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Even bad code can function. But if code isn t clean, it can bring a development organization to its knees. Every year, countless hours and significant resources are lost because of poorly written code. But it doesn t have to be that way. Noted software expert Robert C. Martin presents a revolutionary paradigm with Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship . M Even bad code can function. But if code isn t clean, it can bring a development organization to its knees. Every year, countless hours and significant resources are lost because of poorly written code. But it doesn t have to be that way. Noted software expert Robert C. Martin presents a revolutionary paradigm with Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship . Martin has teamed up with his colleagues from Object Mentor to distill their best agile practice of cleaning code on the fly into a book that will instill within you the values of a software craftsman and make you a better programmer but only if you work at it. What kind of work will you be doing? You ll be reading code lots of code. And you will be challenged to think about what s right about that code, and what s wrong with it. More importantly, you will be challenged to reassess your professional values and your commitment to your craft. Clean Code is divided into three parts. The first describes the principles, patterns, and practices of writing clean code. The second part consists of several case studies of increasing complexity. Each case study is an exercise in cleaning up code of transforming a code base that has some problems into one that is sound and efficient. The third part is the payoff: a single chapter containing a list of heuristics and smells gathered while creating the case studies. The result is a knowledge base that describes the way we think when we write, read, and clean code. Readers will come away from this book understanding How to tell the difference between good and bad code How to write good code and how to transform bad code into good code How to create good names, good functions, good objects, and good classes How to format code for maximum readability How to implement complete error handling without obscuring code logic How to unit test and practice test-driven development This book is a must for any developer, software engineer, project manager, team lead, or systems analyst with an interest in producing better code. "


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Even bad code can function. But if code isn t clean, it can bring a development organization to its knees. Every year, countless hours and significant resources are lost because of poorly written code. But it doesn t have to be that way. Noted software expert Robert C. Martin presents a revolutionary paradigm with Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship . M Even bad code can function. But if code isn t clean, it can bring a development organization to its knees. Every year, countless hours and significant resources are lost because of poorly written code. But it doesn t have to be that way. Noted software expert Robert C. Martin presents a revolutionary paradigm with Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship . Martin has teamed up with his colleagues from Object Mentor to distill their best agile practice of cleaning code on the fly into a book that will instill within you the values of a software craftsman and make you a better programmer but only if you work at it. What kind of work will you be doing? You ll be reading code lots of code. And you will be challenged to think about what s right about that code, and what s wrong with it. More importantly, you will be challenged to reassess your professional values and your commitment to your craft. Clean Code is divided into three parts. The first describes the principles, patterns, and practices of writing clean code. The second part consists of several case studies of increasing complexity. Each case study is an exercise in cleaning up code of transforming a code base that has some problems into one that is sound and efficient. The third part is the payoff: a single chapter containing a list of heuristics and smells gathered while creating the case studies. The result is a knowledge base that describes the way we think when we write, read, and clean code. Readers will come away from this book understanding How to tell the difference between good and bad code How to write good code and how to transform bad code into good code How to create good names, good functions, good objects, and good classes How to format code for maximum readability How to implement complete error handling without obscuring code logic How to unit test and practice test-driven development This book is a must for any developer, software engineer, project manager, team lead, or systems analyst with an interest in producing better code. "

30 review for Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship

  1. 5 out of 5

    Oana Sipos

    These are rather notes than a review while reading: 1. Use very descriptive names. Be consistent with your names. 2. A function should not do more than one thing. 3. SRP (Single Responsibility Principle): a class or module should have one, and only one, reason to change. 4. Stepdown rule: every function should be followed by those at the next level of abstraction (low, intermediate, advanced). 5. A long descriptive name is better than a short enigmatic name. A long descriptive name is better than a These are rather notes than a review while reading: 1. Use very descriptive names. Be consistent with your names. 2. A function should not do more than one thing. 3. SRP (Single Responsibility Principle): a class or module should have one, and only one, reason to change. 4. Stepdown rule: every function should be followed by those at the next level of abstraction (low, intermediate, advanced). 5. A long descriptive name is better than a short enigmatic name. A long descriptive name is better than a long descriptive comment. 6. The ideal number of arguments for a function is zero (niladic). Next comes one (monadic), followed closely by two (dyadic). Three arguments (triadic) should be avoided where possible. More than three (polyadic) requires very special justification and then shouldn't be used anyway. 7. Flag arguments are ugly. Passing a boolean into a function is loudly proclaiming that this function does more than one thing. It does one thing if the flag is true and another one if the flag is false. 8. Write learning test when using third-party cody to make sure it behaves the way you expect it to. And if codebase changes in time, at least you find out early enough.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Francis Fish

    The first half of this book is well worth a read. Then I was reminded of Martin Fowler's (I think) comment that the original Design Patterns Elements of Reusable Software book was a response to the limitations of C++. It dovetailed so well into Java because Java has a lot of the same annoying limitations, and in some ways is even harder. The latter section of the book contains some worked examples that I didn't always agree with because they seemed to be totally over done. A lot of the refactorin The first half of this book is well worth a read. Then I was reminded of Martin Fowler's (I think) comment that the original Design Patterns Elements of Reusable Software book was a response to the limitations of C++. It dovetailed so well into Java because Java has a lot of the same annoying limitations, and in some ways is even harder. The latter section of the book contains some worked examples that I didn't always agree with because they seemed to be totally over done. A lot of the refactorings came from limitations in the language and even then felt arbitrary and not that "clean", more like differences of opinion. In light of this I think the book would have been better titled Clean Java, and then we'd all know where we stand. Have to say I was disappointed by the case studies. I think if you're a jobbing Java programmer you will get a real benefit from this book. I use dynamic languages like Ruby and most of the problems described in need of refactoring just never happen.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Vladimir

