Prince Charmings with black cards, and occasional money problems that magically sort themselves out in a neat two-episode arc, but real life is nothing like that. The point is, the only way we're going to have not just the relationships that satisfy us and evolve with us but the freedom to live that rich, fulfilling adult life is to be honest. We owe it to ourselves, and the people around us, to be open about our needs and our differences, and to not allow a little thing like money take a relationship down because we refuse to look it in the eye." Read the full review here: http://www.thebookielooker.com/2019/0...

  15. 5 out of 5

    Casey (caseydillabooks)

    My dad recommended this book to me after hearing it was a finance book aimed at millennial women and hearing an interview of Chelsea Fagan, probably on NPR. Since working on my finances is a goal for me this year, i was eager to have a good beginners guide that was accessible and informative. I would say this delivered on inspiring me to learn more about finances, but it didnt really have a lot of the information a handbook should have. There were a few tips and tidbits that stood out to me, My dad recommended this book to me after hearing it was a finance book aimed at millennial women and hearing an interview of Chelsea Fagan, probably on NPR. Since working on my finances is a goal for me this year, i was eager to have a good beginners guide that was accessible and informative. I would say this delivered on inspiring me to learn more about finances, but it didn’t really have a lot of the information a handbook should have. There were a few tips and tidbits that stood out to me, like a career checklist and Chelsea’s recommendation to have multiple streams of income or “side hustles.” I also liked that it consulted a lot of different people to give a rounded perspective. However as far as practicality, I think it would have been more helpful to spend more pages explaining 401(k)s and IRAs than sharing budget friendly recipes. The guidelines for how to budget effectively basically could be summarized by saying you need to experiment to find what’s right for you (duh) and the sample budgets were not detailed enough to be helpful. For me, this book reinforced what I already knew about the importance budgeting and saving (with a few extra tips that I will keep in mind), but it didn’t give me very much practical advice on how to do so. I do feel more confident that I can afford to save and invest, but again the “how” of it will still need more research. I would recommend this book as a decent intro to managing money with a lot of inspo, but not as any kind of practical guidebook.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Lawson

    I Have Been Fired From A Dozen Jobs In THE FINANCIAL DIET, author Chelsea Fagan provides a ton of practical ways to manage your money, as well as ideas on furthering your career. In the beginning pages, the author admits to her many foolish decisions as a kid. In particular, she laments this big mistake: The day I turned eighteen, I acquired my little card full of free money, and maxed it out within a month and a half of delirious spending. I bet a lot of readers can identify with the foolhardy I Have Been Fired From A Dozen Jobs In THE FINANCIAL DIET, author Chelsea Fagan provides a ton of practical ways to manage your money, as well as ideas on furthering your career. In the beginning pages, the author admits to her many foolish decisions as a kid. In particular, she laments this big mistake: “The day I turned eighteen, I acquired my little card full of free money, and maxed it out within a month and a half of delirious spending.” I bet a lot of readers can identify with the foolhardy decisions we all made when young. The book especially focuses on suggestions for readers who are just beginning the journey on sound money management. Thus, Chelsea includes valuable tips such as, “#4. Automate What You Can Card payments, bill payments, and savings transfers should all be automatically made from your checking account. This way, you won’t tempt yourself to not save.” Here is a tip that I especially liked. “Even if you just dedicate a few hours a month to a side job, even one additional stream of income has a huge impact.” I’ve never really thought seriously about doing that—now I will! Here’s another gem: Don’t slide into a “CEO lifestyle” where you tell yourself how much you deserve all the money-wasting things you buy. There is one feature of this book that is especially commendable: Chelsea doesn’t just rely on her OWN ideas—she consults experts whom she respects for their business wisdom. So instead of just getting the perspective from the author, the reader gets advice from lots of different folks. I don’t think I’ve seen that particular format in any other personal finance book. For example, the author consults with Bridget Casey, Award-Winning Entrepreneur, and asks her, “What are the three most important financial strategies you live by?” The author repeats this “Q&A” approach many times throughout the book. I thought this was a really wise idea. So all I all, I found THE FINANCIAL DIET to be a surprisingly fun read—as well as a practical book. The author is a witty and funny writer. She turns a pretty dull subject into something a lot more interesting. The illustrations by Eve Mobley also add a nice touch. There is a glossary of business terms appendix. The end of the book has a few closing exhortations to the reader. She wants the reader to figure out “What you really want out of your life— not just the “big” things, but how you want your average day to look and what you want to be doing with it. “ Good advice! Advance Review Copy courtesy of the publisher.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Spence

