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March 4, 1861: On the day of Abraham Lincoln’s inauguration, the air is charged with hope and apprehension. The last thing anyone wants is any sort of hitch in the proceedings—let alone murder! Fortunately the president has young Adam Quinn by his side . . . At the inaugural ball, Lincoln’s trusted entourage is on their guard. Allan Pinkerton, head of the president’s March 4, 1861: On the day of Abraham Lincoln’s inauguration, the air is charged with hope and apprehension. The last thing anyone wants is any sort of hitch in the proceedings—let alone murder! Fortunately the president has young Adam Quinn by his side . . . At the inaugural ball, Lincoln’s trusted entourage is on their guard. Allan Pinkerton, head of the president’s security team, is wary of potential assassins. And Lincoln’s oldest friend, Joshua Speed, is by his side, along with Speed’s nephew, Adam Quinn—called back from the Kansas frontier to serve as the president’s assistant and jack-of-all-trades. Despite the tight security, trouble comes nonetheless. A man is found stabbed to death in a nearby room, only yards from the president. Not wishing to cause alarm, Lincoln dispatches young Quinn—instead of the high-profile Pinkerton—to discreetly investigate. Could the proximity of the murder possibly be a coincidence? Or is the crime directly related to Lincoln himself—possibly a political act? Quinn’s observation skills as a frontier scout are invaluable as he examines the victim and begins a complex investigation. Though he is new to Washington, DC, he must navigate through high society, political personages, and a city preparing for war in order to solve the crime. He finds unexpected allies in a determined female journalist named Sophie Gates, and Dr. Hilton, a free man of color Quinn—with assistance from Sophie and Dr. Hilton—must make haste to solve the murder if he is to protect the president he’s pledged to serve. With the shadow of war looming on the horizon, there’s no margin for error, as no less than the fate of the nation is at stake . . . PRAISE FOR THE PREVIOUS WORKS OF C. M. GLEASON: “Exhilarating . . . Sure to please.” —The New York Times Sunday Book Review “Wonderfully witty . . . deliciously dark and delightfully entertaining.” —The Chicago Tribune “Sophisticated, sexy, surprising . . . This book grabs you and holds you tight till the very last page!” —#1 New York Times bestselling author J. R. Ward “Gleason’s novel is a well-oiled machine . . . the authentic historical framework . . . the compelling personalities.” —School Library Journal “Witty, intriguing, and addictive.” —Publishers Weekly “Phenomenal storytelling.” —Romantic Times


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March 4, 1861: On the day of Abraham Lincoln’s inauguration, the air is charged with hope and apprehension. The last thing anyone wants is any sort of hitch in the proceedings—let alone murder! Fortunately the president has young Adam Quinn by his side . . . At the inaugural ball, Lincoln’s trusted entourage is on their guard. Allan Pinkerton, head of the president’s March 4, 1861: On the day of Abraham Lincoln’s inauguration, the air is charged with hope and apprehension. The last thing anyone wants is any sort of hitch in the proceedings—let alone murder! Fortunately the president has young Adam Quinn by his side . . . At the inaugural ball, Lincoln’s trusted entourage is on their guard. Allan Pinkerton, head of the president’s security team, is wary of potential assassins. And Lincoln’s oldest friend, Joshua Speed, is by his side, along with Speed’s nephew, Adam Quinn—called back from the Kansas frontier to serve as the president’s assistant and jack-of-all-trades. Despite the tight security, trouble comes nonetheless. A man is found stabbed to death in a nearby room, only yards from the president. Not wishing to cause alarm, Lincoln dispatches young Quinn—instead of the high-profile Pinkerton—to discreetly investigate. Could the proximity of the murder possibly be a coincidence? Or is the crime directly related to Lincoln himself—possibly a political act? Quinn’s observation skills as a frontier scout are invaluable as he examines the victim and begins a complex investigation. Though he is new to Washington, DC, he must navigate through high society, political personages, and a city preparing for war in order to solve the crime. He finds unexpected allies in a determined female journalist named Sophie Gates, and Dr. Hilton, a free man of color Quinn—with assistance from Sophie and Dr. Hilton—must make haste to solve the murder if he is to protect the president he’s pledged to serve. With the shadow of war looming on the horizon, there’s no margin for error, as no less than the fate of the nation is at stake . . . PRAISE FOR THE PREVIOUS WORKS OF C. M. GLEASON: “Exhilarating . . . Sure to please.” —The New York Times Sunday Book Review “Wonderfully witty . . . deliciously dark and delightfully entertaining.” —The Chicago Tribune “Sophisticated, sexy, surprising . . . This book grabs you and holds you tight till the very last page!” —#1 New York Times bestselling author J. R. Ward “Gleason’s novel is a well-oiled machine . . . the authentic historical framework . . . the compelling personalities.” —School Library Journal “Witty, intriguing, and addictive.” —Publishers Weekly “Phenomenal storytelling.” —Romantic Times

