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Anne of Green Gables Collection

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Don't Miss a Moment with Anne Shirley in this Anne of Green Gables Bundle This bundle includes: • Anne of Green Gables • Anne of Avonlea • Anne of the Island • Anne's House of Dreams • Rainbow Valley • Rilla of Ingleside • Chronicles of Avonlea • Further Chronicles of Avonlea


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Don't Miss a Moment with Anne Shirley in this Anne of Green Gables Bundle This bundle includes: • Anne of Green Gables • Anne of Avonlea • Anne of the Island • Anne's House of Dreams • Rainbow Valley • Rilla of Ingleside • Chronicles of Avonlea • Further Chronicles of Avonlea

30 review for Anne of Green Gables Collection

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jess the Shelf-Declared Bibliophile

    Check out my reviews for each individual book on their main pages.

  2. 4 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    Wonderful, classic series, all the books are worth reading but good lord, the cover chosen for this e-book collection of 10 books makes it look like the books are about mystery or horror, which is the absolute furthest thing from Anne Shirley's stories!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    One of my favorite book series of all time. Rilla of Ingelside is my all time favorite book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Saidah Gilbert

    Does not include Anne of Windy Poplars so did not read it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Zaffino Valori

    Loved it. A great story of old fashioned values. And some of the drawbacks

  6. 4 out of 5

    Toni

    Kindle volume is a collection of the "Anne" books. (downloaded it for 49 cents!) I reread Anne of Green Gables for book club. Eventually I will read the remaining Anne's I have not previously read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Cook

    A great classic series. I thoroughly enjoyed Anne of Green Gables and the subsequent books based around her personal journey. The books written about her children are fine reads, as well. I still need to read the final book in this particular collection, but must move on to other books for now.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dr.J.G.

