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A Murder in Music City: Corruption, Scandal, and the Framing of an Innocent Man

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Nashville 1964. Eighteen-year-old babysitter Paula Herring is murdered in her home while her six-year-old brother apparently sleeps through the grisly event. A few months later a judge's son is convicted of the crime. Decades after the slaying, the author stumbles upon a secret file related to the case and with the help of some of the world's top forensic experts--includin Nashville 1964. Eighteen-year-old babysitter Paula Herring is murdered in her home while her six-year-old brother apparently sleeps through the grisly event. A few months later a judge's son is convicted of the crime. Decades after the slaying, the author stumbles upon a secret file related to the case and with the help of some of the world's top forensic experts--including forensic psychologist Richard Walter (aka -the living Sherlock Holmes-)--he uncovers the truth. What really happened is completely different from what the public was led to believe. In this true-crime page-turner, the author lays out compelling evidence that a circle of powerful citizens were key participants in the crime and the subsequent cover-up. The ne'er-do-well judge's son, who was falsely accused and sent to prison, proved to be the perfect setup man. The perpetrators used his checkered history to conceal the real facts for over half a century. Now, for the first time, the author reveals the true story. Including interviews with the original defense attorney and a murder confession elicited from a nursing-home resident, the information presented here will change Nashville history forever.


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Nashville 1964. Eighteen-year-old babysitter Paula Herring is murdered in her home while her six-year-old brother apparently sleeps through the grisly event. A few months later a judge's son is convicted of the crime. Decades after the slaying, the author stumbles upon a secret file related to the case and with the help of some of the world's top forensic experts--includin Nashville 1964. Eighteen-year-old babysitter Paula Herring is murdered in her home while her six-year-old brother apparently sleeps through the grisly event. A few months later a judge's son is convicted of the crime. Decades after the slaying, the author stumbles upon a secret file related to the case and with the help of some of the world's top forensic experts--including forensic psychologist Richard Walter (aka -the living Sherlock Holmes-)--he uncovers the truth. What really happened is completely different from what the public was led to believe. In this true-crime page-turner, the author lays out compelling evidence that a circle of powerful citizens were key participants in the crime and the subsequent cover-up. The ne'er-do-well judge's son, who was falsely accused and sent to prison, proved to be the perfect setup man. The perpetrators used his checkered history to conceal the real facts for over half a century. Now, for the first time, the author reveals the true story. Including interviews with the original defense attorney and a murder confession elicited from a nursing-home resident, the information presented here will change Nashville history forever.

30 review for A Murder in Music City: Corruption, Scandal, and the Framing of an Innocent Man

