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Classical Me, Classical Thee: Squander Not Thine Education

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Grades aren't the point, so drill to win. Rebekah Merkle knows which high school classes you like and which you roll your eyes at, which books you enjoy and which you kinda skim. That's because she went through this whole thing called classical education, too. Classical Me, Classical Thee is light-hearted and—most importantly for you busy students—very short. It has a simp Grades aren't the point, so drill to win. Rebekah Merkle knows which high school classes you like and which you roll your eyes at, which books you enjoy and which you kinda skim. That's because she went through this whole thing called classical education, too. Classical Me, Classical Thee is light-hearted and—most importantly for you busy students—very short. It has a simple goal: to explain why you students are doing what you do in class. (Spoiler: it's not because you'll use your knowledge of the Iliad Book 5 yearly until you die.) What you do in class is a drill—and nobody drills for the sake of the drill. You do drills so you can win the game. The real tragedy, though, would be if you didn't know you were doing drills . . . or didn't know there was a game at all.


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Grades aren't the point, so drill to win. Rebekah Merkle knows which high school classes you like and which you roll your eyes at, which books you enjoy and which you kinda skim. That's because she went through this whole thing called classical education, too. Classical Me, Classical Thee is light-hearted and—most importantly for you busy students—very short. It has a simp Grades aren't the point, so drill to win. Rebekah Merkle knows which high school classes you like and which you roll your eyes at, which books you enjoy and which you kinda skim. That's because she went through this whole thing called classical education, too. Classical Me, Classical Thee is light-hearted and—most importantly for you busy students—very short. It has a simple goal: to explain why you students are doing what you do in class. (Spoiler: it's not because you'll use your knowledge of the Iliad Book 5 yearly until you die.) What you do in class is a drill—and nobody drills for the sake of the drill. You do drills so you can win the game. The real tragedy, though, would be if you didn't know you were doing drills . . . or didn't know there was a game at all.

30 review for Classical Me, Classical Thee: Squander Not Thine Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Boomershine

    An excellent brief apologetic written for students of CCE by a product of CCE. Answers many objections and let's them get the broader picture of why they are sitting there doing what they are doing and admonishes them how they ought to be approaching the work.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Christine Norvell

    It's all about the angle. It really is. Education should not be something we endure. It’s not something “done” to you. How you perceive your own education AS you are in it can increase or negate its value. Merkle writes, “Because, and I acknowledge this cheerfully, if you graduate with all of the skills but none of the discernment, then you’re actually turning into a monster.” I couldn’t agree more, and this tiny book challenged me as a teacher. I’m not sure my everyday classes do understand the “w It's all about the angle. It really is. Education should not be something we endure. It’s not something “done” to you. How you perceive your own education AS you are in it can increase or negate its value. Merkle writes, “Because, and I acknowledge this cheerfully, if you graduate with all of the skills but none of the discernment, then you’re actually turning into a monster.” I couldn’t agree more, and this tiny book challenged me as a teacher. I’m not sure my everyday classes do understand the “why” of education, which motivates me to be more intentional.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Ray

    Last year I read Rebekah Merkle’s Eve in Exile, and found it to be a delightful and enlightening read. So, when I started looking at books for the year’s #vtreadingchallenge, I noticed that one of the first categories was “a book for teens and young adults.” Because of my previous experience with Merkle, her book Classical Me Classical Thee rose to the top of my list for this category. In this book, Merkle is directly addressing students in classical Christian schools, and she is attempting to pe Last year I read Rebekah Merkle’s Eve in Exile, and found it to be a delightful and enlightening read. So, when I started looking at books for the year’s #vtreadingchallenge, I noticed that one of the first categories was “a book for teens and young adults.” Because of my previous experience with Merkle, her book Classical Me Classical Thee rose to the top of my list for this category. In this book, Merkle is directly addressing students in classical Christian schools, and she is attempting to persuade high school/rhetoric level students of the importance of their education. As she tells her readers, “The whole education thing is not something you choose, it’s something that’s being done to you.” There’s a potential for students to take a great classical education method, designed to give them a leg-up in life and squander it by not entering into their education fully. Merkle’s goal is to have students value the education they receive and use it in the very ways that their parents are most hoping. She begins by explaining how different the education they are receiving is from the one that most American high school students receive. It’s an education that will make these students stand out in comparison to those around them. These students assume that their peers are similar except for not having to learn as much Latin and Bible, and they find that they’re on a whole separate trajectory. Once Merkle establishes that, she takes students on a journey through each of the subject areas, explaining how their education in each of these subjects prepares them for life and gives them a framework for truth, beauty and godliness. The book is light and breezy. It’s also a slim volume that could be read in an hour or two, depending on the inclinations of the teen reading. Her arguments are interesting and a little elitist. I felt a little distaste at her arguments to the students because she argues to them from a place of building them up to the superiority of their education. That may appeal to our pride, but as I read, I mostly felt pity for the children whose education the author looks down so upon. I also kept having the verse from I Corinthians 8:1, “Knowledge puffeth up, but charity edifieth.” Perhaps I am being to0 stern with the author because all she is trying to do is to convince children to buy into their education. Although we don’t educate classically, I do agree that children need a proper framework to hang their education on and that classical education is a worthy frame. It’s not the actual content of this book that I find myself in disagreement with so much as the tone and the comparison that creates almost an us and them mentality for me. I read this book because I was I hoping to find some wisdom to help my eleven year old buy into the idea of education in general and I didn’t find any thing that I would truly use. So, even though Merkle’s last book was for me, this book really was not to my taste.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Rapinchuk

