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From the author of The Fifth Letter comes a controversial and darkly comic story about the frustrations of being a childless woman in the modern baby-obsessed world... . Poppy's world has been tipped sideways: the husband who never wanted children has betrayed her with her broody best friend. At least Annalise is on her side. Her new friend is determined to celebrate their f From the author of The Fifth Letter comes a controversial and darkly comic story about the frustrations of being a childless woman in the modern baby-obsessed world... . Poppy's world has been tipped sideways: the husband who never wanted children has betrayed her with her broody best friend. At least Annalise is on her side. Her new friend is determined to celebrate their freedom from kids, so together they create a Facebook group to meet up with like-minded women, and perhaps vent just an little about smug mummies' privileges at work. Meanwhile, their colleague Frankie would love a night out, away from her darlings - she's not had one this decade and she's heartily sick of being judged by women at the office as well as stay-at-home mums. Then Poppy and Annalise's group takes on a life of its own and frustrated members start confronting mums like Frankie in the real world. Cafés become battlegrounds, playgrounds become war zones and offices have never been so divided. A rivalry that was once harmless fun is spiraling out of control. Because one of their members is a wolf in sheep's clothing. And she has an agenda of her own . . .


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From the author of The Fifth Letter comes a controversial and darkly comic story about the frustrations of being a childless woman in the modern baby-obsessed world... . Poppy's world has been tipped sideways: the husband who never wanted children has betrayed her with her broody best friend. At least Annalise is on her side. Her new friend is determined to celebrate their f From the author of The Fifth Letter comes a controversial and darkly comic story about the frustrations of being a childless woman in the modern baby-obsessed world... . Poppy's world has been tipped sideways: the husband who never wanted children has betrayed her with her broody best friend. At least Annalise is on her side. Her new friend is determined to celebrate their freedom from kids, so together they create a Facebook group to meet up with like-minded women, and perhaps vent just an little about smug mummies' privileges at work. Meanwhile, their colleague Frankie would love a night out, away from her darlings - she's not had one this decade and she's heartily sick of being judged by women at the office as well as stay-at-home mums. Then Poppy and Annalise's group takes on a life of its own and frustrated members start confronting mums like Frankie in the real world. Cafés become battlegrounds, playgrounds become war zones and offices have never been so divided. A rivalry that was once harmless fun is spiraling out of control. Because one of their members is a wolf in sheep's clothing. And she has an agenda of her own . . .

30 review for Those Other Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Deanna

    My reviews can also be seen at: https://deesradreadsandreviews.wordpr... I LOVE books that have anything to do with social media. After reading the description for this novel, I was even more excited to get reading. Poppy Weston has just been betrayed by the two people she trusted most in the world. She didn’t see it coming and it’s left her reeling….and extremely angry. But with the help of her co-worker and new friend, Annalise, Poppy finds an outlet for that anger. However, it’s not long before My reviews can also be seen at: https://deesradreadsandreviews.wordpr... I LOVE books that have anything to do with social media. After reading the description for this novel, I was even more excited to get reading. Poppy Weston has just been betrayed by the two people she trusted most in the world. She didn’t see it coming and it’s left her reeling….and extremely angry. But with the help of her co-worker and new friend, Annalise, Poppy finds an outlet for that anger. However, it’s not long before something that was giving her such satisfaction turns on her and ends up leaving her feeling worse than ever. She’s thankful that she has Annalise, although it seems like Annalise is keeping things from her. Poppy realizes there’s a lot she doesn’t know about her new friend. “Why didn’t she know anything about Annalise beyond the woman she saw in front of her? Why had they never chatted about Annalise’s childhood, her family?” Poppy wonders if she can fully trust Annalise…. Annalise doesn't like to talk about herself or her past. She thinks co-worker, Poppy is a good girl who always follows the rules. But she can clearly see that she has been betrayed and is in pain. It’s something Poppy can’t hide. Annalise wants to help her. But there are things that Poppy doesn’t know about Annalise….things that no one knows. And when something happens that threatens to turn everything in Annalise’s life upside down, she doesn’t know what to do….or who to trust. If she comes clean will she lose Annalise? Frankie is overwhelmed with everything. She can feel the judgment and the disdain that Poppy and Annalise have for her yet she doesn’t know what she did to cause it. Frankie has secrets too. And then comes the worst day of Frankie’s life… The Imposter “Just being logged in under the fake persona made her breathe a sigh of relief” “Did she feel a level of guilt about lying to these women? Yes, of course. But it didn’t last” Who is The Imposter? What do they want? The story is told from multiple perspectives. We hear from Poppy, Annalise, Frankie, and The Imposter. Interspersed throughout the book are Facebook posts, private messages, as well as notebook entries which I thought really added to the story and gave insight into the characters. I found “Those Other Women” honest and realistic in many ways. The author has written a story with relatable characters who have relatable issues. The story deals with relationships and conflicts both online and in real life, and it was a very enjoyable read. I wish a few things had a little more clarification at the end but overall I was really happy with how it all came together. Women can be really hard on themselves and other women. Many of us are so fearful of being judged. And behind the keyboard, it’s often even easier to say what you think/give your opinion. Over the years I’ve seen people say such vicious things to other people on social media. Nothing seems to be off-limits. This really was a very entertaining and well-written domestic drama about social media, family, friendship, secrets, and lies. I’m really looking forward to reading more from Nicola Moriarty. I'd like to thank William Morrow & Company for giving me the opportunity to read this book in exchange for my honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Those Other Women by Nicola Moriarty is a 2018 Penguin publication. A timely and cautionary tale- When Poppy is informed by her lifelong friend that she and Poppy’s husband have been having an affair, which has resulted in a pregnancy, Poppy is blindsided. It’s not just the affair, it’s that she and her husband had both agreed they didn’t want kids. Now she’s been told that he really did want kids after all. When Poppy makes a new friend, Annalise, they decide to create a private Facebook group f Those Other Women by Nicola Moriarty is a 2018 Penguin publication. A timely and cautionary tale- When Poppy is informed by her lifelong friend that she and Poppy’s husband have been having an affair, which has resulted in a pregnancy, Poppy is blindsided. It’s not just the affair, it’s that she and her husband had both agreed they didn’t want kids. Now she’s been told that he really did want kids after all. When Poppy makes a new friend, Annalise, they decide to create a private Facebook group for women without kids- a direct response to a similar group for women who do have children. It’s supposed to be a supportive kind of group, but the comments become mean and vitriolic in no time flat. To make matters worse, there is a mole in the group. Before long the members of the two Facebook groups start and all -out war with one another, and Poppy, who never intended for any of that to happen, gets caught in the middle of it. Meanwhile, Annalise is harboring an explosive secret that, if discovered, could end her friendship with Poppy. Social media is a wonderful place to find like-minded people, to receive and give advice, to support people, to get support. But, there is a dark side of social media, as we all know, and it can quickly get out of control. This is a story that reminds us that even if we think we have a safe place to vent our frustrations, you can not completely count on privacy and you might want to temper yourself before serious damage is done. It is also a story that highlights the various choices women have today and the way some judge others for choosing a path different from theirs. Many women today have chosen to pass on motherhood for many reasons. Others embrace motherhood, while still pursuing a demanding career, while others stay at home. Every one of these options is perfectly fine. But, some non-mothers feel left out, looked down on, as though choosing to forego parenthood is a sin, or that there is something fundamentally wrong with them. I have heard them lament about working moms getting special treatment or extra time off during the work day so they can take care of a sick child or pick their kids up from school or daycare. Mothers may feel entitled to take that time and are unapologetic about missing an important meeting or causing someone else to have to work late or increasing the workload for someone already feeling overwhelmed. I’ve actually heard these arguments, and honest frustrations from both sides. This is why I say this novel is very timely. It is also so realistic I could really see something like this happening. As we will see, both sides have legit arguments, but instead of working through those issues like adults, they lash out, pout, and point fingers and hold grudges. Presumptions and pre-conceived notions, as well, as gossip, secrets, lies and misunderstandings all aided by the rapid, and toxic atmosphere on social media nearly culminated in the ultimate cat fight. But, without giving too much away, the ladies on both sides of the pond will discover how petty their worries really are. I loved the way this story ended. Ladies, we are all on the same team here. We all experience difficulties and challenges on a daily basis because we are women. The last thing we need is a bunch of infighting. Let’s be good to each other, support each other, and most importantly let’s respect each other. You never know what someone is going through or what challenges they are facing. In the big scheme of things, working through our differences so that we can help people in far more serious circumstances is a goal we should all strive to achieve. Count your blessings and give your sisters in spirt a virtual hug and a little encouragement. We're all in this thing together!! 4 stars

