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This is an illustrated and unabridged edition of the popular classic The Return of Tarzan. It comes with a free audiobook download. The audio files are in standard MP3 format. Download the audiobook to your reading device and listen using your favourite audio player app. Enjoy! *** *** *** *** *** In this book, Tarzan had renounced his right to the woman he loved, and civi This is an illustrated and unabridged edition of the popular classic The Return of Tarzan. It comes with a free audiobook download. The audio files are in standard MP3 format. Download the audiobook to your reading device and listen using your favourite audio player app. Enjoy! *** *** *** *** *** In this book, Tarzan had renounced his right to the woman he loved, and civilization held no pleasure for him. After a brief and harrowing period among men, he turned back to the African jungle where he had grown to manhood. It was there he first heard of Opar, the city of gold, left over from fabled Atlantis. It was a city of hideous men—and of beautiful, savage women, over whom reigned La, high priestess of the Flaming God. Its altars were stained with the blood of many sacrifices. Unheeding of the dangers, Tarzan led a band of savage warriors toward the ancient crypts and the more ancient evil of Opar.


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This is an illustrated and unabridged edition of the popular classic The Return of Tarzan. It comes with a free audiobook download. The audio files are in standard MP3 format. Download the audiobook to your reading device and listen using your favourite audio player app. Enjoy! *** *** *** *** *** In this book, Tarzan had renounced his right to the woman he loved, and civi This is an illustrated and unabridged edition of the popular classic The Return of Tarzan. It comes with a free audiobook download. The audio files are in standard MP3 format. Download the audiobook to your reading device and listen using your favourite audio player app. Enjoy! *** *** *** *** *** In this book, Tarzan had renounced his right to the woman he loved, and civilization held no pleasure for him. After a brief and harrowing period among men, he turned back to the African jungle where he had grown to manhood. It was there he first heard of Opar, the city of gold, left over from fabled Atlantis. It was a city of hideous men—and of beautiful, savage women, over whom reigned La, high priestess of the Flaming God. Its altars were stained with the blood of many sacrifices. Unheeding of the dangers, Tarzan led a band of savage warriors toward the ancient crypts and the more ancient evil of Opar.

30 review for The Return of Tarzan (Illustrated): with free audiobook download

  1. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    EXTRA! EXTRA! {Paris; France} TARZAN OF THE APES RESCUES YOUNG AND PRETTY RUSSIAN COUNTESS FROM SOCIAL EMBARRASSMENT Busts heads of malicious scoundrels in the process {Sidibel-Abbes; Algeria} APE-MAN RESCUES YOUNG AND PRETTY OULED-NAIL DANCER FROM SLAVERY Busts heads of malicious scoundrels in the process {Sahara desert; North Africa} JUNGLE LORD GOT RESCUED FROM EXECUTION BY YOUNG AND PRETTY OULED-NAIL DANCER Kills malicious lions in the process {Jungle; West Africa} KING OF THE JUNGLE RESCUES BLACK WAR EXTRA! EXTRA! {Paris; France} TARZAN OF THE APES RESCUES YOUNG AND PRETTY RUSSIAN COUNTESS FROM SOCIAL EMBARRASSMENT Busts heads of malicious scoundrels in the process {Sidibel-Abbes; Algeria} APE-MAN RESCUES YOUNG AND PRETTY OULED-NAIL DANCER FROM SLAVERY Busts heads of malicious scoundrels in the process {Sahara desert; North Africa} JUNGLE LORD GOT RESCUED FROM EXECUTION BY YOUNG AND PRETTY OULED-NAIL DANCER Kills malicious lions in the process {Jungle; West Africa} KING OF THE JUNGLE RESCUES BLACK WARRIOR FROM LION ATTACK Befriends savage tribe; kills malicious Arabs in the process {Opar; Jungleland} WHITE CHIEF GOT RESCUED FROM SACRIFICE BY YOUNG AND PRETTY HIGH PRIESTESS Flees from mystical city on food; no casualties [Ed. Really? Check!] {Opar/Jungle} ENGLISH LORD RESCUES YOUNG AND PRETTY AMERICAN FROM MORTAL DANGER All’s well that ends well Don’t trust everything you read in the papers! Better check it out for yourself. Once you turn a blind eye on its shortcomings this story becomes some gripping adventure. For me anyway; I’m hooked! This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Werner

