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While teaching an online class on how to pick up women, Guru Stan picks the wrong target. His pick-up, Raven, is a woman who has discovered a plot to remove surplus humans from the planet in order to pave the way for an automated society. Stan and Raven find themselves the only people who can save the 99.9% of humanity deemed surplus to the new society. To survive, Stan While teaching an online class on how to pick up women, Guru Stan picks the wrong target. His pick-up, Raven, is a woman who has discovered a plot to remove surplus humans from the planet in order to pave the way for an automated society. Stan and Raven find themselves the only people who can save the 99.9% of humanity deemed surplus to the new society. To survive, Stan must use all the skills he has learned as a pick-up artist as well as confront the personal demons that shaped his life. The events in this book are an extension of our current world, with technological advances and a more sophisticated approach to the destruction of humanity in favor of the corporate world's ultimate quest for efficiency. In the end Stan finds himself as the unlikely hero, tasked with standing up for the worth, the dignity, and the basic rights of all mankind.


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While teaching an online class on how to pick up women, Guru Stan picks the wrong target. His pick-up, Raven, is a woman who has discovered a plot to remove surplus humans from the planet in order to pave the way for an automated society. Stan and Raven find themselves the only people who can save the 99.9% of humanity deemed surplus to the new society. To survive, Stan While teaching an online class on how to pick up women, Guru Stan picks the wrong target. His pick-up, Raven, is a woman who has discovered a plot to remove surplus humans from the planet in order to pave the way for an automated society. Stan and Raven find themselves the only people who can save the 99.9% of humanity deemed surplus to the new society. To survive, Stan must use all the skills he has learned as a pick-up artist as well as confront the personal demons that shaped his life. The events in this book are an extension of our current world, with technological advances and a more sophisticated approach to the destruction of humanity in favor of the corporate world's ultimate quest for efficiency. In the end Stan finds himself as the unlikely hero, tasked with standing up for the worth, the dignity, and the basic rights of all mankind.

26 review for The Genocide Game

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stjepan Cobets

    My rating is 4.5 The writer in the book provides us the near future that even a little bit is not very good. All that the writer wrote inevitably happens in this moment, and in most cases, we cannot influence anything. The main character in the book Stan is a love guru and managed with a fictitious company and he connected man and women. Although in appearance it is not at all perfect, it easily enters into relationships with women. Due to bad experiences in the past, at Stan, it comes down only My rating is 4.5 The writer in the book provides us the near future that even a little bit is not very good. All that the writer wrote inevitably happens in this moment, and in most cases, we cannot influence anything. The main character in the book Stan is a love guru and managed with a fictitious company and he connected man and women. Although in appearance it is not at all perfect, it easily enters into relationships with women. Due to bad experiences in the past, at Stan, it comes down only to sex without any feelings. But Raven woman he met in a bar he will completely change his life. He decides to help her but it will result in immediate mortal danger. He will have to use all his powers of manipulation and his all knowledge in order is brought to the lab in Bethesda. The reason is that the survival of the entire world's population depends on his actions. Those who persecuted him and Raven have no mercy and have all the resources that are trying to catch them and kill them. Stan will face life decision how to complete this task. The writer Darrell B. Nelson introduces us to the world of corruption, multinational companies and governments that are willing to do everything for profit, not fearing favor of those that destroy the greater part of mankind to reach their destination. The book I would recommend to all fans of science fiction and fiction. We need to ask ourselves on occasion if the technology advances dangerous when he gets into the wrong hands. "I received a free copy from the author without an obligation to review."