    This book makes some very good points, sometimes taking them to extreme ("Never write functions longer than 15 lines! Never write functions with more than three arguments!"). Some of these points were quite new and useful for me - YMMV. It's too Java-specific in a few places, and reading the last refactoring chapter on a kindle was quite a challenge, but otherwise it was well worth a read. At least I got a clear picture of how I want to refactor a big piece of my current project after reading th This book makes some very good points, sometimes taking them to extreme ("Never write functions longer than 15 lines! Never write functions with more than three arguments!"). Some of these points were quite new and useful for me - YMMV. It's too Java-specific in a few places, and reading the last refactoring chapter on a kindle was quite a challenge, but otherwise it was well worth a read. At least I got a clear picture of how I want to refactor a big piece of my current project after reading this :)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nariman

    If you are a programmer, you must read it! full of good examples of how to write clean and readable code.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rod Hilton

    There is a movement brewing in the world of professional software development. This movement is concerned not merely with writing functional, correct code, but also on writing good code. Taking pride in code. This movement is the Software Craftsmanship movement, and one of the people near the head of this movement is Robert C. Martin, also known as Uncle Bob. His book "Clean Code" is, in many ways, an introduction to the concept of Software Craftsmanship and a guide for developers interested in b There is a movement brewing in the world of professional software development. This movement is concerned not merely with writing functional, correct code, but also on writing good code. Taking pride in code. This movement is the Software Craftsmanship movement, and one of the people near the head of this movement is Robert C. Martin, also known as Uncle Bob. His book "Clean Code" is, in many ways, an introduction to the concept of Software Craftsmanship and a guide for developers interested in becoming craftsmen. Clean Code is not about only writing correct code, it's about writing code that is designed well, code that reads well, and code that expresses the intent of the author. The book is essentially divided into two parts. The first part contains Bob's suggestions for writing and maintaining clean code. This includes suggestions on everything ranging from how to properly comment code and how to properly name variables to how to separate your classes and how to construct testable concurrent code. The second part of the book uses the principles in the first part to guide the reader through a few exercises in which existing code is cleaned. The first part of the book is fantastic. I can't recommend it highly enough for a professional software developer that wishes to elevate him or herself to a higher standard. This guide is excellent, and gave me lots of things to think about while reading it. I could almost feel myself becoming a better programmer as I internalized Martin's advice, and the code I've been writing has been noticeably better since I began following his suggestions. In the second part of the book, Martin essentially guides us through three projects: a command line argument parser he wrote, a section of the JUnit source code, and a section of source code from SerialDate. Of these, the most detailed guide is Martin's illustration of refactoring the command line argument parser. These sections all suffered from a fundamental flaw: they were inside a book. These sections all required reading large amounts of source code. Not just scanning it, but really reading and understanding the code, so that the reader can understand the changes Martin makes to the code. Reading and understanding code is something I do every day as a professional, but I never have to do it from paper. When I read code, I'm interacting with something, not just reading. I can scroll up and down. If I see a method being used and I wonder how it's written, I can click on it and jump right to the implementation. My IDE shows me symbols in my gutterbar when methods are overridden. I can press a keystroke to pull up a list of just the methods in a source file. I can right click on a method and find its usages immediately. The source code I am reading is something I can push and pull, gaining an understanding of it through interaction. When source code is printed in a book, you get none of this. To make matters worse, Martin's code samples have absolutely no syntax highlighting applied to them. When I read source code, certain parts are rendered in specific ways that make it easier to pull the information into my brain. Strings and literals are formatted differently, comments are dimmer so I can focus on code, and so on. Code samples in "Clean Code" are just characters, with occasionally bolding used to draw attention to parts that were changed. It's amazing how much syntax highlighting helps make code more comprehensible, even at a completely subconscious level. A book is, quite simply, not an appropriate medium for a guided code walkthrough. I'd have preferred the content of these sections as perhaps a lecture, with Martin's text done in audio and his code kept on the screen. This would at least prevent me from having to flip back and forth constantly. I didn't get as much out of these sections as I would have liked to, simply because it was so difficult to digest the information it contained in such an awkward, unnatural medium. At the very least, the code samples should have been printed in color, with syntax highlighting. I can tell that his advice was good and that the refactorings he applied to the code samples in the book made the code far better, but mostly because I've observed these efforts in real life and observed how much they improve code. If I were to encounter Martin's "before" and "after" code in a project I was working on, I undoubtedly would find the "after" code far, far cleaner and more enjoyable to work with. However, since the book format made it so difficult to understand EITHER code sample, it didn't seem like Martin's efforts offered much improvement, even though I know they did. Despite this frustration, the book is an excellent read, and I'm quite certain it has contributed a great deal to helping me improve as a professional. I can't recommend it enough, especially for Java developers. I just think that most readers will find the final few chapters intensely frustrating - I recommend downloading the code and viewing it in your favorite code editor so that you can comprehend the source code the way you would any other source code.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    I had a tough time deciding between 3 or 4 stars. The book should be called Clean Java Code. Some of the concepts definitely translate to other languages, but it uses Java for all of the examples and some of the chapters are dedicated to Java-specific issues. I consider many of the the suggestions to simply be common sense, but I've worked with enough of "other people's code" to realize they don't necessarily agree. With all of that said, I'd definitely recommend the book to Java developers at th I had a tough time deciding between 3 or 4 stars. The book should be called Clean Java Code. Some of the concepts definitely translate to other languages, but it uses Java for all of the examples and some of the chapters are dedicated to Java-specific issues. I consider many of the the suggestions to simply be common sense, but I've worked with enough of "other people's code" to realize they don't necessarily agree. With all of that said, I'd definitely recommend the book to Java developers at the beginner and intermediate levels.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Carl-Eric