    Anne Stories Most classic literature by women authors is reflection of their collected wisdom through their lives, and the morality and ethics of the writing follows a lifeblood path as do the romances, rather than a study and a fancy clubbed together. This set of tales was probably serialized originally, especially the second one on, from the tone of separate chapters - each a complete story, and yet they follow smoothly, flowing quite nicely one after another together. The titles seem to indicate Anne Stories Most classic literature by women authors is reflection of their collected wisdom through their lives, and the morality and ethics of the writing follows a lifeblood path as do the romances, rather than a study and a fancy clubbed together. This set of tales was probably serialized originally, especially the second one on, from the tone of separate chapters - each a complete story, and yet they follow smoothly, flowing quite nicely one after another together. The titles seem to indicate Anne's progress in life via the procession of widening circles they indicate - the house, the village, the island, and then they go specifying again, with house her home, and it's location. One exasperation for a reader would be, when tempted by the beautiful descriptions of various places, one looks for just where it all is - and the place doesn't exist, or at least pieces don't match. Names are taken from wherever the author liked, and while descriptions might fit a place, it's hard to find just where any of them exists on maps. ............ ............ Anne of Green Gables The book begins with Mrs. Rachel Lynde, who is as much antithesis of Elizabeth from Elizabeth's German Garden as could be. That, one supposes after the protagonist appears, was a little bitter dose so the cherry cake Anne is that much more astounding, taking one by complete surprise. It's a surprise that the protagonist is a little orphan girl arriving fresh at the home named Green Gables, rather than the woman of indeterminate age one sees on the cover, but that passes. Before long, before one knows, one is deep in comfort with Anne's world. The book is about halfway before one realises she's not going to be grown up in this volume, the author being in no hurry, and one is to enjoy the girlhood and the world thereof, with school and friends, teachers and walks in woods, and not talking to boys who are interested in one. Nice to have descriptions of loveliness of nature and seasons strewn all over, but characterisation are good, and one expects Anne would grow out of hating Gilbert Blythe, which she is more than done already, long before they tie for top at entrance exam to Queen's. And they are friends just as this ends, bringing satisfaction to reader despite the tragedy that smites in the silent Matthew departing and Marilla dealing with more. June 26, 2020 - July 01, 2020. ............ Anne of Avonlea Here we have Anne's career as a schoolteacher and beginning of society of her generation of Avonlea, with Gilbert Blythe now her close friend, apart from Diana (now courted by Fred Wright), and other schoolmates that had been at Queen's. Her life now moreover is already centred on children, her pupils at school and twins at home who are Marilla's cousins. Anne and her friends try to improve Avonlea by getting people to improve their properties and fronts, fences and sidewalks, but are confronted by unexpected problems, from mixups leading to a hall painted bright blue instead of green, to serious horrors looming in shape of people renting their fences for advertisements. Anne lingers in girlhood, woods and flowers and children, with Gilbert still only a friend, although she's become aware he's growing out of boyhood. Her first acquaintance with the phenomenon of love is via a love story of two people of a prior generation, one a father of a favourite student and another she discovers living in a lovely house far out of the village, surrounded by a forest anne is enchanted with; the now middle aged woman finds a kindred spirit in the young boy so like his father, the love of her life. And the romance does blossom, with Stephen Irving returning to marry Lavender Lewis finally, after Paul writes him about meeting her. But Marilla has the sensible comment:- ""I can't see that it's so terribly romantic at all," said Marilla rather crisply. Marilla thought Anne was too worked up about it and had plenty to do with getting ready for college without "traipsing" to Echo Lodge two days out of three helping Miss Lavendar. "In the first place two young fools quarrel and turn sulky; then Steve Irving goes to the States and after a spell gets married up there and is perfectly happy from all accounts. Then his wife dies and after a decent interval he thinks he'll come home and see if his first fancy'll have him. Meanwhile, she's been living single, probably because nobody nice enough came along to want her, and they meet and agree to be married after all. Now, where is the romance in all that?"" Exactly what those not fooled by the candy floss KJ copy, KKHH, thought. But meanwhile Anne is being sent off to college after all by Marilla, and that's the end of this part of the story and of her teaching Avonlea school for now, with a possible glimmer of romance with Gilbert Blythe on horizon. July 01, 2020 - July 07, 2020. ............ Anne of the Island One must give credit for continuity of the narrative that it picks up exactly where it left off, strengthening the guess that these were serialised writings published in periodicals before a suitable bunch was published as a book, rather than individual books published at intervals. Changes are smooth - Diana Barry, engaged to Fred Wright back in Avonlea, has another path in life, and Priscilla Grant, familiar since Queen's, is now close friend and companion of Anne, who is at Redmond college at kingsport in Nova Scotia along with Gilbert Blythe and another Avonlea boy, Charlie Sloane. And now they meet Philippa Gordon from Bolingbroke, NS, where Anne originated. Letters from Avonlea secured her life at college. "Mrs. Lynde had more time than ever to devote to church affairs and had flung herself into them heart and soul. She was at present much worked up over the poor "supplies" they were having in the vacant Avonlea pulpit. ""I don't believe any but fools enter the ministry nowadays," she wrote bitterly. "Such candidates as they have sent us, and such stuff as they preach! Half of it ain't true, and, what's worse, it ain't sound doctrine. The one we have now is the worst of the lot. He mostly takes a text and preaches about something else. And he says he doesn't believe all the heathen will be eternally lost. The idea! If they won't all the money we've been giving to Foreign Missions will be clean wasted, that's what! Last Sunday night he announced that next Sunday he'd preach on the axe-head that swam. I think he'd better confine himself to the Bible and leave sensational subjects alone. Things have come to a pretty pass if a minister can't find enough in Holy Writ to preach about, that's what. What church do you attend, Anne? I hope you go regularly. People are apt to get so careless about church-going away from home, and I understand college students are great sinners in this respect. I'm told many of them actually study their lessons on Sunday. I hope you'll never sink that low, Anne." This book is about change experienced through college years, with summers spent at home in Avonlea even as home is coming to be in two places. And instead of it being limited to light frolic and serious study - which is there, of course, with a couple of exasperating and very unexpected