  3. 4 out of 5

    Crumb

    Let the claws come out and the hair come down! This one is a catty, women's fiction romp fest. It was just another ordinary day in Poppy's life. She certainly didn't expect to come home and be face to face with the worst news of her life. Her best friend and her husband. Affair. Poppy could barely process these words as they were tumbling out of their mouths. Distraught and disheartened, Poppy begins looking online for support groups. The issue however, is that she is only finding support groups Let the claws come out and the hair come down! This one is a catty, women's fiction romp fest. It was just another ordinary day in Poppy's life. She certainly didn't expect to come home and be face to face with the worst news of her life. Her best friend and her husband. Affair. Poppy could barely process these words as they were tumbling out of their mouths. Distraught and disheartened, Poppy begins looking online for support groups. The issue however, is that she is only finding support groups for mothers. Filled with even more rage, Poppy decides that she will start an online group for women who don't ever want to be mothers. Pretty harmless, right . . . This book was mediocre. Sure, it kept my attention, however, I wasn't truly invested in any one of the characters. The protagonist, Poppy, didn't have any distinguishable traits that made me think "I love this girl!" When I'm reading, I always find it more enjoyable when I can relate or at the very least, like the person I'm reading about. This was not the case here. I did enjoy, however, the drama. If I could equate this to a television show, the Real Housewives franchise comes to mind. My guilty pleasure is watching the Real Housewives drunkenly make fools of themselves on national television. In this novel, it was a delight to see the characters act in a similar manner. The cattiness was off the charts, ya'll. There wasn't anything wrong with Those Other Women, but at the same time, there wasn't anything so right about it either. Will I remember this book in a week? Probably. In a month? Fat chance.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nicola

    Look, after reading and re-reading this book about thirty times over the course of six months, I have the admit, the story started to get a tad predictable, but that said, I'll still have to give it five stars because of my fragile ego.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sandy *The world could end while I was reading and I would never notice*

    EXCERPT: Poppy and Garret's separation was pretty easy. No kids, no pets, no mortgage. Separate bank accounts, one car each. And their rental lease had been due for renewal. There was a shared savings account they'd each been depositing money into to buy a house one day, and they simply split it down the middle. Admittedly, Poppy earned a little more than Garret, so she'd probably put more money into the account than he had, but she didn't care. She didn’t want to have any arguments. She didn’t EXCERPT: Poppy and Garret's separation was pretty easy. No kids, no pets, no mortgage. Separate bank accounts, one car each. And their rental lease had been due for renewal. There was a shared savings account they'd each been depositing money into to buy a house one day, and they simply split it down the middle. Admittedly, Poppy earned a little more than Garret, so she'd probably put more money into the account than he had, but she didn't care. She didn’t want to have any arguments. She didn’t want to delay things any more than she had to. She just wanted to get Garret and Karleen out of her life as quickly as possible. Garret got the sofa; Poppy never liked that pattern anyway. Poppy got the coffee table - it was an antique from her grandmother. Garret got the bed. Poppy got the bedroom furniture. Garret got the coffee machine and Poppy got the kettle. Garret got the toaster and Poppy took the blender. And of course, Garret not only kept his best man from the wedding - his mate from high school - but he cleaned up with the maid of honour too. How nice for him to collect the set. ABOUT THIS BOOK: From the author of The Fifth Letter comes a controversial and darkly comic story about the frustrations of being a childless woman in the modern baby-obsessed world . . . Poppy's world has been tipped sideways: the husband who never wanted children has betrayed her with her broody best friend. At least Annalise is on her side. Her new friend is determined to celebrate their freedom from kids, so together they create a Facebook group to meet up with like-minded women, and perhaps vent just a little about smug mummies' privileges at work. Meanwhile their colleague Frankie would love a night out, away from her darlings - she's not had one this decade and she's heartily sick of being judged by women at the office as well as stay-at-home mums. Then Poppy and Annalise's group takes on a life of its own and frustrated members start confronting mums like Frankie in the real world. Cafés become battlegrounds, playgrounds become warzones and offices have never been so divided. A rivalry that was once harmless fun is spiralling out of control. Because one of their members is a wolf in sheep's clothing. And she has an agenda of her own . . . MY THOUGHTS: I have often said that being a mother is the most demanding job in the world. If you are lucky you have a great support network, family, friends and, these days, the Internet. But not everyone wants to be a parent, and the decision not to have children seems the most difficult one for family members and society as a whole to accept. These women are often treated as 'oddities', outcasts, while secretly being envied their 'freedom'. Nicola Moriarty has woven a tale of two distinct lifestyle groups, their petty rivalries and erroneous judgements of the others motivations and feelings. She writes about the mothers who resent the career women with their apparent lack of ties, and the career women who resent the mothers for their apparent lack of commitment to the job, about how a few ill-judged words in the heat of the moment pitted woman against woman, sister against sister, friend against friend, and just how far some of those women are prepared to go to denigrate the others choices. And what it takes for them to realise that the grass is really the same shade of green both sides of the fence. This is my first book by Nicola Moriarty, and I am not sure exactly what I was expecting. And I am having trouble deciding exactly what I felt about this book. It was, in parts, amusing. I did have trouble with the concept that two groups of women would literally come to blows over defending their decision to have or not have children, though I guess world wars have been started with little more provocation. Moriarty has demonstrated a good understanding of the feelings and motivations of a wide range of women with differing lifestyles. But somehow, I just didn't get immersed in this book. I felt like I was ' reading a book '. Yes, I know that is exactly what I was doing, but I like to feel that I am right in there with the characters, and this just didn’t happen. However, there was nothing I actively disliked about Those Other Women, and overall I enjoyed the read, so 3.5 stars. Thank you to Harper Collins Publishers Australia via Netgalley for providing a digital copy of Those Other Women by Nicola Moriarty for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions. Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the 'about' page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system. This review and others are also published on my blog sandysbookaday.wordpress.com https://sandysbookaday.wordpress.com/...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    My first book by Nicola Moriarty and I wasn’t disappointed. The characters, situations and places all had an authentic and relatable ring to them. Being from Sydney I got a kick out of recognising some of the places mentioned and I could perfectly visualise the scenarios. The story follows two different groups of women, a mother’s online group and a non mother’s group which end up pitting against each other often with disastrous results. The book offers a real insight to the way we women tend to My first book by Nicola Moriarty and I wasn’t disappointed. The characters, situations and places all had an authentic and relatable ring to them. Being from Sydney I got a kick out of recognising some of the places mentioned and I could perfectly visualise the scenarios. The story follows two different groups of women, a mother’s online group and a non mother’s group which end up pitting against each other often with disastrous results. The book offers a real insight to the way we women tend to judge each other cruelly and unnecessarily and we often get into our own heads and project our own insecurities onto each other. The truth is everyone is struggling to keep it together! The ending offers a heartwarming conclusion and I am happy to have added this to my read list. It’s also no doubt that these Moriarty sisters are genetically talented writers. I say more please! A special thanks to Netgalley and HarperCollins Publishers Australia for my review copy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    This was a light, easy read about a whole bunch of people who I am very glad I do not know! We meet Poppy first who one day, totally unexpectedly, loses her husband to another woman who wants children. Poppy does not and when she makes a friend who claims to feel the same way they create a private Facebook group for like minded women. The scene is set for what turns into a huge catfight between those who do and those who do not wish to procreate. The author makes her point that woman can be each o This was a light, easy read about a whole bunch of people who I am very glad I do not know! We meet Poppy first who one day, totally unexpectedly, loses her husband to another woman who wants children. Poppy does not and when she makes a friend who claims to feel the same way they create a private Facebook group for like minded women. The scene is set for what turns into a huge catfight between those who do and those who do not wish to procreate. The author makes her point that woman can be each others best friends and they can also be their worst enemies. There is a lot of cattiness but also a lot of humour and in the end, of course, a better understanding. Not my favourite of Nicola Moriarty's books so far but still a valid way to spend a rainy afternoon.

