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30 review for 1984 India's Guilty Secret - Book By Pav Singh

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ashok Rao

    It looks like perpetrators of 1984 riots would never be brought to justice. Gurcharan Singh Gill who lost his father and ten members of his family in 1984 riots says that if the 1984 victims had received justice, then people would not have dared to do the same in Gujarat in 2002. People responsible for the riots go on to become part of the government. And you can't fight the government. Well, riots are here to stay. There is a pattern to every riots. The political party responsible for the riots It looks like perpetrators of 1984 riots would never be brought to justice. Gurcharan Singh Gill who lost his father and ten members of his family in 1984 riots says that if the 1984 victims had received justice, then people would not have dared to do the same in Gujarat in 2002. People responsible for the riots go on to become part of the government. And you can't fight the government. Well, riots are here to stay. There is a pattern to every riots. The political party responsible for the riots have always benefited in the elections. It's a powerful weapon and politicians are going to make use of it. These were my thoughts when I finished reading this book. This well researched book is a reminder why every Indian should feel ashamed of themselves when a riot breaks out in any corner of the country. And remember it will usually happen before the election.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nilesh Kokare

    I am crying as I am writing this. The book is divided into two parts. The first part covers the extremely heinous (every word would be an understatement to describe, actually) barbarity committed on the Sikh community — yes the community we ONLY remember for offering free langars or for making "Sardar" jokes — in Oct/Nov 1984 in the national capital and also across all over India. It was heart-wrenching and heart-breaking first. And then anguishing. And then just heart-numbing..because after som I am crying as I am writing this. The book is divided into two parts. The first part covers the extremely heinous (every word would be an understatement to describe, actually) barbarity committed on the Sikh community — yes the community we ONLY remember for offering free langars or for making "Sardar" jokes — in Oct/Nov 1984 in the national capital and also across all over India. It was heart-wrenching and heart-breaking first. And then anguishing. And then just heart-numbing..because after some time I didn't know what I was feeling reading the vicious ordeal committed unabated on Sikh men, women and children for 4 long dark days. The second part covers how the Indian government (congress party) and its machinery from the police to the army to media to the judiciary — how everyone (even the western government) played their part in planning and committing blood-thirsty genocide of Sikhs in 1984, and also in covering everything with lies and destroying evidence, and giving impunity to all the big preparators and thereby never ever granting the justice to the victims and survivors of that brutal genocide who are till date struggling with trauma and other situations. How India and the West have long forgotten and never gave importance to this barbarous genocide it deserves. The book also briefly touches upon 'Blue-star operation' and what leads to that barbaric shameful attack on the holy Golden temple by the dictator Indira Gandhi led Indian government. I've been seeing jokes on Indian democracy recently. Well, Democracy has always been a big joke in this country. This book is really great. I loved the way it's written. I loved the writing. It's a well-researched book. Also, I know I am also very late but seriously the very least we can do for all victims and survivors of 1984 genocide and everyone from Sikh community all over the world is educate us — educate us about this long-forgotten and cleverly obliterated Indian state-orchestrated unforgivable genocide on Sikh community. Please, please, please read this book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sanjukta

    Growing up in India, this incident has always been referred to as the “Anti-Sikh Riot”. The book helps change that perspective by highlighting the real narrative of these well-orchestrated genocidal massacres. A must-read for anybody with a sense of humanity. As for the writing style - I must say that the content definitely provoked anger and deep sorrow for what shaped the 1984 killings. Although there was a definite possibility to reduce the length of some chapters by avoiding factual redundan Growing up in India, this incident has always been referred to as the “Anti-Sikh Riot”. The book helps change that perspective by highlighting the real narrative of these well-orchestrated genocidal massacres. A must-read for anybody with a sense of humanity. As for the writing style - I must say that the content definitely provoked anger and deep sorrow for what shaped the 1984 killings. Although there was a definite possibility to reduce the length of some chapters by avoiding factual redundancy. However, if the intent behind the repetition was only to reinforce the themes of this book; they sure did a great job.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chris Serrao

    Very Bland book. It just states facts which is I know really really horrific. It feels like you are reading an encyclopedia about the incident and it does not engage the reader in an effective manner. If you want to just know the facts then go for it or else just don't read it. It's not worth your time. Very Bland book. It just states facts which is I know really really horrific. It feels like you are reading an encyclopedia about the incident and it does not engage the reader in an effective manner. If you want to just know the facts then go for it or else just don't read it. It's not worth your time.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Esha Kak

    I don't remember when was the last time that I cringed as much as I did while reading this book. 1984 Indias Guilty Secret is a mind boggling narrative of the 'state sponsored terrorism' following Indira Gandhi's assassination, the repercussions of which are fresh in my mind since we have very close family friends who are Sikhs. Thankfully, we were in Bihar and almost untouched by the insanity. I was only 3 years old, but I clearly remember the tension all around us. This book HAS to be read by I don't remember when was the last time that I cringed as much as I did while reading this book. 1984 Indias Guilty Secret is a mind boggling narrative of the 'state sponsored terrorism' following Indira Gandhi's assassination, the repercussions of which are fresh in my mind since we have very close family friends who are Sikhs. Thankfully, we were in Bihar and almost untouched by the insanity. I was only 3 years old, but I clearly remember the tension all around us. This book HAS to be read by anyone who wants to know what really happened and WHY was the army never deployed to put a stop to the killngs and WHY were policemen seen participating in them. It will shake you up to your core and make you question your patriotism. At one point, it even gets overwhelming. Please do not read if you have a weak heart. Well, I do. But then, what the heck!