proposals Anne has to turn down, and a attempt at story writing that ends in disappointment at rejection by publishers - there is serious life too, with death of a beautiful friend from school, experienced deeply by Anne. And the anticlimactic winning of story competition because Diana Barry sent the story in without telling Anne, modifying it to suit the advertising of a baking powder, and Anne consequently winning twenty five dollars, to her great mortification! Splendid! It only gets better thereafter, with millionaire neighbour asking to buy Mrs Lynde's gift of tulip patchwork quilt from Anne, the cats, and Aunt Jamesina, at Patty's Place. There's the very rich, beautiful and brainy Phillipa Gordon sharing this new home and consequently learning frugal life, and saying shopping for groceries was more fun than parties with beaux fighting over her. It ends well, with several satisfactory weddings, and finally uniting Gilbert Blythe with Anne, after she's had every chance at her romantic fancies - refusing him, meeting the dark handsome Roy Gardner who promptly falls in love and courts her and proposes after graduation, realising she didnt love him, and finally understanding that she could only love Gilbert - so it's quite satisfactory. July 07, 2020 - July 09, 2020. ............ Anne's House of Dreams Three years have passed between where the last volume ends and this begins, and Anne has taught school at Summerside while Gilbert Blythe finished his medical school. Their wedding is set and he's to join his great uncle's practice or rather take it over, at Four Winds Point, and he's found a dream house for them - hence the title. Diana Wright, who'd had her son Fred as the last volume ends, meanwhile has a two year old daughter called Small Anne Cordelia, mystifying Avonlea. There's a beautiful wedding in the orchard, with Allens presiding and Philippa Gordon's husband Jonas Blake leading a prayer, a bird singing through it all. Marilla keeps in her grief at Anne no longer living at Green Gables, and expecting her to visit no longer through every vacation, after the fourteen years of lighting up Marilla's life with love. But Anne's friends - Diana with babies, Allans and Irvings - stay through the evening to supper, comforting them, and the twins are grown and taking over. Marilla might grieve Anne, but she won't be left lonely. Anne's new home, unlike Green Gables, is close to harbour, and it's her first close acquaintance with the ocean with its might, beauty and more. The author compares the difference of woods verses ocean as human society versus mighty lonely soul, and one gets a feeling on the other hand that a veiled comparison here is that of childhood versus adult life - woods being comparatively safe, comfy, beautiful, while ocean has all the unpredictability and lurking dangers one might encounter in life as adults. A glimpse thereof is already in the previous volume, where Anne meets her perfect romantic fantasy in Roy on seaside walk in heavy storm, and is brought back to the same spot by him when he proposes. Gilbert, on the other hand, proposes both times in woods, in a park first and in an overgrown garden finally. She rejects Roy and the uncertainty, because she realises she doesn't love him; she realises she loves Gilbert Blythe before he proposes again, and faces life in a harbour in a home facing the ocean - in secure company of the love and security thereof that she found in woods. In a way, this progression runs parallel to that of her life moving from village of Avonlea to the college life in town of Kingsport, and then to the harbour of Four Winds, signifying possibilities of global travel and adventures. This volume is as much about the beauty of a harbour as it's about the stunningly beautiful neighbour of Anne and Gilbert Blythe, Leslie Moore, and her travails, the very lovable Captain Jim whose life's story is entrusted to Owen Ford the incredibly handsome author, and it's all woven together in reflections somehow of light and ocean, mist and shore, lighthouse and garden. The resolution of it all is unexpected too, and answers the question one wonders about, which is, why isn't there more about the twins and Marilla and so on. It's because they are there, doing fine, but life moves on, and Anne's life is blossoming. She and Gilbert are to buy a larger house with property across the harbour so it's convenient, and Owen Ford is buying the little house of drems so he and his bride Leslie can have vacations there. July 09, 2020 - July 12, 2020. ............ Rainbow Valley By the time one begins this one, one is hooked. Then comes the surprise, of Rainbow Valley - the title corresponding more to the various chikdren portrayed than the valley unseen by the reader, hence quite misty. Now thirteen years have lapsed, Anne is a mother of half a dozen, the eldest who looks like both parents born before the family shifted at the end of the last one; next son a dreamer like Anne, twin daughters Anne and Diana who look one each like one of the parents except its diana who takes her mother's colouring, the youngest a six year old daughter Rilla - short, presumably, for Marilla - in Anne's own image, and another son; and the household at Ingleside still retains Susan Baker for housekeeping and cooking, while Cornelia Bryant - who'd married Marshall Elliott after Liberals won and he got a haircut and a shave, after seventeen years - still visits regularly. And Mrs rachel lynde disapproves of Susan pampering the children. The Blythe couple has been to Europe for summer as this opens and left children in Avonlea except one whom Susan kept, since he's her pet. Their gossip session is how the author introduces next batch of characters and their histories, characters and more. There is a new minister, and the four Meredith children make friends with the Blythe children while the latter picnic at Rainbow Valley, so named by them because they saw a rainbow stretch over it once. Here the author has a variation of the Avonlea woods for Anne's children. And then the Meredith children find a starving orphan and adopt her for a while, with no adult any wiser, before Cornelia Bryant steps in to correct the situation - and is coaxed by Una Meredith into adopting her! So now we have a kaleidoscope of variations of the original Anne, none quite like her, and some even boys. The author is far more comfortable with children, unless it was readers who steered the author. Anne is now in background, with occasional comments from her, in conversations with Gilbert Blythe, Susan, Cornelia Bryant and others. Cornelia Bryant continues to be the window for a reader not well versed in politics of churches, politics between communities of different churches, and what's considered propriety, which are all startling if one assumed any of it had anything to do with values such as truth, humanity, or kindness. Hence the Meredith children being always in soup despite their goodness. Trust Anne to set the gossipers right, and point out that Meredith family is an extraordinary collection of people with rare virtues. The author ends the book with a double wedding in immediate future, Anne's eldest Jem going off to Queen's soon, and gives a hint of the impending WWI that none of them have foreseen, except for Ellen West, sister of Rosemary, the soon to be new Mrs Meredith. July 12, 2020 - July 14, 2020. ............ Rilla of Ingleside ............ Chronicles of Avonlea ............ Further Chronicles of Avonlea ............ The Story Girl ............ The Golden Road ............ Kilmeny of the Orchard ............ The Watchman and Other Poems ............ The Short Story Collection .........