    As I read this book over the last few weeks, I remembered and recognized more and more parts of it --finally, including the ending-- and realized that I'd read it before as a kid. (Evidently, I did so after reading part of it at a friend's house; but had forgotten the title of what I'd read there, and so came to think that episode involved a different book.) The re-reading, after a lapse of nearly 50 years, was fresh and enjoyable once again; in fact, it made me recall how much I enjoyed the ori As I read this book over the last few weeks, I remembered and recognized more and more parts of it --finally, including the ending-- and realized that I'd read it before as a kid. (Evidently, I did so after reading part of it at a friend's house; but had forgotten the title of what I'd read there, and so came to think that episode involved a different book.) The re-reading, after a lapse of nearly 50 years, was fresh and enjoyable once again; in fact, it made me recall how much I enjoyed the original Tarzan book! I'd given that one just three stars when I reviewed it here, judging it on the basis of literary criteria like accuracy of the background, etc.; but this reading persuaded me to rate both works just on the basis of how much I enjoyed them, and so to allow the extra star. Readers of the first Tarzan novel probably almost unanimously feel that, despite the nobility of Tarzan's choice at the end, it concludes in a very unsatisfactory way. They'll be delighted to know that this sequel affords Tarzan and Jane another chance. :-) It picks up soon after those events, commences on an ocean liner, moves to Paris and then French-ruled North Africa, and only later returns to sub-Saharan Africa. Along the way, it offers a duel, a shipwreck, attempted murders, espionage, suicide, lion attacks, a lost race, and fabulous ancient treasure, with jeopardies, rescues and escapes galore. (And, of course, romance; not just one, but four --well, actually five-- attractive ladies are among the characters.) The positive and negative characteristics of Burroughs' style are fully in evidence here --though he was apparently more familiar with his French and North African setting than his tropical African one; the former natural and cultural landscapes come across much more realistically than the latter. (His picture of the remnants of lost Atlantean civilization in Opar, on the other hand, is wildly implausible; the extreme sexual dimorphism, with the females beautiful and the males ugly and ape-like, produces the kind of reader reactions to the two groups that he wanted, but is genetically impossible, and the idea that humans could mate with apes comes straight out of the quack Darwinism of his day.) Burrough's plotting would sometimes subject the long arm of coincidence to, at the very least, a dislocated wrist; but given the fascination of his story-telling (and cliff-hanger transitions from one character/characters to another) it's a forgivable flaw. :-) African blacks in 1913 were far more advanced than the Waziri as he portrays them, but his depiction of blacks is more positive than that of some of the writers who were his contemporaries, such as Thomas Dixon (though the contrast he attempts to draw between the Waziri and the coastal blacks exhibits racial stereotyping and profiling). And here as in the first book, Tarzan is confronted with serious moral temptations and choices, and he learns and grows in that area. All in all, a great read for adventure fans!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gary Sundell

    The completion of the tale begun in Tarzan of the Apes. New characters are introduced. Tarzan finds a lost city, Opar, which may have been built by people from Atlantis before it sank. Pulp adventure at its best.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Tarzan, grieving his beloved Jane who will soon marry another, sets off to visit France. Where of course he causes problems with Russian blackmailers, becomes a spy for the French government, and ends up back in Africa. There's lots of fighting, lots of yelling, lost cities are rediscovered, gold is found, lions are killed with Tarzan's bare hands! It's pretty much exactly what you would expect. Although I was shocked by the cannibalism. Like, white Europeans deciding to eat each other. That was Tarzan, grieving his beloved Jane who will soon marry another, sets off to visit France. Where of course he causes problems with Russian blackmailers, becomes a spy for the French government, and ends up back in Africa. There's lots of fighting, lots of yelling, lost cities are rediscovered, gold is found, lions are killed with Tarzan's bare hands! It's pretty much exactly what you would expect. Although I was shocked by the cannibalism. Like, white Europeans deciding to eat each other. That was interesting.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    I'm pretty sure I gave Tarzan of the Apes 5 stars, so I have to give this one the same. It's really one, 2 part book. It is better in one way, much of Burroughs earlier seeming racism is gone. Otherwise, it is just a continuation of the basis for a story we've all come to know so well. It relies heavily on coincidence, monumentally stupid bravery & sheer magic, but it's a heck of a lot of fun. I'm pretty sure I gave Tarzan of the Apes 5 stars, so I have to give this one the same. It's really one, 2 part book. It is better in one way, much of Burroughs earlier seeming racism is gone. Otherwise, it is just a continuation of the basis for a story we've all come to know so well. It relies heavily on coincidence, monumentally stupid bravery & sheer magic, but it's a heck of a lot of fun.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Malum

    3.5 stars. This is a very uneven book. The first half is just ok, and deals with Tarzan travelling around the world and getting into various scraps and scrapes. The second half, on the other hand, is really great. Tarzan returns to the jungle and has to deal with a lost city, an ancient civilization of beast-men, and murderous pagan rituals. The two halves are only connected by the fact that they include the same mustache-twirling villain that keeps showing up and screwing around with Tarzan. In 3.5 stars. This is a very uneven book. The first half is just ok, and deals with Tarzan travelling around the world and getting into various scraps and scrapes. The second half, on the other hand, is really great. Tarzan returns to the jungle and has to deal with a lost city, an ancient civilization of beast-men, and murderous pagan rituals. The two halves are only connected by the fact that they include the same mustache-twirling villain that keeps showing up and screwing around with Tarzan. In other words, the book goes from standard pulp adventure to fantastical Robert E. Howard fever dream. It really felt like either Burroughs didn't know what to do with this story, or it wasn't long enough and so he had to add some filler to meet his word count. Still, there is a lot of fun here, especially once Burroughs gets locked in on a plot.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    About 25 years ago, I decided to revisit the real turning point in my life as a reader, the point at which I became a voracious reader. I decided to re-read the Tarzan books I'd devoured as a teenager, to see if they still held up. I re-read the first book, Tarzan of the Apes, about an orphaned boy who grew up among the great apes, and was delighted to see that whatever maturity I had gained hadn't cost me the joy I'd experienced in that first book of the long series. For some reason, though, I About 25 years ago, I decided to revisit the real turning point in my life as a reader, the point at which I became a voracious reader. I decided to re-read the Tarzan books I'd devoured as a teenager, to see if they still held up. I re-read the first book, Tarzan of the Apes, about an orphaned boy who grew up among the great apes, and was delighted to see that whatever maturity I had gained hadn't cost me the joy I'd experienced in that first book of the long series. For some reason, though, I didn't get around to the next book until now. The Return of Tarzan was actually the first Tarzan book I ever read. It was a bit mystifying at the time, because it's a sequel that picks up where the first book ended, which means that it starts out in Paris where Tarzan goes by the name of Jean C. Tarzan and sips absinthe and wears white tie and is involved in intrigue with a Russian countess. Not exactly what I was expecting for my first experience with the Lord of the Jungle. (The book doesn't even get to the jungle until more than half way through.) As a result, this was always my least favorite Tarzan book as a kid, though it still compelled me to give probably the most breathless and persuasive book report ever heard at Thomas J. Rusk Junior High School. Burrough's Tarzan books are just plain wonderful adventures. I don't read stuff like that much anymore, but re-reading The Return of Tarzan makes me realize that I still hunger for it a little. The books are dated, but only (primarily) in the style of language and in a paternalistic racial viewpoint. Burroughs makes far too much use of coincidence (in the first two books, no fewer than four shipwrecks strand passengers on one five-mile stretch of African coast, and the passengers of all the wrecks are intricately connected with one another). But nevertheless, what Burroughs captures is the absolute essence of adventure viewed through a near-Victorian worldview. I don't recommend starting the Tarzan novels with The Return of Tarzan, as I did, but it's hard for me to imagine a boy of 13 not still being caught by the magic of these tales. And I don't think it will be 25 years before I revisit the next in the series.