30 review for Murder in the Lincoln White House

  1. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    The Times They Are A-Changin' (Bob Dylan) History carries a heavy stick. It raps to a familiar beat heard since the beginning of time. The panoramic stage weaves variations and set changes, but the actors, oh the actors, are cloaked in hues of long-standing hate, greed, animosity, and belligerent behavior. The curtain rises in the Inaugural Ballroom in March of 1861 ushering in the newly elected President Abraham Lincoln. The dance floor is lined with hoop-skirted ladies and men wearing a cockade The Times They Are A-Changin' (Bob Dylan) History carries a heavy stick. It raps to a familiar beat heard since the beginning of time. The panoramic stage weaves variations and set changes, but the actors, oh the actors, are cloaked in hues of long-standing hate, greed, animosity, and belligerent behavior. The curtain rises in the Inaugural Ballroom in March of 1861 ushering in the newly elected President Abraham Lincoln. The dance floor is lined with hoop-skirted ladies and men wearing a cockade on their waistcoats depicting their political leanings. Abolitionists and secessionists mingle in the same crowd. But eyes sweep the clusters of people in an age when that is the highest level of security. Pinkerton's men move from one end of the hall to the other. They have broken through many plots to threaten Lincoln's life including a recent one in Baltimore in which Lincoln was swept away to board another train. Even congratulatory baskets of sweets may be tainted with arsenic. A most loved and a most hated President of the times. The discovery of a dead body in a room near Lincoln sets the White House on alert. The man was stabbed to death. Lincoln calls in Adam Quinn to investigate the crime. Quinn becomes a most unusual protagonist. He lost his arm in the Bloody Kansas revolts and wears the heaviness of a prothesis. Quinn is more of an adventurer than an investigator. But his living-off-the-land experiences serve him well here. Washington, D.C. is filled with unsavory characters with hidden and not so hidden agendas. C.M. Gleason presents a fictional storyline encased with scenarios of impending war, political stances, the role of females in society, the day upon day effects of slavery, and the impact of the Black Code on free black men and women of the time. Gleason even brings in a black doctor educated in Montreal to do an autopsy at the request of Quinn. Quinn is not the sole Robin Hood here. It is through a combined effort of various individuals that the crime will be solved. I especially enjoyed Gleason's introduction of early forensic procedures and the analytical deduction of clues. Murder in the Lincoln White House is the first book in this series. I am looking forward to future adventures involving the sharp skills of this one-armed earthy character. Well done, C.M. Gleason. I received a copy of this book through NetGalley for an honest review. My thanks to Kensington Books and to C.M. Gleason for the opportunity.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Juli

    It's March 4, 1861. Tension is riding high between the northern and southern states. War will soon break out, but for now, it's just rumblings and quiet threats. Newly elected President Abraham Lincoln has been sworn in, and a crowd has gathered for the Inaugural Ball. Fears of assassination or other violence are high....so security around President Lincoln is tight. Allan Pinkerton, head of Lincoln's security team, and three other guards watch the crowd for signs of trouble. Adam Quinn, It's March 4, 1861. Tension is riding high between the northern and southern states. War will soon break out, but for now, it's just rumblings and quiet threats. Newly elected President Abraham Lincoln has been sworn in, and a crowd has gathered for the Inaugural Ball. Fears of assassination or other violence are high....so security around President Lincoln is tight. Allan Pinkerton, head of Lincoln's security team, and three other guards watch the crowd for signs of trouble. Adam Quinn, recovering from a wound he suffered while in the Kansas Territory, has been hired for security and also to act as a Jack-of-all-Trades for Lincoln. Quinn sees a man in the crowd acting strangely, but he is waylaid by women wanting him to dance, reporters and others at the ball, never making it over to the man. By the time he returns to the raised dais to check in with Lincoln an his entourage, something grave has happened. A man has been stabbed to death. Custer Billings, a banker, is dead, two knife wounds in his chest. Quinn quickly starts investigating the killiing. Was this a political killing? Related to Lincoln? Or a random act? This book is a nice blend of mystery and historical fiction. The author obviously did quite a bit of research to capture the tensions, political climate and issues of 1861. I did have just a twinge of incredulity that Quinn would have paired up with a female reporter and a free black man to investigate this murder. I doubt there were many female reporters in Washington D.C. in 1861. For a moment, it felt like forced diversity for PC purposes....but I liked the characters and felt they meshed together as investigators. So, it was a momentary twinge only. The story is an enjoyable, believable read. The mystery has plenty of action, twists and suspects. This is the first book in a series....great start! I can't wait to read more! The second book in the series, Murder in the Oval Library, will be out in August 2018. C.M. Gleason is a penname used by author Colleen Gleason. She writes action/adventure novels under C.M. Gleason, and paranormal and YA books under Colleen Gleason. To learn more about the author, check out her websites: http://www.cmgleason.com/ and http://www.colleengleason.com/ **I voluntarily read an advanced readers copy of this book from Kensington via NetGalley. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.**

