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Is Anyone Responsible?: How Television Frames Political Issues

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A disturbingly cautionary tale, Is Anyone Responsible? anchors with powerful evidence suspicions about the way in which television has impoverished political discourse in the United States and at the same time molds American political consciousness. It is essential reading for media critics, psychologists, political analysts, and all the citizens who want to be sure that t A disturbingly cautionary tale, Is Anyone Responsible? anchors with powerful evidence suspicions about the way in which television has impoverished political discourse in the United States and at the same time molds American political consciousness. It is essential reading for media critics, psychologists, political analysts, and all the citizens who want to be sure that their political opinions are their own. "Not only does it provide convincing evidence for particular effects of media fragmentation, but it also explores some of the specific mechanisms by which television works its damage. . . . Here is powerful additional evidence for those of us who like to flay television for its contributions to the trivialization of public discourse and the erosion of democratic accountability."—William A. Gamson, Contemporary Sociology "Iyengar's book has substantial merit. . . . [His] experimental methods offer a precision of measurement that media effects research seldom attains. I believe, moreover, that Iyengar's notion of framing effects is one of the truly important theoretical concepts to appear in recent years."—Thomas E. Patterson, American Political Science Review


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A disturbingly cautionary tale, Is Anyone Responsible? anchors with powerful evidence suspicions about the way in which television has impoverished political discourse in the United States and at the same time molds American political consciousness. It is essential reading for media critics, psychologists, political analysts, and all the citizens who want to be sure that t A disturbingly cautionary tale, Is Anyone Responsible? anchors with powerful evidence suspicions about the way in which television has impoverished political discourse in the United States and at the same time molds American political consciousness. It is essential reading for media critics, psychologists, political analysts, and all the citizens who want to be sure that their political opinions are their own. "Not only does it provide convincing evidence for particular effects of media fragmentation, but it also explores some of the specific mechanisms by which television works its damage. . . . Here is powerful additional evidence for those of us who like to flay television for its contributions to the trivialization of public discourse and the erosion of democratic accountability."—William A. Gamson, Contemporary Sociology "Iyengar's book has substantial merit. . . . [His] experimental methods offer a precision of measurement that media effects research seldom attains. I believe, moreover, that Iyengar's notion of framing effects is one of the truly important theoretical concepts to appear in recent years."—Thomas E. Patterson, American Political Science Review

33 review for Is Anyone Responsible?: How Television Frames Political Issues

  1. 5 out of 5

    Neil

    Iyengar argues that how television frames news stories affects how viewers assign responsibility. I found the evidence to be less than convincing. First off, the sample sizes in the experiments are very small. Second, with the exception of the first experiment, he fails to use a control group. Thus, we have no way of knowing what the baseline responsibility judgments are for people. Finally, the main categories of news stories (thematic and episodic) are not entirely clear. One can easily see so Iyengar argues that how television frames news stories affects how viewers assign responsibility. I found the evidence to be less than convincing. First off, the sample sizes in the experiments are very small. Second, with the exception of the first experiment, he fails to use a control group. Thus, we have no way of knowing what the baseline responsibility judgments are for people. Finally, the main categories of news stories (thematic and episodic) are not entirely clear. One can easily see some thematic content being episodic as well (especially in the Iran Contra chapter). On the whole, an interesting idea, but the execution leaves my unconvinced.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chris LoPresti

  3. 4 out of 5

    C

  4. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kristie

  6. 4 out of 5

    dogunderwater

    THESISSSSSS.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Robert

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    Ana Vasquez

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    Atınç Gürçay

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    Laura

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    Aimee

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    Christine (Queen of Books)

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    Jeff Gulati

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    Tim Metayer

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    Emily

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    Linda Oheron

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    Mmyoung

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dan

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    John Kaye

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    Keith Stern

  21. 4 out of 5

    Anna Klimenko

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bhuwanesh Singh

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amy Alpert

  24. 4 out of 5

    양명철

  25. 4 out of 5

    Carl

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    Raf

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    Kamilla

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    Dani

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    Nikita Rangwani

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    Ahmed Gamal

  31. 5 out of 5

    Tareq Amin

  32. 4 out of 5

    Amelita Lusia

  33. 5 out of 5

    Roxana Carter

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