  8. 5 out of 5

    East Bay J

    Tarzan smokes cigarettes, drinks absinthe and says, “Mon Dieu!” That’s in between beatin’ the bad guys and dazzlin’ the ladies. I found the second volume of the Tarzan series to be just as good as the first, just as exciting, interesting and action packed. Those who know me might say, “Yeah, Justin, but that’s because you’re a little kid and you like this sort of thing.” Not so, folks. Well, I do like this sort of thing and I don’t often win awards for stoic maturity but Burroughs is no slouch an Tarzan smokes cigarettes, drinks absinthe and says, “Mon Dieu!” That’s in between beatin’ the bad guys and dazzlin’ the ladies. I found the second volume of the Tarzan series to be just as good as the first, just as exciting, interesting and action packed. Those who know me might say, “Yeah, Justin, but that’s because you’re a little kid and you like this sort of thing.” Not so, folks. Well, I do like this sort of thing and I don’t often win awards for stoic maturity but Burroughs is no slouch and he is not kidding around. And, finally, a resolution to the tragic love story of Tarzan and Jane. It’s interesting, from a sort of socio-historical point of view, to note what social attitudes were prevalent in 1913 when The Return Of Tarzan was published based on the book itself. The attitude towards blacks is not especially flattering, though Burroughs does recognize nobility in some of the “savages” of his stories. There’s an awful lot of damsel in distress style sexism, y’know, women succumbing to their “natural” instinct to be protected by their man. You get the sense Burroughs bought into this one pretty deep. On the other hand, you get the sense that Burroughs was something of an environmentalist. And his ideas about nobility, chivalry and honor are quite pure and have inspired generations. I suppose the other criticism is that, sometimes, things are a little too neat and easy in terms of the plot. However, Burroughs suffers less from this than many of his pulp writing peers. Regardless, these books are fun to read and I’m getting a kick out of them. Now if I could just find a used copy of The Beasts Of Tarzan.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nick Angelis

    Tarzan is simply a white SuperCaptainCoolMan. That's all there is to it. With sinewy arms of steel forged in the leafy shadows of the darkest jungles--you get the picture. The silliest theme in the book is Tarzan's de-evolution from a gentleman in Paris to the ape-man rampaging through the jungle with his primate brethren. The not-so-subtle social Darwinism featured in all the Tarzan books is annoying if you can't get past the stupid ideas of previous generations--maybe in 75 years people will b Tarzan is simply a white SuperCaptainCoolMan. That's all there is to it. With sinewy arms of steel forged in the leafy shadows of the darkest jungles--you get the picture. The silliest theme in the book is Tarzan's de-evolution from a gentleman in Paris to the ape-man rampaging through the jungle with his primate brethren. The not-so-subtle social Darwinism featured in all the Tarzan books is annoying if you can't get past the stupid ideas of previous generations--maybe in 75 years people will be put off by the murky postmodernism of the early 21st century. Burroughs was still way ahead of his time in his ability to create a predictable comic book hero about whom he could churn out multiple titles. Of course, that whole genre depends heavily on remarkable coincidences. I'm still bewildered about how most of the characters in this book end up at Tarzan's boyhood cabin on the west coast of Africa at some point or another when I can't even find the closest Target without a GPS. I'm still giving the improbable plot four stars because it's fun to read, with shipwrecks, political scandals, militant pygmies covered in bling, diabolical villains, and gentle ladies throughout (although Tarzan only wants to be "bully chums" with the non-European females he meets, even if he does call Arabs "white men"). Despite his embarrassing habit of being randomly heroic, I think Tarzan would be a good friend to play video games with--not any complex board games though, he's not evolved enough for that.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Celise

    Sequels always get compared to the first in the series for evident reasons. This is a case where the second book has almost nothing in common with the first so the issue is more that the genre seems to have switched and it feels less like a sequel and more like a separate story with the same character (kind of? I wanted more ape-man Tarzan than civilized hero Tarzan). The first half reads like a Russian spy novel, with none of the apes and lions and African Jungle. That is my warning to anyone l Sequels always get compared to the first in the series for evident reasons. This is a case where the second book has almost nothing in common with the first so the issue is more that the genre seems to have switched and it feels less like a sequel and more like a separate story with the same character (kind of? I wanted more ape-man Tarzan than civilized hero Tarzan). The first half reads like a Russian spy novel, with none of the apes and lions and African Jungle. That is my warning to anyone like me who went in expecting savagery and tree-swinging from the beginning. You will probably be disappointed. After I began to get bored of this genre-flip, it reverted back to something similar to the first novel. I can't say this was anywhere near as enjoyable as the first book, but it wasn't awful if treated as a separate book altogether? I don't know, I'm a little bit confused about what I just went through to be honest. I may or may not continue the series.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nigel

