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In the second book in The Hundredth Queen Series, Emily R. King once again follows a young warrior queen’s rise to meet her destiny in a richly imagined world of sorcery and forbidden powers. Though the tyrant rajah she was forced to marry is dead, Kalinda’s troubles are far from over. A warlord has invaded the imperial city, and now she’s in exile. But she isn’t alone. In the second book in The Hundredth Queen Series, Emily R. King once again follows a young warrior queen’s rise to meet her destiny in a richly imagined world of sorcery and forbidden powers. Though the tyrant rajah she was forced to marry is dead, Kalinda’s troubles are far from over. A warlord has invaded the imperial city, and now she’s in exile. But she isn’t alone. Kalinda has the allegiance of Captain Deven Naik, her guard and beloved, imprisoned for treason and stripped of command. With the empire at war, their best hope is to find Prince Ashwin, the rajah’s son, who has promised Deven’s freedom on one condition: that Kalinda will fight and defeat three formidable opponents.But as Kalinda’s tournament strengths are once again challenged, so too is her relationship with Deven. While Deven fears her powers, Ashwin reveres them—as well as the courageous woman who wields them. Kalinda comes to regard Ashwin as the only man who can repair a warring world and finds herself torn between her allegiance to Deven and a newly found respect for the young prince.With both the responsibility to protect her people and the fate of those she loves weighing heavily upon her, Kalinda is forced again to compete. She must test the limits of her fire powers and her hard-won wisdom. But will that be enough to unite the empire without sacrificing all she holds dear?


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In the second book in The Hundredth Queen Series, Emily R. King once again follows a young warrior queen’s rise to meet her destiny in a richly imagined world of sorcery and forbidden powers. Though the tyrant rajah she was forced to marry is dead, Kalinda’s troubles are far from over. A warlord has invaded the imperial city, and now she’s in exile. But she isn’t alone. In the second book in The Hundredth Queen Series, Emily R. King once again follows a young warrior queen’s rise to meet her destiny in a richly imagined world of sorcery and forbidden powers. Though the tyrant rajah she was forced to marry is dead, Kalinda’s troubles are far from over. A warlord has invaded the imperial city, and now she’s in exile. But she isn’t alone. Kalinda has the allegiance of Captain Deven Naik, her guard and beloved, imprisoned for treason and stripped of command. With the empire at war, their best hope is to find Prince Ashwin, the rajah’s son, who has promised Deven’s freedom on one condition: that Kalinda will fight and defeat three formidable opponents.But as Kalinda’s tournament strengths are once again challenged, so too is her relationship with Deven. While Deven fears her powers, Ashwin reveres them—as well as the courageous woman who wields them. Kalinda comes to regard Ashwin as the only man who can repair a warring world and finds herself torn between her allegiance to Deven and a newly found respect for the young prince.With both the responsibility to protect her people and the fate of those she loves weighing heavily upon her, Kalinda is forced again to compete. She must test the limits of her fire powers and her hard-won wisdom. But will that be enough to unite the empire without sacrificing all she holds dear?

30 review for The Fire Queen

  1. 5 out of 5

    R.K. Gold

    This review will contain spoilers, if that bothers you stop reading here. I liked this book a lot more than the first. The first was all insta-love and angst between Kalinda and Deven, wanting to be together but unable to because of Raja Tarek. The tournament added drama but it felt secondary to their love and fighting tournaments have become such a staple in YA it just wasn't exciting because it wasn't anything new. What made this book better was the love between Deven and Kalinda took a backseat This review will contain spoilers, if that bothers you stop reading here. I liked this book a lot more than the first. The first was all insta-love and angst between Kalinda and Deven, wanting to be together but unable to because of Raja Tarek. The tournament added drama but it felt secondary to their love and fighting tournaments have become such a staple in YA it just wasn't exciting because it wasn't anything new. What made this book better was the love between Deven and Kalinda took a backseat and it was much more about Kalinda fighting for her kingdom and her throne. The tournament itself was a more interesting concept as well, though I thought all the challenges were a little rushed, I didn't feel much tension build. Each had a moment that Kalinda was on the brink of failure then she of course turned it around and won, however the near defeat and the turnaround all happened pretty quickly. All in all this was an interesting enough second book to make me continue on to the third.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chelsies Reading Escape

    I appreciated the small recap that was interwoven in at the beginning of this sequel. It was just enough to nudge my memory without feeling info dumpy. Im also terrible at remembering names so it definitely helped with that too. Overall I ended up liking this a bit more than the first book. This was a short read with a quick pace, but it didnt lack any world building. I really enjoyed the world and culture. We get both a desert and jungle setting, but theres also fascinating Sumerian mythology a I appreciated the small recap that was interwoven in at the beginning of this sequel. It was just enough to nudge my memory without feeling info dumpy. Im also terrible at remembering names so it definitely helped with that too. Overall I ended up liking this a bit more than the first book. This was a short read with a quick pace, but it didnt lack any world building. I really enjoyed the world and culture. We get both a desert and jungle setting, but theres also fascinating Sumerian mythology and animals. I wish I owned one of those wing flyers. They seem like alot of fun.  Some desperate situations annoy me while others add to the story. If done right it can keep me on the edge of my seat, but if done wrong I get frustrated with the characters for not doing more to help themselves. Fire Queen was a bit of both. Thankfully the obstacles she faced werent due to her own stupidity and it added a good amount of intensity and action to the story, but I felt like Kali never fufilled her full potential. She could have been more resourceful and done more scheming to out maneuver the Sultan instead of just letting him mistreat her people and wait to see what he would do after the trials. I just wish she would have tried harder. I liked how we got more than just Kalis perspectives in this sequel but it made me realize how clueless Deven can be at times. I wasnt totally sold on the romance in the first book and this sequel didnt make things any better, but Deven did start to man up towards the end. I loved the little friend group at the beginning of this book and was dying to have them back together. We obviously have the 2 main characters Kali and Deven, but we also have Kalis temple sister Natesa, the guard Yatin, as well as Devens brother Brac and their mother. I was kind of disapointed when they got separated. I would have loved to see more of a friendship between Kali and Natesa.  I didnt like how Brother Shaan tried to manipulate Kali and the Prince seemed to good to be true. I never knew whether to trust him or not and that made things interesting. The Vizier Gyan tried my patience so much, but I love me a villain who can make me angry. If I was the Sultan Kuval I would have one of my guards listen to Kali 24 hours a day with their wind ability to find out if she had the book. It didnt make sense that he wouldnt so she should have been worried about it and written stuff down before burning it if she wanted to share secrets with someone. Theres also the fact that the fight went beyond first blood and was never addressed. I thought the dire situations picked up my reading pace, but at the same time I wanted Kali to do more to help herself and her friends. The last half of the book was hard to put down. Some parts were pretty intense and got me so angry, especially went nothing was going their way. I liked the ending and Im really looking forward to reading the next book in the series, Rogue Queen. It feels like we'll need more than just one more book in the series after the way things ended. If you enjoyed the Wrath and the Dawn duology than you should give the Hundredth Queen a try. *received for honest review consideration*