  8. 5 out of 5

    PattyMacDotComma

    3.5★ “‘You need a change. I think you should do something radical,’ Annalise had said. ‘Get an undercut with patterns shaved into it! Dye it blue!’ ‘Are you kidding me? You could get away with shaving the side of your head, I’d just look like I’d been in a terrible accident or had brain surgery.’” Poppy is a happily married young woman whose life changes instantly when the rug is pulled out from under her. She’s got a good job, has no kids, plays competitive soccer, and finds a new bestie at work 3.5★ “‘You need a change. I think you should do something radical,’ Annalise had said. ‘Get an undercut with patterns shaved into it! Dye it blue!’ ‘Are you kidding me? You could get away with shaving the side of your head, I’d just look like I’d been in a terrible accident or had brain surgery.’” Poppy is a happily married young woman whose life changes instantly when the rug is pulled out from under her. She’s got a good job, has no kids, plays competitive soccer, and finds a new bestie at work in Annalise (who suggests the makeover above). She and Annalise are getting fed up with the married women who take family time off, leave work early to pick kids up, and generally seem to take advantage of motherhood to wangle free time and expect the single women to pick up the slack. There is a Facebook group for mums, so they decided to start one for women without kids so they can support each other in their wish to NOT have children for reasons of their own. They want a place where they can speak freely without having to listen to some well-meaning friend or mother or sister warning them they aren’t getting any younger and they’ll change their minds. Get-togethers with family or friends all mean going somewhere the kids can play, and yell, and spill food on everyone. Poppy and Annalise just want some child-free zones where they can have a coffee and conversation without having to listen to tantrums or be bumped by prams. Well, not just coffee. The wine flows fairly freely, but to be fair, a lot of it is being consumed by frazzled mums. As a wine-lover who regularly suffers through DryJuly, I feel a little like this myself sometimes. “One day every week, Annalise doesn’t drink. She figures it’s pretty impressive – her level of restraint. People ought to hold a parade for her. One day out of seven when she doesn’t consume alcohol.” There are side stories, back stories, and sneaky business with women infiltrating each other’s Facebook groups and starting rumours. It's duelling Facebook posts at 20 paces. Women are a funny lot. “Sometimes that’s what a new friendship between women was like – a touch of flirtatiousness. Mutual attraction. Didn’t have to be sexual. Could be if you wanted it.” I very much enjoyed the beginning, I liked the believable characters, and I thought it had a promising storyline. Unfortunately, I wasn’t surprised by the ‘secret’ story, and the way one of the women stumbles across it is far too convenient. I expected more. There will be plenty of readers who will enjoy the way everything ties up neatly at the end, I’m sure. Thanks to NetGalley and HarperCollins Australia for the copy for review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bianca

    While it's true that sometimes it feels that women are their own and each others' worst enemies, it's also women, be it mothers and grandmothers, friends or acquaintances, who help in meaningful ways, for longer periods. So, yeah, we are a complex, crazy bunch, sometimes we feel "too much", give too much, expect too much, and definitely do too much. We are also extremely apt at splitting hairs and dwelling on things and agonising over what others might perceive as unimportant things etc. Details While it's true that sometimes it feels that women are their own and each others' worst enemies, it's also women, be it mothers and grandmothers, friends or acquaintances, who help in meaningful ways, for longer periods. So, yeah, we are a complex, crazy bunch, sometimes we feel "too much", give too much, expect too much, and definitely do too much. We are also extremely apt at splitting hairs and dwelling on things and agonising over what others might perceive as unimportant things etc. Details matter to us; we have insecurities that we take on others, usually other women, whom we judge, sometimes harshly. Some say it's got an anthropological explanation, including the damn patriarchy. Anyway, things are complicated and complex, something that Nicola Moriarty manages to convey brilliantly in this novel. Social media is a conduit for connectivity but also for causing trouble. It offers women a way of connecting, but then cliques are formed and they can get nasty. Mothers vs non-mothers, criticising each other, not really seeing each others' points of view or merits. Mothers who fantasize not being mothers, not having to make a million and one decisions, not having to put up with the constant demands of little people, the demands of work, school, home - feeling that there's nothing left of themselves. The non-mothers, having to defend constantly their choice not to be mothers - because, there are women who choose not to become mothers - but society still has an issue with that. Go figure! They don't care much if a man chooses not to become a father, but should a woman be childless, is she still a woman, is she still whole etc. It's funny how we expect everyone to be like us, is it so that they reinforce the fact that we made the right choice? Why do we care if someone doesn't toe the line? Anyway, I'm going on a tangent, again ... This was my first Nicola Moriarty novel and it was well worth my time. In case you're wondering, Nicola and Liane are sisters. If I remember correctly, there's another sister who's a writer. That's one good gene pool! The messages I took away from this novel are universal: we all have crap in our lives, we all think the grass is greener on the other side, and ... don't post anything on social media when you're angry and/or under the influence - things can go crrraaazzzzy. Anyway, I'll make sure to read more by Nicola Moriarty as I found this relatable and quite enjoyable. This goes towards my Aussie Authors Challenge 2018 on www.bookloverbookreviews.com