    Another readable adventure story which my two boys enjoyed, this one is a direct sequel to the first book (Tarzan of the Apes). The book has many flaws, but there is enough action, intrigue, shipwrecks, savages, and romance to keep the story moving along. Recommended.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Gallup

    My daughter is being encouraged by her teacher to get a little variety in her reading, and maybe I'm trying for the same in going back to books that captivated me when I was about her age. Well, no, not exactly. The real reason is that I've been feeling the pressures of life more keenly than usual and wanted an escape. I read all the Tarzan books so many times way back in my youth that I still remember them fairly well. Remembered liking this one in particular, perhaps because it moves our hero t My daughter is being encouraged by her teacher to get a little variety in her reading, and maybe I'm trying for the same in going back to books that captivated me when I was about her age. Well, no, not exactly. The real reason is that I've been feeling the pressures of life more keenly than usual and wanted an escape. I read all the Tarzan books so many times way back in my youth that I still remember them fairly well. Remembered liking this one in particular, perhaps because it moves our hero through the widest range of settings (from a transAtlantic ocean liner at the beginning, to Parisian society, to life as a member of an African tribe, with stops along the way for a pistol duel, imprisonment in an Arab's tent, and the threat of being sacrificed by primitive sun-worshippers). Through it all, his steps are dogged by an utterly slimy Russian spy who never tires of trying to end Tarzan's days. Again and again, having thwarted the villain's plots, Tarzan resists the entirely rational urge to break his neck. In most of his books, Burroughs has at least something to say about the romantic concept of the noble savage. This one makes his point explicitly, as the civilized men Tarzan meets are either soulless monsters or useless weaklings, whereas thanks to an upbringing away from decadent modern society he both instinctively knows the right thing to do and also does it. Failing to kill the spy might be a noble choice, but it isn't a wise one (at least, not for the character; for the narrative, it ensures the bad guy will continue providing more opportunities for Tarzan to do what he does best). Aside from that, there aren't too many shades of gray here. At any rate, the bon sauvage slant works for getting Tarzan back home to the jungle, where he needs to be for all the sequels that will follow. Hard to say how many stars this should have. Of course, as a kid, I would have given it five. It's not great literature. On the other hand, without first thoroughly enjoying books like this, I might never have found my way to literature. And here I am choosing to pick it up again even today. So let's go with four.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    At the end of Edgar Rice Burroughs’s “Tarzan of the Apes”, Tarzan (a.k.a. Lord Greystoke) arrived in America to see the woman he loves, Jane Porter, engaged to marry another, a man who claimed a title that Tarzan, by all rights, should have claimed. Dejected, Tarzan returns to Paris, melancholy but with the knowledge that what he was doing was the decent thing to do. “The Return of Tarzan”, Burroughs’s sequel (the first of 23) to his immensely popular novel that introduced the world to one of the At the end of Edgar Rice Burroughs’s “Tarzan of the Apes”, Tarzan (a.k.a. Lord Greystoke) arrived in America to see the woman he loves, Jane Porter, engaged to marry another, a man who claimed a title that Tarzan, by all rights, should have claimed. Dejected, Tarzan returns to Paris, melancholy but with the knowledge that what he was doing was the decent thing to do. “The Return of Tarzan”, Burroughs’s sequel (the first of 23) to his immensely popular novel that introduced the world to one of the most famous fictional characters ever, continues the story of Lord Greystoke, as he travels by boat across the Atlantic and manages to gain the wrath of Nicholas Rokoff, a Russian ne’er-do-well and rapscallion who quickly becomes Tarzan’s archenemy. Tarzan, in his attempts to do the right thing, ends up being hunted by the police, falsely accused of adultery, and forced into a duel with a man who believes that Tarzan is making love to his wife. In this sequel, Tarzan also: becomes a spy for the French Intelligence, travels to Algeria, saves the daughter of a sheikh, is thrown overboard in the middle of the ocean by evil henchman, swims to shore only to find that he has arrived at his birthplace, befriends an African tribe known as the Waziri and later becomes their chief, discovers a lost civilization deep in the jungle that may be an ancient pocket of survivors from the lost continent of Atlantis, is reunited with Jane, saves Jane from priests from the lost city of Opar bent on sacrificing her to their gods, and gets married. All of this, and more, amazingly takes place within the novel’s sparse 273 pages. Talk about action-packed. Therein lies the appeal of Burroughs’s novel: whatever the man lacked in writing talent, he more than made up for in the sheer joy of story-telling ability. The man could spin a yarn. It’s clear to me why Tarzan had such a huge popularity and has had a readership for over a century. These are fun, exciting, romantic action-adventure stories written solely to entertain, and that’s precisely what they do.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    So good. I really don't like Rokoff. And then Clayton. ;'( But Tarzan and Jane. :D