  3. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Anze

    Its March 4, 1961, the night of the inagural ball for the newly elected president Abraham Lincoln. The room is packed with men & women, northerners & southerners and allies & enemies alike. President Lincoln is surrounded by a tight team of security led by the experienced Allan Pinkerton. When the body of Custer Billings is found stabbed in a room not too far away from the new president, its not Pinkerton who is summoned but Kansas frontiersman Adam Quinn. Quinn is asked to Its March 4, 1961, the night of the inagural ball for the newly elected president Abraham Lincoln. The room is packed with men & women, northerners & southerners and allies & enemies alike. President Lincoln is surrounded by a tight team of security led by the experienced Allan Pinkerton. When the body of Custer Billings is found stabbed in a room not too far away from the new president, its not Pinkerton who is summoned but Kansas frontiersman Adam Quinn. Quinn is asked to discreetly investigate the murder. Being a fresh arrival in Washington D.C., that may be a challenging task but Quinn is not one to back down. This work is a perfect combination of a murder mystery and a historical novel. Its no secret that when Lincoln was elected, he was not widely poplular. The pro-slavery southerners threatened with secession, Lincoln received multiple personal threats and war was looming. Still, the inaguration moved forward. This is a fictional work of a murder happening on inagural night. Adam Quinn is a new face in Washington D.C. and is part of Lincoln's security team. While the political scene is new to him, he is about to get a crash course. Gleason captures the heated political climate and scene of 1961 accurately. Dealing with slavery, women's roles and rights and the growing conflict with the south, not one detail went unnoticed. The mystery aspect had me guessing til the very end and was very much satisfying. Not be left aside is the characterization. While the plot centers around Lincoln, he is not the protagonist. Gleason provides a balanced narrative that I absolutely taken in with. This is a series and the next is due to be released this year. Looking forward for it. An interesting piece of history, the "White House" was not called that name til 1901 when Teddy Roosevelt made it official. When Lincoln was in office it was called the "President's Palace" or simply the President's House. The reference to the color white comes from the fact that the president's house had to be repainted after the British attempted to burn it down druring the American Revolution.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    I want to give this a very solid 4.5 stars. This was especially well done historical fiction and an incredibly well done mystery! The author does an amazing job at putting you right into the heart of Washington DC during the very first days of Lincoln's presidency. The descriptions of the city and the White House and the clothing were so incredibly clear you could really easily picture yourself standing there observing it all yourself. The mystery was really a good one and the investigation was I want to give this a very solid 4.5 stars. This was especially well done historical fiction and an incredibly well done mystery! The author does an amazing job at putting you right into the heart of Washington DC during the very first days of Lincoln's presidency. The descriptions of the city and the White House and the clothing were so incredibly clear you could really easily picture yourself standing there observing it all yourself. The mystery was really a good one and the investigation was fascinating as it was providing a glimpse into early forensics. The author also did a a great job in providing summaries of the clues as the story went along (which in so many mysteries is missing) although at times it felt a bit redundant. Many, many well planted red-herrings and twists along the way. If you like historical mysteries I think this will be right up your alley! I would like to thank NetGalley and Kensington Books for providing me with an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    This is the first installment in C. M. Gleason's Lincoln White House Mysteries. It's President Lincoln's Inaugural Ball and the room is filled with attendees, both supportive and non-supportive. This leaves a long list of possible suspects when a murder is committed on this night of celebration. Lincoln has had so many death threats that his staff can't be sure if he was really meant to be the intended victim. Lincoln puts all his trust into Adam Quinn, a young frontiersman, to find out who This is the first installment in C. M. Gleason's Lincoln White House Mysteries. It's President Lincoln's Inaugural Ball and the room is filled with attendees, both supportive and non-supportive. This leaves a long list of possible suspects when a murder is committed on this night of celebration. Lincoln has had so many death threats that his staff can't be sure if he was really meant to be the intended victim. Lincoln puts all his trust into Adam Quinn, a young frontiersman, to find out who committed the murder. Adam has his work cut out for him as he continues to be concerned with the protection of the President and the motive for the killing(s), which have increased since he started his investigations. This one will keep you guessing right up to the end.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Krista Taracuk

    Frontiersman Adam Quinn left the racial tension of the Kansas Territory hoping to escape the memories of the violent deaths of his friends and the loss of his arm. He arrives in Washington, DC, in the spring of 1861 to find the city mired in hatred, gossip, and corruption on the eve of the impending war. As a long-time and trusted friend of the Lincolns, Quinn is hired to find a murderer and travels between the high society of the rich and powerful to the overlooked slums of the city. Volatile Frontiersman Adam Quinn left the racial tension of the Kansas Territory hoping to escape the memories of the violent deaths of his friends and the loss of his arm. He arrives in Washington, DC, in the spring of 1861 to find the city mired in hatred, gossip, and corruption on the eve of the impending war. As a long-time and trusted friend of the Lincolns, Quinn is hired to find a murderer and travels between the high society of the rich and powerful to the overlooked slums of the city. Volatile tempers, hostilities, racial tension, and assassination plots cloud his investigation but he finds assistance from such unlikely characters as a black doctor, a poor Irish boy, and a young woman posing as a male reporter. Both YAs and adults will enjoy the well-researched details of the political and cultural swampland of DC in the spring of 1861 in this new series of historical fiction.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    I won this book on goodreads in return for a review. I really enjoyed this book! Plot twists, good research, and relatable characters. The only thing I had issues with were there were times when the main character would mention something, and I would get the feeling I should know what they're referring to. Almost like I hadn't read the first book in a series, but I checked and there aren't other books. It didn't take away from the novel at all though. I also found a slight error on page 288. The I won this book on goodreads in return for a review. I really enjoyed this book! Plot twists, good research, and relatable characters. The only thing I had issues with were there were times when the main character would mention something, and I would get the feeling I should know what they're referring to. Almost like I hadn't read the first book in a series, but I checked and there aren't other books. It didn't take away from the novel at all though. I also found a slight error on page 288. The author puts nineteen fifty eight, while the novel is actually set in the 1800's. Just a small misprint. Overall, excellent book and I can't wait to read more by this author!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bryleigh