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ova - Excuse My Reading

    When you want to read a light but gripping, lovely chick-lit book, Moriarty sisters never let you down. Nicola Moriarty has a witty and entertaining tone. I loved the way she described the 'hipster' cafes: In a time when most cafes had gone full hipster - everything organic, staff with beanies and thick glasses, and seats made out of tree stumps or milk crates - the cafe next to Cormack was unapologetically ... plain. Everything on the menu had gluten in it, there was no fancy coffee art on top of When you want to read a light but gripping, lovely chick-lit book, Moriarty sisters never let you down. Nicola Moriarty has a witty and entertaining tone. I loved the way she described the 'hipster' cafes: In a time when most cafes had gone full hipster - everything organic, staff with beanies and thick glasses, and seats made out of tree stumps or milk crates - the cafe next to Cormack was unapologetically ... plain. Everything on the menu had gluten in it, there was no fancy coffee art on top of the cappuccinos and no quirky 1950s style names for the meals. No beards, no fedoras, no kale. The novel is about motherhood and friendship. Poppy's husband betrays her with her life-long best friend. Back-stabbed twice, she tries to keep her chin up. Her colleague Annalise replaces as her new best-friend but there is an air of mystery around her. The duo set up a Facebook group together, NOP, which embraces the women who doesn't want to be mothers. The group quickly seen as a rival to an existing group for mums, called MOP. It doesn't take long that events get out of control. This was such a fun read; and lots of delightful conversations about what mothers, and non-mothers go through. You get judged either way, with or without children. Funny but true! I liked Annalise and her honest, brave and crazy personality. everyone needs a friend like her. Thanks to NetGalley and Penguin UK for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Elle's Book Blog

    Release Date: June 26, 2018 Genre: Women's Fiction Actual Rating: 4 stars Those Other Women is an authentic and accurate novel about women. More specifically, moms versus non moms. It captures the feelings of those who have children and those who never wanted them to begin with. It allows readers to ponder their feelings on the subject and shows us what it's like to be on both sides of the fence. Overall, I truly enjoyed this novel. In fact, I was so absorbed in the story that one minute I wa Release Date: June 26, 2018 Genre: Women's Fiction Actual Rating: 4 stars Those Other Women is an authentic and accurate novel about women. More specifically, moms versus non moms. It captures the feelings of those who have children and those who never wanted them to begin with. It allows readers to ponder their feelings on the subject and shows us what it's like to be on both sides of the fence. Overall, I truly enjoyed this novel. In fact, I was so absorbed in the story that one minute I was just sitting down to start it and the next I was reading the final chapter. It's original, interesting, and has a thrilling air about it. For those who are looking for a women's fiction novel that processes real women's issues I recommend this one. This isn't the first novel I have read by the author and after this is certainly won't be my last. I think many will agree. Nicola is a fine writer and this novel proves it. Those Other Women, how can I sum up this novel better then the synopsis? I can't really, but will give it a try. This book is told in dual POV's by parts. The first is told in Poppy's POV. She recently found out her husband and best friend were having an affair, and now having a baby. Poppy was never one to want kids, and although devastated by the betrayal, moves on with her life. However, moving on to Poppy doesn't simply mean cutting these two out of her life. Instead, she starts a "non mom" group where women can come together. Women who DON'T want children. They share their stories, their fears, feelings about moms and their children, and more. Unfortunately, it causes causes a lot of backlash between her group and a moms only group. And fighting between who knows best "moms or non moms" ensues. Annalise is the next women who plays a big role in the novel. She is a non mom just like Poppy and the two seem to hit it off. But Annalise is hiding a secret. And it has the potential to screw up no only their friendship, but their little group as well. Finally, readers will learn about some non moms. Frankie, who plays a key role in the novel, is a mom with two children. She learns of their little non moms group and decides to join out of curiosity. But when things become heated between two groups, she causes irrevocable consequences. Women's fiction fans, this is a fantastic novel with a set of interesting and lifelike characters. It tackles the issue of motherhood and non motherhood, along with the effects of social media. If you are looking for a book to get lost in, one that could make a perfect fit for your beach or travel bags, this is one you will want to grab! I very much recommend it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    It's so hard for women to get it right - in their own eyes and in those of the people around them. If they choose not to work when their children are young, they feel they are looked down on by those women around them with careers and expected to be the ones to volunteer for school fundraisers and sports day. Women trying to juggle work and child-raising feel they are judged as selfish by the Mums who don't work and not serious about their careers by working women without children. And those who It's so hard for women to get it right - in their own eyes and in those of the people around them. If they choose not to work when their children are young, they feel they are looked down on by those women around them with careers and expected to be the ones to volunteer for school fundraisers and sports day. Women trying to juggle work and child-raising feel they are judged as selfish by the Mums who don't work and not serious about their careers by working women without children. And those who decide not to have children - well they feel everyone with children thinks they are selfish and self-centred. Women just can't win! In this entertaining novel, the main character, Poppy who does not want to have children, loses her life-long best friend and her husband in one fell sweep when they fall in love, her best friend becomes pregnant and her husband decides he does want children after all. Hurting and furious Poppy is talked into starting a new Facebook Group for women who don't want to have children by Annalise, a new friend from work. There is already a Facebook Group for Mums in the area and with a spy in the non-mothers group, it's not long before the two groups start to snipe at each other over their lifestyle choices and open hostilities start to flare up. Nicola Moriarty has written an engaging look at all sides of the coin on the issue of juggling careers and children. With her light and often humorous touch, she has captured the women's voices and points of views perfectly and melded social media with everyday life and the womens' experiences. 3.5★

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Metcalf

    3.5 stars Those Other Women is the sort of book I enjoy immersing myself in and for the space of a day that's exactly what I did. Billed as thriller/psychological it definitely had an Australian contemporary womens fiction feel to it - which I love. From the first page I was caught up in the drama as Poppy was blindsided by her husband Garrett and best friend Karleen's affair. I couldn't stop turning the pages as Poppy came to terms with their betrayal, of the news they were expecting a baby - th 3.5 stars Those Other Women is the sort of book I enjoy immersing myself in and for the space of a day that's exactly what I did. Billed as thriller/psychological it definitely had an Australian contemporary womens fiction feel to it - which I love. From the first page I was caught up in the drama as Poppy was blindsided by her husband Garrett and best friend Karleen's affair. I couldn't stop turning the pages as Poppy came to terms with their betrayal, of the news they were expecting a baby - though Poppy and Garret had always agreed they never wanted children. With new friend Annalise by her side, Poppy sets about building a new life, and creating an online group for Non-Mothers. This was a story filled to the brim with multi dimensional, mostly likeable but realistically flawed female characters. It shone a light on the possible perils and pitfalls of social media, even for grown women. It was about the differences between childless women and mothers of all shapes and sizes but perhaps more than all of that it was about friendships and the need for women to support each other. A great offering from Aussie author Nicola Moriarty - sister to two other talented Moriarty sisters (Liane & Jaclyn). Thanks to William Morrow HarperCollins Publishers and Edelweiss for the digital review copy in exchange for an honest review which it was my pleasure to provide.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    It's all very well promising to write a review in return for a copy of a book, but this is where it gets difficult. I didn't like 'Those Other Women.' Please bear with me here because I have read through many other reviews that have praised it and provided excellent scores and I do seem to be very much in the minority. As I always say, mine is an entirely subjective point of view, and perhaps it wasn't the right time for me to read this book and enjoy it, or maybe it just isn't for me. Who knows It's all very well promising to write a review in return for a copy of a book, but this is where it gets difficult. I didn't like 'Those Other Women.' Please bear with me here because I have read through many other reviews that have praised it and provided excellent scores and I do seem to be very much in the minority. As I always say, mine is an entirely subjective point of view, and perhaps it wasn't the right time for me to read this book and enjoy it, or maybe it just isn't for me. Who knows. I can however provide a reasonable explanation of exactly why I didn't like this book. I didn't like the characters; they were snarky (this is a brilliant American word that says it all!) and unkind, and I just didn't want to spend time in their company. An awful lot of time was spent on Facebook worrying about what other people on Facebook thought - people that the characters had never even met! I have many concerns about the hold that Facebook has over peoples' lives, and in particular those who are growing up without ever having lived in a world where Facebook and other social media didn't exist. I'm sure that Nicola Moriarty was using her book as a platform to make this point about Facebook, but again, I didn't want to spend time in the company of characters who spent all their time worrying about the people in a cyber world rather than the real one they actually inhabited. I'm sure the fact that the book affected me as it did, means that the author has been successful in highlighting a very real problem with the modern world that has touched a nerve in me so that I couldn't enjoy what I was reading. Readers! Read 'Those Other Women,' and make up your own minds!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ova - Excuse My Reading