  2. 5 out of 5

    Segilola Salami

    I didn't enjoy this book at all. This book was assigned to me in a 'book club' where it was listed as out-of-this-world. There was nothing out-of-this-world about this book in my opinion. It very much focuses on what's currently going on in the world and what could potentially happen in the future. The book starts off with a man infecting women with a virus intentionally by kissing them. That really put me off as it's something you read of in the news every so often. There was also a bit of I didn't enjoy this book at all. This book was assigned to me in a 'book club' where it was listed as out-of-this-world. There was nothing out-of-this-world about this book in my opinion. It very much focuses on what's currently going on in the world and what could potentially happen in the future. The book starts off with a man infecting women with a virus intentionally by kissing them. That really put me off as it's something you read of in the news every so often. There was also a bit of fluff, describing things in a way I felt didn't add any value to the story (well not obvious to me). For instance (view spoiler)[On the roof, six 250 watt solar panels popped up and tracked the sun. They increased the amount of electricity the village produced by a third. The Air Conditioning unit raised up, the first filter on it was made from carbon nano-tubes woven together, the microscopic ends of nano-tubes came out from the filter the exact length of a water molecule attracting the water in the air to stick to them without any impurities tagging along. The air going through the filter was drier than air in the driest desert. The pure water that stuck to the filter was pushed off by air jets into a hose that led to water jugs at the back of the RV giving the villagers some pure clean water, while the RV's Air Conditioning and HEPA filters benefited by only having to deal with dry air. (hide spoiler)] Why did I have to read all that??? After this point, I found myself just turning the pages for the sake of it. If you are reading this review, don't let my one star put you off. I was looking forward to reading something truly out-of-this-world but this book isn't it for me. If you are looking for an in-this-world book with the potential for human annihilation, then you may enjoy this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    E.M. Swift-Hook

    A Deadly Serious Techno-Thriller with Laugh Out Loud Moments 'Whoever holds this in their powerful hands, has the ability to abolish all human suffering or all human life.' For Stan, high stakes means pushing for a date with a good looking girl, it is what he teaches his students how to do and he has the moves - and the odds of success - all down. But when his technique nets him a Raven he suddenly finds that the world is just a little bit more dangerous than he had realised. Together he, Raven A Deadly Serious Techno-Thriller with Laugh Out Loud Moments 'Whoever holds this in their powerful hands, has the ability to abolish all human suffering or all human life.' For Stan, high stakes means pushing for a date with a good looking girl, it is what he teaches his students how to do and he has the moves - and the odds of success - all down. But when his technique nets him a Raven he suddenly finds that the world is just a little bit more dangerous than he had realised. Together he, Raven and a handful of others set out to save it. The world, that is. This is classic Darrell Nelson. He will find a bunch of social pariahs and misfits and turn them into heroes. In this case, two guys teaching ‘pick up’ skills make unlikely heroes, but they really are. Indeed the very skills they have developed are called on and used to further their ‘world saving’.This is a book packed with social commentary on the impact of technology - biological, cybernetic and robotic. It pushes the envelope of concern around where the powerful elites would be willing to go to become ever more powerful and wealthy. It also highlights the ultimately utterly self-defeating end of such a course. "You can sit there and be disgusted, or you can use the skills and assets we've built over the last few years to help you on your quest to save the world." The characters really are the stars of this show. The pacing is good and the tension is kept running high throughout. The plot brings together a range of technologies which are presented very convincingly. It is a real thriller of a ride, but there is a wonderful leavening of humour - even if that is occasionally rather dark. The one thing I struggled with was the eventual resolution. To me, although it was well explained, it seemed very ill-fitting and I was left thinking that our ‘good guys’ were not really too much better than the ‘bad guys’ at the end of the day. Dehumanising people, in my opinion, is still dehumanising people, no matter who does it, or why… A great ride from a great author who has found his pace and is turning out some consistently good books. I recommend it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anna Lane