  6. 4 out of 5

    R

    Pav Singh in his book 1984 India's Guilty Secret details the horrors that people inflict on one another. This book is an easy read but also a painful read. India's massacre of Sikhs is another example of a genocide of a minority group by a more powerful majority and how easy it can be for people to engage in horrific atrocities against people in their community. This particular genocide is something unfamiliar to the wider world and an example of the never again slogan as a failed international Pav Singh in his book 1984 India's Guilty Secret details the horrors that people inflict on one another. This book is an easy read but also a painful read. India's massacre of Sikhs is another example of a genocide of a minority group by a more powerful majority and how easy it can be for people to engage in horrific atrocities against people in their community. This particular genocide is something unfamiliar to the wider world and an example of the never again slogan as a failed international idea.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kislay Chaturvedi

    Book is good. It'll horrify u at some place. It's reveals many truths that were kept hidden from comman public. But some point writer repeats the same thing again n again. I don't know , whether it is to exaggerate or its the writing skills . But overall this book is a must read atleast for all indians. Book is good. It'll horrify u at some place. It's reveals many truths that were kept hidden from comman public. But some point writer repeats the same thing again n again. I don't know , whether it is to exaggerate or its the writing skills . But overall this book is a must read atleast for all indians.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Abhishek Acharyya

    A book that should be read and re-read by everyone in the country. Especially in the times that we live in. It's important that we identify those who to further their narrow political ideas, try to divide and perpetrate worst of atrocities against their fellow citizens. A book that should be read and re-read by everyone in the country. Especially in the times that we live in. It's important that we identify those who to further their narrow political ideas, try to divide and perpetrate worst of atrocities against their fellow citizens.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Debolina Bhattacharya

    I never been as horrified and haven't cried as much as I have while I was reading this book. It was difficult to complete it simply because of the sad truth put on the book. More power to the author. I never been as horrified and haven't cried as much as I have while I was reading this book. It was difficult to complete it simply because of the sad truth put on the book. More power to the author.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bhuvaneswari Mathuraiveeran

    A good compilation of events, the book just outlines on how planned usage of power helped in organising crime. Dark years of India

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kalwinder Dhindsa

    A devastating, well researched account of the 1984 Anti-Sikh Pogroms. One day the full truth will be revealed and justice will prevail.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Varun Oak-Bhakay

    Pav Singh’s 1984: India’s Guilty Secret is a damning indictment of the nation as a whole in the 1984 Sikh pogrom. One might argue that the pogrom was the doing of the Congress Party and its “leaders” but the fact remains that everybody else stood by and allowed the horrors to take place. Singh details the sheer scale of bloodthirsty violence and cruelty that resulted in thousands of deaths – in a variety of ways, some of which one might feel human beings are incapable of. By adopting a mix of det Pav Singh’s 1984: India’s Guilty Secret is a damning indictment of the nation as a whole in the 1984 Sikh pogrom. One might argue that the pogrom was the doing of the Congress Party and its “leaders” but the fact remains that everybody else stood by and allowed the horrors to take place. Singh details the sheer scale of bloodthirsty violence and cruelty that resulted in thousands of deaths – in a variety of ways, some of which one might feel human beings are incapable of. By adopting a mix of details available to the citizenry and eye-witness accounts, Singh presents a picture that is quite different from that which even those who might know the basic facts of the massacre will testify to being aware of. Singh reminds us of the methods used to create distrust of Sikhs among non-Sikhs by the Congress, which is just another reminder that at their very core, all political parties are the same. He spares no one – not Tytler, not Sajjan Kumar, not HKL Bhagat, and certainly not Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi, who had, in response to the news of the bloodshed, talked of a tree falling and the ground shaking. In places, Singh does stumble – giving space to hearsay and rumour – and a fatal flaw is his inability to question the Khalistani secessionist movement and the form it assumed. That apart, he sticks to a journalistic line that spares the reader no detail. A fine, fine book that should be prescribed reading for every single one of us…..so that such a thing never happens in India again.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sriram Patil

  14. 5 out of 5

    Manan Sheth

  15. 4 out of 5

    Claire Lugton

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shobika Kavimani

  17. 4 out of 5

    sandeep

  18. 5 out of 5

    Uttamjit Kaur

  19. 4 out of 5

    Yogesh Potbhare

  20. 4 out of 5

    Suki

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tanveer

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rishav

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gunreet

  24. 5 out of 5

    Serena Gataora

  25. 5 out of 5

    Abhay Singh

  26. 4 out of 5

    Paresh

  27. 5 out of 5

    A

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kajal Kaur

  29. 4 out of 5

    Deepak Singh

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sangeeta

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