    I appreciated the accessibility of the book to a complete novice in the financial field. Explanations were very well phrased and the numerous anecdotes and interviews provided a wide range of viewpoints and catered to the specific areas I was curious about while giving me an overview of financial aspects I had never considered. As a millennial/ gen-z this book was a wonderful jumping off point for me and I would highly recommend it to other people with financial dreams but no concrete I appreciated the accessibility of the book to a complete novice in the financial field. Explanations were very well phrased and the numerous anecdotes and interviews provided a wide range of viewpoints and catered to the specific areas I was curious about while giving me an overview of financial aspects I had never considered. As a millennial/ gen-z this book was a wonderful jumping off point for me and I would highly recommend it to other people with financial dreams but no concrete understanding of what that looks like in our quickly changing world.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gabie (OwlEyesReviews)

    This is definitely helpful since I will be moving out of my Mom's house and into my first adult house soon.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jenni Clark

    This would have been great to find when I was a teenager or in college. Pretty basic, but I liked how they did not present one universal plan for financial planning, its a personal thing. This would have been great to find when I was a teenager or in college. Pretty basic, but I liked how they did not present one universal plan for financial planning, it’s a personal thing.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Helly

    Three stars for the beneficial points, however, most of it is actually irrelevant if you are not from US

  21. 5 out of 5

    Patti

    A pretty great little book filled with interviews from financial experts and tips from Chelsea Fagan, the creator of one of my favorite YouTube channels that shares the name of this book. A great resource to have in my pocket for investing, and the perfect addition to their other media sites.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Templeton

    I am a bit of a financial literacy nerd and I really appreciate the honest perspective of this quick read. With realistic and honest viewpoints and goals throughout, it is a great starting point for those who have no clue where to begin with personal finance.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    Rating: 2.5 I think I was expecting more financial info and less whatever this was. I'm thinking part of the issue is that I appear to be way older than her target audience which appears to be mid-twenties people. There were certainly some good nuggets of information or reminders of things to keep in mind, but for the most part, it came off as common sense info with topics that were all over the place.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Perkins

    More of an inspirational book and lifestyle guide than a real how to manual, The Financial Diet is a cute, quick read with lovely illustrations. It is a good basic overview of financial terms and concepts that one should read more about at a later date. I did learn a thing here or there--there are spousal IRAs for SAHs? If my children get paying jobs before turning 18 they can get a Roth IRA specifically for children?! First I had heard of either, despite reading several books on financial More of an inspirational book and lifestyle guide than a real how to manual, The Financial Diet is a cute, quick read with lovely illustrations. It is a good basic overview of financial terms and concepts that one should read more about at a later date. I did learn a thing here or there--there are spousal IRAs for SAHs? If my children get paying jobs before turning 18 they can get a Roth IRA specifically for children?! First I had heard of either, despite reading several books on financial topics--but this book isn't really intended for someone like me; it is more for a complete beginner who might not know anything about finances at all. However. I did appreciate that unlike most other books on the subject I have read, Fagan does not fall into shaming anyone who didn't shoot out the gate knowing to start investing or a retirement account at 20 or 25 at the latest. (Because of that compound interest, don'tcha know? I get so sick of that dead horse of a topic that every other book keeps beating. We have no time machines, financial advisers; please talk to us about thing we can do *now* and not dwell on choices we did not make when we were younger.) Since the author did plenty of screwing up herself, she has a more kind perspective to start where you are and work from there. Much of this book was dedicated to living a fulfilling life within the means one has and coming to peace with Dreaming Medium. It still has a heavy slant toward young, urban professionals, but I found it less offensive than the last financial book I read by a Millennial author. There is a chapter that uses Sex in The City as a metaphor that I found a bit bizarre since I never watched the show, but I'm sure more people than not are familiar enough with the characters to go along with it. For myself the most valuable part of the book was the final chapter, and that alone is worth checking this book out from the library for. (A quick note about the language: I expected some cuss-filled tirade based on some of the reviews on here. I was disappointed to see that swearing was pretty minimal and spread out. Unless you're very sensitive about swearing, it's hardly noticeable. None of it felt gratuitous or out of place.)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Im not sure this is a fair rating, so I shall explain the thinking behind it. It turns out Im not actually the total beginner this book is aimed at, which is both a nice surprise and rather unfortunate, considering I had bought the book only to discover this. I am also a) unable to work long-term and b) British, so really I was setting The Financial Diet an impossible task to ~speak to me~, and must take some of the blame for us not quite hitting it off. However, it aint all me. There was a lot in I’m not sure this is a fair rating, so I shall explain the thinking behind it. It turns out I’m not actually the ‘total beginner’ this book is aimed at, which is both a nice surprise and rather unfortunate, considering I had bought the book only to discover this. I am also a) unable to work long-term and b) British, so really I was setting ’The Financial Diet’ an impossible task to ~speak to me~, and must take some of the blame for us not quite hitting it off. However, it ain’t all me. There was a lot in the book that I - and I assume many other people around my age - am a full-on n00b to, the kind of stuff I bought TFD to learn about, but they weren’t explained in anywhere near sufficient depth. Yet very basic things were covered in far too much detail, often repeatedly. This was a frustrating dichotomy to work with. I didn’t dig the borderline glorification of ‘the side hustle’, though I of course realise they are simply a necessity of reality for many people. The book did balance this by talking about having more than work in your life, prioritising downtime, knowing your worth etc, and made up for it with some great, very frank words about capitalism and the ideal of ‘following your dreams’ in its later pages. The design is gorgeous, but involves a lot of unnecessary full-page quotes and other such padding. I felt like there could have been so much more in the book. That, I think, is the crux here. This book was my introduction to world of TFD, which seems to be the opposite experience of most readers, but I have settled on the same opinion many of them hold - the website and YouTube channel are where it’s at. They are what I was looking for in the book, and so for that I’m glad to have given the book a go. I will definitely be following and utilising TFD online from now on. For its decent content, which is not at all inconsiderable; for its last couple of chapters especially; for its warmth, humour and approachability; for bringing the wider phenomenon of TFD to my attention; and in recognition of the fact that someone closer to the admirably broad target audience may get more out of it - I went for three stars. :)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stacia