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dana Perkins

    I enjoyed watching the Netflix TV series Anne With An E so much I just had to read the book on which it is based. I loved the way irrepressibly optimistic Anne, a bright 11-year-old orphan girl, used her wit and imagination to cope with the difficulties of her childhood. From the very beginning of this story, Anne captured my heart as she navigates her way through what promises to be a turnaround in her life. Perhaps of interest to those who attended Pastor Jims evening series on forgiveness, th I enjoyed watching the Netflix TV series Anne With An E so much I just had to read the book on which it is based. I loved the way irrepressibly optimistic Anne, a bright 11-year-old orphan girl, used her wit and imagination to cope with the difficulties of her childhood. From the very beginning of this story, Anne captured my heart as she navigates her way through what promises to be a turnaround in her life. Perhaps of interest to those who attended Pastor Jims evening series on forgiveness, the story also just happens to have to two wonderful examples that illustrate so well what makes a good apology (express regret, accept responsibility, make restitution, genuine repentance, request forgiveness). The first is when Anne has to ask a neighbor to forgive her for being rude. The second is when Marrila, the girl's ward, has to ask Anne for forgiveness. A friend of mine says he read this book 41 times when he was growing up. The storyline, the writing and the character development make this a very worthwhile and enjoyable read even as an adult.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jackie

    I really enjoyed this series; all 8 books! The last book caught me by surprise. I wasn't expecting a historical fiction (which is my fav), but that is exactly what the last book is. I am sure that LMM didn't expect to write a historical fiction book, but when the Great War (WWI) broke out she didn't have much choice. I love the way the last book ended. It was so sweet it left me smiling for a while. Today I found myself wishing I had another Anne of Green Gables book to read. The only book I fou I really enjoyed this series; all 8 books! The last book caught me by surprise. I wasn't expecting a historical fiction (which is my fav), but that is exactly what the last book is. I am sure that LMM didn't expect to write a historical fiction book, but when the Great War (WWI) broke out she didn't have much choice. I love the way the last book ended. It was so sweet it left me smiling for a while. Today I found myself wishing I had another Anne of Green Gables book to read. The only book I found difficult to get through was number 6. It focuses on Anne's kids a lot, in fact the last 3 books are about her kids. The 6th one was some what dull though. There was no real plot, just discriptions of them as they played. As a mother I love to watch my kids play, but as a reader I need more of a plot. Overall the series is a must read!

  11. 4 out of 5

    M.M. Strawberry Library & Reviews

    This rating is not for the Anne of Green Gables books themselves, but this particular product (by Xist) which is a incomplete collection. Two vital books are missing, number 4 and 6 (Anne of Windy Poplars and Anne of Ingleside, respectively) so avoid this particular product if you're looking for the complete series.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Julie Christiano

    Just read Avonlea for now! Some sweet parts but like a child star today, some of Ann's magic does not translate as she becomes an adult. But I still enjoyed Avonlea, Green Gables, and the characters of Montgomery.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Robbie

    Most sticky sweet book I've ever read

  14. 5 out of 5

    Coco.V

    💝 FREE on Amazon today (1/27/2018)! 💝

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jan Berkowitz

    This was probably the third or fourth time I have read the series, but I enjoyed it just as much as always ! I recommend watching "Anne With An E" also if you can !

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dr.J.G.