    The book’s concept is intriguing: automation will take over, and humans will become redundant. Cons: The concept is somehow lost -scenes, pov, and settings change and shift. Much goes on which has nothing to do with the high concept. I’m not the picky type when it comes to grammar and typos. But the prose was confusing and hard to follow. In the first chapter, in the opening sentences, we have The girl smiled and turned her head away, blushing slightly she turned back to look Stan in the eye. The The book’s concept is intriguing: automation will take over, and humans will become redundant. Cons: The concept is somehow lost -scenes, pov, and settings change and shift. Much goes on which has nothing to do with the high concept. I’m not the picky type when it comes to grammar and typos. But the prose was confusing and hard to follow. In the first chapter, in the opening sentences, we have The girl smiled and turned her head away, blushing slightly she turned back to look Stan in the eye. The characters also need some development and history. Pros: the main character, Stan, starts as a shallow man but grows to find a deeper meaning in life. He’s pitted against Ferguson, the antagonist, who believes you’d need only ‘a fifth of the human race with the higher skills you need to run civilization’. He thus develops a virus that ‘leaves the tools to rebuild a better civilization’. The author weaves in a lot of tech in the plot: neuro-cybernetic interfaces (where the brain is connected to a computer), enhanced soldiers, androids playing poker and using microexpressions, biohazard suits, and, my favorite, the synthetic meat cooked perfectly together with the hydroponic-grown vegetables. All placed on a dish generated by a 3-D printer. The author also touches on the world of corruption, the few rich people who control the world, and the millions with low-level jobs that can be replaced by robots. Thought-provoking and fast-paced. What will happen after four days and the spread of the virus?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dale Rutter

    3.5 stars. The Genocide Game is a very entertaining novel. The parts of the book I enjoyed the most is Nelson’s ability to embed facts and data within the plot, with technology flowing all through his thriller. It is all critical to the compelling story. The only thing that lets it down is that it is a little confusing when the place or character changes. But, nonetheless, a very good read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Katie Epstein

    I liked this book. To me the storyline was original, with depth when needed and humour well-timed. You want to kind of hate Stan and Flair with their dating prowess and their “skank line”, but you just can’t end up doing it. Their hearts are in the right place and we see them progress through the story as a woman called Raven throws them into the path of saving in the world that weirdly so, fits them to a tee. This made me laugh: "Hey, fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. Fool I liked this book. To me the storyline was original, with depth when needed and humour well-timed. You want to kind of hate Stan and Flair with their dating prowess and their “skank line”, but you just can’t end up doing it. Their hearts are in the right place and we see them progress through the story as a woman called Raven throws them into the path of saving in the world that weirdly so, fits them to a tee. This made me laugh: "Hey, fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. Fool me twenty times, I must like it." Again, the humour forcing you to like these guys and the naive way they viewed women of the world before they had to save it. The parts where the military aspect comes in I thought was well-written and believable, and the style allowed it to play out in my head like those cult eighties movies we’ve all come to love. My only complaint, is that the scene changes across the chapters were a bit confusing. A header to state the location of where we were now headed would have helped as it does weave in and out of different plot lines a little unexpectedly, but other than that, it was a good read for the genre that I would classify personally as Sci-Fi.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alex Avrio

    Unfortunately, this book just wasn't for me. This was for a variety of reasons. The book is driven by a lot of dialogue, which I normally find to be a good thing. However, the dialogue here seemed quite robotic and unnatural, and so it didn't draw me into the characters and their plight. This hindered my ability to engage with the plot. The plot itself was unusual, and touched on some fundamental themes, challenging the status quo, and attempting to push some political messages. However, many of Unfortunately, this book just wasn't for me. This was for a variety of reasons. The book is driven by a lot of dialogue, which I normally find to be a good thing. However, the dialogue here seemed quite robotic and unnatural, and so it didn't draw me into the characters and their plight. This hindered my ability to engage with the plot. The plot itself was unusual, and touched on some fundamental themes, challenging the status quo, and attempting to push some political messages. However, many of the discussions seemed no more than a way to convey some scientific fact to the reader, rather than arising organically from the plot, and so again they didn't draw me into the story. I didn't really find any of the characters particularly likeable, so wasn't rooting for them, although I did enjoy the creative ways that they tackled the tough situations they were in, for example how they thwarted the lie detector tests. However, the many typos, punctuation errors, and incorrect word usage were distracting, and the roughness of the reading experience created a further barrier to my enjoyment. I did manage to finish the book, so it was readable, and I can see that there will be a readership out there who might enjoy some of the scientific and political aspects of this book, but I'm afraid it didn't really work for me.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Scott Spotson