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    Perhaps the most well-known fictional creation of the 20th century, Tarzan celebrates his official centennial in October 2012. First appearing in the pulp publication "All-Story Magazine" as a complete novel in October 1912, "Tarzan of the Apes" proved so popular that its creator, Edgar Rice Burroughs, wasted little time in coming up with a sequel...the first of an eventual two dozen! That sequel, perhaps inevitably titled "The Return of Tarzan," was first seen in the pages of the short-lived pu Perhaps the most well-known fictional creation of the 20th century, Tarzan celebrates his official centennial in October 2012. First appearing in the pulp publication "All-Story Magazine" as a complete novel in October 1912, "Tarzan of the Apes" proved so popular that its creator, Edgar Rice Burroughs, wasted little time in coming up with a sequel...the first of an eventual two dozen! That sequel, perhaps inevitably titled "The Return of Tarzan," was first seen in the pages of the short-lived pulp "New Story Magazine" (cover price: 15 cents); unlike its predecessor, it was published serially, in the June-December 1913 issues, and first saw book form in 1915. This is a tremendous continuation of the initial, now-classic story, and does what all good sequels SHOULD do: expand on what we already know while deepening characterizations...and leaving us wanting still more! The book is a direct continuation of the earlier novel, at the end of which Tarzan was seen nobly renouncing his aristocratic title so that his lady love, Jane Porter, could comfortably marry his cousin, William Cecil Clayton. Picking up scant weeks later, the sequel finds a despondent Tarzan mulling over his lot while on a steamer to Paris, where he resides with his good friend Paul D'Arnot. He becomes involved with the affairs of a troubled couple, the Count and Countess De Coude, while on ship and after returning to Paris; it seems that the Countess' brother, the cravenly Russian agent Nikolas Rokoff, will do virtually anything to blackmail the couple into giving him some top-secret government papers. After these episodes (and the book certainly must be deemed "episodic"), Tarzan becomes a secret agent for the French government (!), has some remarkable adventures in the desert of Algeria (again coming up against Rokoff), is thrown off a mid-ocean steamer by Rokoff and his henchman, Alexis Paulvitch, and fetches up in his native Africa. Once on his home turf, Tarzan's veneer of civilization is quickly sloughed off, as he rises to the kingship of a native tribe, the Waziri, leads them in battle against a band of ivory hunters, and discovers the Haggardian lost kingdom of Opar, along with its treasure horde of gold. As you can tell, the novel is just crammed with incident and adventure; Burroughs throws quite a bit into this one to guarantee the reader a rousing good time. And I have not even mentioned the trials that poor Jane and her party go through after a terrible shipwreck and marooning. Readers won't be bored, that's for certain! While no one would ever call Burroughs an elegant writer, he sure was a compelling one, and "The Return of Tarzan" really is quite impossible to put down. With two story lines alternating for our attention, and its chapters arranged cliffhanger fashion, the book is compulsively readable. It also goes far in deflating the charges of racism that have been leveled against Burroughs in the first book; here, the Waziri are portrayed in a very winning light, and Tarzan often ponders how much more decent they are than some "civilized" folks whom he has encountered (still, the book's Manyuema cannibals are naturally shown in anything BUT a decent light!). The novel features some lovely romantic interludes that should have the lady readers sighing, while of course dishing out enough gun battles, fights with wild animals, cloak and dagger antics, and lost-world elements to keep the most jaded action fan happy. And although Burroughs had never visited Africa--and thus could not impart the "Dark Continent" authenticity that H. Rider Haggard engendered so easily in his own books--his research goes far here in filling in the blanks; for example, who has ever heard of alfa (esparto) grass before, ropes of which are used to bind Tarzan in the Algerian desert? Put simply, the book is a gas, from start to finish. Still, it is a far from perfect affair, and Burroughs must be held accountable for several goofs that a careful reading will spotlight. Egregiously, he mentions that Tarzan's ape mother, Kala, had been killed by a spear that "found [her] vitals." In the initial novel, however, it is clearly stated that Kulonga's spear merely "grazed her side"; rather, it was a poisoned arrow that did her in. The author tells us that Bou Saada, Algeria, is south of Sidi-bel-Abbes, whereas a quick look at a map will reveal that it is east. And he tells us that Tarzan's vessel was sailing "east" from Algeria to get to the Strait of Gibraltar, whereas that should of course be west. Perhaps worse than these oversights, which should actually have been caught by Burroughs' editor, is the overdependence on coincidence with which the author advances his plot. By coincidence, Tarzan's first assignment in Africa involves his enemy, Rokoff; by coincidence, the sheik who befriends Tarzan is the father of the dancing girl who later rescues him; by coincidence, Tarzan meets Jane's best friend, Hazel Strong, on a steamer at sea; by coincidence, the marooned Tarzan washes up on the African shore right at the cabin where he was born (!); by coincidence, Hazel bumps into Jane in Cape Town; and by two more coincidences, the lifeboats of the aforementioned shipwreck also fetch up on the African shore within five miles of Tarzan's cabin. Small world, and all that! The first Tarzan novel was also dependent on coincidence, but not nearly as absurdly so as its sequel. But you know what? The story is so entertaining, so much fun, and told with such dash and vigor, that none of these things seems to matter. While one part of the reader's mind is saying "Oh, come on!" the other part is making those pages flip, anxious to see what comes next. To demonstrate this point, I find that, despite having dozens of other books clamoring for my attention right now, I yet HAVE to read the second Tarzan sequel, "The Beasts of Tarzan," next. Flaws and all, even after 100 years, these books CAN prove highly addictive....