  1. 4 out of 5

    Keith Herrell

    This book really hit home for me, as I grew up in Crieve Hall, went to Overton High School (five years behind Paula Herring, but it was a 7-12 school at the time so I remember her playing basketball) and am well acquainted with many of the places mentioned here. I particularly recall spinning on the stools at the old Franklin Road Krystal in Melrose and seeing the Rhea Little service station across the street. No doubt, this was a major page-turner. I knocked it off in three days and was sorry to This book really hit home for me, as I grew up in Crieve Hall, went to Overton High School (five years behind Paula Herring, but it was a 7-12 school at the time so I remember her playing basketball) and am well acquainted with many of the places mentioned here. I particularly recall spinning on the stools at the old Franklin Road Krystal in Melrose and seeing the Rhea Little service station across the street. No doubt, this was a major page-turner. I knocked it off in three days and was sorry to see it end. I recall the murder well, and ever since I had just assumed Herring was in the wrong place (um, her own den?) at the wrong time. Michael Bishop was absolutely obsessive in getting the real story on the case and coming up with a plausible scenario for what really happened. Bishop is (or was) not a professional writer, and this is not necessarily a bad thing. On the good side, it gives him a fresh storytelling perspective. He tells the tale in the first person, starts at the beginning of his investigation and takes it chronologically from there. This is kind of like a sportswriter beginning a game story with, “The Vols won the coin toss and elected to receive,” but it worked so on we go. On the bad side, the writing is occasionally cringe-worthy and lapses into “Goosebumps” style – more than once, Bishop opens his mouth but no sound comes out. Bottom line: I enjoyed the book, and Bishop's scenario is absolutely plausible (in other words, probably correct). Do I have questions and quibbles? Absolutely, and here we go: It's still beyond me as to why Paula came home that weekend. Sure, she planned to go to the basketball game, but remember: it was a district tournament game as part of the state tournament, which meant Overton had to win Friday night (semifinals) to advance to the Saturday night game. (Back then, the games were almost exclusively played at night.) So when she was flying to Nashville, the Friday night game likely had not even been played. And I'm sorry to nitpick, but calling the Saturday night finals “loser goes home” may have been true as far as the district itself was concerned, but back then – at least in the 19th District – all four semifinalists advanced to the regional if my memory is correct. So … why come home? Maybe I was reading too fast and missed something, but I just don't get it. Speaking of nitpicking: I realize the miscreants would have been in a hurry, but to say the Krystal was “less than 3 minutes by car” from the crime scene is laughable. You'd have to average 75 mph or so to do that, and there were stop lights etc. back then just like there are now. I'm not even sure the Harding Place route over Peach Orchard Hill was built by then, so the route would have been even longer than the 3-plus miles it's listed at today. OK, I feel better now. Back to the night of the crime: I realize Paula's mother was an expert in drugs etc., but you better be darn sure what you're doing if you are giving a strong sedative to a 6-year-old. Presumably she was, but … geesh. Also an eyebrow-raiser: Calling Petros, Tenn., “romantic.” Really? Bishop must know something I don't. And another quibble: Bishop refers to Judge Thomas Shriver and DA Thomas Shriver, with no effort to differentiate between the two. If I recall correctly, the judge was the DA's father. There were photos in the back of the book (Kindle version), and if I were to picture Mayor Briley's mistress it wouldn't be Jo Herring. But as Bishop states (or at least implies), maybe the easy access to drugs had a lot to do with it. Sorry if I missed or misinterpreted anything. This is a worthwhile book, and a must read for anyone who grew up in Nashville – particularly Crieve Hall – at that time. Bishop is to be commended for sticking with the case in his search for the truth. About halfway in I was thinking, “What we have here is a bunch of lowlifes shaping or avoiding facts to suit their purposes.” but Bishop hung with it, and good for him. Excellent job.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Good book and very interesting. I’m not sure people who do not live in Nashville would get it but for locals, it’s great to learn about this history. I only give it 3 stars because it needed some serious editing. It was long, rambling, difficult to follow at times and I really question the order in which this story was told. Still very good and worth reading especially for people who love local history.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chandra Claypool (wherethereadergrows)

    True crime is almost the only nonfiction I'll read (almost). Give me a story about a murder that involves a cover up and an innocent man that goes to jail for the crime and I'm sold! Probably my biggest gripe with any nonfiction that I read are all the dang footnotes. While this one at least didn't have them at the bottom of the page, the footnotes were prominent throughout the book and the little number notifications peppered throughout made me feel I was reading a textbook at times. Luckily al True crime is almost the only nonfiction I'll read (almost). Give me a story about a murder that involves a cover up and an innocent man that goes to jail for the crime and I'm sold! Probably my biggest gripe with any nonfiction that I read are all the dang footnotes. While this one at least didn't have them at the bottom of the page, the footnotes were prominent throughout the book and the little number notifications peppered throughout made me feel I was reading a textbook at times. Luckily all the notes were kept at the back of the book. Bishop, who became fascinated with this case after finding a file on the murder of Paula Herring, is quite the amateur sleuth. The book reads like a documentary, which I suppose is basically what it is. Mostly it seemed like facts being thrown out at you.. but what is truly fascinating are the interviews. These bring the story to life and the second half of the book really is where I got sucked into the story. Since this is told strictly through Bishop's own journey into researching this case, it can, at times, read a little flat in terms of reaching certain points into the investigation - the plot could get lost at times. He does, however, bring in a ton of historical facts to tie into all the holes he found within this case and his theory of corruption is completely plausible. What I loved best? The epilogue of "Where Are They Now" for the characters introduced in this book and the Index that provided pictures so you could visualize what you just read. A fantastic true crime read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Donna Dressler