  3. 5 out of 5

    angela

    Omg excellent Descriptive, full of treachery, action, love and so much more. I’m loving this series and so far there’s no swearing or sex. There is fighting, but what book doesn’t. Definitely great so far.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lillian ☁ Cloud 9 Books ☁

    ***** 4.5 Stars ***** Cannot be read as a standalone Kalinda may be free from her tyrant husband, but now her country is falling apart. She needs to search for Prince Ashwin to take the throne. In The Fire Queen, Kalinda and her brave crew travel across dangerous paths. But when she finally finds the Prince, she realizes that she has to enter another deadly competition. I loved how this book highlighted different powers. It was enchanting from beginning to end. I also enjoyed witnessing how Kalinda ***** 4.5 Stars ***** Cannot be read as a standalone Kalinda may be free from her tyrant husband, but now her country is falling apart. She needs to search for Prince Ashwin to take the throne. In The Fire Queen, Kalinda and her brave crew travel across dangerous paths. But when she finally finds the Prince, she realizes that she has to enter another deadly competition. I loved how this book highlighted different powers. It was enchanting from beginning to end. I also enjoyed witnessing how Kalinda became more powerful and learned how to control her fire. I can't wait for the next book!!!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Wren (fablesandwren)

    Really, I don’t know why I expected something more from book two. I guess the cover just told me to read it because it was so pretty. I really hope more people enjoy this series. It just isn’t up my alley. We received more than one Point Of View in this book, but it didn’t change the predictability of it all. The imagery is pretty but that’s about it. The writing isn’t phenomenal, but she does draw a pretty image in my head. The world building was good, but it just wasn’t enough. Sometimes I flip Really, I don’t know why I expected something more from book two. I guess the cover just told me to read it because it was so pretty. I really hope more people enjoy this series. It just isn’t up my alley. We received more than one Point Of View in this book, but it didn’t change the predictability of it all. The imagery is pretty but that’s about it. The writing isn’t phenomenal, but she does draw a pretty image in my head. The world building was good, but it just wasn’t enough. Sometimes I flipped the page and all of a sudden had no idea what was happening; it just moved at weird speeds throughout the book. And of course, the instalove for anyone and everyone that meets Kali was absolutely annoying. It’s 2017. Instalove should be outlawed. This series just isn’t for me. I really, really hope other people like this series. It has a lot of potential but it just wasn’t what I was expecting.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jessi ♥️ H. Vojsk

    Story ⭐️⭐️ Dnf at 26%. Sorry, not sorry. The only thing I loved about the first book was the story and world building, but this one just started to sound like the same idea just slightly changed. Characters ⭐️⭐️ I still don’t like them. They’re boring and I’m not even invested in one of their stories. And Devens story kind of reminds me (this Captain and then the traitor thing) of Chaol in Throne of glass. Hm. World ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ The worldbuilding in this one is pretty cool and I really liked it. It’ Story ⭐️⭐️ Dnf at 26%. Sorry, not sorry. The only thing I loved about the first book was the story and world building, but this one just started to sound like the same idea just slightly changed. Characters ⭐️⭐️ I still don’t like them. They’re boring and I’m not even invested in one of their stories. And Devens story kind of reminds me (this Captain and then the traitor thing) of Chaol in Throne of glass. Hm. World ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ The worldbuilding in this one is pretty cool and I really liked it. It’s nice to see some new places in this world. Relationships ⭐️⭐️ So Deven avoids Kali, because she is kind of officially the wife of someone. But still there is this instalove in the air. Boring. Writing style ⭐️⭐️⭐️ Meh, it’s okay.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Danielle (Life of a Literary Nerd)

    3.5 stars “You have nothing to fear. You are fire and fire is you.” This was such a great followup to The Hundredth Queen. The world becomes bigger the threats become larger and the stakes become higher. The Fire Queen follows Kali as she searches for Prince Ashwin, Tarek’s heir and the only person who can grant the disgraces Captain Deven his freedom. But to win that freedom, Kali must once again compete for herself and those she loves. The Fire Queen is an imaginative story of doing 3.5 stars “You have nothing to fear. You are fire and fire is you.” This was such a great followup to The Hundredth Queen. The world becomes bigger the threats become larger and the stakes become higher. The Fire Queen follows Kali as she searches for Prince Ashwin, Tarek’s heir and the only person who can grant the disgraces Captain Deven his freedom. But to win that freedom, Kali must once again compete for herself and those she loves. The Fire Queen is an imaginative story of doing what is right, even when it is not easy. Things I Liked The imagery is again stunning in The Fire Queen. King manages to craft a lush world that is both dangerous and inviting. The imagery really drew me in and made reading the book SO easy. I really loved the additional worldbuilding we got. The world expands in natural and relevant ways. We, along with Kalinda, learn more about bhutas powers, their history and mythology, and about the different ruling countries. The worldbuilding was well integrated and never felt forced or disruptive. I was really excited to learn more about the bhutas, because they were my favorite part of book 1! I think the addition of the alternating POVs between Kali and Deven also helped with the worldbuilding, but on a more micro level. We get to see and meet individuals and learn more about how they view Tarek’s rule, his death, Kali’s role as Kindred, Kali and Deven’s role in Hastin’s takeover. Like in book 1, The Fire Queen also features a competition with an immensely powerful prize. I like the competition here even more than the epic battle that was in The Hundredth Queen. We really get to know and interact with the other competitors (which I found lacking in book 1) and it creates much higher stakes because people we’ve become invested in are in danger. Things I Didn’t Like I wasn’t the biggest fan of Ashwin’s instant infatuation with Kali. The series as a whole doesn’t really WOW me in the romance department, but the repeated instalove that Kali finds herself at the end of is disappointing. I think the pacing in the book was too quick. It yielded some great action and there was never a dull moment, but it also led to some rash decisions and poor planning from characters. I also found the ending to be a little underwhelming for me. Everything was happening so fast that there wasn’t anytime to just live in the scene. Some major stuff goes down and I would have liked some reflection on it, but there was no time with how quickly the story moved. When I was thinking about the book as I started writing my review, my mind only went to the parts I liked. Even with my grievances, this book was still a joy to read, and leaves a hopeful feeling in it’s wake. The Fire Queen is a story of resilience, strength, and determination. And finding out what you are capable of in the face of unimaginable dangers. I received a copy of the book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tricia Levenseller

    The thing I loved most about this book is that Kali is no longer a reluctant hero. Her journey in THE HUNDREDTH QUEEN was an admirable fight for survival that was exhilarating and painful (in the best way) to watch. But now in THE FIRE QUEEN, Kali knows what she wants. She has embraced who she is, and she isn't afraid to fight for her people. I loved reading the next step in her journey, and I can't wait to see we're Emily R. King takes her next!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Johanna