    In Classical Me, Classical Thee, Rebekah Merkle has written a winsome explanation and defense of classical Christian education for students currently enrolled in a classical Christian school. Of course, the book is wonderful for educators and parents as well, but Merkle knows her audience well and does not depart from a focused conversation with that audience. And this ought to surprise no one as Merkle is both a classical Christian educator and a product of classical Christian education herself In Classical Me, Classical Thee, Rebekah Merkle has written a winsome explanation and defense of classical Christian education for students currently enrolled in a classical Christian school. Of course, the book is wonderful for educators and parents as well, but Merkle knows her audience well and does not depart from a focused conversation with that audience. And this ought to surprise no one as Merkle is both a classical Christian educator and a product of classical Christian education herself. This uniquely qualifies her as one who can speak from both perspectives, from one who understands the struggles of the day-to-day grind for classical students, but who also can look back and understand how easy it can be to waste a wonderful gift. Merkle begins by building rapport with the reader, particularly taking time to win over the student whose parents “forced” them into classical education and they have yet to see the value of it. In order to accomplish this difficult task, she not only empathizes genuinely with this student, but presents a convincing case explaining why they have been given a gift. In chapter 1, “A Fundamentally Different Pizza,” she uses the first of several silly, yet helpful analogies to explain her point. She suggests that many classical Christian students think that they are getting basically the same education (pepperoni pizza) as public school kids, just with a few add-ons like Latin (green peppers). However, later on she claims these students will find that public school kids received something vastly different and altogether less satisfying than their classical Christian educated peers (tuna and crackers, not pizza at all!). As she progresses throughout the work, she demonstrated how various subjects in classical Christian education not only teach different content in many cases, but all subjects help refine skills that will serve the student well throughout life, regardless of whether or not one remembers the content. For example, in chapter 4 she shows how studying Latin helps refine our language use, and in chapter 5 she shows that literature is a fundamentally different subject when we learn what a text means (according to the author) as opposed to what does this text “mean” to you. Chapters 6 and 7 discuss logic and rhetoric respectively, both classes that are rarely taught in public school, and yet shows how an ability to think and communicate clearly, correctly, and persuasively will help students become leaders rather than followers. Chapter 8 on Worldview points out that skills without discernment turn is into monsters, so she argues that we can never say the word Worldview too often, for it stands at the heart of what we do. Chapters 9 and 10 show how math, science, and history are vastly different subjects, despite similarity in content, when we view them through a Christian lens of a creator God and an organized and purposeful universe. Chapter 11, “Complications with the Trivium,” serves as a helpful clarification on the terms Trivium and Quadrivium and how they relate to the learning frame of the student. Of all the chapters, this is the one that seems least applicable to her audience, yet by placing it at the end, Merkle makes it a helpful clarification that readers are willing to consider as opposed to an introduction that would cause many student readers to disengage. The book would be great without this chapter, but it’s certainly not irrelevant. Finally, Merkle provides an appropriately stern warning about the dangers of wasting such a gift, using Jesus’ parable of the talents as her foundation. Since Merkle has worked so hard to win over her audience through empathy (pathos), her own credibility (ethos), and a convincing argument (logos), I suspect most students will receive this warning well and desire to act in such a way that they will make a return on the investment they have received in their education. I would highly recommend this book for any high school student, especially those entering their freshmen or senior years, as it helps provide a wonderful reflective exercise during a season of significant change where it would be easy to despise one’s education. I also recommend this book to parents who are considering classical Christian education for their children. The difference between public education (or even non-classical private) and classical Christian education is a far wider gap than most parents probably realize, and this book helps demonstrate those differences persuasively and clearly. I first published this review on The Classical Thistle, www.theclassicalthistle.com. Used with permission.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Schultz