    I found myself a little confused by this book, shifting in characters, plot, genre, and focus. I think after reading all this, my favourite parts were when the characters discussed pet projects such as water generation and purification infrastructure in third world villages, organically grown meat rather than butchering live animals, remotely controlled traffic patterns in real time in entire cities, taking surveyor photos from satellite instead of using humans, and so on. Problem is, none of I found myself a little confused by this book, shifting in characters, plot, genre, and focus. I think after reading all this, my favourite parts were when the characters discussed pet projects such as water generation and purification infrastructure in third world villages, organically grown meat rather than butchering live animals, remotely controlled traffic patterns in real time in entire cities, taking surveyor photos from satellite instead of using humans, and so on. Problem is, none of them drive the plot on its own. The plot of a virus takeover of humanity in order to "purge" useless populations got a bit lost among the numerous characters and the off-track discussions. Trouble is, I didn't find the virus plot compelling enough on its own, as it is so short. My adrenalin shot up more near the end when the characters fight and run, but since I didn't care too much for the mission, it was hard to keep engaged. This book is a scattered collection of subplots, discussions, and characters striving to be cohesive. It's light, but not attention-grabbing. I'm not sure what to suggest. Perhaps this odd style could benefit with more humour, so we can enjoy the ride. But usually an attempt at humour would use fewer characters so we can identify whom we will laugh along with, and also make fun of the madman's plans for world domination and make him more of a caricature. This could also become a thriller instead, but I sense the author doesn't want to go there. Hence, my delight at the brainstorming concepts of the future, as if I were discussing these with friends. I'm always on the lookout for new ideas, and the organic meat production sounds like a winner to me, an animal fan!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brett Stadelmann

    Ambitious, this is a work which reaches far and wide. It spans the globe, peers into the ancient past and distant future, and explores the very depths of human-centred ethics and morality. That's right: the VERY depths. There were a couple of faults. Transitions between chapters were sometimes clumsy, making it difficult to ascertain the location and company of some scenes until they were already well underway. Characters weren't always given enough time to tell their own story, which would have Ambitious, this is a work which reaches far and wide. It spans the globe, peers into the ancient past and distant future, and explores the very depths of human-centred ethics and morality. That's right: the VERY depths. There were a couple of faults. Transitions between chapters were sometimes clumsy, making it difficult to ascertain the location and company of some scenes until they were already well underway. Characters weren't always given enough time to tell their own story, which would have gone a long way to making us understand them and care about them. Nonetheless, it's very ambition is what I loved about it. It was by no means perfect, but its lessons were poignant, thought-provoking, and conversation-spawning. Good fiction is either sheer mind-numbing entertainment, or serious material that adds to the progression of human culture. Given the choice between a mundane story told beautifully well and an imperfect work that strives towards a nobler and further-reaching goal... I will always prefer the latter. This book delivers. The only problem I had was that, when a vast majority of the human race was threatened, it was never made clear why this would be such a moral outrage, though perhaps this is a fault due more to myself than the author.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rob Cummings

    “Trust is believing something to be true.” Stan Fleibelman from The Genocide Game. Not all of the prospects of our future are happy and bright. We want to think that progress will empower humanity, but as we often see, some humans have an ability to take progress and turn it into a tool for some sort of egotistical holocaust. What The Genocide Game does is give us a look at a possible scenario that could play out not too many years in the future. Corporate greed and productivity fuel the engine of “Trust is believing something to be true.” Stan Fleibelman from The Genocide Game. Not all of the prospects of our future are happy and bright. We want to think that progress will empower humanity, but as we often see, some humans have an ability to take progress and turn it into a tool for some sort of egotistical holocaust. What The Genocide Game does is give us a look at a possible scenario that could play out not too many years in the future. Corporate greed and productivity fuel the engine of the supremacists set on controlling everything. Ultimately, they hope to decide who will join them in the brave new world they are striving to create. Evil unchecked will always succeed. Having someone to stand up and do the right thing to circumvent those plans is the challenge Stan and Raven have accepted. The book took me on a fun-filled ride into the dark corners of a potential outcome. More than once, I found myself catching my breath with the revelation of another twisted possibility. I truly loved the pace of this book as it accelerated to its breakneck conclusion. Thanks for taking me on a wonderful journey. In the words of Stan Fleibelman, “Trust is believing something to be true.” Trust me when I say this read was a great experience.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Humphrey

