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Rupture

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1955. Two young couples move to the uninhabited, isolated fjord of Hedinsfjörður. Their stay ends abruptly when one of the women meets her death in mysterious circumstances. The case is never solved. Fifty years later an old photograph comes to light, and it becomes clear that the couples may not have been alone on the fjord after all… In nearby Siglufjörður, young 1955. Two young couples move to the uninhabited, isolated fjord of Hedinsfjörður. Their stay ends abruptly when one of the women meets her death in mysterious circumstances. The case is never solved. Fifty years later an old photograph comes to light, and it becomes clear that the couples may not have been alone on the fjord after all… In nearby Siglufjörður, young policeman Ari Thór tries to piece together what really happened that fateful night, in a town where no one wants to know, where secrets are a way of life. He’s assisted by Ísrún, a news reporter in Reykjavik, who is investigating an increasingly chilling case of her own. Things take a sinister turn when a child goes missing in broad daylight. With a stalker on the loose, and the town of Siglufjörður in quarantine, the past might just come back to haunt them.


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1955. Two young couples move to the uninhabited, isolated fjord of Hedinsfjörður. Their stay ends abruptly when one of the women meets her death in mysterious circumstances. The case is never solved. Fifty years later an old photograph comes to light, and it becomes clear that the couples may not have been alone on the fjord after all… In nearby Siglufjörður, young 1955. Two young couples move to the uninhabited, isolated fjord of Hedinsfjörður. Their stay ends abruptly when one of the women meets her death in mysterious circumstances. The case is never solved. Fifty years later an old photograph comes to light, and it becomes clear that the couples may not have been alone on the fjord after all… In nearby Siglufjörður, young policeman Ari Thór tries to piece together what really happened that fateful night, in a town where no one wants to know, where secrets are a way of life. He’s assisted by Ísrún, a news reporter in Reykjavik, who is investigating an increasingly chilling case of her own. Things take a sinister turn when a child goes missing in broad daylight. With a stalker on the loose, and the town of Siglufjörður in quarantine, the past might just come back to haunt them.

30 review for Rupture

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Humphrey

    Before going into my official review, I feel it necessary to rehash the importance of the order you read these books in IF you care about spoilers featuring the reoccurring characters. While these were translated in a certain order into english, now that four (almost five) of the series are out, you have the ability to avoid unwelcome spoiling. As best I can tell, the order you should read these is as follows (for chronological consumption): Snowblind Blackout Rupture Nightblind Now that I got that Before going into my official review, I feel it necessary to rehash the importance of the order you read these books in IF you care about spoilers featuring the reoccurring characters. While these were translated in a certain order into english, now that four (almost five) of the series are out, you have the ability to avoid unwelcome spoiling. As best I can tell, the order you should read these is as follows (for chronological consumption): Snowblind Blackout Rupture Nightblind Now that I got that out of the way, let's move on to the review. " 'You think someone may have murdered her?' Ari Thor asked straight out, having long ago given up packaging awkward questions in tactful ways. He had never been particularly considerate in that regard, anyway." ^ Well said Ari, well said. I have always felt my book boyfriend from Iceland expresses the things we introverts wish we could on a daily basis. Maybe it's his lack of filter, his dry sense of humor, and his general sense of unawareness to many a situation we would find to contain common sense, but Ari is a wholly engaging protagonist who is heavily flawed, yet you still love him to pieces. I always try to keep sequel reviews brief and free of spoilers past and present, but I will say that this fits nicely between Blackout and Nightblind, not because of the individual case load, but due to the fact it again features Isrun the reporter from B.O. and also comes chronologically before the events of N.B. I did already know what would happen with a few of the ongoing storyline reveals, as I had already read N.B. which continues from the outcome in Rupture. This was fine; I felt like it wasn't anything major and it gave me a greater appreciation for what I had read before. I also really enjoyed the storyline limited to just this novel, as it was equal parts historical and contemporary fiction and had the feel of solving a cold case that has been haunting you for years. Highly recommended to fans of the series!! *Many thanks to the publisher for providing my copy.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Diane S ☔

    I've given the other books I this series four stars, but this barely garnered a three. Why? Yes, I still love the atmosphere, the darkness, the coldness, so pervasive. Such an enclosing air. Yes, I also still like Ari Thor, though I this one he shares star billing with Isrun, a journalist who has her own issues. My problem was with the many different stories, threads, happening at the same time, made it hard to concentrate on any one. Broke up the narrative with the constant changing of focus. I've given the other books I this series four stars, but this barely garnered a three. Why? Yes, I still love the atmosphere, the darkness, the coldness, so pervasive. Such an enclosing air. Yes, I also still like Ari Thor, though I this one he shares star billing with Isrun, a journalist who has her own issues. My problem was with the many different stories, threads, happening at the same time, made it hard to concentrate on any one. Broke up the narrative with the constant changing of focus. There were also a few subplots that were resolved with nary a blink. One, the quarantine, I couldn't even feel like it was a necessary inclusion, it served imo, little purpose. I did like the past story that was being looked into, and that brought my rating up to a three. Mostly though, I felt this was too rushed and too many items were put into the pot. Didn't stir up well.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kate~Bibliophile Book Club