    Many good points in this book. Unfortunately, almost all of them are overdone. Yes, you should write short functions, if possible. Yes, you should have functions that do one thing. But no, "one thing" does not mean you should tear an algorithm apart into twenty little funclets that make no sense on their own. Basically, like another reviewer wrote, the first part of the book raises many good points, and the second part of the book then merrily applies these points way beyond their usefulness. Read Many good points in this book. Unfortunately, almost all of them are overdone. Yes, you should write short functions, if possible. Yes, you should have functions that do one thing. But no, "one thing" does not mean you should tear an algorithm apart into twenty little funclets that make no sense on their own. Basically, like another reviewer wrote, the first part of the book raises many good points, and the second part of the book then merrily applies these points way beyond their usefulness. Read the book, but keep your brains turned on and be alert.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amir Tesla

    Great great book on principles of clean code. The only problem with the book was that it’s obsessively written for Java. Even though, there are still many principles you can apply to any other languages from C to Python. Although have to say, you have to do your own research for applicability of the principle in your target language. For instance, the inversion of control (IoC)and Dependency Injection (DI) are quite common and intrinsic to Java, but it is not as straightforward in Python (becaus Great great book on principles of clean code. The only problem with the book was that it’s obsessively written for Java. Even though, there are still many principles you can apply to any other languages from C to Python. Although have to say, you have to do your own research for applicability of the principle in your target language. For instance, the inversion of control (IoC)and Dependency Injection (DI) are quite common and intrinsic to Java, but it is not as straightforward in Python (because of dynamic nature of python and duck typing) In any case, This book is an absolute must for any programmer seeking to perfect their craft.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kosala Nuwan Perera

    I had a tough time deciding whether I really liked or It was amazing. I liked the writing style of the book. Its simple, clean, and well crafted. First few chapters of the book makes good practical advice from naming variables-functions-classes to writing functions to testing. Most of the smells and heuristics I found in these chapters can be found in real-world as well. Complexity kills. It sucks the life out of developers, it makes products difficult to plan, build, and test. - Ray Ozzie, CTO, M I had a tough time deciding whether I really liked or It was amazing. I liked the writing style of the book. Its simple, clean, and well crafted. First few chapters of the book makes good practical advice from naming variables-functions-classes to writing functions to testing. Most of the smells and heuristics I found in these chapters can be found in real-world as well. Complexity kills. It sucks the life out of developers, it makes products difficult to plan, build, and test. - Ray Ozzie, CTO, Microsoft Corporation In the next few chapters of the book contains some very good points. Some of them are quite new and very useful for me when applying design principles (such as SRP, OCP, DRY, SOC) to keeping the code base small, simple, and clean. Most freshman programmers (like most grade-schoolers) don't follow this advice particularly well. They believe that the primary goal is to get the program working. Once it's "working", they move on to the next task, leaving the "working" program in whatever state they finally got it to "work". Most seasoned programmers know that this is professional suicide. These parts of the book are *fantastic* and well justified though most of the examples are pure Java-specific. Latter sections of the book is more into Java centric, and thought of skimming few sections (disappointingly) but was compelled to continue reading. The book must titled "Clean Code (Java)". Though this book makes more sense for Java developers at the beginners and intermediate levels, I would definitely recommend the book to any .NET C# developers as well. All in all, it was well worth a read! I got a clear picture of how developers end up with smelly code and how we can refine and "clean" it up. /KP Review: Clean Code by Robert C. Martin

  10. 4 out of 5

    David

    This is a book that one could get started on the idea of "good code" - clean, readable, elegant, simple, easy-to-test, etc. It has the usual stuff that you'd expect - good naming convention, testable code, single responsibility, short classes, short methods - but I feel like it takes them on overdose, going to extremes (IMHO) such as setting short explicit lengths, forbidding certain constructs, and what seems like refactoring for the sake of it. I'd actually recommend other books like the Pragma This is a book that one could get started on the idea of "good code" - clean, readable, elegant, simple, easy-to-test, etc. It has the usual stuff that you'd expect - good naming convention, testable code, single responsibility, short classes, short methods - but I feel like it takes them on overdose, going to extremes (IMHO) such as setting short explicit lengths, forbidding certain constructs, and what seems like refactoring for the sake of it. I'd actually recommend other books like the Pragmatic Programmer or Code Complete; there's something about the way this book reads that irks me. I think it's more useful to highlight the attributes that clean code should have (which this book does do), then it is to declare outright what is "good" and what is "bad" (even in subjective areas like readability, comments, and formatting). To their credit, the author(s) did state right out at the start that these are their very personal preferences, so that's all right - I'm just disagreeing on some of the more subjective areas. Also a plus are a few actual and simple scenarios/use cases to show code clean up in action, but they aren't exactly really tricky bits of code, but rather straightforward examples - very good for developers new to the concept of clean code, but less so for developers already familiar with the basic ideas.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Fahad Naeem

    I started reading it after a lot of recommendations but it wasn't gone up to the standards. Clean Code is about writing code which is not only understandable to the code him/herself but to the others as well. Robert Martin mainly used a lot of JAVA code which is not applicable to other languages like Python and JAVASCRIPT. This book should not be this much lengthy and other languages must be covered so that every programmer can benefit from it. I was looking forward to learn more about refactoring I started reading it after a lot of recommendations but it wasn't gone up to the standards. Clean Code is about writing code which is not only understandable to the code him/herself but to the others as well. Robert Martin mainly used a lot of JAVA code which is not applicable to other languages like Python and JAVASCRIPT. This book should not be this much lengthy and other languages must be covered so that every programmer can benefit from it. I was looking forward to learn more about refactoring but he did not cover it in detail which was disappointing as well. Robert discussed in detail about naming convention which applies to every programming language in general and which were quite helpful.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Yevgeniy Brikman