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    "Tarzan of the Apes"left Tarzans' story a bit on a cliffhanger, where Jane Porter had promised her hand to Clayton Greystoke who was currently the heir to the Greystoke fortune. Tarzan walked away without claiming his love and fortune. So we meet up with Tarzan on a boat headed for Europe on his way back to the African jungle. When we meet him again he is being very much appreciated by a young Russian comtessa whose marriage and reputation is in danger from two Russian hoodlums who find themselv "Tarzan of the Apes"left Tarzans' story a bit on a cliffhanger, where Jane Porter had promised her hand to Clayton Greystoke who was currently the heir to the Greystoke fortune. Tarzan walked away without claiming his love and fortune. So we meet up with Tarzan on a boat headed for Europe on his way back to the African jungle. When we meet him again he is being very much appreciated by a young Russian comtessa whose marriage and reputation is in danger from two Russian hoodlums who find themselves confronted by the giant from the jungle whose strength is underestimated severely in their plans. Tarzan's stay in the civilized world is a world away from the Weismuller movies were most action took place in the Jungle. here he has his adventures in Paris and then in the Africa of Arabian people were he saves a daughter of a tribal leader before continuing his travels and secret mission of catching a spy in the act and confronting once more his enemy Rokoff who will plague him in this book. Tarzan gets thrown overboard and ends up in his beloved Africa, becomes the tribal chief of the Waziri, travels to Opar to be nearly sacrificed, in the meanwhile Jane Porter has not yet married Lord Greystoke and travels Africa where she becomes shipwrecked on the African coast with Clayton, Lord Greystoke and a certain Rokoff. Tarzan again lives with his family of Apes and once again Jane Porter gets kidnapped by the folks from Opar. While the book is one novel too much happens to make a coherent review unless giving away the whole book. Anyway at the end Tarzan is Lord Greystoke and married with his great love. And the noble Savage from Africa has been force of good all the time. He does represent the good in mankind. A very decent and easy to read novel which I am sure was well received in its time and even these days can easily be read bij children.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    I LOVED "Tarzan of the Apes" but I was afraid "The Return" wouldn't thrill me as much. But I think I actually liked it more than the original. I would never recommend reading this first and skipping "Apes," but if you read the first, certainly read the second. I love Tarzan as a part of society. He's awesome and sexy and almost a hybrid of Holmes and...Tarzan (from "Apes") It's arguable, I know. But the whole time I was just sitting there thinking, "Tarzan needs to be a detective." I know it's m I LOVED "Tarzan of the Apes" but I was afraid "The Return" wouldn't thrill me as much. But I think I actually liked it more than the original. I would never recommend reading this first and skipping "Apes," but if you read the first, certainly read the second. I love Tarzan as a part of society. He's awesome and sexy and almost a hybrid of Holmes and...Tarzan (from "Apes") It's arguable, I know. But the whole time I was just sitting there thinking, "Tarzan needs to be a detective." I know it's my overactive child-like imagination that makes me obsessive about these books, but even if you don't feel like a kid, you should read them. This might not be my most eloquent review, but I stand by what I said. ;)

  18. 4 out of 5

    David B

    After renouncing his claim to the love of Jane Porter at the end of the previous novel, Tarzan has an eventful career as a French secret agent among the Arabs, the chief of an African tribe, and the captive of sun-worshipping subhumans, all culminating in a suspenseful reunion with his true love. All of the pros and cons that can be cited for any Edgar Rice Burroughs story can be cited for this one as well. There is a continual and often ridiculous reliance on coincidence to move the action forwa After renouncing his claim to the love of Jane Porter at the end of the previous novel, Tarzan has an eventful career as a French secret agent among the Arabs, the chief of an African tribe, and the captive of sun-worshipping subhumans, all culminating in a suspenseful reunion with his true love. All of the pros and cons that can be cited for any Edgar Rice Burroughs story can be cited for this one as well. There is a continual and often ridiculous reliance on coincidence to move the action forward, but it's just so much damn fun to read that I don’t much care about that. If you don’t appreciate the kind of old-timey Saturday serial thrills that a good Burroughs book delivers, there is not much reason to read this.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lynne Stringer

    Having read 'Tarzan of the Apes' and being slightly disappointed with its ending, I took no time in reading 'The Return of Tarzan' to see the resolution I was sure would result. Fortunately, it did, as there were many other things about this book that tried my patience. As with the first one, I was prepared for sexism and racism, and I got it. But the racism seemed inconsistent. Sometimes Burroughs seemed to honour the pride of other races, others he shot down in flames with no hesitation. I unde Having read 'Tarzan of the Apes' and being slightly disappointed with its ending, I took no time in reading 'The Return of Tarzan' to see the resolution I was sure would result. Fortunately, it did, as there were many other things about this book that tried my patience. As with the first one, I was prepared for sexism and racism, and I got it. But the racism seemed inconsistent. Sometimes Burroughs seemed to honour the pride of other races, others he shot down in flames with no hesitation. I understand what the difference was based on and just had to grin and bear it to finish the story. Of course, there was plenty more telling, rather than showing, and changing point of view, although not as much head-hopping as the first, as we're with Tarzan most of the time. Unfortunately, I didn't find his company as intriguing as I did in the first book. This time, he seemed more reckless than anything, often getting into trouble simply because he couldn't be bothered changing his course to get out of it. Not only that, a few times he wasn't saved by others, or even by his own superhuman strength, but by some ridiculous coincidence. (view spoiler)[ He can't get out of trouble just because someone decides to conveniently go mad at the right moment, for instance. (hide spoiler)] I still find him fascinating, however, which is why I gave the book three stars. However, I'm not interested enough to read any further.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Luke