    This was a lot of fun, and a real page-turner. I have a weakness for mysteries set in the past, and this one didn't disappoint. I'm not going to write much here because it would be hard not to spill the spoilers, but it was well researched, engaging, and the period well captured. Recommended not just for mystery fans, but readers who enjoy a Civil War setting or are Lincoln fans. I received this book as a giveaway from the publisher at BEA 2017 in NYC.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Albert

    Murder in the LIncoln White House by C.M. Gleason is one of those books that you want to like more than you really do and then spend a ridiculous amount of time trying to talk yourself into wanting to praise what is simple, a good book and a good mystery with fairly typical characters for this time period. "....I believe now will be the moment where our jack-of-all-trades will step forward and prove himself both versatile and indispensable.' With a jolt, Adam looked up at Mr. Lincoln, who'd Murder in the LIncoln White House by C.M. Gleason is one of those books that you want to like more than you really do and then spend a ridiculous amount of time trying to talk yourself into wanting to praise what is simple, a good book and a good mystery with fairly typical characters for this time period. "....I believe now will be the moment where our jack-of-all-trades will step forward and prove himself both versatile and indispensable.' With a jolt, Adam looked up at Mr. Lincoln, who'd spoken clearly and gravely. Very different from the relaxed, affectionate man with whom he'd sat at the dinner table and listened to story after story, or argued and joked with in the parlor for years back in Springfield. 'Mr. President,' he began. Lincoln shook his head, holding up a hand. His eyes were calm yet troubled. 'The last thing I want is for anyone out there to know. Especially Mary. She's been waiting for this for...well, years. Decades, really.' His smile was both wry and sad. Adam felt a twinge. He and his uncle had spoken long and intimately about the new president-and what a burden he would bear. What a dangerous, heavy, important burden. 'Whatever I can do, of course, Mr. President,' he replied. Joshua took Adam's arm. 'A man's been stabbed here, at the ball. Murdered..." It is March 4, 1861, the day of the inauguration of Abraham Lincoln. With the threat of war raging on, these are perilous times in Washington for not only its people but for its leader as well. Surrounded by his security team, which consists of Allan Pinkerton and Lincoln's oldest friend Joshua Speed, they are joined by Speed's own nephew, Adam Quinn. Recently of the Kansas frontier, Quinn is back in Washington to serve the President of the United States. What Quinn thought would be a security detail changes quickly when a murdered man is found just outside of the inaugural ball. Now Quinn is charged with finding the killer and solving the crime. But can it just be a coincidence that the murder happened on this date and so close to the President? Or is this a harbinger of a greater danger to come. But when a second killing is done, it is far too close to home. It is in the sanctum of the President. "...A murder in my great White House,' said Lincoln. Looking soberly at Adam. 'if it was to happen, I'd have thought it would have been me...." Quinn enlists the help of a female journalist posing as a man, Sophie Gates and a free man of color, Dr. Hilton to help him solve these violent deaths. Together they must solve these murders and save the stain of blood on Lincoln's young presidency. Okay, on the premise this sounds like a very good book and perhaps it could have been. But the characters are like extras in a film. Devoid of any actual depth. There is a southern belle who wants to escape a loveless marriage proposal and whose diva like actions place her in jeopardy constantly. A situation she needs help to escape, help from a man; Adam Quinn. In contrast, Sophie Gates; the feminist crusading journalist needs no mans help. In fact she pretends to be one to show how much she can do whatever a man can do. The book will pretend that she works alongside Quinn, when in fact she often works against him to serve her own ambitions. She conceals evidence and only reveals it and herself when it helps to further her cause. But the book is blatant in its characterization of the two women. North good. South bad. Dr. Hilton however is a very intriguing character. A man of color, a medical man, who is trying to make a life in the North yet is finding himself facing many of the same prejudices that he faced in the South. He finds that his only clients are those too destitute to go elsewhere. When he is pulled into the crimes, he finds his findings called into question by the enlightened Northerners simply because he is a black man. He also is forced to take in the dead bodies even though by doing so, he is putting his own practice an livelihood in jeopardy. This is something that Quinn and his group seem to not be concerned with much at all. But in the end, it is the motive for the killings which I found so disappointing. I won't give it away here but in a novel in such a setting, such a time and such a nation in turmoil, this was pedestrian. Good but could have been so much better.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jill Wittkopp