    A good book to read for any coder - perhaps not as thorough as Code Complete but much more effective than Pragmatic Programmer. This book's biggest strength is that it includes tons of code examples, including some fairly long and in depth ones. Instead of just listing rules or principles of clean code, many of the chapters go through these code examples and iteratively improve them. The rules and principles fall out of this process and the reader is a part of developing them, which is an effect A good book to read for any coder - perhaps not as thorough as Code Complete but much more effective than Pragmatic Programmer. This book's biggest strength is that it includes tons of code examples, including some fairly long and in depth ones. Instead of just listing rules or principles of clean code, many of the chapters go through these code examples and iteratively improve them. The rules and principles fall out of this process and the reader is a part of developing them, which is an effective way to learn. I also liked the justification for why clean code matters in the intro chapters. However, there was not enough discussion of real world trade offs. The book brushes them aside and claims that the programmer should *always* write the most clean code possible; what is not mentioned is to what extent to do this and when. In fact, the book compares code to poetry and art and makes a point to mention that neither is ever done. And yet, everyone needs to ship at some point. So when is code not just clean, but clean enough? Some downsides: the chapters have different authors, so a few are weaker than others. Also, the book is too tailored to Java and imperative/OO programming. Similar to Code Complete, this book would benefit from discussing functional programming, which addresses many of the lessons/problems. Some fun quotes from Clean Code: We want the factory running at top speed to produce software. These are human factories: thinking, feeling coders who are working from a product backlog or user story to create product. Yet even in the auto industry, the bulk of the work lies not in manufacturing but in maintenance—or its avoidance. In software, 80% or more of what we do is quaintly called “maintenance”: the act of repair. You should name a variable using the same care with which you name a first-born child. Quality is the result of a million selfless acts of care—not just of any great method that descends from the heavens. You are reading this book for two reasons. First, you are a programmer. Second, you want to be a better programmer. Good. We need better programmers. Remember that code is really the language in which we ultimately express the requirements. LeBlanc’s law: Later equals never. Michael Feathers: I could list all of the qualities that I notice in clean code, but there is one overarching quality that leads to all of them. Clean code always looks like it was written by someone who cares. There is nothing obvious that you can do to make it better. All of those things were thought about by the code’s author, and if you try to imagine improvements, you’re led back to where you are, sitting in appreciation of the code someone left for you—code left by some- one who cares deeply about the craft. Language bigots everywhere, beware! It is not the language that makes programs appear simple. It is the programmer that make the language appear simple! The ratio of time spent reading vs. writing is well over 10:1. Books on art don’t promise to make you an artist. All they can do is give you some of the tools, techniques, and thought processes that other artists have used. So too this book cannot promise to make you a good programmer. It cannot promise to give you “code-sense.” All it can do is show you the thought processes of good programmers and the tricks, tech- niques, and tools that they use. The first rule of functions is that they should be small. The second rule of functions is that they should be smaller than that. Functions should do one thing. They should do it well. They should do it only. Every system is built from a domain-specific language designed by the programmers to describe that system. Functions are the verbs of that language, and classes are the nouns. This is not some throwback to the hideous old notion that the nouns and verbs in a requirements document are the first guess of the classes and functions of a system. Rather, this is a much older truth. The art of programming is, and has always been, the art of language design. Master programmers think of systems as stories to be told rather than programs to be written. The proper use of comments is to compensate for our failure to express ourself in code. Note that I used the word failure. I meant it. Comments are always failures. We must have them because we cannot always figure out how to express ourselves without them, but their use is not a cause for celebration. "Objects are abstractions of processing. Threads are abstractions of schedule.” —James O. Coplien Concurrency is a decoupling strategy. It helps us decouple what gets done from when it gets done. Boolean arguments loudly declare that the function does more than one thing. Names in software are 90 percent of what make software readable.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Erika RS

    I wanted to love this book, but instead I just sort of liked it. This book is a member of the extensive genre of books on how to write clean code. It sits alongside books like Code Complete by Steve McConnell[1] and many others. Where Clean Code promised to differentiate itself was in the use of three case studies -- about a third of the book -- showing Martin's code cleanup techniques in action. However, I was disappointed by that section. As someone who codes and reviews code professionally, t I wanted to love this book, but instead I just sort of liked it. This book is a member of the extensive genre of books on how to write clean code. It sits alongside books like Code Complete by Steve McConnell[1] and many others. Where Clean Code promised to differentiate itself was in the use of three case studies -- about a third of the book -- showing Martin's code cleanup techniques in action. However, I was disappointed by that section. As someone who codes and reviews code professionally, the case studies were not particularly enlightening. As seems obvious in retrospect, watching someone clean-up code in fairly straightforward ways is not interesting if you do and see that everyday. What I really wanted was a book on being a better code reviewer with advice on how to spot areas for improvement and convince others of the value of those improvements. The examples could be useful for someone who isn't in a code-review-heavy environment. Martin does a reasonably good job of taking code that may seem reasonable on the surface and improving its readabilty. That said, his comments indicate that he often has a higher opinion of the cleanliness of his end result than I do. As for the general advice and discussion of how to make clean code, I agree with a lot of his tips and disagree with others. Code cleanliness is an area where the core of just-plain-good ideas is surrounded by a nimbus of sometimes contradictory standards that people pick and choose from. The details of what you choose from the nimbus generally does not matter so much as consistency. (Of course, the real trouble occurs when people don't agree on what belongs in the core and what belongs in the nimbus.) The book definitely was not a bad read, but it did not fit my needs. [1] Still my favorite in the genre.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Craig Vermeer