    I’m sure I’ve said this before, but you know when you’ve been waiting for the next book by an author whose work you love? Well that was me, until yesterday evening. I had been waiting patiently, biding my time until Rupture’s release on Christmas Eve. Imagine my utter joy and excitement when I got an email last night and Rupture was attached. Needless to say, I dropped EVERYTHING to start reading, and I finished it this afternoon. There’s always that’s tiny bit of fear when reading a book by an I’m sure I’ve said this before, but you know when you’ve been waiting for the next book by an author whose work you love? Well that was me, until yesterday evening. I had been waiting patiently, biding my time until Rupture’s release on Christmas Eve. Imagine my utter joy and excitement when I got an email last night and Rupture was attached. Needless to say, I dropped EVERYTHING to start reading, and I finished it this afternoon. There’s always that’s tiny bit of fear when reading a book by an author you enjoy, will it be good? Will it be as good as their last book? Well it’s safe to say I was in no way disappointed upon reading the final page of Rupture, it made me smile. Rupture is a chillingly beautiful book. Atmospheric, subtle and utterly enthralling. Opening the book felt like coming home, catching up with friends and seeing what’s been going on in their lives. A gentle and easy prose lends itself perfectly to the story, creating tension at the right times, while keeping the reader completely gripped. There is more than one thread running through Rupture in terms of stories, yet they all weave together seamlessly as you progress through the pages. With Siglufjörður in the grips of a deadly virus, Ari Thor is tasked with rehashing an old case to see if anything can be gleaned in relation to a suspicious death from many years ago. Running parallel to his investigation, news reporter Ísrún is investigating a case of her own. We have met Ísrún before, and it was great to see her in Rupture as well. She’s a very interesting character and I really enjoyed reading more about her. I don’t want to get too much into the plot for fear of giving anything away. What I will say though, is I wasn’t expecting Rupture to go in the direction that it did. The past is a funny thing, and it can resurface at any time and in some very unexpected ways. Rupture is testament to that fact, the past can definitely return to haunt people. Honestly, I think these books just keep getting better. With every new book, I find that Ragnar Jónasson is tackling some very interesting and hard-hitting issues, and always with sensitivity. There is nothing gratuitous in these books, every word serves a purpose. Like flakes of snow falling from the sky, his words fall gently on the reader and have the ability to chill. Rupture was everything I had been hoping for, and so much more. Stunning. Gripping. So completely worth the wait. All the stars. Always.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    4.5 stars Another gorgeous cover, another great read. A couple of years ago, I was browsing in the bookstore at Keflavik airport when “Snowblind” from Orenda Books caught my eye (and wallet). I hadn’t heard of it, the author or the publisher. How times have changed. Most of the series is now translated so I recently spent a few days back in Iceland (from my sofa) by binge reading the next 3 instalments. This is book #4 & I think it just might be my favourite. Ari Thór is having trouble finding 4.5 stars Another gorgeous cover, another great read. A couple of years ago, I was browsing in the bookstore at Keflavik airport when “Snowblind” from Orenda Books caught my eye (and wallet). I hadn’t heard of it, the author or the publisher. How times have changed. Most of the series is now translated so I recently spent a few days back in Iceland (from my sofa) by binge reading the next 3 instalments. This is book #4 & I think it just might be my favourite. Ari Thór is having trouble finding something to do. After a tourist died from a highly infectious bug, Siglufjördur was put under quarantine. No one is allowed in or out & the streets are empty as residents hunker down inside. So it’s the perfect time to dig into an old mystery. Ari is contacted by an elderly gent named Hédinn with a photo that recently came into his possession. It was taken on an isolated farm where the man was born. In 1955, 2 couples from Reykjavik moved to the remote area. Less than 2 years later, one was dead & the others fled back to the city with a newborn in tow. Hédinn wants to know if Ari can find the answer to one question: who is the stranger in the photo? Ari soon finds connections In Reykjavik but can’t travel due to the quarantine. He enlists the help of Isrún, a reporter he met on a previous case. She agrees if he’ll give her the scoop on the situation in Siglufjördur which is gaining national attention. There are several additional side stories that develop as the book progresses. The fun part is watching as the characters pick away at their investigations & uncover a few surprising twists along the way. If you’ve read any of these books, you know you’re in for intricate mysteries & great characters you become attached to. Their personal stories continue to develop & Ari in particular is a young man still struggling to finding his feet (if you’re keeping score, he & Kristin are back together). He’s more accepted by the town’s residents but will always be an outsider & his feelings of isolation are perfectly mirrored by the stark setting. The quarantine serves to heighten the claustrophobic atmosphere as Siglufjördur becomes a ghost town. The silence, chill winds, & looming mountains provide a backdrop for the rising tension as Ari gradually discovers what happened to Hédinn’s family . There are no car chases or shoot-outs here, just a smart, character driven mystery that gives your brain a workout. It’s one of those books that leaves you a bit disoriented when you eventually look up & find yourself on the sofa, reaching for a sweater. Well, the binge-fest is over. I’m left waiting for “Whiteout” & plotting a return trip to Iceland that just might include dropping by a certain town up north.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    Regrettably, this is simply not that good of a story. 1 of 10 stars

  6. 5 out of 5

    Crime by the Book

    Another atmospheric and immersive mystery from Ragnar Jónasson! RUPTURE has another very classic mystery plot, which I always love while reading this series. But my favorite thing about this series is the way Ragnar's writing can transport you to Iceland with its vivid descriptions and beautiful language, and this book absolutely had that quality. I'll be sharing my full review soon!!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Liz Barnsley

    So we are up to book 4 in the Dark Iceland series then and honestly I’m not sure what to say in this review that I haven’t said already – this is one of my favourite series in a quiet, contemplative kind of way and it speaks volumes really that I start reading them as soon as they arrive but take it slowly, the descriptive prose is to savour not to bang out in a sitting – at least for this reader The characters have grown and developed so beautifully over the course of the novels but this one I So we are up to book 4 in the Dark Iceland series then and honestly I’m not sure what to say in this review that I haven’t said already – this is one of my favourite series in a quiet, contemplative kind of way and it speaks volumes really that I start reading them as soon as they arrive but take it slowly, the descriptive prose is to savour not to bang out in a sitting – at least for this reader The characters have grown and developed so beautifully over the course of the novels but this one I think might be my favourite so far – I loved finding out more about Isrun and as for Ari well what is there left to say about him either? Gorgeous, insightful and brilliantly imagined, Ragnar Jonasson breathes life into his creations with every word. In this instalment the tiny community of Siglufjorour is even more isolated due to a virus, Ari has a cold (in more sense than one) case to look into and as ever you are thrown into that claustrophobic yet utterly beautiful setting almost as if you are actually there – that is the sheer quality of the writing shining through. One of the best things about this author is his ability to weave a web made of many strands yet at the end of the day bring them all together into a cohesive and wonderfully constructed whole – there are so many levels to the storytelling yet all are perfectly placed and utterly riveting. Rupture managed to both surprise and delight, engage and inform and there is nothing more really that you can ask for from a read. Gorgeous. Icelandic Noir in a nutshell – that is Ragnar Jonasson and I really cannot recommend these highly enough.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Rupture is the latest from Ragnar Jonasson to hit our shelves. We are now at the fourth story, in this impressive series. Long may it continue! I confess to having a very soft spot for Ari Thor and the Dark Iceland series. Ari Thor is maturing nicely. He is far too clever to be stuck in remote Iceland. I am slightly concerned that the town Siglufjörður might just be a hotbed of evil. Never mind how isolted and cold it is! I see Ari Thor’s town as a kind of Midsommer Murders region, where it is Rupture is the latest from Ragnar Jonasson to hit our shelves. We are now at the fourth story, in this impressive series. Long may it continue! I confess to having a very soft spot for Ari Thor and the Dark Iceland series. Ari Thor is maturing nicely. He is far too clever to be stuck in remote Iceland. I am slightly concerned that the town Siglufjörður might just be a hotbed of evil. Never mind how isolted and cold it is! I see Ari Thor’s town as a kind of Midsommer Murders region, where it is not safe to venture out alone … Once again, Jonasson punishes the citizens of Siglufjörður. It’s bad enough that they have to contend with the cold, dark, bitter months. Now the town is put into quarantine, while a killer virus rampages. Everyone is in fear of getting the lurgy. Most people are stuck at home, waiting for it all to end. Ari Thor is one of the few people who dares to venture out. He is contacted by a man trying to solve a historical mystery. An old photo sparks Ari Thor looking into what happened to a tragic family fifty years ago. Isrun, the journalist we met previously in Blackout, is looking into the case of a missing child, as well as reporting on the killer virus in Siglufjörður. She gets in touch with Ari Thor. Will Ari Thor get to the truth about the mystery photo and solve the cold case? This feels a little gentler, that some of the previous cases for Ari Thor. The balance of an old cold case, the terribly isolating virus sweeping the town and the current case of the missing child all seem very appropriate and chilling. There is something very special here. We have the return of so many characters we know and love. I was surprised to see Isrun again. Ari Thor seems to be happy with his girlfriend now, which is a relief. This is a crime series that feels very familiar and welcome. Rupture keeps you on your toes, waiting for the final reveal from Ari Thor. It’s a cold winter wind of evil coming from Iceland. Turn up the heat! Wrap up warm. Indulge!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    All of my reviews can be found on www.novelgossip.com I read Snowblind just a few days ago then immediately had to start Rupture to read more of Jonasson’s gorgeous writing and to find out more about the intriguing Ari Thor. There’s just something about him that’s captivating and leaves you wanting more. The residents of Siglufjörður are in a panic because a serious illness was brought to their community by an out of towner. When the man dies then someone else falls ill, they are quarantined and All of my reviews can be found on www.novelgossip.com I read Snowblind just a few days ago then immediately had to start Rupture to read more of Jonasson’s gorgeous writing and to find out more about the intriguing Ari Thor. There’s just something about him that’s captivating and leaves you wanting more. The residents of Siglufjörður are in a panic because a serious illness was brought to their community by an out of towner. When the man dies then someone else falls ill, they are quarantined and a bit of hysteria ensues. Ari Thor is one of the few people that still leaves his house as he has to work even though there isn’t much keeping him busy at the moment. When he’s approached by Hedinn, a man with some questions about an old and mysterious family photograph, he welcomes the distraction. He enlists the help of Isrun, a news reporter who is juggling multiple stories. What they uncover is a dark family secret which some serious implications for the future. There are a few storylines running alongside each other here. First, Ari Thor is digging into the old photo from the fifties that’s linked to a cold case that was apparently solved, but he’s not so sure, then Isrun is covering the kidnapping of a child, and finally a politicians son is run over and killed. When links are discovered it’s very clear that someone is hell bent on revenge, but who? And why? No one does atmospheric more beautifully than Jonasson, and one of my favorite scenes in Rupture was when Ari Thor and the local priest visit Hedinsfjörður to follow a lead about the photograph taken there. It’s completely uninhabited now and is totally dark and deserted when they visit. I’m not one to be afraid of the dark yet I found myself a bit panicky and anxious for them to hurry up and get out of there, it was very chilling and creepy. Jonasson’s writing style is very purposeful and totally unmatched by anyone else. Every single word has a meaning deeper than its literal definition, yet there is a simplicity and a quiet gentleness about it. Despite this elegant approach, he is still able to convey a quiet intensity that is more powerful than an in your face approach. He’s very cautious about what he reveals to the reader only letting you in on secrets when the timing is absolutely perfect. This is another classic murder mystery with an icy Icelandic twist, so very perfect for a winter read. As always, the characterization is deep, rich and complex which adds another layer to the story. I can’t say enough good things about this book or the author, just go ahead and read this series already.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laura Rash