    Adam Quinn is our reluctant detective in this mystery series. A frontiersmen that wants nothing to do with big cities or politics finds himself by Mr. Lincoln’s side as he tries to hold the nation together. This book starts with a murder at Lincoln's inaugural ball and sets off running from there. Instead of the high profile pinkerton detectives set to investigate, Lincoln asks his family friend, Adam Quinn, to discreetly find out what happened. A choice representative of Lincoln’s will to hold Adam Quinn is our reluctant detective in this mystery series. A frontiersmen that wants nothing to do with big cities or politics finds himself by Mr. Lincoln’s side as he tries to hold the nation together. This book starts with a murder at Lincoln's inaugural ball and sets off running from there. Instead of the high profile pinkerton detectives set to investigate, Lincoln asks his family friend, Adam Quinn, to discreetly find out what happened. A choice representative of Lincoln’s will to hold the nation together, come what may to his personal safety. Gleason has done her research. She paints a detailed picture of antebellum D.C. and leverages the threat of war looming over every move the characters make. Gleason’s attention to period detail gives a vibrant yet harsh reality to her story. And the main character Quinn is no different. While not in any way a detective, he’s able to leverage the skills that he’s learned on the Kansas frontier to help solve his case. A character that I will continue to read. I’ll look forward to what Adam has to face next and how pressure will continue to build as the nation heads to war.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Wit & Wonder Books

    ***ARC received in exchange for an honest review*** In this historical-mystery-fiction novel, Murder in the Lincoln White House by C. M. Gleason, gives us the first installment of the Lincoln's White House Mystery series. As far as first in a series books goes, this is a whopper of one. The descriptive detail takes you back in time to 1861, the day Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated, as if you are walking on the cobblestone back alley streets with them or dancing at the ball in your hoop skirt. ***ARC received in exchange for an honest review*** In this historical-mystery-fiction novel, Murder in the Lincoln White House by C. M. Gleason, gives us the first installment of the Lincoln's White House Mystery series. As far as first in a series books goes, this is a whopper of one. The descriptive detail takes you back in time to 1861, the day Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated, as if you are walking on the cobblestone back alley streets with them or dancing at the ball in your hoop skirt. Adam Quinn is part of Abraham Lincoln’s assistants. He is the jack-of-all-trades guy. Not knowing fully why he was brought on until President Lincoln's inauguration ball when a man is found stabbed to death and the President assigned Mr. Quinn to find out the who and why. Mr. Quinn proceeds his duty using the skills of animal hunting that he learned from the Kansas frontier to track down a murder during a time of uncertainty and a country in transition doesn’t make his job easy. What keeps you reading is not only the scenery portrayed in detail, but the storyline itself and how at that time, some slaves were considered "free", the north and south were fighting, and women still weren't allowed the freedom of today. The combination of all these things happening back in 1861 and a murder at the inauguration ball made one amazing thriller of a story. One of the most fascinating parts of this story to me is that Adam Quinn saw people for people. That his training from back home leads him to trust people to help no matter what color or background. He saw that people are people and did what was needed to get things done. Then on top of all that, you will keep guessing right to the end on who-did-it!!! the small twist and turns are so well written that you just have to keep reading to find out what happens. Don't be fooled and think this is one of those mystery novels that are heavy in thought it is not. This is so well written and grabs your attention, that you will breeze right thought it and before you know it it’s over and your left with thought of "WOW, well played". Five thrilling stars.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Leith Devine

    I really enjoyed this book. The attention to the historical detail was amazing, especially when discussing the differences between those slaves who were considered "free" and those who were not. The plot was well-written and kept my attention until the very end. At the party after Lincoln's inauguration, a dead body is found. The President asks Adam Quinn, recently arrived in Washington from Kansas and the son of an old friend, to investigate. Adam is a fish out of water in D.C., but he dives I really enjoyed this book. The attention to the historical detail was amazing, especially when discussing the differences between those slaves who were considered "free" and those who were not. The plot was well-written and kept my attention until the very end. At the party after Lincoln's inauguration, a dead body is found. The President asks Adam Quinn, recently arrived in Washington from Kansas and the son of an old friend, to investigate. Adam is a fish out of water in D.C., but he dives right in and starts looking for suspects. His search takes him from the upper corridors of power to the slums of the city as he tries to find the murderer. This is a great book and I highly recommend it. Thanks to Kensington Books and NetGalley for the ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Maxwell

    C.M. Gleason introduces us to the conflicted and incredibly complicated world of 1861, when our nation was about to be divided and every ideal it had been based on less than a century earlier put to the test. Gleason deftly introduces us to a Lincoln who is much in the same vein as Daniel Day Lewis's portrayal -- an outwardly simple and straightforward yet inwardly complex man who gains both the reader's and the sleuth's sympathies. Adam Quinn likes and respects Lincoln, and genuinely wants to C.M. Gleason introduces us to the conflicted and incredibly complicated world of 1861, when our nation was about to be divided and every ideal it had been based on less than a century earlier put to the test. Gleason deftly introduces us to a Lincoln who is much in the same vein as Daniel Day Lewis's portrayal -- an outwardly simple and straightforward yet inwardly complex man who gains both the reader's and the sleuth's sympathies. Adam Quinn likes and respects Lincoln, and genuinely wants to protect him and his presidency. Quinn, a man driven by honor, is a frontiersman who's out of place in the middle of Washington politics, but it's this very quality of being an outsider that allows him to see circumstances and suspects from a fresh perspective, while at the same time his suffering at the hands of anti-abolitionists keeps him on his guard. Very well done!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Zach

    This was a perfectly fine historical mystery, set during the first week of Lincoln's presidency. The main character is the fictional Adam Quinn, nephew of Lincoln's real friend Joshua Speed. The murder investigation is a bit rote, and the culprit is both out of left field but understandable. But overall it was a fine read. One critique: I wish C.M. Gleason didn't occasionally refer to the enslaved characters as "servants."