    Tedious I found this book to be quite tedious as the author rambled frequently. It could have been written in a way to draw the reader into the history.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    Michael Bishop came to my library and did a presentation about his book, A Murder in Music City. He was very passionate about this story of a wrong man convicted and his efforts to exonerate him. I’ve lived in the Nashville area most of my life and had no idea that at one time Nashville was considered one of the most corrupt cities in the nation. The book focuses on the death of Paula Herring, a 19-year-old coed, home for the weekend from UT Knoxville. She was babysitting her younger brother, an Michael Bishop came to my library and did a presentation about his book, A Murder in Music City. He was very passionate about this story of a wrong man convicted and his efforts to exonerate him. I’ve lived in the Nashville area most of my life and had no idea that at one time Nashville was considered one of the most corrupt cities in the nation. The book focuses on the death of Paula Herring, a 19-year-old coed, home for the weekend from UT Knoxville. She was babysitting her younger brother, and when her mother arrived home later that night, she found her daughter shot 3 times lying dead on the living room floor. The murder took place in the early 1960’s, not too long after the JFK assassination. The author found some information in the Nashville archives that made him doubt that the correct man was arrested for the crime. He worked for almost 20 years running down leads and talking to people about this case. What he uncovered is a shocking story of corruption and evil.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ember

    This was a book for book club and I learned not to judge a book by its cover. I was not looking forward to reading this book but it ended up being a fascinating account of a murder in Nashville in 1964 and a man who took it upon himself to investigate more of the story years later. A great read for any Nashvillian.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Vickihaney

    Enjoyed learning about a Nashville crime in 1964 when I was a little girl. What a corrupt time and I have never heard about it. Could not put it down. A MUST read if you are a native Nashvillian.

  8. 4 out of 5

    *Marsha,Marsha,Marsha* It's always Marsha

    Riveting As a Nashville resident during that time I was only 9 yrs old. What was so fascinating was the history.of so many places and people I remember. Knew Crieve Hall area well. Remember Beverly Briley as mayor and many who were not happy with him. I remember the Governor who was charged for selling pardons and favors. Strangely though I don't remember reading about Paula. My parents were very protective of me and probably kept it all hidden. Certainly remember John Overton although today it i Riveting As a Nashville resident during that time I was only 9 yrs old. What was so fascinating was the history.of so many places and people I remember. Knew Crieve Hall area well. Remember Beverly Briley as mayor and many who were not happy with him. I remember the Governor who was charged for selling pardons and favors. Strangely though I don't remember reading about Paula. My parents were very protective of me and probably kept it all hidden. Certainly remember John Overton although today it is not quite as exceptional. So much changed in Nashville and I never heard about all it's corruption. Makes me sad for all those living under illusion of justice in our govt. I most certainly remember Lamar Alexander well and his rise to senator. Hopefully this book will help shed some light for those who might still be living and had any connection. Sadly the right persons were never brought to justice. Another interesting fact is that I graduated From Lipscomb University. So many places I'm familiar with yet had no clue of evil below surface.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    Excellent true crime novel that was made better for me because I had such a personal knowledge of the areas discussed and some of the political figures of the time. While I did not move to Nashville until 1966, and the crime occurred in 1964, many of the areas discussed were so familiar to me for several reasons. My husband moved to the Crieve Hall area where the murder occurred just a few years after this occurred (1966) and probably less than a mile away. He graduated from the same high school Excellent true crime novel that was made better for me because I had such a personal knowledge of the areas discussed and some of the political figures of the time. While I did not move to Nashville until 1966, and the crime occurred in 1964, many of the areas discussed were so familiar to me for several reasons. My husband moved to the Crieve Hall area where the murder occurred just a few years after this occurred (1966) and probably less than a mile away. He graduated from the same high school (John Overton) that the murdered coed did. Many of the areas like Thunderbird Drive (where John Clarke, the framed man, purchased a home following release from prison) or Davidson Road (where the 'Vandy Kids' partied) were in the area where I or my high school friends lived. I'm pretty sure that the apartment complex that the author describes (Lions Head area off White Bridge Rd) was the one that my mother's boss built in the early 70s. I was very familiar with the political figures that were mentioned - Beverly Briley (first mayor of Metro Nashville), John Jay Hooker, John Seigenthaler, Sheriff Kemp - as well as some of the other folks mentioned. But enough of memory lane... The real crux of the novel was a murder that occurred in suburban Nashville in February 1964. A University of Tennessee coed named Paula Herring, home for the weekend and babysitting her younger brother, was brutally murdered in her home. She was discovered late on Saturday night when her mother returned home with two men and discovered the body sprawled on the living room floor. She had been shot 3 times while her 6 yr old brother slept in the next room. Those are facts. What happened? Well, the official story is that John Randolph Clarke murdered her. He was convicted on very circumstantial evidence - a bullet that was not found on an initial search but later found almost comically easy; no bloody clothes or scratches on his body despite evidence of a struggle with the athletic coed and evidence that she bit her attacker; no eyewitnesses to place him at the scene. The author over a course of about 20 years tracks down many of the players. There were times that he seemed at a standstill and extraordinary events would occur to place him in the right place or with the right person. His summary of events at the end is a brilliant indictment of the corruption that was rampant in the Nashville of the 60s. As a kid, I had little idea of much of this. However, I tell a lot of folks now that Nashville today is MUCH different. When I was a teenager and young adult, you did not go downtown unless you were looking for trouble. It was literally peep shows, porn shops, and mostly disreputable honky tonks (with a few exceptions like Tootsie's). Nashville today is a much better place. But this novel does present a different perspective. The author concludes that justice was not done because of the political connections of the prime suspect (and I will not give that away here) and that if that person had been arrested and tried for the crime, "a number of political careers in Music City would likely have burned to the ground."