    This series by Jonasson is like nothing I've ever read. The descriptions of Icelandic life, the stories he creates that are so wrapped up into others are unique. They're like an old fashioned mystery where everyone is brought into the library at the end & you find out who the culprit is. Loved every one of these books. Thanks to Karen at Orenda for this copy in exchange for review!

  11. 4 out of 5

    The Book Review Café

    All my reviews can be found at http://thebookreviewcafe.com Rupture is a crime thriller that feels like a breath of fresh air, it has much more to offer than the average crime thriller, for me this novel is beautifully written with a well crafted plot, this is Nordic crime noir at it’s best. I’m normally a reader who loves a crime read to be fast paced, which I don’t consider Rupture to be, but what I loved about this novel was the authors incredible gift of being able to pull the reader into his All my reviews can be found at http://thebookreviewcafe.com Rupture is a crime thriller that feels like a breath of fresh air, it has much more to offer than the average crime thriller, for me this novel is beautifully written with a well crafted plot, this is Nordic crime noir at it’s best. I’m normally a reader who loves a crime read to be fast paced, which I don’t consider Rupture to be, but what I loved about this novel was the authors incredible gift of being able to pull the reader into his plot and build on the suspense and mystery leaving me eager to read more. Sometimes I struggle with novels that have been translated as the writing can feel stilted or the heart of the story gets lost in translation, but Rupture proves that it can be done successfully, in fact I found it difficult to believe this book was written in anything but English. Ragnar Jónasson’s writing is beautifully descriptive, he describes the town of Siglufjöróur in great detail, so it’s easy to imagine the bleakness and claustrophobic atmosphere that surrounds the small Icelandic town, as the town is quarantined from a deadly virus, the sense of unease and isolation are palatable. Ari Thór is asked to investigate a suspected murder from the 1950’s, and with the town in quarantine he finds himself with plenty of time on his hands, and as he begins to investigate the case it soon becomes clear that not everything is as it seems. The author intricately adds various plots to the story, but in doing so he adds layer upon layer of mystery to the story which kept me captivated to the last page. Despite the numerous threads the author expertly weaves them into an absorbing and suspense filled plot. The author even manages to make his characters multi dimensional and complex, so much so you can’t help but feel a connection to them, I especially liked Ari Thor whose life doesn’t appear to run to plan, but never the less he’s a very intriguing character. There are no shocking or fast paced scenes in Rupture, but the author expertly builds on the atmosphere with every sentence he writes whilst maintaining the suspense and mystery. Rupture reads like a classic who dunnit, but that’s a good thing in my opinion and one of the things that make Rupture standout from other crime thriller reads. For me Rupture is refreshingly different amid all the crime thrillers on the market, beautifully and eloquently written it conjures up breathtaking images of a stark landscape that beg to be visited. Chilling, complex and addictive I would highly recommend Rupture to anyone looking for a unique crime thriller.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Hall