    You know you don't like a book when you pray for the genocidal maniac from book one to swoop in and kill everyone just so you don't have to suffer anymore. Yeah, it was that bad. At least he genocidal maniac had a motivation I could get behind! Misguided, sure, but at least I got it. The heroes? … not so much. Careful, some spoilers ahead. I was too much in a rant mood to bother marking them. Anyway, this is the second book in The Hundredth Queen Trilogy. It picks up a bit after the end of book You know you don't like a book when you pray for the genocidal maniac from book one to swoop in and kill everyone just so you don't have to suffer anymore. Yeah, it was that bad. At least he genocidal maniac had a motivation I could get behind! Misguided, sure, but at least I got it. The heroes? … not so much. Careful, some spoilers ahead. I was too much in a rant mood to bother marking them. Anyway, this is the second book in The Hundredth Queen Trilogy. It picks up a bit after the end of book one. Kali and her friends just arrived at the third of four temples the prince might have been hiding out at only to find it completely destroyed and all the priests burned alive (yay! Fun!). Why they're looking for the prince? Because he is the rightful heir to the throne … because his dad was such a swell dude, his son certainly would be as well? That's already where my problems begin. It makes no sense. If I remember book one correctly, Kali and Deven escaped a crazy tyrant so they could be together. They made deals with the wrong people and ended up being betrayed (suprise! That's a reoccurring theme by the way). Still, why exactly do they think the son of a crazy guy would a any better than his father is beyond me. It's not like we spend book one hearing how awesome he is and how he is trying to ease his people's suffering. Anyway, the third temple is destroyed and before they can go to the fourth one, two kids swoop in and bring them to the Prince and Brother Shaan. And the most infuriating part of the book begins. Because for some reason Kali has to compete against three other princesses or whatever for the honour of being the prince's kindred. You might wonder why Kali would even want that since she's in love with Deven and has no interest in the prince. Well, because of the people obviously. The people who she hasn't interacted with in a meaningful way once during book one or two. The people who would hate her if they knew what she really was (view spoiler)[ and do once they learn of it (hide spoiler)] but sure, why not. Go ahead fight three other girls for a guy you don't know, whose manipulating you because he incapable of doing anything himself, any you're not in love with. It's not like 'your people' are being slaughtered while you have your little competition going on. As you can see, the plot of the book alone infuriated me to no end. Kali was whiny most of the time with the very few exceptions when she actually was badass, but no room in between. She basically begged everyone to manipulate her and use her. Every single twist in this book I saw coming from a mile away. Oh, they turned out to be bad guys? It's not like that wasn't obvious from the moment the character was introduced. And still! She has not a single critical or intelligent bone in her body. Deven is just as bad. While Kali is mostly whiny, he is ridiculously honourable. Honestly, do these two actually want to be together? As much time as they spend in this book pushing each other away, hanging out with other people, and telling themselves that other things are more important, I really don't think so. The most annoying part of this book (apart from the fact the plot was basically the same as book one and the stupidity of the characters) was the blatant misogyny this book showed. The system in this book is deeply deeply patriarchal and misogynistic. That in itself isn't the problem. You can write a book about horrible systems and make clear you don't condone it. You can have your characters fight it. But in this book, no one challenged the system. Not even the 'heroes'. It's perfectly acceptable that women have to fight to the death for the amusement and political power plays of men. It's perfectly all right that Kali 'belongs' to the prince just because she was forced to marry his father in book one. Sure, she doesn't want that, but it's not like she challenges his right. She just makes a deal with him to release her. Guys! This woman has the power to burn people alive! And she lets these men push her around like a chess piece and I'm supposed to feel sorry for her? Hell no! She had a choice! She could have said fuck it all and lived happily ever after somewhere with the guy she loves. Or she could have said fuck it this is my throne, I don't need some man to legitimize me. I'm gonna kick those guys out of my city and my country and build a better world. But she didn't. Instead she let herself be lied to constantly, manipulated constantly (even by people she for some reason trusts, looking at you Brother Shaan). I should probably say something nice as well. The cover is really pretty! And I like the general idea of the world building. In conclusion, I could not get through this book without pausing every two pages to roll my eyes and keep myself from throwing my kindle against the wall. I'm really not sure if I want to finish this trilogy.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alaina

    I loved everything about this book! Okay, so at the beginning I was so into Kalinda and Ashwin.. BUT THAT ENDING GUYS! OH. MY. FREAKING. GOD. GUYS! Yeah, I was messed up because then Kalinda and freaking Deven were on FIRE. God I love those two. Well, actually I loved everyone in this book. The Fire Queen is a dual POV from Kalinda and Deven. Kalinda is finally out of her terrible marriage with her horrible ex freaking husband. God, I hated that douche in the first book. She then runs to the crown prin I loved everything about this book! Okay, so at the beginning I was so into Kalinda and Ashwin.. BUT THAT ENDING GUYS! OH. MY. FREAKING. GOD. GUYS! Yeah, I was messed up because then Kalinda and freaking Deven were on FIRE. God I love those two. Well, actually I loved everyone in this book. The Fire Queen is a dual POV from Kalinda and Deven. Kalinda is finally out of her terrible marriage with her horrible ex freaking husband. God, I hated that douche in the first book. She then runs to the crown prince with her friends. Like I said I did end up liking her and Ashwin but I can totally see them as friends. Although it did break my heart that he found out in a terrible way that she wasn't into him. Sorry not sorry? Other than the romance and rooting for couples within this book, there's this competition. Kalinda makes some friends and some enemies. At first I didn't like one of the girls because she was a bitch and locked her up at one point of the book. Then there's the whole fighting competition which was awesome and scary at the same time. I screamed at one point and then wanted to cry. Yeah, I was basically a hot mess towards the end of this book. Okay, for the whole book. Overall, I really enjoyed this book. It was pretty good for it being the second book of this series. I seriously can't wait to read the third book and I'm so happy it's sitting so pretty on my kindle waiting for me to dive into it. I'M SO FREAKING EXCITED GUYS!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Purdie

    It's rare to find an excellent book two in a trilogy, but this stunning sequel to THE HUNDREDTH QUEEN succeeds! From new and fascinating locales to Kalinda's developing magic and a romance that keeps sizzling, I loved every moment of this action-packed story. A bonus treat is now having chapters from Deven's point of view. I highly recommend this book!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

    Thank you to Netgalley and Skyscape and Two Lions publishing for providing me with an ARC in return for an honest review. Maybe I'm just in a pissy mood today, I don't know, but after writing the review for this book on my blog, you can find it here, it ended up losing another star, bringing my review down to two stars. I don't think I've been let down by a book this badly since Shadow and Bone. I honestly don't even know how to break it down to highlights, so if you're interested in my opinion y Thank you to Netgalley and Skyscape and Two Lions publishing for providing me with an ARC in return for an honest review. Maybe I'm just in a pissy mood today, I don't know, but after writing the review for this book on my blog, you can find it here, it ended up losing another star, bringing my review down to two stars. I don't think I've been let down by a book this badly since Shadow and Bone. I honestly don't even know how to break it down to highlights, so if you're interested in my opinion you'll just have to read what's on my blog.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amy Leigh