    Anne Stories Most classic literature by women authors is reflection of their collected wisdom through their lives, and the morality and ethics of the writing follows a lifeblood path as do the romances, rather than a study and a fancy clubbed together. This set of tales was probably serialized originally, especially the second one on, from the tone of separate chapters - each a complete story, and yet they follow smoothly, flowing quite nicely one after another together. The titles seem to indicate Anne Stories Most classic literature by women authors is reflection of their collected wisdom through their lives, and the morality and ethics of the writing follows a lifeblood path as do the romances, rather than a study and a fancy clubbed together. This set of tales was probably serialized originally, especially the second one on, from the tone of separate chapters - each a complete story, and yet they follow smoothly, flowing quite nicely one after another together. The titles seem to indicate Anne's progress in life via the procession of widening circles they indicate - the house, the village, the island, and then they go specifying again, with house her home, and it's location. One exasperation for a reader would be, when tempted by the beautiful descriptions of various places, one looks for just where it all is - and the place doesn't exist, or at least pieces don't match. Names are taken from wherever the author liked, and while descriptions might fit a place, it's hard to find just where any of them exists on maps. ............ ............ Anne of Green Gables The book begins with Mrs. Rachel Lynde, who is as much antithesis of Elizabeth from Elizabeth's German Garden as could be. That, one supposes after the protagonist appears, was a little bitter dose so the cherry cake Anne is that much more astounding, taking one by complete surprise. It's a surprise that the protagonist is a little orphan girl arriving fresh at the home named Green Gables, rather than the woman of indeterminate age one sees on the cover, but that passes. Before long, before one knows, one is deep in comfort with Anne's world. The book is about halfway before one realises she's not going to be grown up in this volume, the author being in no hurry, and one is to enjoy the girlhood and the world thereof, with school and friends, teachers and walks in woods, and not talking to boys who are interested in one. Nice to have descriptions of loveliness of nature and seasons strewn all over, but characterisation are good, and one expects Anne would grow out of hating Gilbert Blythe, which she is more than done already, long before they tie for top at entrance exam to Queen's. And they are friends just as this ends, bringing satisfaction to reader despite the tragedy that smites in the silent Matthew departing and Marilla dealing with more. June 26, 2020 - July 01, 2020. ............ Anne of Avonlea Here we have Anne's career as a schoolteacher and beginning of society of her generation of Avonlea, with Gilbert Blythe now her close friend, apart from Diana (now courted by Fred Wright), and other schoolmates that had been at Queen's. Her life now moreover is already centred on children, her pupils at school and twins at home who are Marilla's cousins. Anne and her friends try to improve Avonlea by getting people to improve their properties and fronts, fences and sidewalks, but are confronted by unexpected problems, from mixups leading to a hall painted bright blue instead of green, to serious horrors looming in shape of people renting their fences for advertisements. Anne lingers in girlhood, woods and flowers and children, with Gilbert still only a friend, although she's become aware he's growing out of boyhood. Her first acquaintance with the phenomenon of love is via a love story of two people of a prior generation, one a father of a favourite student and another she discovers living in a lovely house far out of the village, surrounded by a forest anne is enchanted with; the now middle aged woman finds a kindred spirit in the young boy so like his father, the love of her life. And the romance does blossom, with Stephen Irving returning to marry Lavender Lewis finally, after Paul writes him about meeting her. But Marilla has the sensible comment:- ""I can't see that it's so terribly romantic at all," said Marilla rather crisply. Marilla thought Anne was too worked up about it and had plenty to do with getting ready for college without "traipsing" to Echo Lodge two days out of three helping Miss Lavendar. "In the first place two young fools quarrel and turn sulky; then Steve Irving goes to the States and after a spell gets married up there and is perfectly happy from all accounts. Then his wife dies and after a decent interval he thinks he'll come home and see if his first fancy'll have him. Meanwhile, she's been living single, probably because nobody nice enough came along to want her, and they meet and agree to be married after all. Now, where is the romance in all that?"" Exactly what those not fooled by the candy floss KJ copy, KKHH, thought. But meanwhile Anne is being sent off to college after all by Marilla, and that's the end of this part of the story and of her teaching Avonlea school for now, with a possible glimmer of romance with Gilbert Blythe on horizon. July 01, 2020 - July 07, 2020. ............ Anne of the Island One must give credit for continuity of the narrative that it picks up exactly where it left off, strengthening the guess that these were serialised writings published in periodicals before a suitable bunch was published as a book, rather than individual books published at intervals. Changes are smooth - Diana Barry, engaged to Fred Wright back in Avonlea, has another path in life, and Priscilla Grant, familiar since Queen's, is now close friend and companion of Anne, who is at Redmond college at kingsport in Nova Scotia along with Gilbert Blythe and another Avonlea boy, Charlie Sloane. And now they meet Philippa Gordon from Bolingbroke, NS, where Anne originated. Letters from Avonlea secured her life at college. "Mrs. Lynde had more time than ever to devote to church affairs and had flung herself into them heart and soul. She was at present much worked up over the poor "supplies" they were having in the vacant Avonlea pulpit. ""I don't believe any but fools enter the ministry nowadays," she wrote bitterly. "Such candidates as they have sent us, and such stuff as they preach! Half of it ain't true, and, what's worse, it ain't sound doctrine. The one we have now is the worst of the lot. He mostly takes a text and preaches about something else. And he says he doesn't believe all the heathen will be eternally lost. The idea! If they won't all the money we've been giving to Foreign Missions will be clean wasted, that's what! Last Sunday night he announced that next Sunday he'd preach on the axe-head that swam. I think he'd better confine himself to the Bible and leave sensational subjects alone. Things have come to a pretty pass if a minister can't find enough in Holy Writ to preach about, that's what. What church do you attend, Anne? I hope you go regularly. People are apt to get so careless about church-going away from home, and I understand college students are great sinners in this respect. I'm told many of them actually study their lessons on Sunday. I hope you'll never sink that low, Anne." This book is about change experienced through college years, with summers spent at home in Avonlea even as home is coming to be in two places. And instead of it being limited to light frolic and serious study - which is there, of course, with a couple of exasperating and very unexpected