    I'm not sure I can write a fair review. Money's emotional, it's tied to security and so many other things... I had to really quickly skim the second half of it because it spun me into a panic attack. I actually talked about it with my therapist. It makes me feel like being depressed in my early twenties ruined everything and there's so much I need to consider and work on, it feels overwhelming and impossible. And that's not the book/author's fault! That being said, I absolutely already recommended I'm not sure I can write a fair review. Money's emotional, it's tied to security and so many other things... I had to really quickly skim the second half of it because it spun me into a panic attack. I actually talked about it with my therapist. It makes me feel like being depressed in my early twenties ruined everything and there's so much I need to consider and work on, it feels overwhelming and impossible. And that's not the book/author's fault! That being said, I absolutely already recommended it to my younger sister. There were things here and there I found helpful. I think the blog might be helpful for researching more specific questions as they come up. I would be more interested in learning how to decide how to invest, how to find good advisers, balancing saving vs. investing vs. paying off debt, figuring out how to set up a retirement account, what you can do if you're working part time, etc. I spend money on gas and every couple months I splurge on books. There is not that much to cut back on (please let me have some joy and dreams), and how many side hustles can you take on and not totally drain yourself? I'm mostly frustrated. Another reviewer pointed out it's more of a lifestyle book rather than a financial book, and that might be true! Maybe part of the issue is the lifestyle I'm trying to build doesn't match what they detail? Like... my family is not financially stable, I can't lean on my parents very much, I'm not an executive and don't plan to be. I'm a fat person, I don't need you guys to tell me what clothes to buy? I'm going to look into some of the books other reviewers have listed.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bethan Mills