    When you want to read a light but gripping, lovely chick-lit book, Moriarty sisters never let you down. Nicola Moriarty has a witty and entertaining tone. I loved the way she described the 'hipster' cafes: In a time when most cafes had gone full hipster - everything organic, staff with beanies and thick glasses, and seats made out of tree stumps or milk crates - the cafe next to Cormack was unapologetically ... plain. Everything on the menu had gluten in it, there was no fancy coffee art on top of When you want to read a light but gripping, lovely chick-lit book, Moriarty sisters never let you down. Nicola Moriarty has a witty and entertaining tone. I loved the way she described the 'hipster' cafes: In a time when most cafes had gone full hipster - everything organic, staff with beanies and thick glasses, and seats made out of tree stumps or milk crates - the cafe next to Cormack was unapologetically ... plain. Everything on the menu had gluten in it, there was no fancy coffee art on top of the cappuccinos and no quirky 1950s style names for the meals. No beards, no fedoras, no kale. The novel is about motherhood and friendship. Poppy's husband betrays her with her life-long best friend. Back-stabbed twice, she tries to keep her chin up. Her colleague Annalise replaces as her new best-friend but there is an air of mystery around her. The duo set up a Facebook group together, NOP, which embraces the women who doesn't want to be mothers. The group quickly seen as a rival to an existing group for mums, called MOP. It doesn't take long that events get out of control. This was such a fun read; and lots of delightful conversations about what mothers, and non-mothers go through. You get judged either way, with or without children. Funny but true! I liked Annalise and her honest, brave and crazy personality. everyone needs a friend like her. Thanks to NetGalley and Penguin UK for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Anze

    Poppy comes home one day to find her husband and best friend waiting for her. They inform her that they have been having an affair, are in love and now are expecting a baby. Poppy is taken aback and deeply hurt. She and her husband had agreed that they did not want children and she still feels that way. To deal with her pain, her new friend Annalise encourages her to start a non-mom group on Facebook for women that choose to remain child-less. Soon Poppy's group starts begins having conflicts wi Poppy comes home one day to find her husband and best friend waiting for her. They inform her that they have been having an affair, are in love and now are expecting a baby. Poppy is taken aback and deeply hurt. She and her husband had agreed that they did not want children and she still feels that way. To deal with her pain, her new friend Annalise encourages her to start a non-mom group on Facebook for women that choose to remain child-less. Soon Poppy's group starts begins having conflicts with the Facebook mom group in the same area. What started out as an outlet to vent is turning into an open war. Seeking a change in pace, I picked what I thought was going to be a lighter read. While this is a quick and easy read, I would not describe it as light. Poppy is heartbroken to learn of her husband's infidelity and even more shocked to discover that he did want children after all. Needing an outlet to vent, Poppy and Annalise create a private non-mom group on Facebook. It starts out as harmless fun, a place where these women can share their thoughts but soon their private conversations are being leaked to the mom group on Facebook (of the same area). There is an impostor in Poppy's group and the sharing of private information leads to public confrontations between mom and non-moms. As I stated before, this is a quick read which starts out as fun but covers relevant issues. With multiple POV's, we learn that everyone is hiding something. Drama ensues and it was fun watching it unfold. I liked this book though at times I found it hard to believe and somewhat predictable. Still, it was a good change of pace. It seems that no matter what women do, we can not win. This narrative explores the assumptions, choices and harsh judgements under which women live when they choose to have/not have children. There are compelling arguments for both and it definitely is not a decision to be taken lightly. If nothing else, this narrative shined a light on an argument that has beeen ongoing for a long time. Bottom line, we should simply respect each other and our choices.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bookread2day

    Absolutely heartbreaking. Poppy's best friend Karleen who was her maid of honour is a back stabbing bitch she's having an affair with Poppy's husband Garret. Too make Poppy's heart hurt even more she always thought that her and Garret had agreement that they both didn't want kids, but now Karleen tells Poppy that Garret does what kids. I'm always the happiest reading about marriage problems, but The Other Women certainly broke my heart for Poppy. Plenty more is ready for Poppy Weston with a grou Absolutely heartbreaking. Poppy's best friend Karleen who was her maid of honour is a back stabbing bitch she's having an affair with Poppy's husband Garret. Too make Poppy's heart hurt even more she always thought that her and Garret had agreement that they both didn't want kids, but now Karleen tells Poppy that Garret does what kids. I'm always the happiest reading about marriage problems, but The Other Women certainly broke my heart for Poppy. Plenty more is ready for Poppy Weston with a group that is a secret from the general public. So much more happens in this page turning story. In March 2017 I did say that after reading The Fifth Letter by Nicola Moriarty that I would like to read her next book and here I have kept to my word. I highly recommend reading The Fifth Letter and Those Other Women. Well you can all count on me I will most certainly be reading the next novel by Nicola Moriarty.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chandra Claypool (wherethereadergrows)