    Three years after his arrival in the unprepossessing fishing village of Siglufjörður precariously located at the northernmost tip of Iceland, life still feels like an arduous task for Ari Thór Arason, despite the much vaunted improvement in transportation links to the community. The isolation of the village and unremittingly morose winter weather has never been anything less than a tall order for city man, Ari Thór, to contend with. Encircled by a ring of mountains which throw an oppressive Three years after his arrival in the unprepossessing fishing village of Siglufjörður precariously located at the northernmost tip of Iceland, life still feels like an arduous task for Ari Thór Arason, despite the much vaunted improvement in transportation links to the community. The isolation of the village and unremittingly morose winter weather has never been anything less than a tall order for city man, Ari Thór, to contend with. Encircled by a ring of mountains which throw an oppressive shadow over the village, he feels their suffocating effect weighing down his spirits, with the threat of an avalanche or landslide always imminent. Yet for Ari Thór the village has never exerted such an intolerable grip on him as it does in the events of Rupture, which sees the region seized by the spread of a highly contagious disease, namely haemorrhagic fever. With the village placed under quarantine and the residents thereby made rudely aware of their importance in the national scheme of things, the Siglufjörður police have an opportunity to take things easy. For Ari Thór, prone to brooding, the opportunity to appraise a centuries old case presents him with an enigma to keep his mind blessedly occupied. The temporary sabbatical departure of Tómas earlier in the year provided an opportunity for fifty-five years old Hédinn to approach Ari Thór and seek a fresh opinion on a mystery that has always blighted his past, specifically the circumstances surrounding his aunt's suicide in 1957. With a skeleton staff juggling the shifts at Siglufjörður, the opportunity has evaded Ari Thór until the village is struck by sickness. Hédinn tells the story of his parents, Gudmundur and Gudfinna, striking out from the village in an attempt to inhabit the now isolated and inhospitable fjord of Hedinsfjörður. Soon after the couple were joined by both his aunt, Jórunn, the sister of his mother and her husband, Marius, only for Jórunn to tragically take her own life soon after Hédinn was born. Her death was never given more than a cursory look, with the family regarded as being the sole dwellers on the fjord, the conclusion always seemed in little doubt. Until, that is, Hédinn comes across a photo taken by his uncle and he must face the prospect that perhaps his family were not quite as alone as they thought.. As Ari Thór takes a closer look he is only too glad to be distracted from the paternity test that it hanging over his head and the stifling atmosphere overwhelming the village, but even he is unprepared for the ominous feeling that Hedinsfjörður embodies. With Ísrún, the news reporter in Reykjavik who readers met in Blackout, covering the epidemic isolating Siglufjörður and tackling her own investigations the opportunity for some pooling of resources is thoroughly appreciated by Ari Thór. After gaining the upper hand in her battle with Ívar, the desk editor at the station, and chalking up an award for her own gritty reporting Ísrún is in prime position to monopolise the crime stories which arise. When she is alerted to a major political player's son being killed in a suspected hit and run, she senses that things might not be as cut and dried as they look. Ísrún, never able to forget her own mortality with a debilitating medical diagnosis hanging over her horizon, strikes while the iron is hot, managing to pose the awkward questions and never shy of bluffing her way to a scoop. Before the hit and run incident can even be digested, the harrowing kidnap of a child in broad daylight sends shockwaves through the entire country and forces a reprioritising of matters. Between juggling two investigations and also covering the Reykjavik end of the work on Ari Thór's cold case, could Ísrún be biting off more than she can chew? Undoubtedly, the most precarious entanglement in the life of Ari Thór is his fractious and brittle romantic liaison, forever teetering on the precipice with the changeable Kristín, not helped by his sometimes surly nature. With Tómas breaking the news that he has instigated his eventual migration to accompany his wife to Reykjavík, making a decision as to his future in on the cards for Ari Thór, but with his tumultuous relationship and the threat of impending fatherhood from his one night stand looming, he feels wholly unprepared for taking a make or break decision. Ari Thór is a compelling lead character, a mix of an impulsive youth but already weighed down by his responsibilities and the loss of his parents at such an early age. He often struggles with his communication, appearing blunt, affronting villagers and bottling up his tensions as his failure to convey the depth of his feelings gets the better of him. His fallibility and evident realism provides an instant magnetism and along with Ísrún, herself not the most diplomatic, they display a admirable naivety. Jónasson's crisply eloquent prose seamlessly travels across country and between the past and present, to flawlessly combine the separate cases into one fluid larger entity. With a growing number of reappearing characters filling the limelight, there is less onus on Ari Thór's personal dramas to plug the hole and as such he feels like he is finally maturing into a more stable figure. But as all followers of the Dark Iceland series know, life in Siglufjörður can turn on a knife edge and wherever the impetuous Ari Thór goes, drama will inevitably follow. Underneath the edifice of peace in the tiny fishing village, the worlds of the characters that surround Ari Thór feel every bit as implosive as the previous three novels. Despite the remorseless doom and gloom stifling the village itself, Iceland as a whole is no longer the safe haven it once was, happily insulated from so much of the nefarious activity that is rife further south and throughout Europe. Times are changing for both Ari Thór and Siglufjörður. It is testament to Ragnar Jónasson's eloquence that after the character of Ari Thór Arason first set foot on the crisp snow of Siglufjörður three years ago, his still feels like ripe territory for exploration and my thirst for his tales of Dark Iceland are unquenched. Jónasson has crafted a character that straddles the shifting territory of an outsider tackling a sensitive job in an insular and remote village, and the necessary distance between Ari Thór and the families who have a centuries old historical connection to the village is critical. The resulting outcomes of both the historic case and the current day matter tackled in Rupture are breathtakingly audacious; combining the deceptively subtle slow reveal of Christie for one, and the depth and elegance of a Karin Fossum sting in the tail for the other. Translated superbly by Quentin Bates with his familiarity for the characters and his invaluable understanding of the quintessentially English charm that Jónasson strives for, Rupture is once again an exquisite read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mairead Hearne (swirlandthread.com)

    'Haunting, frightening and complex. A dark and atmospheric thriller from one of Iceland’s foremost crime writers.’ Rupture is the latest in the Dark Iceland Series from crime writer Ragnar Jónasson, ublished by Orenda Books and excellently translated by Quentin Bates. Rupture is rightfully categorized under the genre of Nordic Noir. There is a uniqueness to this style of writing, none of which is lost in the translation. Read on for my full thoughts… Ari Thor Arason, local Siglufjordur police 'Haunting, frightening and complex. A dark and atmospheric thriller from one of Iceland’s foremost crime writers.’ Rupture is the latest in the Dark Iceland Series from crime writer Ragnar Jónasson, ublished by Orenda Books and excellently translated by Quentin Bates. Rupture is rightfully categorized under the genre of Nordic Noir. There is a uniqueness to this style of writing, none of which is lost in the translation. Read on for my full thoughts… Ari Thor Arason, local Siglufjordur police officer, has a problem. The town is under quarantine, due to a possibly contagious haemorrhagic fever that arrived with a traveler to the area. Ari & his colleagues are restricted in their movements within the town, as are all the residents, in the hope of containing the spread of the infection. Straight away, as a reader, you are brought into a world of bleakness and isolation, against the backdrop of the high dark mountains and surrounding snow and ice. Ari Thor is approached by a local resident interested in unearthing a cold case involving his relatives that reaches back to 1955, to the very lonely and deserted fjord of Hedonsfjordur. As Ari focuses on unearthing the truth, he reconnects with Isrún, a reporter in Reykjavik. Isrún is involved in solving a particularly brutal case that has raised it’s ugly head in Reykjavik, a case that has huge political implications for many. Isrún, sensitive to the nature of the case, does her best to work within fair parameters, but when a child is kidnapped, Isrún looks into every channel available to her, unearthing past histories and connections that may assist in solving this mystery. In parallel to the case solving, Ragnar Jónasson, brings the reader into the personal lives of all his main characters, We are taken behind the scenes of the story, where the reasons and actions, both past and present, are portrayed in a very gentle style. All have secrets, all have pasts and all wish to move forward with their lives in the best way possible. Up to this point, I had not read any novel in the Dark Iceland series. Snowblind, Nightblind and Blackout are all previously translated works from Ragnar Jónasson, all achieving high acclaim with both readers and writers alike. The genre Noir has always intrigued me, exposing me to a whole new world of writers that have a uniqueness in their perspective and technique. Ragnar Jónasson’s writing, while rooted in crime fiction, is distinctly descriptive in every thought and image visualized by the characters. Ari Thor is the Nordic Poirot. As the story comes to a close, Ari ties up all the ends in an orderly fashion with a logical reasoning and methodology in every statement (a twirling mustache comes to mind!!!!) Quentin Bates’ translation of these works by Ragnar Jónasson exposes Nordic Noir to a new audience, exploring a cold, dark, bleak almost intangible part of the world for many readers. This is more that just crime fiction. The pace of the story is neither fast nor particularly gritty, yet as a reader you find yourself sucked in as you turn the pages and wrap yourself up warm in a furry blanket to prevent the chill off the fjords getting into your bones. I suspect it would be wise to read all three previous novels in the series but as a standalone novel Rupture works. If you haven’t yet…go on….lose yourself in the pages of Ragnar Jónasson…I very much doubt you will regret it!!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Skip