    Tarzan diddles around being Superman and you just don't care because he is never in peril, just like Superman. He is invincible, basically. This is boring. The first book had an amazing ending and we want to know what happens next but instead we are treated with a meandering, disjointed plot when all we want to read about is our hero and the fun, if silly, cast of characters that populated the first book, Jane especially. There's a simple, stupid love story here and Tarzan's sacrifice at the end Tarzan diddles around being Superman and you just don't care because he is never in peril, just like Superman. He is invincible, basically. This is boring. The first book had an amazing ending and we want to know what happens next but instead we are treated with a meandering, disjointed plot when all we want to read about is our hero and the fun, if silly, cast of characters that populated the first book, Jane especially. There's a simple, stupid love story here and Tarzan's sacrifice at the end of book one is sweet, if irritating, and makes it necessary to delve into book 2 but book 2 just toys with the reader, which I couldn't stand. Russian spies who act like Snidely Whiplash? C'mon. Evil grins and mustache-twirling and honor besmirching? Stupid, childish drek. The first book flirted with Literature-ish status and then we're insulted with this? It was probably really heady, exciting stuff if you were, say, 13, male, and it's 1901, but even by 1913 when this book was being serialized I'm sure there were educated readers who rolled their eyes, some of them quite possibly 13 and male. Also, Tarzan just feels so out of place in civilization. Burroughs wants him to be a man of superior breeding who is also imbued with the best the savage world has to offer, i.e. strength, agility, etc. He's supposed to be a hybrid but it just won't work. Civilization is full of corny, gentlemanly colonial racism and ideas about the world while the jungle is a world that makes sense, to both us and to Tarzan because we grew up with him in that savage(and laughably inaccurate)place. Hybrid Tarzan won't work simple because the Jungle is cooler than Civilization, so Jungle Tarzan must win-out, that's what we want to see.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Julie Davis

    B.J. Harrison at The Classic Tales podcast is narrating this story. I'll go on a ride with B.J. any time, especially for a Tarzan tale.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jersy

    I had long planned to pick up the second Tarzan book to see him adjust to civilisation, further develope his relationship with Jane and witness the struggles related to that. That's not really the content of this book, though. It's more action - adventure with hardly any interactions between the ape man and his love interest. The story I got was still interesting: Tarzan, who had decided not to claim his heritage nor Jane, has various conflicts within the civilized world, takes an exciting job an I had long planned to pick up the second Tarzan book to see him adjust to civilisation, further develope his relationship with Jane and witness the struggles related to that. That's not really the content of this book, though. It's more action - adventure with hardly any interactions between the ape man and his love interest. The story I got was still interesting: Tarzan, who had decided not to claim his heritage nor Jane, has various conflicts within the civilized world, takes an exciting job and ends up in the wild again. It's one wild adventure story, which sounds awesome for some but is not what I'm most interested in about Tarzan's story. I loved every bit about Jane's parts of the story, however, and there were some interesting characters in this novel. How adjusted Tarzan is to the world seems to more influenced by plot convenience than making sense a lot of the time. I don't think I'll continue the series since the concepts I'm interested in don't seem to be the focus. It would be interesting to see how Jane and Tarzan's marriage turns out, but I'm not much of an adventure book reader so I fear as the series continues I would get less and less out of it. This was a fun book just not what I wanted and love to read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bobbie

    I read this second in the series because I wanted the answer to questions left at the end of the first book and I now have those answers. Now I have read enough of Tarzan. I did enjoy parts of this book but much of it I just wanted to get through.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    Shipwrecks, angry Russians, human sacrifices, and lion wrestling. What more can you ask for from a book? These are so much fun.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    Silly and ridiculous and I will read the next one

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tarissa

    So this sequel comes with a bit of a Romeo and Juliet scenario here... Tarzan can't stand by and watch his Jane Porter married off to another man. So he makes an exit from his circle of society friends, which leaves Jane thinking him dead. Jane, shipwrecked with acquaintances, end up living the wild jungle life that Tarzan was originally accustomed to... Everyone is a bit lost in limbo, and it makes for some interesting situations! COYER Buddy Read: 10. Caleb (5 star rating)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Johnny