    This is something that is totally out of my normal genre and I found the concept behind the book an intriguing one. The idea that the world may one day be run by Automation is certainly something to think about. And the ability to create and use a virus to wipe out the world’s population is terrifying to think about, but at some point, everyone does wonder. I did find the book to be confusing though, which made it very difficult to read. The plot, characters, setting and scenes jumped from place This is something that is totally out of my normal genre and I found the concept behind the book an intriguing one. The idea that the world may one day be run by Automation is certainly something to think about. And the ability to create and use a virus to wipe out the world’s population is terrifying to think about, but at some point, everyone does wonder. I did find the book to be confusing though, which made it very difficult to read. The plot, characters, setting and scenes jumped from place to place and had me back tracking to see if I missed something or to try and find out where I was Character development is needed and the dialogue was a little static and unbelievable at times. Great concept, but the overall flow of the book could use a little tweaking.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Isabella Bedi

    I found the story a bit confusing as we shift from different characters and focus. This made it difficult to fully engage with the story. However I enjoyed the pace of this book as well as how the character, Stan evolves. There were some interesting concepts to ponder over, so all in all a good read. I look forward to future instalments from this author. I found the story a bit confusing as we shift from different characters and focus. This made it difficult to fully engage with the story. However I enjoyed the pace of this book as well as how the character, Stan evolves.    There were some interesting concepts to ponder over, so all in all a good read. I look forward to future instalments from this author.

  13. 5 out of 5

    A.A. Bavar

    A sci-fi novel that misses the mark by a googleplex. OBS: This is a two star book because it still needs a lot of work. Once polished, it can be quite a thriller. In The Genocide Game, Mr. Nelson sets the foundation for a terrifying and all too realistic thriller based on genetically engineered biochemical warfare. Unfortunately, inopportune and unnecessarily long scientific descriptions combined with excessive telling kills the flow and diffuses the tension inherent to most of the scenes. The A sci-fi novel that misses the mark by a googleplex. OBS: This is a two star book because it still needs a lot of work. Once polished, it can be quite a thriller. In The Genocide Game, Mr. Nelson sets the foundation for a terrifying and all too realistic thriller based on genetically engineered biochemical warfare. Unfortunately, inopportune and unnecessarily long scientific descriptions combined with excessive telling kills the flow and diffuses the tension inherent to most of the scenes. The Genocide Game follows the story of Stan and Raven as they try to save the world from the hands of a megalomaniac billionaire who has genetically engineered a super-virus destined to end humanity. Unfortunately, Mr. Nelson misses the mark by a googleplex. I say this because of a variety of reasons, but most importantly due to the fact that despite trying very hard to find some redeeming quality in Stan (the protagonist) and root for him, I wasn't able to do so. Stan is introduced to us by kissing and knowingly infecting several women with a deadly virus, so liking him or finding a compelling enough reason behind this unconscionable act is quite impossible. Furthermore, the dialogue is unnatural and riddled with too many descriptive interruptions or scientific explanations which only take away from the tension. I found myself skimming and thinking who cares despite the fact that I'm a computer systems engineer. I wanted more story and less detailed science. Is the story original? The topic in not, but the story could have been. Unfortunately, there is nothing new or inspiring in The Genocide Game. The main arc of the story is clear and has the necessary depth. However, most of the plot seems forced and cliché. Are the characters well developed? They have original qualities but need more development. Does the story move at a good pace and keep you wanting more? The pace is hindered by excessive descriptions and I found myself skimming to get back to the main plot. Is the manuscript well edited? The Genocide game has all the elements for a thrilling sci-fi, but to get there it needs a thorough round of editing to fix issues such as confusing dialogue, character pov changes, general grammar and punctuation, difficult to follow action sequences, awkward sentence structure, and telling versus showing. Do you recommend this book? Die hard sci-fi fans may enjoy all the technological explanations, but readers in general should wait for the next edition.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bibliophile Johnson