  15. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    3.5. An easy read that kept my attention, and it moved along swiftly. I liked the characters and am looking forward to Mystery #2.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Julie Failla Earhart

    I’m a historical fiction buff, especially for the Civil War era and doubly for anything about the Lincolns. It was with bated breath that I opened the cover of this first book in the Adam Quinn series. The time is March 4, 1861, Lincoln’s first inauguration. The day has gone rather smoothly…a bomb threat at Lincoln’s podium was thwarted, but otherwise it’s been a peaceful day. Now it’s almost 11 p.m. and the Lincoln’s have…finally…made an appearance at the Inaugural Ball. While Abe and his beloved I’m a historical fiction buff, especially for the Civil War era and doubly for anything about the Lincolns. It was with bated breath that I opened the cover of this first book in the Adam Quinn series.  The time is March 4, 1861, Lincoln’s first inauguration. The day has gone rather smoothly…a bomb threat at Lincoln’s podium was thwarted, but otherwise it’s been a peaceful day. Now it’s almost 11 p.m. and the Lincoln’s have…finally…made an appearance at the Inaugural Ball. While Abe and his beloved Mary promenade around the room, a body is discovered in one of the side rooms. There isn’t much blood, but Custer Billings is dead, apparently stabbed. When Abe learns of what has happened he asks his closest friend, Joshua Speed’s, nephew, Adam, to handle the case.   Adam has no background in detective work. In fact he has just returned from the Kansas Territory. He accepts the challenge and the search for the killer begins. Author Colleen Gleason, writer of more than twenty books, does an excellent job in steeping the reader in the 1860s culture, politics and ambiance of Washington, D.C. The Ball is held in a thrown together building, erected especially for the occasion. Planks cover the mud outside. The half-finished Capitol Building looms in the background. I felt as if I was at the ball with the description of the dresses, the dances, the men’s fashions. But often Gleason went on too long. She used the same description of the dresses several times, and repeated many images.  Given the tenseness of the times, there is no tension in Murder in the Lincoln White House. Most of the time we see Adam scurrying from place to place, trying to enlist the help of anyone he can to solve the murder, picking up a small clue here and there and berating the ones he does have to death. As the novel takes place over three-four days, that makes the plot seem to move even slower. I want to give this disappointing novel 2 stars, but the author's research coerced me into giving it 3 out of 5 stars in Julie’s world.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Robin Crawford

    Excellent first entry in what appears to be a new series. Can't wait for the next one to come out!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bridgett Brown

    I won this book in a Goodreads Giveaway. It's President Lincoln's Inaugural Ball and the room is filled with people, both supportive and non-supportive. This gives Adam Quinn, a long list of possible suspects when a murder is committed. Lincoln has had so many death threats that his staff can't be sure if he was really meant to be the intended victim. Adam is determined to find out just who the killer is .

  19. 5 out of 5

    Beverlee

    Thank you to Goodreads and Kensington Books for the opportunity to read "Murder in the Lincoln White House". The combination of historical fiction, a mysterious killing and a little romance - made for a fun and interesting book. I think that Adam Quinn will be seen in many more books by C. M. Gleason and I will look forward to reading them when they are available!

  20. 5 out of 5

    nikkia neil

    Thanks Kensington Books and netgalley for this ARC. Can't wait to read more from C.M. Gleason. This is just the right combination of mystery, romance, and intrigue. It seems like a unsolvable mystery, but it all comes together in the coolest way. Love the originality of this series.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Zoe

    Thanks Kensington Books and netgalley for this ARC. You'll never see Lincoln or the White HOuse in quite the same way after reading. this. Loved the way you feel right there in the city and action.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tina Satterwhite

    it's a quick read, but quite good for something different and entertaining.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christine Boswell

    As a sweet piece of history within the story. Excellent book! I loved it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jeannie Mancini