  10. 5 out of 5

    Katherine Coble

    I first heard about this book when a friend posted the segment of the evening news about it on FB. Nashville’s CBS affiliate did one of those “new information in the fifty year old shocking murder of...Did police have the wrong man?” stories, and I’m a sucker for both cold case procedurals and exoneration narratives. It seemed right up my alley (literally, since it was set in my city). If it weren’t set in Nashville I’d give it two stars instead of three. Because: 1. This isn’t a police procedura I first heard about this book when a friend posted the segment of the evening news about it on FB. Nashville’s CBS affiliate did one of those “new information in the fifty year old shocking murder of...Did police have the wrong man?” stories, and I’m a sucker for both cold case procedurals and exoneration narratives. It seemed right up my alley (literally, since it was set in my city). If it weren’t set in Nashville I’d give it two stars instead of three. Because: 1. This isn’t a police procedural. This is a curious layman setting out to satisfy his curiousity. 2. The book has footnotes all over the place. Footnotes are distracting and really don’t belong in a true crime narrative. This isn’t a term paper—and it’s a good thing, too, because a great number of the footnotes CITE WIKIPEDIA, FOR HEAVENS’ SAKE. It is beyond absurd. For example, at one point the author transcribes a conversation with a friend of the victim and the woman mentions singer Greg Allman of the Allman Brothers. He has nothing AT ALL to do with the case. It’s complete name-dropping. But the author footnotes Greg Allman’s name, citing his Wikipedia entry. 3. Nearly every chapter begins with a lot—a lot—of detail about the restaurants and meals where Curious Author meets up with his interview subjects. (More on THAT in a minute.) Many pages are spent telling us that the skinny man surprisingly ate a salad and French fries or that the dotty old lady served bologna sandwiches. The author is obviously into food. Bizarrely, however, he doesn’t name any of the restaurants. It’s always “a popular cafe off of West End.” Since he’s trying very hard throughout the book to establish Nashville colour, it’s peculiar that he’ll tell how many glasses of water an old lady drank but not say what the restaurant is. Either mention the restaurant for local colour or drop all the talk. 4. The news story posed this book as “new evidence”. To me that means “we found DNA” or “a gun turned up. It does not mean what this book offers: a bunch of elderly people who had lived a life of alcohol and drug abuse recounting hazy anecdotes about the murder. Essentially the book is FOLKLORE. I admit his theory is interesting and most of it fits with the small amount of existing evidence. But it’s gossip. I’ll call it folklore because he documents it as a folklorist would, but it rarely if ever rises above the level of gossip. In fact, he mentions several unfounded items of gossip (the killer had his penis bitten off) and repeats them to his interview subjects. I’m quite disappointed that this book was marketed as a cold case procedural introducing new evidence, because it clearly isn’t that. Is it fascinating? Sure. Most gossip is. Is it exonerating if convicted killer John Randolph Clark? Not legally. Does it satisfy idle curiosity? I suppose so. Maybe check it out of the library if you’re really really interested. Or if you love reading transcribed conversations footnoted with Wikipedia links.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Thanks to Prometheus Books for the advanced copy in exchange for my honest review! What's better than a great murder mystery? A great TRUE murder mystery, of course! True crime will always be a genre that I'll love. Not only do you learn about someone's history, but you also get to see the actual investigation and the forensics behind solving a case. So when I saw A MURDER IN MUSIC CITY by Michael Bishop I had to read it! A murder that was presumed to be solved is now being reopened because a sec Thanks to Prometheus Books for the advanced copy in exchange for my honest review! What's better than a great murder mystery? A great TRUE murder mystery, of course! True crime will always be a genre that I'll love. Not only do you learn about someone's history, but you also get to see the actual investigation and the forensics behind solving a case. So when I saw A MURDER IN MUSIC