    The Genocide Game is a very entertaining novel that kept me thoroughly enthralled. The author, Darrell Nelson, is artful in describing all of the twists and turns that the main character, Stan, went through as he evolved from a man who simply wanted to teach others how to pick-up women, to a champion who wanted to save billions of individuals on Earth. The part of the book I enjoyed the most is Nelson’s ability to embed facts and data within the plot, with technology seamlessly flowing through The Genocide Game is a very entertaining novel that kept me thoroughly enthralled. The author, Darrell Nelson, is artful in describing all of the twists and turns that the main character, Stan, went through as he evolved from a man who simply wanted to teach others how to pick-up women, to a champion who wanted to save billions of individuals on Earth. The part of the book I enjoyed the most is Nelson’s ability to embed facts and data within the plot, with technology seamlessly flowing through his thriller. Drones, vaccines, viruses, and computer hacking are all critical to the compelling story. Without reserve, I recommend this novel to anyone who loves suspense and adventure – Well done.

  15. 4 out of 5

    X. Culletto

    The Genocide Game takes a ladies' man, Stan, and drops him in the middle of a save-the-earth adventure. While Stan appears insultingly shallow in the beginning, the novel slowly peels through his layers until he becomes a beloved hero. With the help of his wing man and two leading ladies, he decides to rise to the challenge. Ferguson, the antagonist, has an interesting view of the role technology plays in our lives. Indeed, it is chilling how closely his ideas of what machines should be match The Genocide Game takes a ladies' man, Stan, and drops him in the middle of a save-the-earth adventure. While Stan appears insultingly shallow in the beginning, the novel slowly peels through his layers until he becomes a beloved hero. With the help of his wing man and two leading ladies, he decides to rise to the challenge. Ferguson, the antagonist, has an interesting view of the role technology plays in our lives. Indeed, it is chilling how closely his ideas of what machines should be match today's ever-more-dependent reality. I loved the changing character perspectives every chapter--it really fleshed out the story. I also enjoyed all the statistics Stan dropped throughout the book. It was fast-paced, and I was a little surprised how quickly the ending came; the whole story happens over only a four-day period, and you have to kind of wonder what really happens after those four days. But any good book will leave you wanting more. The only criticism I have to offer is I wish the supporting characters had been a little more developed. They came across somewhat two-dimensional to me. Overall, though, I was very impressed! It's been a while since I read a suspenseful thriller, and this was good one! I received a free copy of this in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Leland Lydecker