    This had lots of good, practical advice that spanned everything from naming to testing to concurrency. A lot of it was pretty Java centric, so I skimmed a few sections. By far the best portions of the book were the ones where the author demonstrates -- step by step -- his process for writing code test-first, as well as refactoring. If you get frustrated with either of the two at times, these parts of the book are *fantastic*, because you see that even someone who's been coding for 40+ years (like This had lots of good, practical advice that spanned everything from naming to testing to concurrency. A lot of it was pretty Java centric, so I skimmed a few sections. By far the best portions of the book were the ones where the author demonstrates -- step by step -- his process for writing code test-first, as well as refactoring. If you get frustrated with either of the two at times, these parts of the book are *fantastic*, because you see that even someone who's been coding for 40+ years (like Uncle Bob has) writes messy code the first time! He just surrounds it with tests, and then little by little refines it and cleans it up. Awesome.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nick Skelton

    Uncle Bob's book was given to me by a mate at work when I first started. I was introduced to the concept of code reviews and pull requests and told to expect a lot of comments on my code reviews to start with. I was then promptly given this book to read to minimise the pain. As a developer with ten years experience, I had seen so many of the things outlined by Uncle Bob and absolutely loved his remedies to them. I am now a convert to the idea of clean code and it has definitely made me a better Uncle Bob's book was given to me by a mate at work when I first started. I was introduced to the concept of code reviews and pull requests and told to expect a lot of comments on my code reviews to start with. I was then promptly given this book to read to minimise the pain. As a developer with ten years experience, I had seen so many of the things outlined by Uncle Bob and absolutely loved his remedies to them. I am now a convert to the idea of clean code and it has definitely made me a better developer... wait... a better person.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rostislav Vatolin

    To me this book is an extension of Martin Fowler’s “Refactoring”. As a Java developer I enjoyed it. It’s an easy read. I agree with everything, except “J1: Avoid Long Import Lists by Using Wildcards” and using less of final keyword (agree with Robert Simmons here more, he explained it in his “Hardcore Java” book). This book has some useful tips on how to avoid locks and other issues in multithreaded environment (I found it very useful). In short, it is worth reading.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nick Hodges

    I hate to say this, but I wasn't as impressed with this book as I thought I should have been, given its place in the pantheon of programming books. The first half was excellent, but the second half left me a bit cold. It was too Java-y, and had -- dare I say it -- too much code in it. However, I still list this as a must read for all developers.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alex Ott

    Nothing new for experienced developer... Too Java oriented in many places. Code Complete, 2ed is better from my point of view

  19. 4 out of 5

    David

    I was extremely underwhelmed with Clean Code! As other reviewers have noted, this book completely Java-centric and incredibly narrow in its object-oriented focus. Nowhere on the front cover, spine, or back cover is this mentioned at all. Clean Code also relies heavily on other published works. In the case of Fowler's Refactoring and the "Gang of Four"'s Design Patterns, I wasn't too put off by it. These are pretty standard reference books and I have them on my shelf. But the really irritating ref I was extremely underwhelmed with Clean Code! As other reviewers have noted, this book completely Java-centric and incredibly narrow in its object-oriented focus. Nowhere on the front cover, spine, or back cover is this mentioned at all. Clean Code also relies heavily on other published works. In the case of Fowler's Refactoring and the "Gang of Four"'s Design Patterns, I wasn't too put off by it. These are pretty standard reference books and I have them on my shelf. But the really irritating references were to Martin's previous book, Principles, Patterns, and Practices. Martin uses terminology he defined in that book (SRP, OCP, and DIP) and refuses to re-define it when he uses it in this book! I found that to be extremely arrogant and short-sighted. Was I expected to own that book already or to be so impressed with this book that I would immediately run to my local bookstore and purchase it? Fat chance! (Of course you can look up SRP, OCP, and DIP online. But that's entirely besides the point!) Lastly, I think the greatness of Martin's own examples in this book (and his apparent high opinion of his abilities) are highly debatable. I would never crow about my own work with such gusto - I've been humbled far too many times. The Introduction is also rather grandiose - with lots of bluster about how difficult it will be to read the book and how carefully the reader will need to study the master's examples. I've worked through the examples. That introduction is pompous bullshit. To end on a high note: though other authors have already tackled this material and done it better, that's not to say that there isn't plenty of great advice in this book. There is. There's tons of good advice in this book. The "Prefer Polymorphism to If/Else or Switch/Case" tip in Chapter 17 was advice I was able to apply immediately to a project I was working on at the time and that alone was worth reading the book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Erkan Erol