proposals Anne has to turn down, and a attempt at story writing that ends in disappointment at rejection by publishers - there is serious life too, with death of a beautiful friend from school, experienced deeply by Anne. And the anticlimactic winning of story competition because Diana Barry sent the story in without telling Anne, modifying it to suit the advertising of a baking powder, and Anne consequently winning twenty five dollars, to her great mortification! Splendid! It only gets better thereafter, with millionaire neighbour asking to buy Mrs Lynde's gift of tulip patchwork quilt from Anne, the cats, and Aunt Jamesina, at Patty's Place. There's the very rich, beautiful and brainy Phillipa Gordon sharing this new home and consequently learning frugal life, and saying shopping for groceries was more fun than parties with beaux fighting over her. It ends well, with several satisfactory weddings, and finally uniting Gilbert Blythe with Anne, after she's had every chance at her romantic fancies - refusing him, meeting the dark handsome Roy Gardner who promptly falls in love and courts her and proposes after graduation, realising she didnt love him, and finally understanding that she could only love Gilbert - so it's quite satisfactory. July 07, 2020 - July 09, 2020. ............ Anne's House of Dreams Three years have passed between where the last volume ends and this begins, and Anne has taught school at Summerside while Gilbert Blythe finished his medical school. Their wedding is set and he's to join his great uncle's practice or rather take it over, at Four Winds Point, and he's found a dream house for them - hence the title. Diana Wright, who'd had her son Fred as the last volume ends, meanwhile has a two year old daughter called Small Anne Cordelia, mystifying Avonlea. There's a beautiful wedding in the orchard, with Allens presiding and Philippa Gordon's husband Jonas Blake leading a prayer, a bird singing through it all. Marilla keeps in her grief at Anne no longer living at Green Gables, and expecting her to visit no longer through every vacation, after the fourteen years of lighting up Marilla's life with love. But Anne's friends - Diana with babies, Allans and Irvings - stay through the evening to supper, comforting them, and the twins are grown and taking over. Marilla might grieve Anne, but she won't be left lonely. Anne's new home, unlike Green Gables, is close to harbour, and it's her first close acquaintance with the ocean with its might, beauty and more. The author compares the difference of woods verses ocean as human society versus mighty lonely soul, and one gets a feeling on the other hand that a veiled comparison here is that of childhood versus adult life - woods being comparatively safe, comfy, beautiful, while ocean has all the unpredictability and lurking dangers one might encounter in life as adults. A glimpse thereof is already in the previous volume, where Anne meets her perfect romantic fantasy in Roy on seaside walk in heavy storm, and is brought back to the same spot by him when he proposes. Gilbert, on the other hand, proposes both times in woods, in a park first and in an overgrown garden finally. She rejects Roy and the uncertainty, because she realises she doesn't love him; she realises she loves Gilbert Blythe before he proposes again, and faces life in a harbour in a home facing the ocean - in secure company of the love and security thereof that she found in woods. In a way, this progression runs parallel to that of her life moving from village of Avonlea to the college life in town of Kingsport, and then to the harbour of Four Winds, signifying possibilities of global travel and adventures. This volume is as much about the beauty of a harbour as it's about the stunningly beautiful neighbour of Anne and Gilbert Blythe, Leslie Moore, and her travails, the very lovable Captain Jim whose life's story is entrusted to Owen Ford the incredibly handsome author, and it's all woven together in reflections somehow of light and ocean, mist and shore, lighthouse and garden. The resolution of it all is unexpected too, and answers the question one wonders about, which is, why isn't there more about the twins and Marilla and so on. It's because they are there, doing fine, but life moves on, and Anne's life is blossoming. She and Gilbert are to buy a larger house with property across the harbour so it's convenient, and Owen Ford is buying the little house of drems so he and his bride Leslie can have vacations there. July 09, 2020 - July 12, 2020. ............ Rainbow Valley By the time one begins this one, one is hooked. Then comes the surprise, of Rainbow Valley - the title corresponding more to the various chikdren portrayed than the valley unseen by the reader, hence quite misty. Now thirteen years have lapsed, Anne is a mother of half a dozen, the eldest who looks like both parents born before the family shifted at the end of the last one; next son a dreamer like Anne, twin daughters Anne and Diana who look one each like one of the parents except its diana who takes her mother's colouring, the youngest a six year old daughter Rilla - short, presumably, for Marilla - in Anne's own image, and another son; and the household at Ingleside still retains Susan Baker for housekeeping and cooking, while Cornelia Bryant - who'd married Marshall Elliott after Liberals won and he got a haircut and a shave, after seventeen years - still visits regularly. And Mrs rachel lynde disapproves of Susan pampering the children. The Blythe couple has been to Europe for summer as this opens and left children in Avonlea except one whom Susan kept, since he's her pet. Their gossip session is how the author introduces next batch of characters and their histories, characters and more. There is a new minister, and the four Meredith children make friends with the Blythe children while the latter picnic at Rainbow Valley, so named by them because they saw a rainbow stretch over it once. Here the author has a variation of the Avonlea woods for Anne's children. And then the Meredith children find a starving orphan and adopt her for a while, with no adult any wiser, before Cornelia Bryant steps in to correct the situation - and is coaxed by Una Meredith into adopting her! So now we have a kaleidoscope of variations of the original Anne, none quite like her, and some even boys. The author is far more comfortable with children, unless it was readers who steered the author. Anne is now in background, with occasional comments from her, in conversations with Gilbert Blythe, Susan, Cornelia Bryant and others. Cornelia Bryant continues to be the window for a reader not well versed in politics of churches, politics between communities of different churches, and what's considered propriety, which are all startling if one assumed any of it had anything to do with values such as truth, humanity, or kindness. Hence the Meredith children being always in soup despite their goodness. Trust Anne to set the gossipers right, and point out that Meredith family is an extraordinary collection of people with rare virtues. The author ends the book with a double wedding in immediate future, Anne's eldest Jem going off to Queen's soon, and gives a hint of the impending WWI that none of them have foreseen, except for Ellen West, sister of Rosemary, the soon to be new Mrs Meredith. July 12, 2020 - July 14, 2020. ............ Rilla of Ingleside ............ Chronicles of Avonlea ............ Further Chronicles of Avonlea ............ The Story Girl ............ The Golden Road ............ Kilmeny of the Orchard ............ The Watchman and Other Poems ............ The Short Story Collection ......... .........