    Three interwoven stories from Iceland. In Siglufjörður, a man dies of hemorrhagic fever, causing a quarantine. Then, one of the residents Hédinn asks the local policeman Ari Thór to look at a cold case involving the supposed suicide of his aunt by rat poison in a previously remote area (Hedinsfjörður), now easily reached via tunnel. Ari has plenty of time on his hands since everyone is hiding in their own homes, and he systematically tracks down many parties to solve the mystery, facing some of Three interwoven stories from Iceland. In Siglufjörður, a man dies of hemorrhagic fever, causing a quarantine. Then, one of the residents Hédinn asks the local policeman Ari Thór to look at a cold case involving the supposed suicide of his aunt by rat poison in a previously remote area (Hedinsfjörður), now easily reached via tunnel. Ari has plenty of time on his hands since everyone is hiding in their own homes, and he systematically tracks down many parties to solve the mystery, facing some of his own fears along the way. There is also personal drama for Ari, as his tenuous relationship with Kristin is threatened when a former fling asks him to take a paternity test. Finally, we are introduced to some seemingly unrelated parties in Reykjavik, where a musician is killed in a hit-and-run, a young child is kidnapped from a divorcing mother, and a man is grieving the death of his wife, beaten to death in their home in a case of mistaken identity. As you can see, there is more darkness in Iceland than just its northern location. Atmospheric.

  15. 4 out of 5

    K.

    Trigger warnings: stalking, murder, child abduction. This series is proving a little hit or miss for me. I mean, I've enjoyed all of the books I've read so far. But at the same time, they haven't been STAND OUTS. This one primarily covers a cold case, featuring the unexplained death of a woman many years earlier which Ari Thor starts investigating following a request from her nephew. And frankly, that side of the story was...not particularly interesting. The other side of the story covers a guy Trigger warnings: stalking, murder, child abduction. This series is proving a little hit or miss for me. I mean, I've enjoyed all of the books I've read so far. But at the same time, they haven't been STAND OUTS. This one primarily covers a cold case, featuring the unexplained death of a woman many years earlier which Ari Thor starts investigating following a request from her nephew. And frankly, that side of the story was...not particularly interesting. The other side of the story covers a guy who realises that he and his family are being stalked. THAT side of things was very atmospheric and I really liked it. Perhaps a little unfortunately though, it reminded me a tad too much of Yrsa Sigurdardottir's Why Did You Lie? which I read back in June. So this one had MOMENTS of being really really good. But the bulk of it was...pretty forgettable.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    For me this was a disappointing end to the Dark Iceland series. I really enjoyed the first book, but none of the subsequent stories were even remotely as good. Part of the problem is that the books are numbered out of sequence to the timelines of the characters so while this book was numbered as though it was the final book, the events took place prior to events in an earlier book . This book had two storylines: one involving Ari Thor and one involving a reporter in another town. The stories For me this was a disappointing end to the Dark Iceland series. I really enjoyed the first book, but none of the subsequent stories were even remotely as good. Part of the problem is that the books are numbered out of sequence to the timelines of the characters so while this book was numbered as though it was the final book, the events took place prior to events in an earlier book 🤦🏼‍♀️. This book had two storylines: one involving Ari Thor and one involving a reporter in another town. The stories didn’t tie together in any way and neither was remotely compelling. I also found myself liking Ari Thor’s character less and less with each book. He comes across as being a bit of a spineless, arrogant jerk which was not how he was portrayed in the first book. I’m still debating if I want to try this author’s other series. I’ll leave them on my TBR for now, but I don’t see myself turning to them anytime soon.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette

    This book and the a former Dark Iceland by Jonasson- I just do not get the ratings. I'd give it 2.5 stars at the very most. This was my last Icelandic by this author. Too much switching of time periods and "eyes" of narrators. Always a mistaken blame identity or some severe and obtuse reactions to common enough life happenings to make each of them bizarre odd too. But in this one, this novel Rupture, in particular- the "mystery" itself was not a mystery. It was clearly obvious from the first half This book and the a former Dark Iceland by Jonasson- I just do not get the ratings. I'd give it 2.5 stars at the very most. This was my last Icelandic by this author. Too much switching of time periods and "eyes" of narrators. Always a mistaken blame identity or some severe and obtuse reactions to common enough life happenings to make each of them bizarre odd too. But in this one, this novel Rupture, in particular- the "mystery" itself was not a mystery. It was clearly obvious from the first half alone what the issue was for which a murder had occurred. It was to me. Despite how many dozens of ways that Jonasson repeated the exact same posit for the 5 persons "all alone" scenario in that singular fjord Northern (now abandoned) village. The one with 4, 5 or 6 people and one of them just a baby- at any one time. With no electricity or gas for lighting or heating through an Icelandic all night winter in the 1950's. Sounds like a party, huh? But it wasn't only the plotting. The translation is terrible here. Oftentimes there are pronouns and you have no idea for whom they might refer. Pick anyone of two or three present "hims" while you are at it. Or use the exact same phrasing to an additional "new" inquiry on numerous occasions. The short sentences and obscure context messages make a combination that is stark at best. And the continuity of section partial to section partial. That was down to a one star level. Too short, too dire without logic or data knowledge included, too unconnected to the former main characters, too displaced in geographic location. Structure chaos! Just too many characters for "prime" inclusion too. At least 5 or 6 too many. Even the stupendous glow of the all day/ all night summer sun is "beauty" (or some English form of that very word- like beauteous) framed within common phrasing segments repeatedly. UGH! Some of the Nordic genre are creepy and have depth of character study. This series does not. It just doesn't for me at all. Ari himself is pretty much a twerp that does the easiest path of life choices. Be they in work direction or in the pairings department of human attachments. And Isrun, our supposedly intrepid journalist? Tell your folks about the possible genetic disease already, woman. One you are sure NOT to have regardless of you fretting yourself to death about it internally for years. At least in time enough to own a mental breakdown, massive hives attack or just in desperate sighing to trigger the plain old-fashioned fatal heart attack. Are these people emotional cretins! For sure I'm done with this series. Is there an opposite phrase to spell-binding? If there is- then this book was it. I started and stopped it at least 4 times amid other much better reads. A lesson to myself that I must abandon far more when that is the reading situation.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Rupture is the fourth book in the Dark Iceland series and probably best to have read the others prior to this one for full enjoyment. It was great to catch back up with Ari Thor again and to be transported to the wonderful picturesque setting. For a small place, Ari sure is kept busy with murders and crimes. Not so good for him but it’s great for us readers. I really enjoyed the different story lines that ran throughout the novel. I always enjoy having the mixture of the investigations as well as Rupture is the fourth book in the Dark Iceland series and probably best to have read the others prior to this one for full enjoyment. It was great to catch back up with Ari Thor again and to be transported to the wonderful picturesque setting. For a small place, Ari sure is kept busy with murders and crimes. Not so good for him but it’s great for us readers. I really enjoyed the different story lines that ran throughout the novel. I always enjoy having the mixture of the investigations as well as the main characters personal life and the author does this really well. Poor Ari though, things never seem to run to smoothly for him! The Dark Iceland series is one that I think many crime lovers would devour quickly and enjoy. They are not your gritty fast paced crime thrillers but a wonderful atmospheric, who dunnit type of read. Having read all four books in the series I really can’t recommend them highly enough. My thanks to Karen at Orenda Books for a copy of this book. All opinions are my own and not biased in anyway.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Thebooktrail