    Please read the first in this series before reading this review to avoid unintentional spoilers! The Fire Queen picks up two months after The Hundredth Queen. Kali and a group of her friends have escaped Tarachand and are moving around the desert quickly to find Prince Ashwin. Only he can give Kalinda what she truly desires, freedom from her throne. As The Kindred rani Kalinda is tied to her throne until Prince Ashwin takes his place as the new King. When two couriers arrive unexpectedly saying Please read the first in this series before reading this review to avoid unintentional spoilers! The Fire Queen picks up two months after The Hundredth Queen. Kali and a group of her friends have escaped Tarachand and are moving around the desert quickly to find Prince Ashwin. Only he can give Kalinda what she truly desires, freedom from her throne. As The Kindred rani Kalinda is tied to her throne until Prince Ashwin takes his place as the new King. When two couriers arrive unexpectedly saying they have been sent to bring Kali to the Prince her group is unsure of placing their trust in them. Kalinda feels this is her best option and rides with the female courier Opal upon the promise her group will join her a day later. When she arrived at the Janardanian Palace nothing is as it seems. This place is very different than her kingdom with jungles and creatures foreign to her. Prince Ashwin is asking her to fight in another tournament but this one is different. She will be asked to fight three other kingdoms' royals all vying for her throne and to be Prince Ashwin's new Kindred. Her friends have all been taken as soon as they arrive and split into civilian and military encampments without her knowledge. Prince Ashwin and Kalinda have been forbidden to see the encampments or their people until the end of the tournament by the Janardanian Sultan. Little do they know Kalinda is already coming up with a plan. She had secrets of her own like her Bhuta powers and an ancient artifact that can unleash evil and swallow up the world. Kalinda believes she is destined to be a peacemaker for her people and was given her powers of light from the gods. She still doesn't understand much about her powers, how can she defeat 3 bhuta warrior princesses and hold onto her throne? Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for providing me with a copy for a fair and honest review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bitchin' Reads

    This second half of this book made up for the first half, and man, that cliffhanger has me feeling impatient for the next book. *checks for when it releases* As an audiobook, I was still impressed with the female narrator and enjoyed all of Kalinda's chapters. The male narrator chosen for Deven's chapters had me wanting to thunk my head against my desk. He was boring and didn't convey much emotion--I think "dry" describes him well. He also mispronounced SO. MANY. WORDS. Annunciations established This second half of this book made up for the first half, and man, that cliffhanger has me feeling impatient for the next book. *checks for when it releases* As an audiobook, I was still impressed with the female narrator and enjoyed all of Kalinda's chapters. The male narrator chosen for Deven's chapters had me wanting to thunk my head against my desk. He was boring and didn't convey much emotion--I think "dry" describes him well. He also mispronounced SO. MANY. WORDS. Annunciations established in The Hundredth Queen were butchered by him, and he also said specific words two or three different ways, so I was constantly frustrated with his inconsistencies. If you plan to listen to the audiobook, I suggest that you listen to Kalinda's parts but read Deven's parts--it will save you so much frustration. As for Kalinda and Deven, they frustrated me the entire book, but the kind of frustration due to characters trying to go against what is meant to be. Ahem, their love for example. They both kept trying to subvert their love by focusing on the importance of their empire which is, well, a good thing and I understand it...but I was all about their relationship. This forbidden romance born from their small but meaningful moments together. Normally I dislike this kind of quick blooming romance, but I couldn't help it here. I'm not sure as to why--maybe it was how Emily R. King introduced it, or how the characters constantly resisted their feelings and attempted to focus on a life-path that led to the good for all? Or perhaps it was because they were trying to be very selfless in denying their love, but their love continued to triumph regardless? I don't know, I don't know. I'm actually at a loss here. What I really appreciate about this series is the inclusion of hard topics, abuses and injustices against women, and how Emily R. King made these topics so integral to the societies and characters. She showcases the brutalities for what they are and how women have dealt with it all, and how it fuels Kalinda's drive to change their world. Their inclusion does not show a story that excuses them, but rather blows them wide open and reveals them to be the awful they are. I daresay call this a feminist YA series, and I'm proud to say it. Kalinda is strong, and she wants all her fellow women to be just as strong, to not be weak, and to not submit. Lastly, I wanted to say a little on the magic system and the myths/histories that are used to inform others of why this fantasy world exists as it does. There were some huge plot twists in this second book that had me rethinking everything I thought I knew from the first book. Kalinda learns a lot about her capabilities and the origin of her powers, both good and bad. But what I really liked is how fully developed and explained the myths/histories are--as far as I could tell, Emily R. King didn't leave behind holes that left me questioning, and the myths/legends pushed the story along and kept my interest burning. (Ha, a little pun there. Sorry if you don't understand--read the book and you will!) I would liken the magic system to that of the powers in Avatar: The Last Airbender--you have water, land, fire, and air, but they are called aquifier, burner, trembler, and galer (the overall name for them all is bhuta); major differences between the two, however, is that in this book some nations fear all bhutas and other nations fear only burners, and the ones that are feared are most often tortured and executed...but now that I think about it, that is kind of like Avatar...I may have to rework the differences section. Let me think on it. Anyways, I highly recommend this series! It had a little of everything I look for in a fantasy, and it served up some great characters. I hope you check it out! Happy reading!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jina Bazzar

    Enjoyed this one more than the first book. Deven acted childish in this one - and sometimes so did Kalinda. Another case of insta-love with no grounds, this time with prince Ashwin. So far, major players keep falling in love with Kalinda - and it's very annoying and convenient. But I still wanted to know what next, and I admire the book - and author - who leads you on to the end of the book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sheila Goicea