    Writing clean code is what you must do in order to call yourself a professional. There is no reasonable excuse for doing anything less than your best. --- “Honesty in small things is not a small thing.” --- In code, refactor mercilessly. --- The French poet Paul Valery advises us that a poem is never done and bears continual rework, and to stop working on it is abandonment. --- Learning to write clean code is hard work. It requires more than just the knowledge of principles and patterns. You must sweat Writing clean code is what you must do in order to call yourself a professional. There is no reasonable excuse for doing anything less than your best. --- “Honesty in small things is not a small thing.” --- In code, refactor mercilessly. --- The French poet Paul Valery advises us that a poem is never done and bears continual rework, and to stop working on it is abandonment. --- Learning to write clean code is hard work. It requires more than just the knowledge of principles and patterns. You must sweat over it. You must practice it yourself, and watch yourself fail. You must watch others practice it and fail. You must see them stumble and retrace their steps. You must see them agonize over decisions and see the price they pay for making those decisions the wrong way. --- You are reading this book for two reasons. First, you are a programmer. Second, you want to be a better programmer. Good. We need better programmers. --- Of course, in those days we didn’t know LeBlanc’s law: Later equals never. --- Most managers want good code, even when they are obsessing about the schedule. They may defend the schedule and requirements with passion; but that’s their job. It’s your job to defend the code with equal passion. --- Apparently Bjarne thinks that clean code is pleasing to read. --- No duplication, one thing, expressiveness, tiny abstractions. Everything is there. --- Leave the campground cleaner than you found it.5 --- Number-series naming (a1, a2, .. aN) is the opposite of intentional naming. --- One difference between a smart programmer and a professional programmer is that the professional understands that clarity is king. Professionals use their powers for good and write code that others can understand. --- It will pay off in the short term and continue to pay in the long run. --- The first rule of functions is that they should be small. The second rule of functions is that they should be smaller than that. --- FUNCTIONS SHOULD DO ONE THING. THEY SHOULD DO IT WELL. THEY SHOULD DO IT ONLY. --- “Don’t comment bad code—rewrite it.” --- The proper use of comments is to compensate for our failure to express ourself in code. --- Comments are always failures. We must have them because we cannot always figure out how to express ourselves without them, but their use is not a cause for celebration. --- Truth can only be found in one place: the code. Only the code can truly tell you what it does. --- Rather than spend your time writing the comments that explain the mess you’ve made, spend it cleaning that mess. --- There was a time, back in the sixties, when commenting-out code might have been useful. But we’ve had good source code control systems for a very long time now. Those systems will remember the code for us. We don’t have to comment it out any more. Just delete the code. We won’t lose it. Promise. --- Concepts that are closely related should be kept vertically close to each other --- God is in the details, --- In software, 80% or more of what we do is quaintly called “maintenance”: the act of repair. --- A piece of code should be where you expect to find it—and, if not, you should re-factor to get it there. --- Instead, we go up a level: inspect the machines every day and fix wearing parts before they break, --- Making your code readable is as important as making it executable. --- You should name a variable using the same care with which you name a first-born child. --- We abandon our code early, not because it is done, but because our value system focuses more on outward appearance than on the substance of what we deliver. This inattentiveness costs us in the end: A bad penny always shows up. ---- Your Note on Location 511 | Added on Tuesday, November 22, 2016 10:22:44 PMQuote from "Clean Code" --- This book has a subtler message whose profoundness should not be underappreciated. --- Code is anti-evil, and clean code is perhaps divine. --- I think it’s important to note that the Danish wisdom advises us not just to pay attention to small things, but also to be honest in small things. This means being honest to the code, honest to our colleagues about the state of our code and, most of all, being honest with ourselves about our code. Did we Do our Best to “leave the campground cleaner than we found it”? Did we re-factor our code before checking in? --- How can we make sure we wind up behind the right door when the going gets tough? The answer is: craftsmanship. --- There are two parts to learning craftsmanship: knowledge and work. You must gain the knowledge of principles, patterns, practices, and heuristics that a craftsman knows, and you must also grind that knowledge into your fingers, eyes, and gut by working hard and practicing. --- This is not a “feel good” book that you can read on an airplane and finish before you land. --- But if you take the time to work through the case studies, following every tiny step, every minute decision—if you put yourself in our place, and force yourself to think along the same paths that we thought, then you will gain a much richer understanding of those principles, patterns, practices, and heuristics. They won’t be “feel good” knowledge any more. --- Nonsense! We will never be rid of code, because code represents the details of the requirements. At some level those details cannot be ignored or abstracted; they have to be specified. And specifying requirements in such detail that a machine can execute them is programming. Such a specification is code. --- We know good code matters because we’ve had to deal for so long with its lack. --- If you have experienced even one small part of the story I just told, then you already know that spending time keeping your code clean is not just cost effective; it’s a matter of professional survival. --- In short, a programmer who writes clean code is an artist who can take a blank screen through a series of transformations until it is an elegantly coded system. --- Clean code is focused. Each function, each class, each module exposes a single-minded attitude that remains entirely undistracted, and unpolluted, by the surrounding details. --- It should contain only what is necessary. Our readers should perceive us to have been decisive. --- One word: care. That’s really the topic of this book. Perhaps an appropriate subtitle would be How to Care for Code. --- In recent years I begin, and nearly end, with Beck’s rules of simple code. In priority order, simple code: • Runs all the tests; • Contains no duplication; • Expresses all the design ideas that are in the system; --- In recent years I begin, and nearly end, with Beck’s rules of simple code. In priority order, simple code: • Runs all the tests; • Contains no duplication; • Expresses all the design ideas that are in the system; • Minimizes the number of entities such as classes, methods, functions, and the like. --- It is not the language that makes programs appear simple. It is the programmer that make the language appear simple! --- But don’t make the mistake of thinking that we are somehow “right” in any absolute sense. There are other schools and other masters that have just as much claim to professionalism as we. It would behoove you to learn from them as well. --- Indeed, authors are responsible for communicating well with their readers. The next time you write a line of code, remember you are an author, --- The vast majority of the playback was scrolling and navigating to other modules! --- You get the drift. Indeed, the ratio of time spent reading vs. writing is well over 10:1. We are constantly reading old code as part of the effort to write new code. --- Books on art don’t promise to make you an artist. All they can do is give you some of the tools, techniques, and thought processes that other artists have used. So too this book cannot promise to make you a good programmer. It cannot promise to give you “code-sense.” All it can do is show you the thought processes of good programmers and the tricks, techniques, and tools that they use. --- It is easy to say that names should reveal intent. What we want to impress upon you is that we are serious about this. Choosing good names takes time but saves more than it takes. So take care with your names and change them when you find better ones. Everyone who reads your code (including you) will be happier if you do. --- Spelling similar concepts similarly is information. Using inconsistent spellings is disinformation. --- Programmers create problems for themselves when they write code solely to satisfy a compiler or interpreter. ---- Your Note on Location 991 | Added on Sunday, November 27, 2016 1:57:35 PMmartin fowler alintisi --- When constructors are overloaded, use static factory methods with names that describe the arguments. --- only to people who share the author’s sense of humor, and only as long as these people remember the joke. --- Avoid using the same word for two purposes. Using the same term for two different ideas is essentially a pun. ---- Your Note on Location 1167 | Added on Sunday, November 27, 2016 2:41:03 PMburayi tam anlamadim --- Use Problem Domain Names --- So which is it? Is the function doing one thing or three things? Notice that the three steps of the function are one level of abstraction below the stated name of the function. We can describe the ---- Your Note on Location 1339 | Added on Sunday, November 27, 2016 2:52:14 PM3 is mi 1 is mi --- Do One Thing --- The ideal number of arguments for a function is zero (niladic). Next comes one (monadic), followed closely by two (dyadic). Three arguments (triadic) should be avoided where possible. More than three (polyadic) requires very special justification—and then shouldn’t be used anyway. ---- Your Note on Location 1472 | Added on Sunday, November 27, 2016 3:25:54 PMfunctional programming icin gecerli mi --- Using an output argument instead of a return value for a transformation is confusing. --- Flag arguments are ugly. Passing a boolean into a function is a truly terrible practice. It immediately complicates the signature of the method, loudly proclaiming that this function does more than one thing. It does one thing if the flag is true and another if the flag is false! ---- Your Note on Location 1523 | Added on Sunday, November 27, 2016 3:30:59 PMnasil olabilirdi --- Even obvious dyadic functions like assertEquals(expected, actual) are problematic. How many times have you put the actual where the expected should be? The two arguments have no natural ordering. The expected, actual ordering is a convention that requires practice to learn. --- Side effects are lies. Your function promises to do one thing, but it also does other hidden things. --- In general output arguments should be avoided. If your function must change the state of something, have it change the state of its owning object. --- Writing software is like any other kind of writing. When you write a paper or an article, you get your thoughts down first, then you massage it until it reads well. The first draft might be clumsy and disorganized, so you wordsmith it and restructure it and refine it until it reads the way you want it to read. --- Nothing can be quite so helpful as a well-placed comment. Nothing can clutter up a module more than frivolous dogmatic comments. Nothing can be quite so damaging as an old crufty comment that propagates lies and misinformation. --- Think of it this way. A banner is startling and obvious if you don’t see banners very often. So use them very sparingly, and only when the benefit is significant. If you overuse banners, they’ll fall into the background noise and be ignored. --- Others who see that commented-out code won’t have the courage to delete it. They’ll think it is there for a reason and is too important to delete. So commented-out code gathers like dregs at the bottom of a bad bottle of wine. --- Nonlocal Information --- Inobvious Connection --- Generating javadoc pages for the classes and functions inside a system is not generally useful, and the extra formality of the javadoc comments amounts to little more than cruft and distraction. --- When people look under the hood, we want them to be impressed with the neatness, consistency, and attention to detail that they perceive. We want them to be struck by the orderliness. We want their eyebrows to rise as they scroll through the modules. We want them to perceive that professionals have been at work. ---- Your Note on Location 2291 | Added on Thursday, December 8, 2016 8:53:09 PMwhich tools do you use for formating --- The Purpose of Formatting --- First of all, let’s be clear. Code formatting is important. It is too important to ignore and it is too important to treat religiously. Code formatting is about communication, and communication is the professional developer’s first order of business. --- Perhaps you thought that “getting it working” was the first order of business for a professional developer. I hope by now, however, that this book has disabused you of that idea. --- What does that mean to us? It appears to be possible to build significant systems (FitNesse is close to 50,000 lines) out of files that are typically 200 lines long, with an upper limit of 500. --- The topmost parts of the source file should provide the high-level concepts and algorithms. Detail should increase as we move downward, until at the end we find the lowest level functions and details in the source file. --- The important thing is for the instance variables to be declared in one well-known place. Everybody should know where to go to see the declarations. --- Conceptual Affinity. Certain bits of code want to be near other bits. They have a certain conceptual affinity. The stronger that affinity, the less vertical distance there should be between them. --- personally set my limit at 120. --- So subtle spacings like those shown above tend to get lost after you reformat the code. --- A team of developers should agree upon a single formatting style, and then every member of that team should use that style. We want the software to have a consistent style. We don’t want it to appear to have been written by a bunch of disagreeing individuals. --- But it represents more than just a data structure. The methods enforce an access policy. You can read the individual coordinates independently, but you must set the coordinates together as an atomic operation. --- Hiding implementation is about abstractions! A class does not simply push its variables out through getters and setters. Rather it exposes abstract interfaces that allow its users to manipulate the essence of the data, without having to know its implementation. --- These two examples show the difference between objects and data structures. Objects hide their data behind abstractions and expose functions that operate on that data. Data structure expose their data and have no meaningful functions. Go back and read that again. Notice the complimentary nature of the two definitions. They are virtual opposites. This difference may seem trivial, but it has far-reaching implications. --- Procedural code makes it hard to add new data structures because all the functions must change. OO code makes it hard to add new functions because all the classes must change. ---- Your Note on Location 2718 | Added on Saturday, December 10, 2016 12:26:18 PMuzerine konusmali --- So, the things that are hard for OO are easy for procedures, and the things that are hard for procedures are easy for OO! --- The method should not invoke methods on objects that are returned by any of the allowed functions. In other words, talk to friends, not to strangers. --- Such hybrids make it hard to add new functions but also make it hard to add new data structures. They are the worst of both worlds. Avoid creating them. They are indicative of a muddled design whose authors are unsure of—or worse, ignorant of—whether they need protection from functions or types. ---- Your Note on Location 2807 | Added on Sunday, December 11, 2016 12:37:19 PMdata structure vs object --- data structure and an object. --- Error handling is important, but if it obscures logic, it’s wrong. --- What price? The price of checked exceptions is an Open/Closed Principle1 violation. If you throw a checked exception from a method in your code and the catch is three levels above, you must declare that exception in the signature of each method between you and the catch. This means that a change at a low level of the software can force signature changes on many higher levels. The changed modules must be rebuilt and redeployed, even though nothing they care about changed. 1. [Martin]. --- This interface is also tailored and constrained to meet the needs of the application. It results in code that is easier to understand and harder to misuse. The Sensors class can enforce design and business rules. --- Not only are learning tests free, they have a positive return on investment. When there are new releases of the third-party package, we run the learning tests to see whether there are behavioral differences. --- Whether you need the learning provided by the learning tests or not, a clean boundary should be supported by a set of outbound tests that exercise the interface the same way the production code does. Without these boundary tests to ease the migration, we might be tempted to stay with the old version longer than we should. --- Interesting things happen at boundaries. Change is one of those things. Good software designs accommodate change without huge investments and rework. When we use code that is out of our control, special care must be taken to protect our investment and make sure future change is not too costly. --- As I said, our profession has come a long way. --- First Law You may not write production code until you have written a failing unit test. Second Law You may not write more of a unit test than is sufficient to fail, and not compiling is failing. Third Law You may not write more production code than is sufficient to pass the currently failing test. --- What this team did not realize was that having dirty tests is equivalent to, if not worse than, having no tests. The problem is that tests must change as the production code evolves. The dirtier the tests, the harder they are to change. The more tangled the test code, the more likely it is that you will spend more time cramming new tests into the suite than it takes to write the new production code. As you modify the production code, old tests start to fail, and the mess in the test code makes it hard to get those tests to pass again. So the tests become viewed as an ever-increasing liability. --- What makes a clean test? Three things. Readability, readability, and readability. Readability is perhaps even more important in unit tests than it is in production code. What makes tests readable? The same thing that makes all code readable: clarity, simplicity, and density of expression. In a test you want to say a lot with as few expressions as possible. --- Single Concept per Test --- You should be able to run the tests in the production environment, in the QA environment, and on your laptop while riding home on the train without a network. --- If you let the tests rot, then your code will rot too. Keep your tests clean. --- We should also be able to write a brief description of the class in about 25 words, without using the words “if,” “and,” “or,” or “but.” --- The Single Responsibility Principle (SRP)2 states that a class or module should have one, and only one, reason to change. This principle gives us both a definition of responsibility, and a guidelines for class size. Classes should have one responsibility—one reason to change.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nick Craske