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mya

    Average rating = 3.5 stars Anne of Green Gables (1908) - 4 stars Thoroughly enjoyed this. Busy rereading the whole collection. Loved these books as a child and so far enjoying the walk down memory lane. Anne really does speak a lot though! Anne of Avonlea (1909) - 3.5 stars I didn't remember this one, so not sure if I actually did read it when I read the books as a tween. Didn't enjoy it as much as the first book, but still a sweet and enjoyable read. Anne of the Island (1915) - 3 stars I didn't enjoy Average rating = 3.5 stars Anne of Green Gables (1908) - 4 stars Thoroughly enjoyed this. Busy rereading the whole collection. Loved these books as a child and so far enjoying the walk down memory lane. Anne really does speak a lot though! Anne of Avonlea (1909) - 3.5 stars I didn't remember this one, so not sure if I actually did read it when I read the books as a tween. Didn't enjoy it as much as the first book, but still a sweet and enjoyable read. Anne of the Island (1915) - 3 stars I didn't enjoy it as much as the first two, but still a light read and nice distraction from real life Anne's House of Dreams (1917) - 4 stars I quite enjoyed this stage of Anne's life as she leaves Avonlea as a new bride to live with Gilbert in their own little "house of dreams". They befriend some lovely characters and there was happy times and sad times, but as always with Anne, love wins through. Rainbow Valley (1919) - 3 stars The series has moved on to focus on the next generation - those living in Glen St Mary and not Avonlea. Anne as the mother of one of "broods" is often mentioned in passing, but there is a little about her and her friends. The focus sits firmly on her children, and mostly on their friends from the church Manse. There are the regular trials and tribulations of little girls and boys plus some laughter and happiness. Rilla of Ingleside (1921) - 4 stars One of my favourites of the series. It's told from the perspective of Rilla, Anne's youngest, and covers a period from just before WW1 (when she's a bright eyed 15 year old with a head filled with romance and parties) to the end of the war four years later. During this period, life does not quite work out as the young Rilla imagined, and we follow her growth as a human and woman during the happy and sad events that follow. Although Canada was never bombed or invaded, the families who stayed behind were still impacted by what was happening in the rest of the world, and I found it interesting to read about it. Dog Monday also made me cry! Chronicles of Avonlea - 4 stars So this isn't a continuation of the Anne of Green Gables series like I thought, but a collection of short stories set in and around Avonlea. Anne makes a brief appearance in two of them, and warrants a reference in a couple others, and in other stories does not feature at all. There are also some other familiar Avonlea names scattered through the collection, but each story is its own story. I'm not terribly fond of short stories, but this compilation really worked for me for some reason. Perhaps because I've grown used to the style and the way there was a sense of something familiar in every story. Furthere Chronicles of Avonlea - 3 stars More stories from the characters who lived in and around Avonlea, with the common thread (mostly) being loves lost and found. I found it enjoyable except for the very last story which made me very uncomfortable because of its racist references. All normal for the times of LM Montgomery but very jarring in this day and age. I almost couldn't finish it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Susie

    I wanted to love this book. I really really did. But it didn't hold my interest. I think it would be different if I'd read it when I was young and found some kind of common ground with Anne, but I just wasn't feeling this one. The version of this that I bought has all the Anne stories in it, and I'll likely read the next one ("Anne of Avonlea") because I like her much more as a teenager and I enjoy the people in her community. And hey, I want to see what happens with the guy. Because I'm only hu I wanted to love this book. I really really did. But it didn't hold my interest. I think it would be different if I'd read it when I was young and found some kind of common ground with Anne, but I just wasn't feeling this one. The version of this that I bought has all the Anne stories in it, and I'll likely read the next one ("Anne of Avonlea") because I like her much more as a teenager and I enjoy the people in her community. And hey, I want to see what happens with the guy. Because I'm only human. ;)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Phyllis Harms

    Enjoyed This was very good for the first half that referred to Anne life. The other shorts was a bit slow .

