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The Hidden Rules of Race: Barriers to an Inclusive Economy

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Why do black families own less than white families? Why does school segregation persist decades after Brown v. Board of Education? Why is it harder for black adults to vote than for white adults? Will addressing economic inequality solve racial and gender inequality as well? This book answers all of these questions and more by revealing the hidden rules of race that create Why do black families own less than white families? Why does school segregation persist decades after Brown v. Board of Education? Why is it harder for black adults to vote than for white adults? Will addressing economic inequality solve racial and gender inequality as well? This book answers all of these questions and more by revealing the hidden rules of race that create barriers to inclusion today. While many Americans are familiar with the histories of slavery and Jim Crow, we often don't understand how the rules of those eras undergird today's economy, reproducing the same racial inequities 150 years after the end of slavery and 50 years after the banning of Jim Crow segregation laws. This book shows how the fight for racial equity has been one of progress and retrenchment, a constant push and pull for inclusion over exclusion. By understanding how our economic and racial rules work together, we can write better rules to finally address inequality in America.


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Why do black families own less than white families? Why does school segregation persist decades after Brown v. Board of Education? Why is it harder for black adults to vote than for white adults? Will addressing economic inequality solve racial and gender inequality as well? This book answers all of these questions and more by revealing the hidden rules of race that create Why do black families own less than white families? Why does school segregation persist decades after Brown v. Board of Education? Why is it harder for black adults to vote than for white adults? Will addressing economic inequality solve racial and gender inequality as well? This book answers all of these questions and more by revealing the hidden rules of race that create barriers to inclusion today. While many Americans are familiar with the histories of slavery and Jim Crow, we often don't understand how the rules of those eras undergird today's economy, reproducing the same racial inequities 150 years after the end of slavery and 50 years after the banning of Jim Crow segregation laws. This book shows how the fight for racial equity has been one of progress and retrenchment, a constant push and pull for inclusion over exclusion. By understanding how our economic and racial rules work together, we can write better rules to finally address inequality in America.

52 review for The Hidden Rules of Race: Barriers to an Inclusive Economy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Darren

    No society is truly equal but inequality should not be caused by one’s race, gender or another personal factor. This is a specialist book, looking at whether creating economic equality could solve racial and gender inequality. It is written from a pro-U.S. perspective, which is no bad thing when the country allegedly is conscious about discrimination, despite the obvious inequalities that can be found. Poverty is not, of course, restricted to a certain demographic, just as sickness knows no No society is truly equal but inequality should not be caused by one’s race, gender or another personal factor. This is a specialist book, looking at whether creating economic equality could solve racial and gender inequality. It is written from a pro-U.S. perspective, which is no bad thing when the country allegedly is conscious about discrimination, despite the obvious inequalities that can be found. Poverty is not, of course, restricted to a certain demographic, just as sickness knows no boundaries, but there is a powerful argument that says inequality can disproportionate place people into an economically disadvantageous situation. It is sensitively written, rather than being a firebrand book, letting the stories and figures speak for themselves, noting that progress has been made on one hand with equality whilst it has been held back on the other. There is more to be addressed, but is it necessarily a simple action? This is a book that demands your attention. It can be hard-going in places due to its authoritative, academic nature, but the subject also deserves a certain focus from the reader. Its coverage within the sphere of economics is broad, looking at underlying structures, wealth inequality, education and societal challenges, criminal justice and even the wider issues of democracy. A lot of the issues are described as ‘hidden rules of race’, and this sounds appropriate and in no way ‘tin foil hat’ territory. Consideration is also given to what could be changed and how this may be instigated. As you would expect in a book of this kind, there are extensive bibliographic resources to inspire further and deeper reading. The authors do not pull their punches, rejecting some conventional viewpoints in the process to advocate their nuanced beliefs. It makes it an interesting book, even if you are not an economist nor directly affected by such inequalities and a worthwhile consideration to your reading pile nonetheless.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Reginald

    This book covers much of what I've personally learned, via reading AND was taught via Family of previous generations, AND because I'm a READER......who looked back in time via experience and clear warnings....Sadly, much of the information is the exact truth, still in today's society.....Personally, I'll be watching closely, as to what may be predicted to happen in 2019.....via other personal sources. Why the 400 Years of African American History Act Is So Important....

  3. 4 out of 5

    A.B. McFarland

    Fascinating academic read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    ronn

    A bit dry and academic-ish, but good overall. A 2nd, closer reading is in order and I have many stats and portions that would help in some of my research and policy insights.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    330.973 F6482 2017

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    Mark Stamm

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