    How refreshing it is to read a book where there are women who don't want children, never wanted children and don't feel the need to apologize for it. But also gives you a full circle look at women who do have children and the struggles each side goes through. Yes, each side. Although, we all are women and should be supporting each other (and I hope that we do), I'm never going to fully know what a mother goes through and (some) mothers will never understand that I can be completely fulfilled wit How refreshing it is to read a book where there are women who don't want children, never wanted children and don't feel the need to apologize for it. But also gives you a full circle look at women who do have children and the struggles each side goes through. Yes, each side. Although, we all are women and should be supporting each other (and I hope that we do), I'm never going to fully know what a mother goes through and (some) mothers will never understand that I can be completely fulfilled without having children in my life. I admit I've been irritated at children who run amok, are rude, who kick the back of my chair on a flight and their parents do absolutely nothing about it. Then I have friends who are mothers and I understand that sometimes it's just all TOO MUCH. What I found best about this book was not necessarily these issues, but the friendships between women and each one's struggle to find balance. No one's life is perfect and we could all take a step back before judging someone based on an isolated incident or something we see out of the corner of our eye. Let's be real though, we all judge, well all assume.. it's human nature. It's how to act on what you think or feel that makes a difference. And dealing with a devastating break up is NEVER easy and we don't (usually) make the best decisions afterwards. Poppy is a strong character and I love her HUMAN-ness. Mothers, don't assume that a woman who doesn't have children, whether she ever wanted to or not, is less fulfilled, jealous or "missing out". And non-mothers, don't assume you know half of what a mother's life is about. This book was so cute - MOP/NOP... the intricacies of relationships, friendships... how social media is really taking over our worlds.. but how it also helps to bring together communities. Thoroughly enjoyed this read. Thank you to William Morrow for this copy!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I was excited to read a book about a friendship between two childfree women, as someone who doesn't want children myself and has a deep appreciation for my friends who aren't consumed by motherhood at this point in our lives. I got about halfway when I started to have a bad feeling, so I skipped to the end. I can't say much more without a spoiler tag, but I will say it's not a bad book, but it wasn't what I wanted it to be, and perhaps I shouldn't have expected to get the perfect book about chil I was excited to read a book about a friendship between two childfree women, as someone who doesn't want children myself and has a deep appreciation for my friends who aren't consumed by motherhood at this point in our lives. I got about halfway when I started to have a bad feeling, so I skipped to the end. I can't say much more without a spoiler tag, but I will say it's not a bad book, but it wasn't what I wanted it to be, and perhaps I shouldn't have expected to get the perfect book about childfree women from someone who is a mother. (view spoiler)[I JUST KNEW ONE OF THEM WAS GOING TO END UP PREGNANT 😡 There's nothing wrong with that, and maybe it's not even totally unrealistic--some people do change their minds, but I was hoping for a book about two friends who started out and ended up happily childfree, so I was not here for this. Once I found out that I wasn't going to get what I wanted, I quit, because that was the main reason I picked this book up. (hide spoiler)]

  20. 4 out of 5

    Agi

    "Those Other Women" by Nicola Moriarty introduces us to two different groups of women - one of them is a mother's online group, so - called MOP, and the other one is NOP, the non - mothers' one. The second group has been established by one of our main characters, Poppy, who's tired with - as she thinks - mothers being favoured everywhere and, basically, having it all easier - like getting holidays, finishing their work earlier and so on. Also, Poppy's husband has betrayed her with her best frien "Those Other Women" by Nicola Moriarty introduces us to two different groups of women - one of them is a mother's online group, so - called MOP, and the other one is NOP, the non - mothers' one. The second group has been established by one of our main characters, Poppy, who's tired with - as she thinks - mothers being favoured everywhere and, basically, having it all easier - like getting holidays, finishing their work earlier and so on. Also, Poppy's husband has betrayed her with her best friend and they're now expecting a baby - A BABY! It's like double back - stabbing, as they've decided they never want babies, right? Poppy befriends a work colleague Annalise and they both set up this other online group, NOP - this group embraces those women who doesn't want children. Not those, who can't have children because... but those who just don't want to have them. The groups end up working against each other, with disastrous and dangerous results, which Poppy and Annalise haven't seen coming - they wanted a positive place where you can meet same minded women from the neighbourhood, and not this... war? The characters were very realistic. They weren't perfect, they were full of flaws but it made them much more multi dimensional. Poppy was much more likeable character than Annalise in my opinion. While we get Poppy's story immediately, it takes time to learn more about Annalise and her background but I think it's not the reason that it took me so long to warm to her, and actually I've never warmed to her completely. It was not the fact she was keeping secrets, it was not the fact she was so abrupt, she was just like hedgehog, keeping everyone at bay. Sure, she had her reasons, I really did get them, and I felt sorry for her in the end but I just had a feeling that she's pushing everyone off, me included. I'm only happy that I'm not a member of such group - though, of course, you can't avoid being a member in any group those times. Reading the posts, I really often wonder if those grown people don't have other problems, or maybe that they're just too bored, and I'm happy that I have my own real life, with real problems and the times when I was worrying what people there think about me are long, long gone. It is a multi - layered story, told from different points of view, and I really liked this way of narration, as we got an insight into the groups and the way the characters were ticking and what was happening in their lives. It sometimes read like three different stories, but in the end they all came smoothly together. It also showed me that life isn't as easy as we'd like it to be, that nothing is white or black, that there are the shades of grey and there are always two sides of the story. It's easy to take sides but the truth is always somewhere in between. I'm not sure what to think about the end and about the "mole", to be honest. Yes, I was wondering who it might be, I was suspecting almost all of the characters and I didn't guess it, however the moment of reveal didn't knock the life out of me and was not as much a wow - moment as oh, ok - moment. Personally I think that "Those Other Women" was a better story than Nicola Moriarty's debut novel. It is thought - provoking and it made me think really hard. It also touches upon this still controversial topic of women who are not mothers, for whatever reason. My opinion is: live and let live. I hate judging women on the fact of them having children or not. There are thousand reasons why they're childless and all other people should respect it, period. It's actually unbelievable that so many still think that being a mother defines a woman, it's so wrong on so many levels and it is cruel and unfair to label and stereotype. It is a bold and brave book about friendship and motherhood, all sides of motherhood, but also giving insight into what life is being childless and I liked the fact that the author didn't judge her characters - well, the readers can do that on their own, and I think it's a fact that not matter what and who you are, you're going to be judged. It examines and asks if women really need to be mothers to be considered "complete" women, it asks question why the women do not support each other, no matter what their family status is, and why it is actually expected from women to be mothers, no matter what. It was complex, sometimes funny, sometimes sad read, also about consequences of social - media interactions, about empathy and coming together. Recommended! Copy provided by the publisher in return for an honest review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mish