CITY by Michael Bishop I had to read it! A murder that was presumed to be solved is now being reopened because a secret file is found? I need to know more! The setting is Nashville in 1964, the 18 year old babysitter, Paula Herring is brutally murdered in her home while her 6 year old brother sleeps through it. Months later, the son of a judge is convicted and sentenced for her murder. Fast forward a few decades, Michael Bishop (the author) comes across a secret file with information pertaining to the murder case that points in a completely different direction that what the public was told. With the help of world renowned forensic pschologist, Richard Walter (known as the living Sherlock Holmes), they search for the truth. This true crime story includes interviews with the original defense attorney as well as a murder confession from someone else. The information that the author presents shows a massive cover up and conspiracy within the case and it's a very intriguing story to read. The research shows and I loved learning some of the history as well - this helped fill in some gaps! The epilogue of "Where Are They Now" was fascinating and seeing the photos of the characters was great. It gave the characters and the story life. Overall, if you love true crime and don't mind a straightforward approach to the information (footnotes included in the back of the book, historical information, and reads more like a research document than novel) then you'll love this! I give this a solid 5/5 stars!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Monte Lamb

    The events that took place in Nashville in February, 1964 are very disturbing to read. A young woman is murdered in February, 1964 in her home when she is back for a weekend from college. A man is convicted of the murder and after several years is released from prison by the governor. The author runs across the story years after the event and decides to learn more about what happened. It takes him many years and he has to do a great deal of detective work to find out what actually happened that The events that took place in Nashville in February, 1964 are very disturbing to read. A young woman is murdered in February, 1964 in her home when she is back for a weekend from college. A man is convicted of the murder and after several years is released from prison by the governor. The author runs across the story years after the event and decides to learn more about what happened. It takes him many years and he has to do a great deal of detective work to find out what actually happened that night. It is a sordid tale where you will discover that the man convicted was innocent and there was a cover up of enormous proportions that included many key figures in the new metro government. The author does a good job of telling the story and each step in the investigation will keep the reader intent on continuing into the next chapter. The fact that I lived in Nashville at the time and the murder occurred near my home made this book tantalizing to read as I went to the same school as the deceased and knew the area made this book even more interesting. However, I think anyone will find this book impossible to put down. It is a fabulous detective story.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tanya Hopper

    Could not put it down! This is an exceptional and enthralling read and a look into a bygone era in Nashville history. Not only is Michael Bishop a gifted writer, but an excellent investigator and researcher. It's amazing what he was able to uncover! Being from middle Tennessee, it was fascinating to read about the inner workings of Nashville back then and the landmarks mentioned that are gone today. This is a must read for anyone who lived in Nashville then and/or who enjoys reading about odd mur Could not put it down! This is an exceptional and enthralling read and a look into a bygone era in Nashville history. Not only is Michael Bishop a gifted writer, but an excellent investigator and researcher. It's amazing what he was able to uncover! Being from middle Tennessee, it was fascinating to read about the inner workings of Nashville back then and the landmarks mentioned that are gone today. This is a must read for anyone who lived in Nashville then and/or who enjoys reading about odd murder cases. The sordid activities and corruption of some early Metro Nashville's power players will blow your mind. I could not put it down!