    Fatally Unlikeable Protagonist Tries to Save the World A megalomaniac billionaire with an automation fetish plots to wipe out ninety-eight percent of the world’s population, and it falls to Stan– pick-up artist guru and self-proclaimed word-nerd– to save the world. To be more accurate, Stan bumps into Raven, a scientist on the run from her job in the billionaire’s R&D lab, and offers to help her. Pretty soon they’re both on the run from Ferguson’s comically inept goons, racing to reveal the Fatally Unlikeable Protagonist Tries to Save the World A megalomaniac billionaire with an automation fetish plots to wipe out ninety-eight percent of the world’s population, and it falls to Stan– pick-up artist guru and self-proclaimed word-nerd– to save the world. To be more accurate, Stan bumps into Raven, a scientist on the run from her job in the billionaire’s R&D lab, and offers to help her. Pretty soon they’re both on the run from Ferguson’s comically inept goons, racing to reveal the existence of a genetically engineered super-virus before Ferguson can unleash it on the world. The Genocide Game’s protagonist isn’t much of a hero. The book opens on Stan deliberately infecting women with a deadly virus and he doesn’t become much more likeable from there on, despite the author’s attempts to paint him as an awkward nerd who “only” got into college on a diving scholarship. He came from a troubled home, guys! I mean, not really troubled. He wasn’t abused and didn’t grow up in poverty, but his parents were both working and weren’t as emotionally available as he would have liked. This isn’t the first book I’ve read with a nerdy male lead who has a few hangups. It’s been done and it can work. But Stan isn’t your stereotypical nerd. He’s a pick-up artist “guru,” a guy who teaches others how to use a combination of degrading psychological warfare, intimidation, and copious quantities of alcohol to compromise the consent of women who wouldn’t ordinarily be willing to sleep with them. And if that sounds disturbingly similar to sexual assault, then congratulations– you’re probably a decent human being. For me, and I imagine for most people, Stan’s character is about as appealing and relatable as three-day-old roadkill. In fact, I’ve probably felt more sympathy for roadkill than I ever managed to muster for Stan. Although the author tries to paint him and his PUA brethren as benign normal Joes frustrated by the “unfairness” of women’s attraction, it’s a tough sell. The Genocide Game has a lot of interesting concepts– a genetically engineered virus, cyberneural implants, cyber soldiers, and privately owned surveillance satellites among other things– but most of them are covered so briefly that they come across as little more than flashy gimmicks. The cool tech plays frustratingly little role in the story, taking a back seat to Stan’s personal hangups and messy past. Stan enlists the help of his pick-up artist cohorts, and a great deal of time is spent going on about how scientific their methods are and how easily they’re able to evade surveillance and capture. Although PUAs take precautions like these in an attempt to evade the legal consequences of sexual assault, they’re only successful when faced with apathetic, underfunded law enforcement. The idea that they could defeat a Blackwater-esque private army is uproariously laughable. As the story goes on the plot becomes less and less believable. The Genocide Game feels like a mashup of a low-budget SciFi Channel thriller, an advertisement for the pick-up artist lifestyle, and one of those movies about the personal struggles of a middle class white guy. There are also quite a few editing and proofing errors. If that sounds like something you’d enjoy, you may get a lot more mileage out of the story than I did.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gina

    This book was super interesting from start to finish and I thought it was well written. Without giving away too many spoilers, I loved that the end brought the story full circle. Throughout, I had wondered what led one of the main characters, Stan, to do what he did in the very beginning of the story, which turns out to be a flash forward 4 days into the future. The story that follows is an exciting mission between a pick up artist (Stan) and woman named Raven, along with a few other characters This book was super interesting from start to finish and I thought it was well written. Without giving away too many spoilers, I loved that the end brought the story full circle. Throughout, I had wondered what led one of the main characters, Stan, to do what he did in the very beginning of the story, which turns out to be a flash forward 4 days into the future. The story that follows is an exciting mission between a pick up artist (Stan) and woman named Raven, along with a few other characters (enjoyable and not so enjoyable) that really set off the story, whose mission is to save the world from a virus that threatens to take out most of the human race. It's exciting, frustrating at times, and has you on the edge of your seat wondering what is going to happen next! This quote in particular stuck out to me: "Like I said, under life and death pressure, some people will do things even they didn't think they could do." There were a few grammatical errors in the book, which I didn't mind but I felt was important to mention. The jumping between characters and scenes did get a bit confusing and I wished for smoother transitions, but that could be more of a personal preference. And I also felt myself longing for a bit more depth of emotion from the characters. I loved the detail in the surroundings, like what the character's biohazard suits and medical and scientific equipment looked like, but I wanted to know what it felt like to the characters in the book a bit more. All in all, it was a great read! Definitely recommend!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

  19. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  20. 4 out of 5

    Andreas Asimakopoulos

  21. 5 out of 5

    L.N. Denison

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mischenko

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kristijan

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joe Borg

  26. 5 out of 5

    Melanie Haynes

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