    Wow! What a book! I thrived over the drama but at the same time, as a woman, I found the truth and honestly of the story rather confronting. Brilliant concept creating by Nicola Moriarty about women attacking other women. Judging and confronting women over their life choices and parenting skills - bad parent because you can’t control your loud child; jealously over working mums flexibility in the workplace; mums looking down at other mums because they’ve chosen to work or not to work. But the ju Wow! What a book! I thrived over the drama but at the same time, as a woman, I found the truth and honestly of the story rather confronting. Brilliant concept creating by Nicola Moriarty about women attacking other women. Judging and confronting women over their life choices and parenting skills - bad parent because you can’t control your loud child; jealously over working mums flexibility in the workplace; mums looking down at other mums because they’ve chosen to work or not to work. But the judgment and assumptions don’t stop at only mums. There are the women who’ve chosen not to have any children, but everyone assumes they will change their minds one day or because they can’t conceive. Poppy was one of those women, a non-mum who doesn’t have a maternal instinct in her body to have any children, and is fed up with people and family thinking otherwise, and questioning her decision. She was also quite annoyed with the mothers at the work place, believing they had an advantage over everyone else by leaving early to pick up the kids, days off for sick child etc. After being betrayed by her husband and her best friend, Poppy befriends Annalise a work colleague who also doesn’t have an interest in having children either. When Poppy found out about the online mother’s group called ‘MOP’, and the fact that she didn’t qualify, her and Annalise decided to form their own group, a non-mother’s group called ‘NOP’. NOP was a Facebook page for like-minded women and a friendly place for non-mums to organise meet ups, talk, share advice. But everything changed one drunken night when Poppy vented online and posted a challenge for all non-mums, which caused the MOP online group to explode! Being a mother myself, I was very fortunate to be surrounded by supportive and helpful women in my life, when my daughter was young. However I do recall being so fragile at the time. Riddled with guilt because I didn’t pick up the signs when she was sick. Or embarrassed and confused when I couldn’t control her temper tantrums in public. But that’s long gone and looking back I’m proud of myself as a mum. But if a stranger openly confronted me in public at the time, judging my parenting skills I would absolutely crumble. In this book we see all sides of women choices and arguments, and how wrongly they can easily be judge, forming a false picture in ones mind of what someone is like by just one scenario or a comment. Sometime it’s less obvious, it could be a lift of the eyebrow, giving someone the general idea of what you really think of them. I found Poppy and Annalise to be like that. Hypocrites, childish and nasty women who felt it’s right to backstab, and form an negative opinion about mums at work, yet don’t like it done to themselves and uncomfortable about other NOP members doing the same – due to the response to Poppy’s online post. I do have to give them credit though. When confronted about the nasty behaviour or misjudgement, they owned up to it, admitted their error and were genuinely remorseful. Frankie, on the other hand is someone I could relate too. A mum like me, juggling work, home life, loves her children but who occasionally wants to escape family life and be herself. The ending was surprisingly heartbreaking but uplifting. Makes you proud of the lengths that these women will go through to help another women in strife. Thoroughly compulsive read. I highly recommend it. Thanks to the publishers and Netgalley for my review copy.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    3.5/5 I think most of us are are guilty of watching drama unfold online in various groups, I know I sure am and reading this was exactly like having a front row seat at someone else’s virtual cat fight. The mommy wars are nonstop arguing and bickering about how to parent the right way, but what if the fighting was actually not only between the mothers themselves but divided between those who have children and those who actively chose not to? An interesting premise to say the least and one that wa 3.5/5 I think most of us are are guilty of watching drama unfold online in various groups, I know I sure am and reading this was exactly like having a front row seat at someone else’s virtual cat fight. The mommy wars are nonstop arguing and bickering about how to parent the right way, but what if the fighting was actually not only between the mothers themselves but divided between those who have children and those who actively chose not to? An interesting premise to say the least and one that was rife with backstabbing, betrayals, secrets and lies. While this was a super light and easy read I did appreciate that the author dove into some relevant issues surrounding womanhood in a unique way. The vast majority of WF seems to highlight women with children or who are desperate to have children and are struggling and while I can definitely relate to those types of characters, it was refreshing to read about the other side of the coin. Having kids is such a deeply personal decision and one that no one should ever be questioned about, so why is it common practice for people to boldly ask women why they made the choice not to have kids? It’s a bit absurd really and this book made me really think about why it’s a fairly common occurrence. I have several friends who don’t have kids and won’t ever and while we’ve had discussions about it I would never dream of interrogating them, or worse yet trying to convince them to change their mind. Imagine a friend trying to tell you not to have more kids, ridiculous right?! This was a gossipy, fun read with a little intrigue and spice that had me turning pages easily. It was also quick witted and entertaining, it had a very fly on the wall feeling to it, maybe because it included snippets of Facebook posts and messages, but either way it made for one juicy read and one that doesn’t take itself too seriously but also dives a little deeper than the average Chick Lit book. Those Other Women in three words: Gossipy, Sassy and Amusing.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andrienne

    Kind of uneven, I wanted to like this book a lot. The writing was not as stellar as it should have been. The story itself is compelling. Pitting non-mothers with mothers, adding in a bit of social media brouhaha. However there was something lacking and I can’t point out what it is. It took me a while to get through it. Access to review copy provided by the publisher.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Janine

    I was keen to read this book after reading Nicola's book The Fifth Letter last year. This is a very interesting book - funny and sad at times, a little dark, and a little scary about modern life. Poppy has just broken up with her husband, he left her for her best friend who is now pregnant with their child. Poppy and her husband had agreed that they didn't want ever to have children, consequently Poppy feels upset, angry and annoyed with them. At work she befriends Annelise who also says that she I was keen to read this book after reading Nicola's book The Fifth Letter last year. This is a very interesting book - funny and sad at times, a little dark, and a little scary about modern life. Poppy has just broken up with her husband, he left her for her best friend who is now pregnant with their child. Poppy and her husband had agreed that they didn't want ever to have children, consequently Poppy feels upset, angry and annoyed with them. At work she befriends Annelise who also says that she doesn't ever want children, and together they form a friendship. Time after time they get annoyed with women who have children and seem to get privileges from employers and other friends because of the fact that they have children like leaving early from work because the kids need collecting, time off for appointments for the kids, always wanting school holidays off because of kids. They hear about an online site for women with kids and decide to start up their own site exclusively for women who don't have children. What begins as a bit of a social meet up place soon turns nasty when the two groups clash and they discover there is a mole in their group. All is not what it seems when a journalist writes an article which goes viral. Fascinating look at modern motherhood (and lack of) and the dangers of this world where Facebook has become such a part of most people's lives. There are dangers that lurk and what is written can be misinterpreted easily and go viral. The author captured a very accurate snapshot of modern life and the consequences of social media interaction. I found this to be a real page turner and thoroughly enjoyed it. Recommended for readers of Women's Fiction. She has become one of my go-to authors, now to read her earlier novels :)

  25. 4 out of 5

    Saarah Niña

    Crazy, dramatic, but relatable! The story begins with Poppy. She discovers her husband hasn't been faithful. That, and he was slightly confused when he told her, he was like her, he didn't want children. A betrayal that would be hard for anyone to get past, alongside her mother's lack of acceptance that her daughter really and truly just doesn't want children. So to move on, Poppy creates her own private, exclusive, Facebook group to connect with like-minded women. It gets disastrous, as do mo Crazy, dramatic, but relatable! The story begins with Poppy. She discovers her husband hasn't been faithful. That, and he was slightly confused when he told her, he was like her, he didn't want children. A betrayal that would be hard for anyone to get past, alongside her mother's lack of acceptance that her daughter really and truly just doesn't want children. So to move on, Poppy creates her own private, exclusive, Facebook group to connect with like-minded women. It gets disastrous, as do most things when the online world is involved. And to topple it off, there's the side problem that not everyone is who they say they are, and not all their secrets are safe... These characters will resonate with you, their stories, and their need to talk about their situation. I was overly judgemental regarding some of the women and I was quick to take sides. It was realistic of human behaviour: we listen to a story and quickly decide who's right and who's wrong. But it's never so black and white, for one thing we're only hearing the storyteller's version and we're caught up by our own problems and our own values. But this book was more than drama, it was intelligently written and beautifully thoughtful in its portrayal of women. Representation is a huge thing, and this book is for any woman: whether you wish to be a mother, and can't contain yourself by the prospect, or whether you simply don't harbour that wish. I stayed up late reading this, as though it was crucial to read another chapter and to know more. I just felt so involved, it was brilliant. I remember a debate that took place on This Morning, the subject was stay at home mothers vs. working mothers. I despise that there's a rivalry and intense judgment. Nicola Moriarty got that: and she offered the idea of openness and simple acceptance. We should lift each other up and have the more difficult conversations. We all have so much to say. A very 'fun' Mother's Day read! I received this book through Netgalley.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Naomi