  14. 4 out of 5

    John Anderson

    I had just moved to Nashville when this occurred. Very interesting story. A friend of mind told me his brother found the missing book. My parents knew a could of the lawyers in this story.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Riley

    I definitely rate this as a 4+, simply because I had a hard time putting it down. This was an excellent whodunit, which I am particularly fond of. Kind of like the Perry Mason mysteries.😀 My only problem was I was hurriedly reading it to get to the end, haha! So .... I had a hard time trying to figure out if a particular person or place was something I needed to file away in my brain to drawn on later, or if was just a bit of fluff to add to the story. As it turns out I needed to recall almost e I definitely rate this as a 4+, simply because I had a hard time putting it down. This was an excellent whodunit, which I am particularly fond of. Kind of like the Perry Mason mysteries.😀 My only problem was I was hurriedly reading it to get to the end, haha! So .... I had a hard time trying to figure out if a particular person or place was something I needed to file away in my brain to drawn on later, or if was just a bit of fluff to add to the story. As it turns out I needed to recall almost every bit of info given. A recommendation for any readers that have this marked as a Want To Read, take notes or process names and places better than I did!! I'll go back and read at a slower pace, to put it all together! It was a great help that he put a general synopsis of what he thought transpired over the course of those few days at the end of the book. The info on those involved that are still living was a great postscript to this book! I hope the author's next book is as interesting!👍

  16. 4 out of 5

    Brandi

    4.5 stars for pure enjoyment and the dedication of the author's pursuit for the truth. This was a fascinating read that I sped my way through. I had the honor of meeting the author when buying my copy. He told me about his discovery of the police file that spurred his investigation. I'll admit I did expect the file to have some immediately damning evidence of a wrongful conviction, which isn't exactly the case. The author himself readily admits that his theory may be entirely wrong, and perhaps 4.5 stars for pure enjoyment and the dedication of the author's pursuit for the truth. This was a fascinating read that I sped my way through. I had the honor of meeting the author when buying my copy. He told me about his discovery of the police file that spurred his investigation. I'll admit I did expect the file to have some immediately damning evidence of a wrongful conviction, which isn't exactly the case. The author himself readily admits that his theory may be entirely wrong, and perhaps it is, but nevertheless he provides an intriguing alternate (though someone convoluted) theory of the crime. As a Tennesseean currently living in the city where Paula Herring was attending college, the connections to places I know and have been was an extra bonus.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Laura Ellison

    4.5 stars I’m happy that my book club picked this and that they will have the author at our meeting next month. I’m so impressed by the author’s tenacity with this case and his persistence in researching it over decades. The book is written in a way to keep your attention and reveals the unfolding of the case in a great way. As a Nashvillian, I’ve driven on the street Paula lived on many times and will now always think of her when I’m in the Crieve Hall area. I’ll also think of Beverly Briley wh 4.5 stars I’m happy that my book club picked this and that they will have the author at our meeting next month. I’m so impressed by the author’s tenacity with this case and his persistence in researching it over decades. The book is written in a way to keep your attention and reveals the unfolding of the case in a great way. As a Nashvillian, I’ve driven on the street Paula lived on many times and will now always think of her when I’m in the Crieve Hall area. I’ll also think of Beverly Briley when on Briley Parkway. I’m saddened to hear of how insidious corruption was back then but given that our mayor recently was discovered to have had an affair with her security guy, I shouldn’t be surprised.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    I may come back to this once I've lived in Nashville longer, but it assumes so much knowledge about the history of the city that it was essentially meaningless for someone who isn't familiar with these characters. I'm not sure if the book was intended to be read elsewhere in the country, but it's kind of a shame that the very thing that makes it so successful for local readers is what limits its reach. Maybe that wasn't the intent of the author? From what my book club said, the murder and cover- I may come back to this once I've lived in Nashville longer, but it assumes so much knowledge about the history of the city that it was essentially meaningless for someone who isn't familiar with these characters. I'm not sure if the book was intended to be read elsewhere in the country, but it's kind of a shame that the very thing that makes it so successful for local readers is what limits its reach. Maybe that wasn't the intent of the author? From what my book club said, the murder and cover-up sound really compelling, but I've read plenty of location-specific true crime that I could still understand. Regardless of that, the desperate need for editing was what really made me quit reading. I'm okay with author-as-character in the book, but he included too many superfluous details of his investigation and it really slowed down the pace.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ronnie Cramer