    See this FULL review along with others on my blog at: shesgoingbookcrazy.com 1) The Hundredth Queen: ★★★★ Content Warning: Flogging, Prejudice/Discrimination, Polygamy ”You can start the fire, but you cannot control it. Anu created mortals in the image of the gods. Sky in our lungs, land beneath our feet, fire in our soul, and water in our blood. The First Bhutas were each given dominion over one of these powers. So you see, you have nothing to fear. You are fire, and fire is you.” I had a difficult See this FULL review along with others on my blog at: shesgoingbookcrazy.com 1) The Hundredth Queen: ★★★★ Content Warning: Flogging, Prejudice/Discrimination, Polygamy ”You can start the fire, but you cannot control it. Anu created mortals in the image of the gods. Sky in our lungs, land beneath our feet, fire in our soul, and water in our blood. The First Bhutas were each given dominion over one of these powers. So you see, you have nothing to fear. You are fire, and fire is you.” I had a difficult time getting into this book. It wasn’t the book’s fault--it was mine for reading this installment a while after The Hundredth Queen. (This is why I like, and recommend, to read series sequentially--not spaced over the course of a year. Unless you have an amazing memory.) Either way, woe to me for having to get caught up to speed. The Fire Queen takes place two months after the end of The Hundredth Queen. Kalinda and her ban of friends and allies travel to the desert to locate the late Rajah Tarek’s son, Prince Ashwin. Since Kalinda is still Kindred to the throne, Ashwin becoming king is the only way she can renounce her duties. The Fire Queen introduces the reader to bhutas representing the other elements. Tremblers (earth), Galers (air), and Aquifers (water) all make their presence known when royals from foreign lands enter to compete for Prince Ashwin’s hand in marriage, in order to become his Kindred. Little does Kalinda know that she cannot simply transfer her duties to Ashwin. Since she was Kindred to the previous rajah, the next in line to the throne could either claim her as a wife, or not. Without much of a choice, Kalinda also is to take part in a tournament against the other women vying for Ashwin’s hand. Not only is Kalinda to partake in this tournament to the death, her people are forced into military encampments by the Janardanian Sultan. Determined to come up with a plan to free her people, Kalinda holds two powerful elements that could tip the odds in their favor: her power of fire, and an artifact which holds an ancient, but evil power. Being The Kindred gives her a place of power where she has the ability to help and protect her people from these foreign threats--but she needs to surpass the obstacles in front of her in order to do so, and ultimately decide if pursuing Ashwin as a husband to keep her place of power. “Kali loves our people, and blames herself for their recent suffering. She will compete in another tournament to protect them from a foreign queen and more hardship.” ------------------------------------------ Things that I liked: #1 The lore and its simple complexity is so alluring, “Anu sought to possess his father’s glory and become king of the gods, so he killed Abzu and usurped his lordship. Enraged by her son’s betrayal, Tiamat birthed the First-Ever Dragon and filled the creature’s body with fiery venom. Together, they made war against her son. Armed with the arrows of his winds, Anu, the god of storms, fought Tiamat and the dragon. Anu cut through the channels of Tiamat’s blood and made the north wind bear her body away into secret places, creating rivers that ran into the salty seas. From her ribs, Anu crafted the vault of the sky and land, and from her spine, she sprouted the Morass.” “What happened to the First-Ever Dragon?” “Doesn’t say, but I once read that another name for the demon Kur is the First-Ever Dragon.” Demons and dragons are one and the same? While I remember there being some background on the lore in The Hundredth Queen, this book definitely dives in deep to unveil more details of the Parijana religion. Even more interesting were the translations of the faith by the different realms. While Kalinda grew up knowing certain customs, she witnessed the vast variety of different people and how they interpret their faith. While in real life, I don’t think this tactic is as practical, but this type of lore-based religion goes hand-in-hand with mythological deities and how they were worshiped by many different people in various ways. #2 I really grew to revere Kalinda’s character through the many struggles she faces. If she can fall this far, I can too. Kalinda finds herself in a precarious position. When she discovers that her people are being corralled, she will stop at nothing to free them. However, she must put aside her own wishes and her relationship with Deven, to realizes that her position may be used for the greater good. Yes, that greater good would call for her to sacrifice (her heart), but she’s ultimately willing to do that in order to keep her people safe. Having my title taken is like tumbling down endless stairs. I am falling for an eternity, with no means of stopping. You can turn to the Voider. The errant thought sprouts from nowhere. I try to pluck out the terrible idea, but it grows roots. The Voider can answer your heart’s wish. It can set Deven and our people free from the encampments. I’m not sure what it is about this series, but I’ve noticed some Biblical parallels. When Kalinda’s plans go awry, she’s tempted several times over to release the Voider, a terrible force that would change not only wreak havoc, but bring ruin. I couldn’t help but think of Jesus being tempted by the devil in the wilderness in Matthew. The best aspect of her character is the steadfastness she possesses. While she holds a great and terrible power within her grasp, and is tempted to unleash it, she doesn’t. She knows the cost everyone would pay if she did out of selfish fear. #3 The theme of redemption exists throughout this book, particularly with Ashwin’s character. While Ashwin is not his father, and hasn’t necessarily done anything wrong, he’s working to constantly prove himself to Kalinda. It’s so common for people to inherit their parents’ bad reputations whether they are guilty of those acts themselves or not. ”Not every son is destined to become his father.” There are times when he’s given a chance and proves himself as being much different than Kalinda expects. ”I’m ashamed of Tarek, ashamed of how the rest of the world perceives the empire and me on account of him. However, I need to say that this is a point that I’m also torn on. even though he didn’t have any other choice in the matter. So, I’m a bit torn with how his character was portrayed in the end. #4 Real-world problems of prejudice and discrimination are integrated into the plot. The divide between the Burner bhutas and human population turns a corner. ”Undoing their prejudice will take time. Have patience and faith.” When Kalinda’s powers are discovered, she falls from Kindred to despised. Not only is the Janardanian Sultan terrible towards her, so are the people. Derogatory terms like slag and the like, are used towards Kalinda. While this isn’t a positive point per say, I wanted to mention it because I appreciated that there were some very real issues brought into this fantasy book that many could find Things that I disliked: #1 The repetition of the death tournament was a downside for me. Not only was it similar to the first book, it made me think of other dystopian series with the “forced battle” aspects in them (i.e. The Hunger Games). I thought that a different avenue could have been pursued to widen the plot elements a bit. #2 Romances with both Deven and Ashwin occur (yeah, there’s a bit of a love triangle happening here.) Although...it’s not as far-fetched as some because of the circumstances, I just didn’t care for it. Overall, I thought this was a great addition to the series, and am looking forward to the next installment to see where Kalinda ends up, and the conclusion to the ice demon. I wished to see more variety in the plotline, and hope that Kalinda can make a quick decision her romantic relationships. Vulgarity: So, I didn’t come across any swearing. However, I’ve read other reviews that said there is swearing. I may have missed something. If there is, then it was minute because I’d catch on pretty quick if more than a few words were used. Sexual content: Kissing only. However, Kalinda has some haunting encounters with Rajah Tarek where he is suggestive about their “wedding night” and is pursuing her in sexual manners. Violence: Moderate. There aren’t many gory scenes, but there is a scene where Deven is being flogged into oblivion, as well as the beheading of another character. My Rating: ★★★★