    While attending President Abraham Lincoln’s Inaugural Ball a man is brutally murdered. Stabbed three times and left for dead in a hallway of the newly dubbed White House. Due to more upheaval and political uprisings than he could imagine, Lincoln assigns a newcomer to investigate the crime in order to leave his bodyguards and the Pinkerton Detective Agency to watch over the rest of the city. Abolitionists and Secessionists are monopolizing the city’s interest in 1861, as the topic of slavery While attending President Abraham Lincoln’s Inaugural Ball a man is brutally murdered. Stabbed three times and left for dead in a hallway of the newly dubbed White House. Due to more upheaval and political uprisings than he could imagine, Lincoln assigns a newcomer to investigate the crime in order to leave his bodyguards and the Pinkerton Detective Agency to watch over the rest of the city. Abolitionists and Secessionists are monopolizing the city’s interest in 1861, as the topic of slavery causes many a heated debate that will soon lead to war. Trusting the nephew of his long-time friend and advisor Joshua Speed to the task, our newly appointed President is sure Adam Quinn is up for the job. New to Washington and fresh from the Kansas frontier, Adam accepts the challenge although doubtful he has the skills needed to hunt down a coldblooded killer. Using his adept tracking skills that he learned from a Native American Indian out west, he applies his sharp mind and combines his efforts with a motley crew of intriguing background characters that all jump into the fray to help Adam to zero in on any target suspects they are suspicious of. A crafty woman journalist parades around town in men’s clothes sneaking into gentleman’s secret meetings and scientific research clubs, a free black man who is a physician in hiding acts as coroner when Adam brings him body after body to determine causes of death, a little boy down on his luck and poor as dirt aids our new detective becoming errand boy and spy, and a lovely lady in petticoats and hoop skirts bats her eyelashes in Adam’s direction in order to clear her father’s name from being the prime suspect. Evocative of the times and extremely well penned with wonderful period detail, C.M. Gleason has once again showed her accomplished writing skills in this first installment of her new historical mystery series. I devoured this in two days and can’t wait until August when the next episode Murder in the Oval Library is released. Five stars, darn good yarn that I couldn’t put down.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michele

    I have been reading a lot of mysteries set in England lately. So when Murder in the Lincoln White House by C.M. Gleason came across my path, I was excited to read one set in America. The story is set in Washington DC and begins on March 4, 1861, the day of Abraham Lincoln’s inauguration. Attempts on Lincoln’s life have been suspected and so security during the evenings ball is high. Despite this, a man is found stabbed to death in a room not far from the president. Adam Quinn, a friend of I have been reading a lot of mysteries set in England lately. So when Murder in the Lincoln White House by C.M. Gleason came across my path, I was excited to read one set in America. The story is set in Washington DC and begins on March 4, 1861, the day of Abraham Lincoln’s inauguration. Attempts on Lincoln’s life have been suspected and so security during the evenings ball is high. Despite this, a man is found stabbed to death in a room not far from the president. Adam Quinn, a friend of Lincoln’s from Kansas is asked by Lincoln to discreetly investigate. Quinn has no experience investigating a murder. But, he does have experience tracking animals which makes for a really interesting and new way of gathering clues in a mystery novel. I liked the character of Quinn and his frontier characteristics set among the political drama of Washington DC. I thought Murder in the Lincoln White House was a fun mystery with lots of suspects and motives. There was a great cast of diverse characters who kept things moving and had me guessing as to who committed the murder. I realized reading this book that I do not know much about America right before the Civil War when Lincoln is put into office. I enjoyed learning more about that history and really enjoyed the depictions of Washington during that time period. Who knew pigs roamed the streets! The city itself has come a long way. Murder in the Lincoln White House is the first book in a series and I’m looking forward to more books. The character of Quinn had events in his past that were referenced and I’m looking forward to learning more about those events and more about him as a character. I’m also looking forward to reading more about this time period and doing so in the setting of a mystery sounds like fun. My copy of Murder in the Lincoln White House was provided by Kensington Books in exchange for an honest review. Thanks!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    I really enjoyed this! An interesting and unique combination of historical fiction and murder mystery. There were several things that were different about this from what I normally gravitate to. First the main character was male; not that I don't like male narrators, but I somehow tend to pick up books driven by women. But I really connected with Adam Quinn - he was smart and resourceful, and while he didn't want to be in Washington, coming from the Kansas wilderness, he manages just fine with I really enjoyed this! An interesting and unique combination of historical fiction and murder mystery. There were several things that were different about this from what I normally gravitate to. First the main character was male; not that I don't like male narrators, but I somehow tend to pick up books driven by women. But I really connected with Adam Quinn - he was smart and resourceful, and while he didn't want to be in Washington, coming from the Kansas wilderness, he manages just fine with the intrigue and political maneuvering and back-biting while investigating a murder at the personal request of President Lincoln as it happens right after the inauguration in the White House. Adam builds rapport with some fun and funny people as his investigation proceeds, and there are some very funny moments, my favourite being when a young Irish boy who helps Adam uses a chicken to foil an assault on Adam [you'll have to read the book for details] that provide some moments of relief to the murder and dangerous things going on. Lincoln only makes a few brief appearances, so there is only the tiniest connection to Lincoln and the historical realities of the situation at that time, but it is an interesting take on a setting for a murder mystery and I liked it. The murder, and the who and why of it is well-constructed, and I feel that if you wanted to try to figure it out before the reveal, there are plenty of clues to help a reader play sleuth. I just really enjoyed this, and if more books are released in this world I would definitely check them out. A good, solid, entertaining start to what could become a favourite series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Camille Wilson