    Warm, perceptive. Would winningly helps students, dare I say, love their schooling!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Palumbo

    This a great book for current classical Christian students. Equally valuable as a teaching tool for parents with students at the Logic/Rhetoric School level. Classical Christian school administrators should consider this book to supplement their parent education programs. Well written Rebekah! Thank you.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Josiah Brown

    Read this for the second time now. So encouraging in going through my senior year. This book has a great explanation of why we classically schooled kids are classically schooled. I highly recommend this book!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steve Hemmeke

    A quick 100 pages written to classical school students to point out the benefits of such an education, and to call for appreciating and not squandering such a gift. Merkle does a decent job speaking to a high school audience, with little gimmicks or patronizing, making the case for logic, rhetoric, Latin and more. I’m not sure 6-7 chapters were needed each on a different topic, but the basic point was a good one: you’ve been given a gift. Don’t squander it like the man given 1 talent who buried i A quick 100 pages written to classical school students to point out the benefits of such an education, and to call for appreciating and not squandering such a gift. Merkle does a decent job speaking to a high school audience, with little gimmicks or patronizing, making the case for logic, rhetoric, Latin and more. I’m not sure 6-7 chapters were needed each on a different topic, but the basic point was a good one: you’ve been given a gift. Don’t squander it like the man given 1 talent who buried it in the ground.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    Written to encourage appreciation and thankfulness among students of the Trivium for their classical education. And does it's job pretty well. I liked it, even though it didn't really add anything to what I already knew.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    For Teachers, Too This books was written to an audience of students in the classical Christian education world, but I, as a teacher not even in that world, greatly benefitted from it! I was challenged to really know why I teach what I teach, and to make sure that I actually am effectively accomplishing the goals for why I teach what I teach. This is a great breakdown of why the different subjects matter, and is sure to make you at least very curious about classical Christian education, if you are For Teachers, Too This books was written to an audience of students in the classical Christian education world, but I, as a teacher not even in that world, greatly benefitted from it! I was challenged to really know why I teach what I teach, and to make sure that I actually am effectively accomplishing the goals for why I teach what I teach. This is a great breakdown of why the different subjects matter, and is sure to make you at least very curious about classical Christian education, if you aren’t into it already! On top of that, Rebekah’s writing style is delightful. I found myself craving this book whenever I wasn’t reading it, haha. :)

  11. 5 out of 5

    amanda gardiner

    Fabulous!!! Absolutely hilarious and witty (I kept bursting into laughter at the hair dresser). As someone that’s never been classically educated I found myself stumped by many of the “obvious questions” she asked in the book. I can’t wait to hand this to my daughter in a few years.

  12. 5 out of 5

    David King

    Excellent 30,000' view of classical and Christian education. A must read. And reread.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shaina Herrmann

    This is an excellent book written for CCE students, demonstrating the vast difference between the education they are receiving vs. that of a modern public education. Having been a student guinea pig in some of the first CCE classes in the USA, there are few people who could write a book such as this. I'm so glad that she had the opportunity to take this on! I look forward to sharing this with my girls when they are older.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lucylu57

    SO good. Didn't expect to get much out of this since I've already finished my classical Christian education, but I was wrong! Give this one a read. (It is written for students, so if you're not a teenager anymore, you'll just have to deal.)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sean Higgins

    I am not in the target audience for this book. I am one of the parents who is trying to "give" a classical Christian education to my kids. But my oldest is in Bekah's bullseye, as are all the other secondary students at our school. This is a fun (and short) and persuasive book that makes the water look tasty to many horses (even if they don't know how thirsty they are).