    On the tour for this fantastic book so a quick one here - Brilliant brilliant. Best one yet. Go and buy. You won't regret End of review ;) And today I'm on the blog tour so here's the longer version: AND the Literary Travel Agency Travel to Iceland Maybe the strap line to this book should read ‘Just when you thought it was safe to go back to Siglufjörður..” as like in the jaws of that famous shark, this book has just as much bite and shock factor. This great white is a vast icy landscape which On the tour for this fantastic book so a quick one here - Brilliant brilliant. Best one yet. Go and buy. You won't regret End of review ;) And today I'm on the blog tour so here's the longer version: AND the Literary Travel Agency Travel to Iceland Maybe the strap line to this book should read ‘Just when you thought it was safe to go back to Siglufjörður..” as like in the jaws of that famous shark, this book has just as much bite and shock factor. This great white is a vast icy landscape which chills to the core and I have been looking forward to going back there and was not disappointed. It’s even more claustrophobic and eerie than the last time I was there. A cold case, a weird cold case with people disappearing from an isolated fjord, the crux this time is a local policeman and an outsider – a journalist no less – tackling sensitive issues amongst those who have lived there for years. Very clever to merge an historical case with a modern day mystery – icy hard snowballs bombard you from each and every angle, icicles bomb down from above – that’s how reading this book feels to be. There is an underlying current of evil, of hardcore death and murder, of a mystery unfurling across the centuries, and of isolation putting up one ice wall after another to keep out anyone who dares enter. Everything can turn on a knife edge in this Dark Iceland and it’s becoming an obsession of mine. So much depth and intrigue in a relatively short read – at 244 pages in the print copy, that is no easy feat. Chillingly brilliant.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    Not exciting,but pretty solid.9/10.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Oh what a story. Much like the preceding novels, there are no big whizz bang revelations, no high speed chases and no intense moments of jeopardy but then this is what I like about this series of books. It is so beautifully written, such an absorbing read that relies on the building of atmosphere to deliver chills that it does not need to be. The way in which Ragnar Jónasson establishes and delivers the picture of the remote Icelandic town of Siglufjörður is just perfect, and more so with the Oh what a story. Much like the preceding novels, there are no big whizz bang revelations, no high speed chases and no intense moments of jeopardy but then this is what I like about this series of books. It is so beautifully written, such an absorbing read that relies on the building of atmosphere to deliver chills that it does not need to be. The way in which Ragnar Jónasson establishes and delivers the picture of the remote Icelandic town of Siglufjörður is just perfect, and more so with the descriptions of Hédinsfjörður which seems incredibly bleak and isolated. The descriptions of the journey made by one of the residents of Siglufjörður in order to take pictures of the remote fjord are inspired, as is much of the series, by his own Grandfather and his writings on the town, but are perfectly captured and recounted on the page here that it feels new and undiscovered. There are probably what seems, at first, to be three distinct threads throughout this book. The story of Jórunn and her unexplained death which Ari Thór is investigating; the story of the hit and run involving the politician’s son who thinks he is finally about to get his big break in the music industry, and the abduction of the small child by someone who may well have been stalking the family home. The story moves seamlessly between the three investigations with Ísrún providing the only true link between them. It means that a large portion of the book moves away from the traditional setting of Northern Iceland into the streets of Reykjavik and yet the atmosphere is no less taught. We already know Ísrún from her appearance in Black Out and are aware of her struggles, both personally and professionally. It is nice to learn even more about her character throughout the book, seeing her in her family situation as well as her professional one. She is a journalist through and through, with an engaging and enquiring mind, a nose for a story and a need to find the truth, if only not to be scooped by another journalist. In many respects she is very similar to Ari Thór with his need to discover the answer to the puzzle and this certainly helps the story to flow back and forth between the two locations. The mixture of cold case (no pun intended) and new is matched by the perfect pacing. There is more tension and a greater sense of jeopardy in the current cases, particularly that of the missing child, and Jónasson creates this with assured ease, tapping into the thoughts of the boys step-father, a man on the edge who is holding too many secrets of his own, and the utter despair and desolation of his mother as she weeps for her missing child. Even the urgency of Ísrún’s investigation, her frustration when she cannot get information from her police informant, is indicative of the flow of the story. It informs the pace. When it comes to the cold case back in Siglufjörður, the story visibly slows, echoing the isolation and slow yet bitter winds of its location. The creeping and growing sense of foreboding that Ari Thór feels when visiting the ruined farmstead with the Priest is surely also felt by the reader and whilst drawn in by whispers of the past, you also feel the need to escape. To move away as fast as possible before you too fall fowl of the depression which must have affected the family who lived there. Although not as dark as its predecessor, Black Out, it is still a story with a tainted and deepening shadow at its heart. All of the events are built upon a foundation of lies and deceit. Whatever the resolution, there can be no winners and the lives of all involved are clouded by indelible changes. Another superb read and a fine example of the way in which Jónasson uses atmosphere to create the ultimate sense of dread while not sacrificing the integrity and authenticity of the setting.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

