counter create hit The Emotions of Protest - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Emotions of Protest

Availability: Ready to download

In Donald Trump’s America, protesting has roared back into fashion. The Women’s March, held the day after Trump’s inauguration, may have been the largest in American history, and resonated around the world. Between Trump’s tweets and the march’s popularity, it is clear that displays of anger dominate American politics once again. There is an extensive body of research on p In Donald Trump’s America, protesting has roared back into fashion. The Women’s March, held the day after Trump’s inauguration, may have been the largest in American history, and resonated around the world. Between Trump’s tweets and the march’s popularity, it is clear that displays of anger dominate American politics once again. There is an extensive body of research on protest, but the focus has mostly been on the calculating brain—a byproduct of structuralism and cognitive studies—and less on the feeling brain. James M. Jasper’s work changes that, as he pushes the boundaries of our present understanding of the social world. In The Emotions of Protest, Jasper lays out his argument, showing that it is impossible to separate cognition and emotion. At a minimum, he says, we cannot understand the Tea Party or Occupy Wall Street or pro- and anti-Trump rallies without first studying the fears and anger, moral outrage, and patterns of hate and love that their members feel. This is a book centered on protest, but Jasper also points toward broader paths of inquiry that have the power to transform the way social scientists picture social life and action. Through emotions, he says, we are embedded in a variety of environmental, bodily, social, moral, and temporal contexts, as we feel our way both consciously and unconsciously toward some things and away from others. Politics and collective action have always been a kind of laboratory for working out models of human action more generally, and emotions are no exception. Both hearts and minds rely on the same feelings racing through our central nervous systems. Protestors have emotions, like everyone else, but theirs are thinking hearts, not bleeding hearts. Brains can feel, and hearts can think.


Compare

In Donald Trump’s America, protesting has roared back into fashion. The Women’s March, held the day after Trump’s inauguration, may have been the largest in American history, and resonated around the world. Between Trump’s tweets and the march’s popularity, it is clear that displays of anger dominate American politics once again. There is an extensive body of research on p In Donald Trump’s America, protesting has roared back into fashion. The Women’s March, held the day after Trump’s inauguration, may have been the largest in American history, and resonated around the world. Between Trump’s tweets and the march’s popularity, it is clear that displays of anger dominate American politics once again. There is an extensive body of research on protest, but the focus has mostly been on the calculating brain—a byproduct of structuralism and cognitive studies—and less on the feeling brain. James M. Jasper’s work changes that, as he pushes the boundaries of our present understanding of the social world. In The Emotions of Protest, Jasper lays out his argument, showing that it is impossible to separate cognition and emotion. At a minimum, he says, we cannot understand the Tea Party or Occupy Wall Street or pro- and anti-Trump rallies without first studying the fears and anger, moral outrage, and patterns of hate and love that their members feel. This is a book centered on protest, but Jasper also points toward broader paths of inquiry that have the power to transform the way social scientists picture social life and action. Through emotions, he says, we are embedded in a variety of environmental, bodily, social, moral, and temporal contexts, as we feel our way both consciously and unconsciously toward some things and away from others. Politics and collective action have always been a kind of laboratory for working out models of human action more generally, and emotions are no exception. Both hearts and minds rely on the same feelings racing through our central nervous systems. Protestors have emotions, like everyone else, but theirs are thinking hearts, not bleeding hearts. Brains can feel, and hearts can think.

33 review for The Emotions of Protest

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ein belesenes Wesen

    Most accessible of Jaspers work in my opinion. He mainly differentiates between five broad categories of "Emotion" that are universally existant in human interactions and demonstrates past theories to explain these fields, while always keeping the focus on the specific relationship between protest and emotions. Thoroughly recommend if you are interested in the sociology of emotions or the emotions of protest in general. Most accessible of Jaspers work in my opinion. He mainly differentiates between five broad categories of "Emotion" that are universally existant in human interactions and demonstrates past theories to explain these fields, while always keeping the focus on the specific relationship between protest and emotions. Thoroughly recommend if you are interested in the sociology of emotions or the emotions of protest in general.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Steffen

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael Baldwin

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  5. 4 out of 5

    Giorgi Burduli

  6. 5 out of 5

    Inna

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sahra Işıkdemir

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michael Messner

  9. 4 out of 5

    Julie Cook

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jamison

  11. 5 out of 5

    Konstantinos Kampouris

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Banks

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

  14. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  15. 5 out of 5

    Grant Tietjen

  16. 5 out of 5

    Annelot

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jaap

  18. 4 out of 5

    Aia

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dallas Cant

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Gude

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael Rubin

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  23. 5 out of 5

    Wim

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jakub

  25. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

  26. 4 out of 5

    Caleb

  27. 4 out of 5

    V

  28. 4 out of 5

    Romeo

  29. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

  30. 5 out of 5

    Holly

  31. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle

  32. 5 out of 5

    Stevie

  33. 5 out of 5

    Sara

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.