  20. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Absolutely LOVED re-reading this. I laughed, cried and appreciated Anne with an E's imagination and steadfast goodness all the more as an adult.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gwen

    Lovely escapism and a good teensy for to much current events.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Libba South

    Not as enchanting as an adult but will always hold a place in my heart!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Annabelle Garcia

    It is a great read. So easy to get lost in the world L.M. Montogmery created.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kelvin

    I really really enjoyed these books. My favourites were Rainbow Valley & Rilla of Ingleside. I really really enjoyed these books. My favourites were Rainbow Valley & Rilla of Ingleside.

  25. 5 out of 5

    BigHeadWalt

    Very enjoyable read. Wish I had read this when I was younger as I would have championed it for my daughters. Precocious Ann(with an e) Shirley is a very memorable heroine.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amy Meyers

    I've reviewed these all separately. I'm only adding this for my highlighted notes on Kindle.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Ellyson

    Anne Of Green Gables Collection Review!!!! I love this series!!!!! It is one of my all time favorite!!!! Love these books so much!!!! One my childhood favorite series!!!!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    I love the first few and then slog through the rest. It's a classic.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle

    This collection dropped on Audible for pennies so I figured why not! I listened to the first few in this series last year; this collection has 6 of the eight books. It skips over Anne of windy poplars and Anne of Ingleside. If you are an Anne of green gables fan then this is not a bad listen for the easy price.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    5 stars - certainly for vol 1 & 7, possibly also 4 & 8 then 2,3. Definitely not for 6 Re-reading these 30 years on was pure delight. An enchanting setting of a wholesome, moral and upright world where the rules for a good life are simple and straightforward (love god and nature, do your duty and no evil) and a cast of vividly depicted colourful characters. But in contrast with many similarly popular books of the time, there is a huge sense of fun with many hilarious incidents - especially in the 5 stars - certainly for vol 1 & 7, possibly also 4 & 8 then 2,3. Definitely not for 6 Re-reading these 30 years on was pure delight. An enchanting setting of a wholesome, moral and upright world where the rules for a good life are simple and straightforward (love god and nature, do your duty and no evil) and a cast of vividly depicted colourful characters. But in contrast with many similarly popular books of the time, there is a huge sense of fun with many hilarious incidents - especially in the books in which children feature more: 1, 2 & 7) Impressed at how smoothly crafted the books are. 1. Green Gables. Que dire! 2. Avonlea: delightful, but lacks the shine of no.1 3: Island: the idyl and self-discovery of college days 4. Windy Willows: teaching while G goes through medical school. Great cast of characters (Rebecca Dew!) but Anne is now too perfect. 5. House of Dreams. More fabulous characters (Cornelia, light-man James) but Anne is nearly a secondary character. 6. Ingleside: least favourite: unsure if about children or Anne, but no real insight into Anne's thoughts. Everybody and everybody is far too perfect, and the result is coying. 7. Rainbow Valley What a discovery! The main subjects are children - and not Anne's perfect brood - so we return to the very amusing scrapes and adventures of the 1st 2 books. The main characters are friends of Anne's children, the Merediths, the new family at the manse. They decide to bring themselves up as there is nobody else to do it: “”: their mother has died and their father is too absent-minded. Many adventures and scrapes to feed the town's gossip. But there is a more poignant side to the book. There are hints throughout, and confirmation in the closing pages that it describes a time of innocence about to end. Throughout the book Ellen is worried about the Kaiser. Jem's longs to be a soldier and on a bleak forewarning of the war to come. Written in 1919. "To the memory of Goldwin Lapp, Robert Brookes and Morley Shier who made the supreme sacrifice that the happy valleys of their home land might be kept sacred from the ravage of the invader." Walter Blythe speaking of “The Piper” "The Piper is coming nearer," he said, "he is nearer than he was that evening I saw him before. His long, shadowy cloak is blowing around him. He pipes - he pipes - and we must follow - Jem and Carl and Jerry and I - round and round the world. Listen - listen - can't you hear his wild music?" (...) But Jem sprang up with a gay laugh. He stood up on a hillock, tall and splendid, with his open brow and fearless eyes. There were thousands like him all over the land of the maple. Let the Piper come and welcome," he cried, waving his hand. "I'LL follow him gladly round and round the world."* 8. Rilla Rilla-my-Rilla! A beautiful description of Anne's youngest growing up as WW1 unfolds, changing from a vain and spoilt girl into a reliable, brave and thoughtful woman. A combination of hilarious scenes (R waking up in strangers' house for e.g), pure horror (this is WW1...) , heartwarming sentiment (dog Monday!) but above all optimism as there is an underlying current of faith, and belief that the war preserved important values and was thus necessary.

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