    Ragnar Jónasson is the most excellent wordsmith, committed to painting the most perfectly atmospheric scenes with a quiet composure. I have developed a fondness for this unassuming style, where a rare and tragic event is the only thing on earth that can taint the purity of the location. Nestled in the most wondrous and often challenging of landscapes, what can the isolated beauty of a fjord hide? How can an old family photograph shed light on a mystery that was forgotten along with the people Ragnar Jónasson is the most excellent wordsmith, committed to painting the most perfectly atmospheric scenes with a quiet composure. I have developed a fondness for this unassuming style, where a rare and tragic event is the only thing on earth that can taint the purity of the location. Nestled in the most wondrous and often challenging of landscapes, what can the isolated beauty of a fjord hide? How can an old family photograph shed light on a mystery that was forgotten along with the people that passed on? A peaceful solitude can be shattered as the truth emerges. And Ari Thór Arason? He remains a human puzzle where all of the pieces are still trying to fit together, much like the underlying sequence of events we run into in Rupture. Feeling restless, yet still emanating an air of calm, Ari Thór is struggling to police the streets as there is no one on them! During Siglufjörður’s quarantine period from a particularly nasty strain of virus everyone has isolated themselves indoors hoping to avoid infection leaving him with more time on his hands than he’s used to. Still, it gives him time to pursue an archived investigation that has a curious question mark hanging over it. With the long distance assistance of the instantly recognisable reporter Ísrún from Reykjavik, bravely concealing her own health and parental concerns while chasing several delicious scoops, Ari Thor looks into a local historical case of alleged poisoning recorded as accidental according to police reports. As he unravels this flawlessly crafted mystery, a kidnapping, a hit-and-run incident, and political scandal brews – plus Ari Thór’s summing up speech would rival any master detective’s performance. What truly gives Dark Iceland its exceptional charisma is the respect that applies not only to the volatile environment and times of hardship, but for maintaining particular customs and a common courtesy missing from most fiction. The reliably cryptic intrigue, coupled with the characters’ subtle peculiarities and life developments, never ceases to enthral. I hereby declare THIS my favourite in the series so far! (I received a copy of this title from the publisher with my thanks and it is my pleasure to provide an unbiased review.)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Rupture – Another Classic in the ‘Dark Iceland’ Series Orenda Books have now published the fourth book in Ragnar Jónasson's 'Dark Iceland' and it is easy to understand why this series is so popular in his native Iceland. He once again centres the story around Arí Thór set in the remote town of Siglufjörður in the far north of Iceland which adds to the claustrophobic dark atmosphere of the books. Siglufjörður is under quarantine and Arí Thór has been asked to look in to a case from 1955 where one Rupture – Another Classic in the ‘Dark Iceland’ Series Orenda Books have now published the fourth book in Ragnar Jónasson's 'Dark Iceland' and it is easy to understand why this series is so popular in his native Iceland. He once again centres the story around Arí Thór set in the remote town of Siglufjörður in the far north of Iceland which adds to the claustrophobic dark atmosphere of the books. Siglufjörður is under quarantine and Arí Thór has been asked to look in to a case from 1955 where one of the two couples that moved to a farmstead in Hedinsfjörður, isolated at the side of a fjord. Once one of the couples die they leave the farmstead and nothing more seems to be said about what happened at that time. When a picture surfaces from that time, it is clear that the couples may not have been alone out in Hedinsfjörður. Arí Thór once again enlists the help of Reykjavík TV news reporter, Ísrún who at the same time is able to investigate a series of connected murders that leads all the way to the Prime Ministers door. Once again Ísrún is deeply involved in recovering the truth even if nobody actually wants to know what really happened. Rupture is a classic Icelandic noir crime thriller, that is claustrophobic dark and pulsating and as a reader we have to work out the connections as we work our way through the story. Rupture is also a throwback to the old fashioned detective novels that have always been loved and I am sure the same will happen to Rupture.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marina Sofia

    Excellent, enthralling, moving effortlessly between past and present, between Ari Thor and Isrun, without letting their back story overwhelm the investigations. Quick-paced, giving us multiple points of view and two mysteries to resolve - it's Agatha Christie in a frozen location and bang up to date. Possibly one of my favourites in this series to date!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dimitris Passas (TapTheLine)

    ''Rupture'' is an excellent addition to a magnificent series, titled ''Dark Iceland'' and the writer, Ragnar Jonasson, along with Arnaldur Indridason and Yrsa Sigurðardóttir form the core of this new-wave Icelandic noir invasion in literature as well as the television or cinema. This book is the fourth book in the series and R. Jonasson proves once again that he has a special talent with the use of the words as his dense and unadorned descriptions manage to create the appropriate atmosphere for ''Rupture'' is an excellent addition to a magnificent series, titled ''Dark Iceland'' and the writer, Ragnar Jonasson, along with Arnaldur Indridason and Yrsa Sigurðardóttir form the core of this new-wave Icelandic noir invasion in literature as well as the television or cinema. This book is the fourth book in the series and R. Jonasson proves once again that he has a special talent with the use of the words as his dense and unadorned descriptions manage to create the appropriate atmosphere for the plot to evolve. The structure of the novel is the same with the previous installments, the reader follows the thread of three, initially not related, stories which take place in Siglufjörður, in Reykjavik and in Hedinsfjörður, a now deserted fjord 20 kilometers away from Siglufjörður. The Hedinsfjörður story took place fifty years before and concerns a shady suicide case, which may very well have been a murder. The central character, Ari Thor, has to deal with some personal problems in this one as well as to confront a really nasty epidemic in his town which is responsible for the death of two people. Ari Thor will have to wander around the deserted, due to the quarantine, little town of Siglufjörður and finally, he will connect the pieces of a jigsaw puzzle and reveal the guilty party. My only reservation concerning ''Rupture'' is the, relatively weak, central character (Ari Thor) who is nevertheless surrounded by really interesting secondary characters who seem to balance the reader's impression on that matter. It is a rather short novel, around 250 pages, and a highly entertaining read. Fans of Scandinavian crime fiction have to make sure not to overlook this great series. ΜΥ RATING: 3,5/5

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joanne Robertson

    Over Christmas there was a seasonal Kindle sale going on over at Amazon. Normally, I back away from that one click button as it makes book buying a bit too easy at times! But then I noticed that the first three books in this series had been reduced to 99p each! I have only recently allowed myself to be seduced by Scandinavian crime so that price it was a risk I was prepared to take. And as buying all three would cost me less than a chai latte and an almond croissant (and be much better for my Over Christmas there was a seasonal Kindle sale going on over at Amazon. Normally, I back away from that one click button as it makes book buying a bit too easy at times! But then I noticed that the first three books in this series had been reduced to 99p each! I have only recently allowed myself to be seduced by Scandinavian crime so that price it was a risk I was prepared to take. And as buying all three would cost me less than a chai latte and an almond croissant (and be much better for my blood sugar levels as well!) I hit those one click buttons. My Christmas then became a complete Icelandic crime fest as I read the whole series within the week between Christmas and New Year…and LOVED IT! So I couldn’t wait to get stuck into Rupture, the fourth in the series to be translated into English, and thankfully the standard of writing and plotting has not dropped from the high expectations set in the first book, Snowblind. We are once again in the company of journalist Isrun, whom we also met in Blackout, and who is following up on a case of her own while Ari Thor is investigating a cold case from 1955 on behalf of a woman’s nephew, who thinks his aunt was murdered. On top of all this, the town is in quarantine due to a virus that is proving fatal so leaving to gather more information is impossible, or is it? I just love the delicately plotted storytelling in this series. It’s like the author is painting a winters landscape for us as he enriches the plot, slowly building up the layers, giving it depth and shadows which don’t seem to come together or make sense until you stand back to appreciate the whole picture. It’s a joy to read such an enchanting, atmospheric crime mystery featuring well rounded characters that are greeted like old friends and grip the reader immediately with their lives and careers. I’m fascinated by those inhabitants, living in their beautiful Icelandic setting which has almost become a character in its own right as it entwins itself around the crimes leaving the reader with serious goosebumps. The last few pages of Rupture leave us warmed up nicely for the next addition to the series and made me feel much better about not spotting the twists and turns that came before it! Although Rupture is the most recent of the series it can still be read as a standalone novel and if you love it then you can always treat yourself to the rest, knowing that they are all highly addictive, quality crime dramas. And they are so seamlessly translated you will forget that they were ever written in anything other than English to being with! If Agatha Christie were alive today I know she would be a huge supporter of this enthralling series and quite rightly so! Huge thanks to Orenda Books for my review copy of Rupture.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nerdish Mum