    Having reignited my love of programming I have dived into learning Unity with an aim to build games. It's purely for my personal enjoyment. Clean Code is written in an accessible, relaxed and conversational style and throws light and insight on every corner of writing, maintaining and refactoring code. Using Java examples the author clearly sets out his manifesto for elegant, well structured, concise and readable code. It feels good to be coding again.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Luboš

    I should have read this book at the beginning of my career. On the other hand, after 10 years experience I may appreciate it even more. It is sad, that principles described in the book are not yet heavily adopted.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Darren

    This book is #1 on my list of books I'd recommend to other programmers. I don't know how else to elaborate on how important I think the ideas in this book are.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stefan Kanev

    It's a great book. The only reason I give it four stars instead of five is the extremely awkward use of private fields for passing data between functions in the examples.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Damith

    Definitely worth a read ... :-)

  26. 4 out of 5

    Petar Ivanov

    Great book! There's a lot of ideas, techniques, tips, and tricks and examples that help you enhance your programming skills and coding style. I didn't like a lot the SerialDate case study because there was a lot of back and forth with the Appendix. It was quite hard for me to follow the refactoring of the SerialDate class. Overall, I enjoyed reading the book and it helped me to generate more ideas on how to refactor and write better and cleaner code. Personally, I think it's a must-read for ever Great book! There's a lot of ideas, techniques, tips, and tricks and examples that help you enhance your programming skills and coding style. I didn't like a lot the SerialDate case study because there was a lot of back and forth with the Appendix. It was quite hard for me to follow the refactoring of the SerialDate class. Overall, I enjoyed reading the book and it helped me to generate more ideas on how to refactor and write better and cleaner code. Personally, I think it's a must-read for every self-respecting programmer and software engineer.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marko

    This book provides some very good general advice for any practicing programmer. While examples use java, the lessons transfer to any object-oriented language. Each chapter can be read separately, but they are each about writing clean code.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mohammad Mahdi Ramezanpour

    This is one the best books for programmers and I think every programmer should read it. The only problem this book has is some parts of it is written specifically for Java developers; so, you may want to skip them, if you're not a Java developer.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Abtin

    Every true programmer must at least skim through this book. The techniques and methods are essential to educating a perfect programming style and you don't want to enter the market without this asset.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tadas Talaikis

    You're joking with this productivity vs time. That's old oversimplified thinking. It has some truth, but also it produces fast shortcuts that later lead to blue screens in MS presentations. I probably would always remember them, haha. No, even more recent, Surface tab crashes on presentation: Where's you productivity now? This is all shit, because I can create complex website in a few weeks, but then I would need months to fix various bugs (e.g. provide "support"). I always say those meaningless u You're joking with this productivity vs time. That's old oversimplified thinking. It has some truth, but also it produces fast shortcuts that later lead to blue screens in MS presentations. I probably would always remember them, haha. No, even more recent, Surface tab crashes on presentation: Where's you productivity now? This is all shit, because I can create complex website in a few weeks, but then I would need months to fix various bugs (e.g. provide "support"). I always say those meaningless unproven by probability and game theory graphs are made by people who have nothing to do in their life. Not talking about what else I think. For example, about tests. They needed only in an ideal world. 1) Many big companies don't seem using them anyway, 2) if using then missing bigger picture, 3) if projects need several technological rewrites until release then your tests on what phase?, etc. In rapid development environment you often just pass on errors until better times, especially if not paid for that extra work. Sometimes I miss this note. Or another simple example: "Avoid Long Import Lists by Using Wildcards" Yes, *but* this can cause security and performance issues*, so don't use it. See my point? In real world there are not rules, you make them, or rather, each and every environment or practice makes them. * Or at least state "Clean code for Java" then.

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