  17. 5 out of 5

    Aneta Bak

    The Fire Queen was an amazing sequel! If you liked the first book, you will love this one even more. Kalinda is on the run. Running for their safety, Kalinda and her allies must find Prince Ashwin and help him reach his throne before his whole empire falls. Ashwin needs help defeating his enemies, and the only way to ensure assistance to get his throne back, is for him to marry. Kalinda must battle 3 other women, and the winner will marry the prince. Even though Kalinda loves Deven, her love for The Fire Queen was an amazing sequel! If you liked the first book, you will love this one even more. Kalinda is on the run. Running for their safety, Kalinda and her allies must find Prince Ashwin and help him reach his throne before his whole empire falls. Ashwin needs help defeating his enemies, and the only way to ensure assistance to get his throne back, is for him to marry. Kalinda must battle 3 other women, and the winner will marry the prince. Even though Kalinda loves Deven, her love for her friends and her people forces her to compete. I really liked Kalinda in the first book, but I loved her so much more in this one. In the first book, she went from being the underdog to a powerful woman, and I loved reading about that. In this book she's already powerful, but now she has to battle a darkness inside her, and she has to face doing the right thing or being selfish. I think Kalinda is a great character, any woman can look up to her. The plot of this story was definitely a lot more interesting. I found that the first book was little bit predictable in the plot, but this one was definitely a nice surprise. There were still some aspects that were predictable (like how Kalinda does in the tournament) but the ending wasn't exactly what I expected, it was a pleasant surprise. The romance in this book was alright. It sort of has that second book syndrome regarding the romance, where in the first book the characters fall in love and everything is great, but in the second book they have some problem and it keeps them away from each other, only to work it out in the end. Well that was exactly what happened here, Deven feels ashamed for being a traitor and doesn't feel like he deserves Kalinda, his standoffish nature makes Kalinda think that he is upset with her and it just causes tension in their relationship. In comes the new "suitor" and the love-triangle begins. While the love triangle is still present, it is quite obvious who Kalinda will chose in the end. Overall, the plot and the story were so much better in this book, as well as Kalinda's development. I found myself surprised at the ending, which was really good. I loved everything about the book, except the love triangle, it just seemed really pointless to me. I would still recommend this series to anyone who loves fantasy, and the people who have read The Bone Witch or The Wrath and the Dawn. Happy Reading, Aneta

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dark Sith Lordette Jennymort ♔

    well. this one was a little better in terms of plot, but the love triangle? from mother fucking hell? i am pretty much at level 10 with stopping this series. i just can't with this shit. the drama, angst, the whole, 'oh woe is me' bullshit. meh. why do i keep doing this to myself? and what kind of fucking ending was that? and why the time jump? the hell? well. this one was a little better in terms of plot, but the love triangle? from mother fucking hell? i am pretty much at level 10 with stopping this series. i just can't with this shit. the drama, angst, the whole, 'oh woe is me' bullshit. meh. why do i keep doing this to myself? and what kind of fucking ending was that? and why the time jump? the hell?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Marsh

    While this was a fun, quick read, I can’t possibly give it a higher rating due to the countless similarities it has to other books I’ve read. Elements of this are definitely taken from other, more successful stories. I liked it, and I care for the characters, but there’s nothing original about it that merits a higher rating.

  20. 5 out of 5

    ℓуηη, ℓσкιѕℓутнєя¢ℓαω

    This series is definitely worth reading. With today's feminist movements around the globe this book shows what we're fighting for: equality & the strength to stand on our own. In Kalinda's world ranis & courtesan are collected like trophies to be out on a shelf, admired & used every now and then. But they have no power, no voice. They are forced into tank tournaments to slaughter each other for better standing, or in this book's case to win a throne. It's infuriating that they're just pawns for m This series is definitely worth reading. With today's feminist movements around the globe this book shows what we're fighting for: equality & the strength to stand on our own. In Kalinda's world ranis & courtesan are collected like trophies to be out on a shelf, admired & used every now and then. But they have no power, no voice. They are forced into tank tournaments to slaughter each other for better standing, or in this book's case to win a throne. It's infuriating that they're just pawns for men's amusement & games. The good part though is that we are given so many strong women in these books that rise up & fight for their beliefs & the rights of the people they love. They defeat men & fight back, they beat down the norm of docile, acquiescence expected of them. They are fierce when they need to be. I just really love reading about them 💕 Natesa, Indah & Kalinda are the current favs, though I really liked Tinley as well. The storyline in this one wasn't quite as attention getting as The Hundredth Queen, but it was still very good and moved along at a steady pace. There's more tension in this one though because you really don't know who Kali can trust & who's plotting behind her back. There are listening ears everywhere & a Kingdom at stake. I'm still on the fence about trusting a couple characters, but I won't mention names so I don't spoil things. Onto some brief annoyances: I really liked Seven in the first book, but in this he just came off as whiny, pity-party, jealous boy & he was just irritating to read sometimes lol. I know he's battling his heart & his duty, but a little less whine would be nice. And if course we get a silly love triangle of sorts when we through Prince Ashwin into the mix. As the the previous rajah's wife, Kali is bound to the throne & Ashwin has "first rights" to any of his father's wives & courtesans. Bleck! So of course Ashwin is trying to win her favor, but he's just so meh in my opinion. And I have to displaying on principle for trying to steal Kali away from Deven. Little turd. Hopefully everything works out properly in the next book. Some other good stuff though is the blossoming relationship between Yatin and Natesa. Totally loving that. So sweet! Also I love seeing Kali really come into her powers & learning to trust them and herself. There's a nice dramatic, cliff-hanger finish that definitely prompts you to pick up the next book. Luckily I've got it right here & ready t crack open ^_^

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bee Glosson

    Second book of the series, this one take a bit of a different approach to its story telling mechanism. Instead of just the main characters view, it splits it between the 2 main characters. Kalinda and Devin are your heroes struggling to find their way after everything they went through in book 1. With a new, yet strangely familiar villain this book pushes the characters full speed into the destiny that they dont know is theirs. Kalinda finds herself still having to live a life she never asked fo Second book of the series, this one take a bit of a different approach to its story telling mechanism. Instead of just the main characters view, it splits it between the 2 main characters. Kalinda and Devin are your heroes struggling to find their way after everything they went through in book 1. With a new, yet strangely familiar villain this book pushes the characters full speed into the destiny that they dont know is theirs. Kalinda finds herself still having to live a life she never asked for, even if she is somehow built for it. I give this book a 3.75 which is better than the first. I still feel like this series can take the next step but I'll have to wait til book 3 to find out if it does. Worth the read but its potential wasnt reached.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Atlas