    I struggled through most of this book. As a woman, I feel almost insulted that this book was written by a fellow woman, who I can only believe hates other women! Women don't just hack other women's hair off because of a Facebook group, or deliberately feed each other's children food that will send them into anaphylactic shock?! I can see that somewhere, deep deep down, this book may have tried to teach us bitter old harpies of a species that we need to be "bigging each other up", not tearing eac I struggled through most of this book. As a woman, I feel almost insulted that this book was written by a fellow woman, who I can only believe hates other women! Women don't just hack other women's hair off because of a Facebook group, or deliberately feed each other's children food that will send them into anaphylactic shock?! I can see that somewhere, deep deep down, this book may have tried to teach us bitter old harpies of a species that we need to be "bigging each other up", not tearing each other down, but it hasn't worked. And poor old Annalise, with such a meaty and thoughtful subject matter and you fobbed her off so dreadfully. Hideous character development, nasty plots and nastier women abound... I closed the book entirely unsure what Moriarty's intention even was.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sherri Thacker

    Only got to page 75 and DNF. I was so confused as to what was going on, why go any further? Not for me.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Clare

    With thanks to Netgalley and Penguin for this ARC in exchange for an open and honest review. Poppy felt shocked and betrayed when she found out her husband Garrett had been having an affair with her childhood friend Karleen. When Poppy had first met Garrett she explained she never wanted children which he agreed upon. However Garrett had changed his mind and did want to start a family. Four months After Poppy and Garrett had divorced she was devastated to find out Karleen was already pregnant wit With thanks to Netgalley and Penguin for this ARC in exchange for an open and honest review. Poppy felt shocked and betrayed when she found out her husband Garrett had been having an affair with her childhood friend Karleen. When Poppy had first met Garrett she explained she never wanted children which he agreed upon. However Garrett had changed his mind and did want to start a family. Four months After Poppy and Garrett had divorced she was devastated to find out Karleen was already pregnant with his child. Football fanatic Poppy quickly made friends with one of her work colleagues Annalise when she joined her football team. Poppy and Annalise further bonded when Poppy found out Annaliese did not want children either. In meetings Annalise and Poppy felt resentful because they felt women with children could finish work earlier and take time off for school assemblies. They both hated Frankie their boss Paul's P.A, Annalise suspected Holly was having an affair with Paul. Poppy decided they should create a Facebook group for non mothers call NOP. Alongside a rival group call MOP for mothers. SOP quickly became popular until a MOP member posing as a NOP published a scathing article in the local newspaper. Angry Poppy declared on Facebook it was time to retaliate and to confront the parents if their children do something wrong. Suddenly the group Poppy envisioned goes to pieces and hears stories about her members confronting mothers in restaurants..... But who is the mole in the group? I think Nicola Moriarty will become one of my new go to authors. I think the storyline in this book was very relatable. I work in an office environment, many times a colleague has asked me to work late so they can finish early to collect their kids. Or I have had to cover the work of someone who is part time. I have to admit I have felt rather bitter but never appreciated the other side of the story. My favourite characters were Poppy who coped with the breakdown of her marriage so well. I also liked Frankie who on the surface seemed so calm on the surface but her legs paddling underneath. I was not keen on Annalise to begin with, I thought she was reckless but I came to feel sorry for her on the charity cruise. In a nutshell Those Other Women has some funny moments with great characters. I highly recommend this book to readers.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Betty

    Poppy and her friend Annalise are sick and tired of the special treatment some of the women at her job get, just because they have children.Why should they constantly get to leave work early, and have more flexible hours, simply because they chose to have kids? And what's the deal with the local Facebook group MOP (Mums Online in Parramatta) that only allowed mothers to join? Why wasn't there a local group that only allowed women who chose not to have kids as members? They couldn't do anything a Poppy and her friend Annalise are sick and tired of the special treatment some of the women at her job get, just because they have children.Why should they constantly get to leave work early, and have more flexible hours, simply because they chose to have kids? And what's the deal with the local Facebook group MOP (Mums Online in Parramatta) that only allowed mothers to join? Why wasn't there a local group that only allowed women who chose not to have kids as members? They couldn't do anything about the former, but they could do something about the latter—and that's how NOP (Non-Mums Online in Parramatta) came to be. It was a great place to vent amongst like-minded women, and everyone loved it—well, almost everyone. There's a spy in there midst, and it isn't long before their private rants are being shared with their rival group. As it turns out, the spy isn't the only member of NOP who's hiding something. Social media is great for connecting like-minded people who are interested in a particular topic, hobby, or lifestyle choice. If you've been online for a while and take part in such things, you've likely run into message boards or Facebook groups that has an issue/issues with a rival group, whether you participate in the drama or not. I've seen it many times, myself, so the enmity between MOP and NOP in Those Other Women absolutely rang true. Told in alternating parts mainly featuring the perspectives of Poppy (the group founder) and Annalise (her close friend and fellow group member), readers see the rivalry mostly from NOP's side. What starts out as a group of non-mother's venting to each other about the "special treatment" mothers receive spirals out of control with real life consequences. The drama within the drama of the realization that there is a mole in NOP, and the distrust amongst members as they tried to pinpoint who betrayed them, was also realistically portrayed. Naturally, I tried to figure out who the mole was and (as usual) suspected the wrong person, but the true identity of the mole—and the reasoning behind it—was MUCH better than what I imagined it was going to be. I can't say anything about the ending, other than to say that I thought it fit perfectly and it left me with a smile on my face. If you haven't read this book yet, do give it a chance. I received an advance reading copy of this book courtesy of William Morrow via Edelweiss.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Grace J Reviewerlady

    This is a book which has captivated my attention on so many levels; it’s packed full of details with several story lines. It entertaining and fun, but with a serious side. Poppy and Annalise are women who work for the same company and play sport together. When Poppy’s best friend betrays her in the worst way, Annalise helps her pick up the pieces. Fed up with – as they see them – smug mummies getting an easier ride at work than they do – they set up a facebook group for women who don’t want child This is a book which has captivated my attention on so many levels; it’s packed full of details with several story lines. It entertaining and fun, but with a serious side. Poppy and Annalise are women who work for the same company and play sport together. When Poppy’s best friend betrays her in the worst way, Annalise helps her pick up the pieces. Fed up with – as they see them – smug mummies getting an easier ride at work than they do – they set up a facebook group for women who don’t want children as they are already aware of a local fb group for women with families. Aiming for a group with a positive influence, they could never have foreseen how things would turn out. In addition, we follow both ladies – together and separately – and find out about their families and workmates, and a little of their histories. There is a LOT going on in this one, and all of it good. It’s a novel which holds your interest from beginning to end and certainly had my brain ticking over trying to work out the puzzle within. As well as some sad moments, there are some hysterically funny scenes. This is a well-written, well-plotted novel which is all go from first to last and one I most definitely recommend as a great read. My thanks to publishers Penguin UK – Michael Joseph for pre-approving my requests via NetGalley. This is my honest, original and unbiased review.

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