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    This book is a pretty good idea: now that we are getting into the second or even third generation of classical education, have someone from the first generation write to the current generation trying to get them on board with the project. In execution, it turns out pretty OK: there is definitely a lot here that might help get current students on board. Alas, as Kierkegaard warned, life, which can only be lived forwards, can only be understood backwards, and so I fear a lot gets lost in translati This book is a pretty good idea: now that we are getting into the second or even third generation of classical education, have someone from the first generation write to the current generation trying to get them on board with the project. In execution, it turns out pretty OK: there is definitely a lot here that might help get current students on board. Alas, as Kierkegaard warned, life, which can only be lived forwards, can only be understood backwards, and so I fear a lot gets lost in translation across time and experience. Proclaiming that the aim of classical education is to make you a "leader" seems like a sop to adolescent vanity, particularly when it gets translated in terms of "success," and "success," it is strongly suggested, will show up on balance sheets. (And if we tried to put the Beatitudes on a balance sheet, would they be what anyone would describe as "success"? Was Jesus a "successful" teacher, having no place to lay his head, no assets to speak of, a paltry number of students, by one of which he was betrayed, abandoned by the rest?) The trouble is trying to communicate the value of something which is not really of instrumental value to people (that is, young people) who think almost exclusively in terms of instrumental value, if not in more explicitly hedonic terms . Though it can be done, trying to convey the importance of cultivating the soul to someone who is motivated by superficial things is not easy. To try to enlist a sanitized version of the will to power (Nietzscheans 4 Jesus) to try to motivate young people to cultivate their souls is an understandable move, given the circumstances, but I am not really sure it is productive. There are some other assorted issues here, though none very major. Though I am as skeptical of the mainstream education system as anybody, some of Merkle's descriptions of it are pretty dismissive, and few of them seem to be based on firsthand experience. There are also some embarrassing rhetorical gaffes here -- words used with indifference to their meaning and register (has nobody ever told Merkle what "schmuck" means? It is hardly a polite word), confusion about terminology ("case" is used where "tense" is meant in a discussion of Latin grammar), and a colloquial tone that sometimes comes across as patronizing ("She wrote 'wait a sec'? OMG! Merkle is one of us!!"). In a typical book targeted at high school students all this would be de rigeur, but in a book that claims to prize eloquence and precision it is somewhat disappointing. For reasons best explained at length in a different medium, I also do not particularly find the emphasis on "worldview" helpful. However, Merkle's discussion of it is more nuanced than one often finds. Her comments about other subject areas are also often helpful and even insightful. (Her ebulliently optimistic attitude about the power of logic to make us more rational is almost certainly wrong, however: abundant evidence seems to show that pretty much anybody behaves very rationally when discussing topics on which they are well informed and predictably irrational elsewhere, in spite of formal training). Overall, a good attempt and a worthy project. Hopefully it will inspire further efforts at talk about education across generations.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Christian

    This book is not so much an argument for classical Christian education as it is an encouragement to high schoolers in the CCE trenches that all the hard work will be worth it. Don't be embarrassed that you're different - you're learning superpowers! On the level of encouragement, it could be helpful. On the other hand, the representation of other, non-CCE schools is not good. Classical Christian education does not have a monopoly on knowledge, despite what this book's tone implies. The tone coul This book is not so much an argument for classical Christian education as it is an encouragement to high schoolers in the CCE trenches that all the hard work will be worth it. Don't be embarrassed that you're different - you're learning superpowers! On the level of encouragement, it could be helpful. On the other hand, the representation of other, non-CCE schools is not good. Classical Christian education does not have a monopoly on knowledge, despite what this book's tone implies. The tone could easily encourage snobbery among CCE graduates - who'd be in for a rude awakening when they went to college and discovered that they still had a lot to learn. Read on Kindle.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    First off, how fun is that title?? XD Secondly, This is a great book about taking full advantage of the gift of education. Written in an easy-to-read style and very clearly communicated. Lastly: While it doesn't cover all the ground, it's the only book like this I know of and it is much needed. Everyone should read it and I say, the sooner the better!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mary Beth

    A pleasant, concise explanation of the importance and benefits of a Christian classically minded education.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    Kindle freebie. Quick read geared toward students in a classical school. I'm trying to compare Charlotte Mason/classical methods. Karen Glass is probably better for what I want.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Linda Mock