    "I made myself a champion. I won't make the same mistake twice" * 1 / 5 Without being facetious, the best thing about this book is the cover. It's lovely! Everything else ... meh. I felt the same way after finishing this book as I did after finishing Frostblood: like I've just read several hundred pages where, technically, lots of stuff is going on, but I just didn't care about any of it and now feel a bit weird. I had virtually zero emotional reaction to anything in this book, which is weird and "I made myself a champion. I won't make the same mistake twice" * 1 / 5 Without being facetious, the best thing about this book is the cover. It's lovely! Everything else ... meh. I felt the same way after finishing this book as I did after finishing Frostblood: like I've just read several hundred pages where, technically, lots of stuff is going on, but I just didn't care about any of it and now feel a bit weird. I had virtually zero emotional reaction to anything in this book, which is weird and unfortunate because I rather enjoyed The Hundredth Queen. Despair crawls far inside me and expands into my bones. We are lost to the evernight The Fire Queen picks up with Kalinda, Deven, Yatin, Natesa and a few others on the run. The bhuta (magic people) warlord has seized the capital of the Empire, the rajah is dead by Kalinda's hand, and they are seeking the Prince of the Empire, Rajah Tarek's son Ashwin. When they find him, they all travel to a neighbouring kingdom to seek aid in overthrowing the warlord and reclaiming the empire for Ashwin. The Sultan offers aid willingly. The catch? Kalinda has to compete against three other women for the "honour" of wedding Prince Ashwin - this doesn't really make much sense, but basically the Sultan wants his chosen woman to win so he can get political power. Not sure why he didn't just demand that Ashwin marries someone from his family in return for an army, but hey ho. In the end, this book has pretty much the same plot as the last one. Kalinda learns more about her fire powers, Kalinda competes against other women in tests of skill and strength, some of these women are clever and others are mean, Kalinda meets a new man who makes her doubt everything she thought was true. Eh. It's just repetitive and boring and full of a love triangle. The chapters from Deven's perspective aren't that much more interesting; Deven is kept in a camp along with the other soldiers who served the Rajah, and he's not very popular on account of the whole traitor thing. Ashwin is not particularly interesting and really only serves for Kalinda to have conflict between liking this guy but also being irrevocably reminded of Tarek. Kali is a shooting star. I do not know how much longer I can keep her close without burning up in her wake The setting is also rather bland. There's deserts and jungle. I believe the people and their culture is loosely based on Sumer and the Sumerians, but it's a pretty flavourless characterisation and they are essentially "desert people who like magic except for those nasty fire ones". There's a bit of cool mythology involving demons and such threaded in, which I quite liked, in terms of positives. There's also two sweet new characters, Opal and Rohan, who are children and Galers who travel using paragliders, which is kinda cool. I didn't really find anything in this book for me to invest in emotionally. Some of the writing was quite nice and poetic, but it wasn't enough for me to enjoy The Fire Queen. I would still recommend the first book in the series, but perhaps suggest that people don't continue. My thanks to Netgalley, the publisher, and the author for an ARC of this book Read this review and more on my blog: https://atlasrisingbooks.wordpress.co...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Flavia

    The Fire Queen is the second book in a series called The Hundredth Queen series, and you can read my review for the first book here. The thing that really attracted me to both of these books respectively was their covers. They are colourful, the first being an eye-catching red, and the second being a lush purple…and it was also the fact that the character pictured on the covers (probably Kalinda, the main character) is wearing a saree, and has henna on her hands! Considering the fact that I had The Fire Queen is the second book in a series called The Hundredth Queen series, and you can read my review for the first book here. The thing that really attracted me to both of these books respectively was their covers. They are colourful, the first being an eye-catching red, and the second being a lush purple…and it was also the fact that the character pictured on the covers (probably Kalinda, the main character) is wearing a saree, and has henna on her hands! Considering the fact that I had never seen books with covers like these before, I felt really drawn to the series before I even read the first word. I also found it a little funny that I was sent an ARC of The Fire Queen as a surprise (a.k.a. I requested it, but had no idea it was being sent to me!), and that it arrived while I was away at a Bengali wedding, and wearing a saree myself! I wish I could have taken a photo of myself holding the book while wearing the saree, and though that sadly didn’t happen, I was able to take photos with the book while I still had the wedding mehndi (henna) on my hand when I got home the next day! I really enjoyed the world building, and the general introduction of the world and characters of The Hundredth Queen series in the first book. The second book in the series, The Fire Queen, however is more focused on advancing the plot, which I really appreciated too. I missed some of the descriptions which were found in the first book, that helped me to picture the palace and other settings, in the second book, but am also glad that the plot was not sacrificed, or the book made longer due to the addition of descriptions. The plot, like in book one, remained easy to follow, just as King’s writing remained easy to read! I also wanted to note that although the second book picks up where the first one left off, I had some difficulty getting back into the story at first (or maybe it was just a bit slow for me?). But that could be due to how my having read the first book in June, and also having had a lot of work-related things to do. So, the start of this book might not be slow for everyone, but just keep in mind that if you’re having a bit of a hard time getting into it, you should not give up, because the excitement that comes after is well worth the wait! I kind of flew through the rest of the book in one sitting after I hit a certain part of the story. Another change in the second book from the first book is that we no longer get just Kalinda’s first person perspective, but also Captain Deven Naik’s. I found this change to be quite interesting, and was intrigued to see what was going on in his mind as well. I think that due to how the plot is laid out, it was a very good idea to change the format in this manner. That being said, I did not enjoy Deven’s character quite as much in this book as in The Hundredth Queen, but that does not mean that I disliked his character in any way! I just didn’t like him as much as I did before. His character also did develop throughout The Fire Queen, and I look forward to seeing how I feel about him in the third book (coming out in February 2018). I recommend this book to those who have read the first book, since it was very interesting to see how the plot progressed and will lead into book three. And I also recommend the series as a whole to those who enjoy fantasy with a hint of romance, in a setting quite dissimilar to the high fantasy books we are normally used to!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Kalinda is finally free of her jerky husband, the emperor. Now, though, the empire is in danger of being run by man just as cruel. So Kalinda and her friends rush to find the crown prince on the nation's border where he is being tutored by a holy man. A powerful man in the area refuses to let the prince leave and requires Kalinda, as part of the inherited wealth of the prince, to compete in yet another tournament to become the first queen to the new emperor. So, The Fire Queen. The cover is aweso Kalinda is finally free of her jerky husband, the emperor. Now, though, the empire is in danger of being run by man just as cruel. So Kalinda and her friends rush to find the crown prince on the nation's border where he is being tutored by a holy man. A powerful man in the area refuses to let the prince leave and requires Kalinda, as part of the inherited wealth of the prince, to compete in yet another tournament to become the first queen to the new emperor. So, The Fire Queen. The cover is awesome, but I think it needs a better title. It's too similar to the first book. Still, the content was pretty interesting. Kalinda is finally free from her jerky husband. Is it murder for her to kill him when he's murdered hundreds of others? Will she be punished if people find out she did it? I find myself asking these questions as I read. But the more crucial question for this book is: Is this crown prince as kind and naive as he appears or is he as great a manipulator as his father? When Kalinda finally met the prince, she finds out that she will have to be his wife if he desires it. He offers her the choice, but she will still have to compete in the tournament. He seems to genuinely care for her, but Kalinda, other characters, and I still wonder whether to trust this powerful figure. It adds more of a love triangle to this story, too. In the last book, it was less of a triangle because Kalinda did not want to marry the Emperor at all. In this book, she's torn. It irritated me, because her guard deserved her love. I'm voting for them, whenever they can get themselves together enough to figure it out. The arena set was kind of repetitive with the first book, you know? The author changed everything up at least. There was more time actually competing, the stakes were raised, the groom was different, and all the competitors had abilities (all four elements, go figure). I was happy to see them compete more, and the challenges were fascinating, like something out of a legend. I recommend this book to fans of YA fantasy, especially non-European medieval fantasy. I received a complementary copy of this book from NetGalley. All opinions expressed are my own.