    Rupture is my first Ragnar Jonasson book and I realise I've been missing out! Rupture is the fourth book in the Dark Iceland series but can definitely be read as a stand alone like I did, however I do now need to go back and read them all! First things first, the cover is absolutely stunning and really reflects the isolation and cold from the book. Also I am eternally grateful for the pronunciation guide in the front of the book as it immediately helped me immerse myself in the story without Rupture is my first Ragnar Jonasson book and I realise I've been missing out! Rupture is the fourth book in the Dark Iceland series but can definitely be read as a stand alone like I did, however I do now need to go back and read them all! First things first, the cover is absolutely stunning and really reflects the isolation and cold from the book. Also I am eternally grateful for the pronunciation guide in the front of the book as it immediately helped me immerse myself in the story without spending time sounding out words and names that were unfamiliar to me. The story is a slow burn and weaves beautifully between two storylines. As you get further into the book, the pace builds up and leads to a crescendo for both cases which both took a direction that I had not expected at all. The story telling is clear and really well thought out and everything worked out really well. I really enjoyed the character Ari Thór and I liked how he went about investigating the cold case and his interaction with people in the community. I also think the friendship/partnership that was developed between him and Ísrún was really good as it was built on mutual need and respect. Ísrún was also a really interesting character and I think there will be a lot more to her story going forward. The location itself feels like a character in its own right, you can feel the oppressive isolation, especially during the threat of a contagious and killer disease and I certainly kept myself wrapped in my blanket as I felt the cold. Overall an absolutely wonderful book and I have discovered a new favourite author.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ken Fredette

    I like the way Ragnar Jónasson talks and put things together. He makes it seem difficult when Ari Thór does something that a normal person doesn't do, but then when his mind is on the right track it seems there is some wisdom finding a way to come out. Hédinn's family fiasco is a telling example of how well Ari Thór finds out information and puts it all together and it makes sense. While waiting for Ari Thór's information Ísrún's world seem to come together with her health and then in her I like the way Ragnar Jónasson talks and put things together. He makes it seem difficult when Ari Thór does something that a normal person doesn't do, but then when his mind is on the right track it seems there is some wisdom finding a way to come out. Hédinn's family fiasco is a telling example of how well Ari Thór finds out information and puts it all together and it makes sense. While waiting for Ari Thór's information Ísrún's world seem to come together with her health and then in her scrambling for a new position at the paper. Kristín also made a leap with Ari Thór and you can read about it yourself. This is a very good book that follows in a semblance of order and I gave it 4 stars out of 5.

  29. 5 out of 5

    eyes.2c

    Intrigue stalks! All seems tangential and disconnected but as the threads are teased out in Rupture small strands lead to larger surmises. Isolated incidents seem just that: A long dead woman, presumably a suicide, living by a remote fjord of Hedinsfjorour. A photo surfacing showing an unknown youth with the dead woman and the others living there A hit and run accident A kidnapped child What might they or might they not have in common? Ari Thór has time on his hands when Siglufjorour is quarantined due Intrigue stalks! All seems tangential and disconnected but as the threads are teased out in Rupture small strands lead to larger surmises. Isolated incidents seem just that: A long dead woman, presumably a suicide, living by a remote fjord of Hedinsfjorour. A photo surfacing showing an unknown youth with the dead woman and the others living there A hit and run accident A kidnapped child What might they or might they not have in common? Ari Thór has time on his hands when Siglufjorour is quarantined due to a deadly virus outbreak. A request to look into a 1955 suicide gives Ari something to do, an investigation that catches his interest and his imagination. Reporter Ísrún from Reykjavik is juggling the thought of a serious illness, her parents separation and now three newsworthy items drop into her Investigative journalist's lap. When Ari and Ísrún connect to pursue their threads, things become interesting. Rupture, a fitting title as lives are indeed ruptured when facts and conjecture unfold, reminding us of the old adage of "six degrees of separation". Chronologically taking place before Nightblind, Rupture fills in the gaps of Ari and Kristin's relationship. Again a brooding, atmospheric piece of writing from Jonasson. A St. Martins Press ARC via NetGalley

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tripfiction

    Thriller set in ICELAND Rupture is the fourth book in highly successful and critically acclaimed Dark Iceland series by Ragnar Jónasson (all beautifully translated by Quentin Bates). For the TripFiction blog reviews of the other three, please click on the respective links – Snowblind, Nightblind, and Blackout… As with the rest of the series, Rupture is set in Siglufjörður in Northern Iceland and features detective Ari Thór. It also features Ísrún, a TV journalist based in Reykjavik. She first Thriller set in ICELAND Rupture is the fourth book in highly successful and critically acclaimed Dark Iceland series by Ragnar Jónasson (all beautifully translated by Quentin Bates). For the TripFiction blog reviews of the other three, please click on the respective links – Snowblind, Nightblind, and Blackout… As with the rest of the series, Rupture is set in Siglufjörður in Northern Iceland and features detective Ari Thór. It also features Ísrún, a TV journalist based in Reykjavik. She first appeared in Blackout, but not with the same prominence… She appears to have taken over from Ari Thór’s boss, Tómas, as his new ‘partner’. Rupture is very much in the same vein as the other three books but, if possible, the series gets better as it progresses. Jónasson has created a totally believable set of characters and locations (and for the first time, Rupture has a pronunciation guide at the beginning!). There are two parallel stories in Rupture. Siglufjörður is in quarantine following the outbreak of a deadly infection and Ari Thór uses the opportunity to investigate an unexplained 1955 death in a nearby, and isolated, fjord – Hedinsfjörður. Two couples had lived there is an old farmhouse – and one of the women had died in suspicious circumstances. It was put down at the time to suicide, but was it? Meanwhile in Reykjavik, Ísrún is both helping Ari Thór with his Hedinsfjörður investigation – and also covering the story of a hit and run death with links to people in the highest echelons of government. I said in my review of Blackout that ‘one of Ragnar’s great talents is bringing together disparate strands into a convincing and thrilling finale’. This time I felt just a tad disappointed to find there was no such connection – the two stories both end dramatically, but quite separately… There is no doubt that Jónasson is a quite excellent storyteller. His plots are finely worked out, and his locations are authentic. You can actually feel the isolation of Hedinsfjörður, and imagine what it must have been like to experience a winter there. The plots, as I have remarked before, are Christie-esque in their complexity – but so much darker than the model. Not perhaps as ‘noir’ as some of the Swedish or Norwegian writers (I’m thinking of a Stieg Larsen or a Jo Nesbø), and you almost get lulled into a false sense of security with the normality and routine of Ari Thór’s life – until something gets up and bites you. Rupture is a quite excellent read. Strong on characters, strong on plot, and strong on Iceland. No wonder that, with books like this, Iceland is becoming an increasingly popular tourist destination.

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