    I am a massive fan of The Financial Diet's content in general, but found this book more limited in scope and less useful than I was expecting. This book is a helpful introduction to managing your personal finances but it seems aimed at a very limited audience - young, female professionals in the private sector, living in cities in the USA, with student loans, no dependants, and affluent backgrounds. I found most of the chapters helpful but not specific enough - for example one chapter focuses on I am a massive fan of The Financial Diet's content in general, but found this book more limited in scope and less useful than I was expecting. This book is a helpful introduction to managing your personal finances but it seems aimed at a very limited audience - young, female professionals in the private sector, living in cities in the USA, with student loans, no dependants, and affluent backgrounds. I found most of the chapters helpful but not specific enough - for example one chapter focuses on the importance of budgeting while remaining very secretive about how to draw up a budget and what tools (apps etc.) to use to do this. Another chapter focuses on investment but is so orientated towards an American audience that I mostly skipped the whole thing. I appreciated the chapters about feeding yourself cheaply and having a budget friendly home, and also the chapter that looked at talking about money in the context of relationships (romantic but also friendships!). I also appreciated that a theme running throughout is that money is the means to an end; a tool to achieve greater security and push for your goals. I overall found it a helpful motivator as I think about handling my money more effectively in 2020, but I wouldn't recommend it to a friend. Just visit moneysavingexpert.com.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    This is closer to 1.5 stars, if I'm feeling generous. I said in my first update that I've already got a love/hate thing with TFD and that as someone who already has savings, some investments and a mortgage I'm not exactly the target demographic. But there's truly not much to be learned from this book the chapter on investing was just explaining that it isn't all dudes on Wall Street making investments. And referring readers to the glossary for breaking down investment acronyms! One featured This is closer to 1.5 stars, if I'm feeling generous. I said in my first update that I've already got a love/hate thing with TFD and that as someone who already has savings, some investments and a mortgage I'm not exactly the target demographic. But there's truly not much to be learned from this book – the chapter on investing was just explaining that it isn't all dudes on Wall Street making investments. And referring readers to the glossary for breaking down investment acronyms! One featured "expert" suggests to climb the lattice work of your career you need to build the ground work, which is doing things bit part of your job description. Maybe that would have worked pre-2008, but now it leads to a title change, the expectation of doing that work and no raise. Don't do extra work for free. That said, the most helpful parts of the book are the downloadable resources, which drives you to the site (and I'm assuming TFD getting some $ad$ revenue.) Also I thought the design of the book was garbage. Random sentences in lists would be different weights. Huge sections would be larger fonts and bold to... meet the page requirements? Save yourself the money and check this out form the library if you're dead set on reading it, or check out any number of legit financial resources online for free.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lexy

    Id like to preface this by saying that I generally enjoy TFDs YouTube channel and that the design of this book was really pretty, a marketing tactic I appreciate and am certainly not immune to. However, I learned absolutely nothing of value. I should have done a cursory flip through before purchasing because the recipe section should have tipped me off that this book wasnt going to provide me what I needed. If youre looking for advice on professional workwear, home decor, and an easy quiches I I’d like to preface this by saying that I generally enjoy TFD’s YouTube channel and that the design of this book was really pretty, a marketing tactic I appreciate and am certainly not immune to. However, I learned absolutely nothing of value. I should have done a cursory flip through before purchasing because the recipe section should have tipped me off that this book wasn’t going to provide me what I needed. If you’re looking for advice on professional workwear, home decor, and an easy quiches I guess you could pick up this book, but honestly you’d be better off with a book, blog, or YouTube video covering that specific topic. Or ya know, just scroll through Pinterest for 15 minutes? Not only did I feel like there wasn’t much financial advice in the book, the little there was was aimed at a very specific set of women. Millennial (which I am) working a corporate 9-5 (that requires business casual attire) and isn’t necessarily struggling with to pay the bills, just needs to “cut back” on impulse spending. I come from a pretty privileged background all things considered, and still found this book rubbing me the wrong way. Truthfully, “Confessions of a Shopaholic” was more relatable and that was a work of fiction with an insufferable protagonist.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    This author has a lot of warm commiserations of being bad with bread in the past, and shares warm encouragements like (and I am paraphrasing) 'next time you want to do x, look it up on Youtube', or 'people want to talk about anal sex more than money, but just like one's sex life, it cannot be improved without talking about it', and advice such as 'never go shopping when you're sad, angry, or hungry.' All this is well and good, but this has very little substance, and said substance is hardly This author has a lot of warm commiserations of being bad with bread in the past, and shares warm encouragements like (and I am paraphrasing) 'next time you want to do x, look it up on Youtube', or 'people want to talk about anal sex more than money, but just like one's sex life, it cannot be improved without talking about it', and advice such as 'never go shopping when you're sad, angry, or hungry.' All this is well and good, but this has very little substance, and said substance is hardly unique. Practically anyone off the street could tell you that saving more money means reaping more over time through interest, and paying with a credit card should be thought of as if it's a debit card, because....etcetera, etcetera. Maybe it's because I came strictly for financial advice rather than cringe-worthy millennial marketing, but this seems like it would do much better as a single buzzfeed article (or series) than as a book. Strongly recommend avoiding

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