    Recently, I was told by a friend that I would be disliked by someone he knew, because among other things, I am a Christian and I home school my kids. Ahh, I've been there many times. Rebekah Merkle's book is not about being a Christian or about homeschooling. It is about the value of a classical (and yes, a Christian) education. But, I found myself, nodding my head and scribbling notes in the margins, because there was a comforting parallelism between this book and my life. So many of the argumen Recently, I was told by a friend that I would be disliked by someone he knew, because among other things, I am a Christian and I home school my kids. Ahh, I've been there many times. Rebekah Merkle's book is not about being a Christian or about homeschooling. It is about the value of a classical (and yes, a Christian) education. But, I found myself, nodding my head and scribbling notes in the margins, because there was a comforting parallelism between this book and my life. So many of the arguments Merkle mentions against a CC education have been raised with me, against me, and my choices in how I have educated my children. Apart from the fact, that how I educate my children is not, I repeat NOT, anyone else's business, these criticisms are usually coming from people who hardly know how to use the English language to order a cheeseburger much less articulate disapproval of an educational method. And then in waltzes Rebekah Merkle to set everyone straight with humor and clear thinking. God bless the woman! Every summer, I read at least one educational book, because you know, I'm a teacher, and ongoing education and all that. It's just that I do it without government supervision or interference. Merkle's book was just a fun bonus add on to this summer's list, and I highly recommend it, especially to those still on the battlefield of education in America.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I enjoyed this little book. The writing is engaging and breezy. For me the topic is essentially preaching to the choir, but I do enjoy hearing the arguments for why we do what we do. Gave the book three stars because I spent actual real money on this and thought $12 was a bit much for what seems like a glorified pamphlet.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Josiah

    The purpose of this book is to explain to students why they should care about classical education and what the point is of all the things that classical education does differently. While I'm not the intended audience anymore (I'm a classical teacher, not a student), I was a student in classical schools only a few short years ago and Merkle tends to nail many of the concerns I had myself (though I was largely sold on classical education myself for most of my education) and also many of the concer The purpose of this book is to explain to students why they should care about classical education and what the point is of all the things that classical education does differently. While I'm not the intended audience anymore (I'm a classical teacher, not a student), I was a student in classical schools only a few short years ago and Merkle tends to nail many of the concerns I had myself (though I was largely sold on classical education myself for most of my education) and also many of the concerns I hear in my current students. There were many strong points about the book. I appreciated her intentional effort not to focus on the technical aspects behind the Trivium, Quadrivium, etc. that teachers need to know, and instead to focus on the obvious things students experience. She also gave some really great defenses of various subjects--especially Latin. Latin was the one subject I never totally bought as a student, one I still have trouble completely buying today, but Merkle almost convinced me in the book that Latin is essential (there are just a few more things I need to research to be completely sold on it). She also utilized some great analogies (I am 100% stealing her analogy between classical education and basketball drills), and her tone seems to me to be a very relatable, appropriate tone for this kind of book. The only critiques I'd make of this book are nit-picky ones based on the things that classical education nerds fight over (such as whether Dorothy Sayers has an accurate understanding of classical education, or whether the Trivium should be more central than the Quadrivium--I disagree with both positions). But classical education nerds like me aren't the intended audience. For students, this is a great book that's short, says many of the things it needs to, and strikes a great tone in the delivery. I will be relying on many of Merkle's insights in the marketing materials I'm currently trying to create for my classical school and highly recommend this as a great gift for any classical students in your life. Rating: 4 Stars (Very Good).

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mia McNamee

    Compelling Apologetic for Classical Christian education I teach at a classical Christian school (Logic Stage, 6th grade), and strive to help my wonderful students understand all the whys behind ... well, everything! (6th grade, right?) But particularly the whys behind the peculiar school in which they find themselves. Since my students are in the thick of the ‘pert’ stage of life, it’s imperative to do so to keep my teacher cred. This short book gives such a succinct, relevant reason for each of t Compelling Apologetic for Classical Christian education I teach at a classical Christian school (Logic Stage, 6th grade), and strive to help my wonderful students understand all the whys behind ... well, everything! (6th grade, right?) But particularly the whys behind the peculiar school in which they find themselves. Since my students are in the thick of the ‘pert’ stage of life, it’s imperative to do so to keep my teacher cred. This short book gives such a succinct, relevant reason for each of the elements of classical ed., while also reminding the student (and teacher, and parent) of the larger framework we are working within, that I plan to quote from it shamelessly. Rebekah Merkle has covered the very questions and complaints I hear (if not daily, then sometimes weekly) from my students. Not only that but she gives insight into where different attitudes on the part of the student may lead academically and, more importantly, in later life. All this in a conversational, intelligent, non-preachy fashion! When the students hear how entertaining a read it is, they will want to read it on their own.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Derek Wright