  25. 4 out of 5

    ☼♎ Carmen the Bootyshaker Temptress ☼♎

    Rated 3.5 stars

  26. 4 out of 5

    Krysti

    There were so many things about THE HUNDREDTH QUEEN that I absolutely loved, but above anything else, I was so enamored with the incredible women depicted in that book. They were such tremendous examples of strength, femininity, and sisterhood. I am so thrilled to say that there are even more incredible female characters in THE FIRE QUEEN, and I am absolutely inspired by each of them in different ways. One of the things I most enjoyed about this book was getting to see more of the bhuta powers o There were so many things about THE HUNDREDTH QUEEN that I absolutely loved, but above anything else, I was so enamored with the incredible women depicted in that book. They were such tremendous examples of strength, femininity, and sisterhood. I am so thrilled to say that there are even more incredible female characters in THE FIRE QUEEN, and I am absolutely inspired by each of them in different ways. One of the things I most enjoyed about this book was getting to see more of the bhuta powers on display. At the heart of this series is a fascinating, elemental-based magic system, and there are some really fantastic scenes in this book where that magic comes into play to create some truly stunning imagery. It was very apparent that Emily was really enjoying herself while writing this, because despite the dire situations the characters find themselves in, there's this undercurrent of fun that runs throughout and makes the story a pleasure to read. The plot in this book is very fast-paced and high-stakes. It perfectly transitions the story from book one into the epic finale I imagine is coming in book three. If you enjoyed the tournament elements of THE HUNDREDTH QUEEN, then you certainly won't be disappointed with THE FIRE QUEEN. The romantic tension between Kalinda and Captain Deven Naik continues to simmer throughout this story. We even get to read through Deven's perspective through some of this novel, which not only sheds more light on the circumstances Kali and Deven find themselves in but also shows us more of Deven's character and motivations. Another element of the story that I found highly entertaining was that we get to see more of the empire in this book, as well as individuals from many of its different regions. The setting was beautiful and exuded magic. It also added some really interesting conflicts for the characters to overcome. So often in second books, we see main characters who become plagued by self doubt when things begin to go awry. And while there are so many different elements in this story that make Kali question her purpose and her goals, she steadfastly believes in her own strength, and I think that was the thing that I loved above all else in this story. I am so in awe the way that Emily writes female characters. Reading these novels truly is like a lesson in sisterhood, and I cannot wait to read the next book in this beautiful series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Almney King

    3⭐️ A good sequel The sequel of this book was just as high action packed as deadly as its predecessor. All of our non-dead characters return, all at one crazy exception spurred the by dark magic of a powerful book! again, I was entertained by these characters but not as deeply invested emotionally as I would have liked. The stakes in the book keep getting higher the danger burning closer to our warrior heroine as she learns the strength of her own Burner powers! What is disliked was the book’s s 3⭐️ A good sequel The sequel of this book was just as high action packed as deadly as its predecessor. All of our non-dead characters return, all at one crazy exception spurred the by dark magic of a powerful book! again, I was entertained by these characters but not as deeply invested emotionally as I would have liked. The stakes in the book keep getting higher the danger burning closer to our warrior heroine as she learns the strength of her own Burner powers! What is disliked was the book’s structure as its character POV alternates between Kalinda (our MC) and her wayward lover Deven. Honestly, I couldn’t give a rats azz about Deven. He just isn’t interesting to me and basically swallows 1/2 of the book with his constant worry over Kalinda but a push and pull uncertainty about his devotion as he is wary of her being a butha (or Burner) for he hates butahs for certain reasons. Gosh, I really wish he had an actual ROLE in this story, something much more to his brother Brac’s importance as he reaches Kalinda how to control her Burner powers being a Burner himself. That would have been a good turn of romance, but sadly, I wasn’t appeased, lol. But there IS a love triangle I still wasn’t too crazy about, but it worked... I guess. There was a lot of interesting foreshadowing going on which led to the BIG REVEAL in the end that had some Mummy Returns vibes. I’m still not sure how I feel about it, won’t know until I read book three. Overall, 3.5 Stars because once again, I was entertained, but not impressed. It was a fun enough adventure to hook me. A Out! ✌️

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty (Amethyst Bookwyrm)

    Thanks to Netgalley and Skyscape for giving me this book to review. The Fire Queen is the light, fast paced sequel to The Hundredth Queen which improved on the world building and descriptive writing. However, I found the story very predictable as it was so similar to the first book. I also was not a fan of the love triangle in this book, and while I liked the alternating POVs in this book as we got to see more story, it did make me like Deven less. Kali is a good character as she knows what she wa Thanks to Netgalley and Skyscape for giving me this book to review. The Fire Queen is the light, fast paced sequel to The Hundredth Queen which improved on the world building and descriptive writing. However, I found the story very predictable as it was so similar to the first book. I also was not a fan of the love triangle in this book, and while I liked the alternating POVs in this book as we got to see more story, it did make me like Deven less. Kali is a good character as she knows what she wants now and is very loyal to her country and the people in it. I wish Deven would grow a pair as in the entire book he was moping around, pushing people away, and then was upset that they weren’t around. I found Ashwin’s character a bit inconsistent but also naïve and a pushover. Brother Shaan’s character changed completely in this book as he seemed a bit shady. While this book is not perfect I still enjoyed it, and am looking forward to reading The Rogue Queen. I would recommend The Fire Queen to fans of the first book The Hundredth Queen. This and my other reviews can be found at Amethyst Bookwyrm

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michelle ♥ The Romance Vault ♥

    Well I can safely say I'm still enthralled by this series. I flippin' loved this continuation. The only bits that didn't sit well were the recapping of book one, I hate that some authors do this. Please, if someone didn't bother to read book one and get the gist of the story then tough on them. I don't need to be reading recaps, especially if I'm reading in quick succession. Anyho, Kali and Deven and all the characters in The Fire Queen bring forth a captivating read that I take as what it is: a Well I can safely say I'm still enthralled by this series. I flippin' loved this continuation. The only bits that didn't sit well were the recapping of book one, I hate that some authors do this. Please, if someone didn't bother to read book one and get the gist of the story then tough on them. I don't need to be reading recaps, especially if I'm reading in quick succession. Anyho, Kali and Deven and all the characters in The Fire Queen bring forth a captivating read that I take as what it is: a great piece of escapism that plays out every time like a movie as I read the words. I truly loved book 2 and couldn't put it down and can't wait to dive into book 3. Loved it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Terrie's Just Another Book B*tch

    LOVING This series!! Full review coming soon But if you enjoy YA fantasy ...add it to your shelf!

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