    In the initial pages of this book, John Clayton (aka Jean C. Tarzan) is a sophisticated westerner who is welcome at any sophisticated Parisian gentleman’s club (meaning something rather different when this was written than what it means in most modern cities). Indeed, there is a portion of the book where the “apeman” seems more like a western spy than the “King of the Jungle.” If you, like me before picking up this edition, have never actually read any of the myriads of Tarzan novels penned by t In the initial pages of this book, John Clayton (aka Jean C. Tarzan) is a sophisticated westerner who is welcome at any sophisticated Parisian gentleman’s club (meaning something rather different when this was written than what it means in most modern cities). Indeed, there is a portion of the book where the “apeman” seems more like a western spy than the “King of the Jungle.” If you, like me before picking up this edition, have never actually read any of the myriads of Tarzan novels penned by the late ERB after the success of Tarzan of the Apes, you will be pleased to know that Tarzan is no James Bond. You may even be relieved to know that Tarzan’s career as a spy was attenuated in rather bad form. But the closing of one door usually results in the opening of another and suddenly, we find ourselves on familiar ground. The Return of Tarzan is the book where the King of the Jungle discovers Opar, the famous City of Gold. I’m presuming it’s the same city that shows up in a later book called Tarzan and the City of Gold and one of the subjects of a Tarzan movie (I saw so many when I was a kid!). It has the familiar jungle priestess trope but it has slavers (I don’t remember those in the Tarzan canon before.) who happen to be ivory poachers (I remember that one in a lot of movies and think they appear in other books.) and a lost civilization. Tarzan does get reunited with characters from the first book at one point and the ending isn’t a huge surprise. One thing I hadn’t realized about ERB before was exactly how skeptical he was about religion (whether Occidental, Oriental, or Pagan). Two statements jumped out at me in this novel. The first was a high priestess who said, “It is the duty of the high priestess to instruct, to interpret—according to the creed that others, wiser than herself, have laid down; but there is nothing in the creed which says that she must believe. The more one knows of one’s religion, the less one believes—no one living knows more of mine than I.” (p. 272) Sadly, I’ve met a few religious practitioners of which this might be true, but I asked myself why they were doing what they were doing. My answer was more cynical than ERB’s. However, I must insist that I’ve known a lot more ministers who were sincere than I have known that were like this high priestess. At another point, there is a great irony because a helpless female is being dragged to a sacrificial altar. She doesn’t know what’s going on and here’s what she thinks just before she sees the bloodstained “table:” “…was she not among the servants of God? It might be, of course, that their interpretation of the supreme being differed from her own, but that they owned a god was sufficient evidence to her that they were kind and good.” (p. 303) The Return of Tarzan is a delightful (albeit shallow and formulaic) escape. I still think the John Carter of Mars series (albeit shallow and formulaic) and the Pellucidar series are ERB’s best work, but I’ll probably read the occasional Tarzan novel as I find them. After all, lots of people think I’m shallow and formulaic, too.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    More 1913 action, adventure, and chivalrous paternal misogynistic attitude than you can spear with a primitive jungle stick! The original ended with Tarzan somehow crossing an ocean and traveling halfway across North America to somehow save his true love in the nick of time, and with him nobly suppressing the facts of his parents and heritage so she could marry the one she was betrothed to and her betrothed would keep his title and fortune. This continues where that left off. I must admit a fond More 1913 action, adventure, and chivalrous paternal misogynistic attitude than you can spear with a primitive jungle stick! The original ended with Tarzan somehow crossing an ocean and traveling halfway across North America to somehow save his true love in the nick of time, and with him nobly suppressing the facts of his parents and heritage so she could marry the one she was betrothed to and her betrothed would keep his title and fortune. This continues where that left off. I must admit a fondness for stories where the guy doesn't get the girl at the end, so I appreciated the first and during a couple parts of this one I was sure it would remain that way. After all, how else do you keep stringing readers along? Similar to Alexandre Dumas' work, you can take a class in intricate plotting, melodrama, and suspense by reading this book. It's a bit cliche, but it works and I enjoyed it. Burroughs brings in his villains quickly and makes them deliciously despicable. Tarzan's strength and ingenuity is rivaled only by the ability of his enemies to keep providing their services as antagonists. And the setting in this story is wider than before, spanning France, more of the African continent than before, and the Atlantic ocean (three times). One selection from the book should say everything you need to know about the style and attitude in the writing: One result of the duel was that they all rode back to Paris together in D'Arnot's car, the best of friends. De Coude was so relieved to have had this double assurance of his wife's loyalty that he felt no rancor at all toward Tarzan. It is true that the latter had assumed much more of the fault than was rightly his, but if he lied a little he may be excused, for he lied in the service of a woman, and he lied like a gentleman. After such a quote I hardly need mention that the second word in the book is "ejaculated" and the opening scene is of a lady unable to resist ogling Tarzan as a magnificent physical specimen. How a duel could have developed out of that is beyond me ;)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Jones

    While I reviewed Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs, I compared the novel to my favorite Disney movie, Tarzan. I found myself enjoying the Tarzan story created by Disney rather than the original Tarzan story by Burroughs. While reading The Return of Tarzan, the sequel of Tarzan of the Apes, I had neither expectations of the plot nor visuals to match the descriptions. For this reason, I enjoyed The Return of Tarzan immensely more than Tarzan of the Apes, especially the further character While I reviewed Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs, I compared the novel to my favorite Disney movie, Tarzan. I found myself enjoying the Tarzan story created by Disney rather than the original Tarzan story by Burroughs. While reading The Return of Tarzan, the sequel of Tarzan of the Apes, I had neither expectations of the plot nor visuals to match the descriptions. For this reason, I enjoyed The Return of Tarzan immensely more than Tarzan of the Apes, especially the further character development of Tarzan. In The Return of Tarzan, Tarzan is attempting to create a new life in the world of men while dealing with Jane’s decision to marry Tarzan’s cousin, William Cecil Clayton. On his voyage back to France, his interference in a villainous plot makes him the enemy of Nikolas Rokoff, his archrival throughout the Tarzan series. As a reward for his chivalrous behavior, he is offered a job for the ministry of war in Algeria, where his adventures with the local Arabs results in his abandonment in the same jungle he called home. While there, he becomes chief of a local African tribe, finds the lost city of Opar, and attains a golden treasure. In an unbelievable sequence of events, Jane, her father, and Clayton are again shipwrecked onto the same jungle as Tarzan. Fortunately for the King of the Apes, the déjà vu will this time favor Tarzan instead of Clayton. Most Tarzan adaptations focus on his ascent from the savage jungle into the civilized world of men as well as his first meeting of Jane Porter. The Return of Tarzan is intriguing because it explores the type of man Tarzan becomes while interacting with other humans. Although I found Jane to be annoyingly perfect, her eventual reunion with Tarzan was satisfying.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Laci

    Tarzan gets the highest rating not because it's a flawless books, but because if you set your expectations correctly, you get exactly what you came for. Want an impeccably polite, smart, stronger than any human or animal, always chivalrous and decent "Forest God" (as he's actually called in the book) that always comes out on top, having adventures? Then by Jove you're in the right place. This sequel also makes up for what it did at the end of the first novel, so there's that. (No need to think a Tarzan gets the highest rating not because it's a flawless books, but because if you set your expectations correctly, you get exactly what you came for. Want an impeccably polite, smart, stronger than any human or animal, always chivalrous and decent "Forest God" (as he's actually called in the book) that always comes out on top, having adventures? Then by Jove you're in the right place. This sequel also makes up for what it did at the end of the first novel, so there's that. (No need to think about the weird laws of nature, or the Lamarckism, or the lions _in a jungle_ and stuff like that. Just enjoy the ride. :) Oh yeah, and seems Burroughs didn't want to overuse the word 'said', so Tarzan is soliloquising and ejaculating all over the place.

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