    A young man gets interested in an old homicide case and sets out to learn more about it. This book is the story of how he went about conducting his self-styled investigation. I'm not sure I buy all his conclusions, but I like his honesty; at one point he tells an interviewee, "I'm an amateur researcher...kind of like an investigative journalist but without a journal or any real credentials."

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    The story is interesting but I found the author to be a bit ponderous and his detailed recollection of his obstacles while investigating this murder slowed the book down.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Matt Pierce

    Fantastically written. I am from Nashville and I had no idea about this at all! I even went to the same high school but I graduated many decades later. This is a riveting story and I couldn’t put it down.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Krystal Forgey

    A little bit tedious. A whole lotta interesting. Years and years worth of research and investigative work put into this shocking true crime...about an area where I now reside.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lisa DeBusk

    3.5 stars. Nice read, being a Nashville native and knowing the areas well. I was surprising not aware of this crime, and certainly appreciate the writer's devotion to getting all the facts from many characters. But, it was hard to follow because of all the characters without referencing the index in the back.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brooke West

    Highly recommend this to anyone who lives in Nashville. I enjoyed reading about our city.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Whitney Smith

    Crazy! I can’t believe this is real! Argggg!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rita

    Twenty years of dogged research created a gumshoe extraordinaire out of this talented author. His meticulous investigation gave a legacy to the teenage victim, who had such promise, and gave due process to the accused murderer...finally!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Monroe

    This book was so fascinating, and not just because I am a Nashville resident. It kept me turning pages, wanting to get to the truth of what really happened. Highly recommend!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    While this is not a captivating read, it is a fascinating one, especially for long time residents of Nashville. There is a lot of mentions of local places and one can almost picture how small the city was in 1964. The crime investigation itself goes all over the place, but the author wraps up his theory nicely in the end. A great "local" read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    John

    A tech salesman and amateur researcher comes across some intriguing information about a decades-old “solved” murder case, and relentlessly pursues every possible lead he can think of for years, culminating in a well-supported alternate theory of the crime involving high-level officials in the fledgling metro Nashville government. Let me tell you, this is an interesting read for anyone, but for people who live in the greater Nashville area, it’s a must read. Only critique I have is that you can t A tech salesman and amateur researcher comes across some intriguing information about a decades-old “solved” murder case, and relentlessly pursues every possible lead he can think of for years, culminating in a well-supported alternate theory of the crime involving high-level officials in the fledgling metro Nashville government. Let me tell you, this is an interesting read for anyone, but for people who live in the greater Nashville area, it’s a must read. Only critique I have is that you can tell that Mr. Bishop is not an super-accomplished writer, and at times I was wishing for a more chronologically-based narrative, but when you remember who he is and the dedication behind the research he did, all of that is easily overlooked. Interesting footnote: Beverly Briley was the mayor Nashville in 1964, a person named as part of a conspiracy in Bishop’s theory of the coverup of the crime, and the person for whom Briley Pkwy is named. His grandson David Briley has now succeeded the disgraced Megan Barry as mayor of Nashville.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Phyllis Bond

    A must read for some one living in Nashville in the '60:s! If you are from Nashville, Tn or the areas around south Nashville, this is a must read book! It's a eye opener to what was happening in this small southern town in the mid 60's!

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