    Merkle quite blatantly suggested that the aim of Classical Christian education (through the efforts of teachers and parents) is to turn children "into leaders", which I thought was unnecessary to argue for the merits of classical education. And yet I expected Merkle to be more 'boastful' in other places, like in Chapter Five (finding meaning in Literature)—and encourage that it's the Christians who are most able to rightly interpret classic and complicated works of art and literature; but she se Merkle quite blatantly suggested that the aim of Classical Christian education (through the efforts of teachers and parents) is to turn children "into leaders", which I thought was unnecessary to argue for the merits of classical education. And yet I expected Merkle to be more 'boastful' in other places, like in Chapter Five (finding meaning in Literature)—and encourage that it's the Christians who are most able to rightly interpret classic and complicated works of art and literature; but she seemed content to stick with small examples and anecdotes—that we read sentences, excerpts, and versus quite well. Nonetheless, I love Merkle, and it's a joy listening to her no matter the subject. I deeply admire that this is a book written for young people—to encourage them and to help them appreciate the beautiful rarity of their circumstance.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Though it's written specifically to students in a classical Christian school setting, much of the information is pertinent to classical homeschooling families with children entering the dialectic and rhetoric phases of their education. It really does give them the answers to the big "why" questions that they have....WHY are we studying Latin, etc. I would highly recommend this book not just for students, but also for parents who choose to educate their children classically. It would be a great "f Though it's written specifically to students in a classical Christian school setting, much of the information is pertinent to classical homeschooling families with children entering the dialectic and rhetoric phases of their education. It really does give them the answers to the big "why" questions that they have....WHY are we studying Latin, etc. I would highly recommend this book not just for students, but also for parents who choose to educate their children classically. It would be a great "first read" for someone choosing classical education for their child, to help them navigate through all of those big "why" questions as well. Great book!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Some good thoughts, I appreciate the idea, but a few things bothered me. First of all, you don't have to be in a school to be classically educated. She could have made it broader to include homeschoolers. Also, the frequent font size changes were annoying and distracting. My eye wanted to skip over the enormous parts; they look like quotes in magazine articles that are lifted from the article itself. My other complaint is that the author does not have the same reasons for Latin that I do (some a Some good thoughts, I appreciate the idea, but a few things bothered me. First of all, you don't have to be in a school to be classically educated. She could have made it broader to include homeschoolers. Also, the frequent font size changes were annoying and distracting. My eye wanted to skip over the enormous parts; they look like quotes in magazine articles that are lifted from the article itself. My other complaint is that the author does not have the same reasons for Latin that I do (some are the same, but she leaves out any discussion of Latin as critical thinking).

  28. 4 out of 5

    David Mcnelley

    The Paraclete’s Hammer Review This book was well-articulated and concise in its summation of the plusses of a classical education, treating the various major aspects of CE as the tools that they are. Even for those who are not doing classical education, this is a very engaging read that will add to your understanding of your own method of teaching and learning, in addition to broadening you own comprehension of pedagogy. Read this one with a mind to learn something. David Michael MacNelley #TheParac The Paraclete’s Hammer Review This book was well-articulated and concise in its summation of the plusses of a classical education, treating the various major aspects of CE as the tools that they are. Even for those who are not doing classical education, this is a very engaging read that will add to your understanding of your own method of teaching and learning, in addition to broadening you own comprehension of pedagogy. Read this one with a mind to learn something. David Michael MacNelley #TheParacletesHammer

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Now that I have had a chance to see all the stages of the Trivium in a classroom setting, this book was even richer for me in the reading experience. I was thinking of the different discussions that I have witnessed, and how much it impacted me- especially the high school years. This will definitely be a book I recommend to my kids to read as they get older and take more personal ownership of their education. My first reading of this was on kindle, but I definitely plan to purchase some hard cop Now that I have had a chance to see all the stages of the Trivium in a classroom setting, this book was even richer for me in the reading experience. I was thinking of the different discussions that I have witnessed, and how much it impacted me- especially the high school years. This will definitely be a book I recommend to my kids to read as they get older and take more personal ownership of their education. My first reading of this was on kindle, but I definitely plan to purchase some hard copies to loan out to friends to serve as encouragement to stay the course. Highly recommend.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    It's actually written FOR the classical Christian student who wants to know the why of his or her education, but I found it even beneficial as a fairly new parent to classical education. Why we study Latin, why rhetoric, why logic is so important, these are the question I am most asked and have never been able to answer. This was a fast read and perfect for anyone wanting to know the why behind classical education.

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