    I really enjoyed the first installment of the new mystery series "Lincoln's White House Mysteries." Newly inaugurated President Abraham Lincoln hires Kansas frontiersman and his best friend's nephew, Adam Quinn, to investigate the murder of a wealthy banker at his first inaugural ball in March 1860. The reader is treated to a bevy of interesting, witty characters before the mystery is solved: Abraham Lincoln, himself, who can spin a yarn like no one else; Adam Quinn, a disabled frontiersman who I really enjoyed the first installment of the new mystery series "Lincoln's White House Mysteries." Newly inaugurated President Abraham Lincoln hires Kansas frontiersman and his best friend's nephew, Adam Quinn, to investigate the murder of a wealthy banker at his first inaugural ball in March 1860. The reader is treated to a bevy of interesting, witty characters before the mystery is solved: Abraham Lincoln, himself, who can spin a yarn like no one else; Adam Quinn, a disabled frontiersman who can follow the trail of a murderer like he can follow the tracks of an animal on the midwestern plains; Dr. George Hilton, an African American doctor trained in Montreal, Canada and who can perform a spur of the moment autopsy; Sophie Gates, aspiring journalist who has to dress and compete in a man's world and will do just about anything to get a story; Southern belle, Constance Lamagne who can't keep her eyes or white gloves off Adam Quinn; and Brian Mulcahey, feisty street urchin and boy Friday to Adam Quinn. Author C.M. Gleason peppers her story with fascinating facts of the era such as the Megatherium Club in the Smithsonian Institution, the decrepit state of the President's House (Lincoln called it "the White House"), and the Pinkerton Detective agents whom Lincoln hired for his personal security team. Last but not least, little ol' me was able to follow the clues and solve the mystery myself! Just like Nancy Drew!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kim Bakos

    I love mysteries and historical fiction - this book is the perfect blend of both. Doesn't get much better than this! The history of Washington City (now DC) at the start of the Civil War is very interesting. I didn't realize that it was still so undeveloped at that time, basically a mud hole with some buildings and lots of loose farm animals. The political climate with the brewing division of the North and South created a hotbed for all sorts of violence and discontent and constant danger for the I love mysteries and historical fiction - this book is the perfect blend of both. Doesn't get much better than this! The history of Washington City (now DC) at the start of the Civil War is very interesting. I didn't realize that it was still so undeveloped at that time, basically a mud hole with some buildings and lots of loose farm animals. The political climate with the brewing division of the North and South created a hotbed for all sorts of violence and discontent and constant danger for the President. It was very interesting to see how little Lincoln let this rattle him and how he refused to change his open way of dealing with others in light of the everpresent threat. The mystery was well executed and quite believable but the best part was how it kept me guessing. I didn't have this one figured out at all before the ending. I love the characters that bring to the forefront those who were so overlooked at that time - the poor immigrants, the educated blacks, and women who desired to be more than a man's showpiece. Very little gore, no profanity and no sex - yes, it is possible to write a great story without any of that!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cecilia

    Loved this book. I love the era, when Abraham Lincoln is first elected, March 1861. The political atmosphere where the issue of slavery and division of the Union is boiling and emotions are raw, violent and dangerous. The author incorporates vivid detailed descriptions of the ladies fashions (and the drawbacks of the large and cumbersome hoop skirts of dresses). The cost of such mundane things as a shave (three cents) and a hotel room or meal set a backdrop that grabs the reader's attention. Loved this book. I love the era, when Abraham Lincoln is first elected, March 1861. The political atmosphere where the issue of slavery and division of the Union is boiling and emotions are raw, violent and dangerous. The author incorporates vivid detailed descriptions of the ladies fashions (and the drawbacks of the large and cumbersome hoop skirts of dresses). The cost of such mundane things as a shave (three cents) and a hotel room or meal set a backdrop that grabs the reader's attention. These details give the story depth and texture. This is the first of a series of mysteries set in and around what Lincoln affectionately and presciently described as "the white house." The frontiersman and friend of Mr. Lincoln, Adam Speed Quinn becomes a detective of sorts who is enlisted by the new President to discretely solve a murder. Adam is believable, fallible and brings his unique skill set honed in the Kansas frontier to solve the crime. Great easy read. If you like these ingredients in a mystery, Murder in the Lincoln White House is a must read for you.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gayle Slagle

    Murder in the Lincoln White House is a mystery that effectively uses historical facts regarding the early days of the Lincoln presidency. The story begins on the day of Lincoln's inauguration. In attendance with Lincoln is his guard, Allan Pinkerton, his oldest friend Joshua Speed and Speed's nephew, Adam Quin, who is to be Lincoln's assistant and becomes the key player in the novel. During the Inauguration party, a man is found stabbed to death in a room yards from the President. Not wanting to Murder in the Lincoln White House is a mystery that effectively uses historical facts regarding the early days of the Lincoln presidency. The story begins on the day of Lincoln's inauguration. In attendance with Lincoln is his guard, Allan Pinkerton, his oldest friend Joshua Speed and Speed's nephew, Adam Quin, who is to be Lincoln's assistant and becomes the key player in the novel. During the Inauguration party, a man is found stabbed to death in a room yards from the President. Not wanting to cause alarm in the guests, Lincoln sends Quinn to quietly investigate. The question is whether this murder is related to Lincoln; there had been plans to a murder Lincoln in Baltimore on his way to Washington, but the plot had been discovered and foiled. Was this murder another attempt on the new President's life? The book is well-written and suspenseful and though the story line is fiction, the historical facts surrounding the story are accurate and presented in a way that contributes to the story in an interesting and educational way.

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