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Batman: Detective Comics, Volume 6: Fall of the Batmen

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Batman's team of vigilantes is on the verge of destruction from within in the epic new graphic novel BATMAN: DETECTIVE COMICS VOL. 6! Everyone in Batman's orbit is broken somehow--some more than others. For Clayface, keeping the pieces of his psyche together has been a years long struggle...and it's a war he may be about to lose! And as the team tries to pull itself back Batman's team of vigilantes is on the verge of destruction from within in the epic new graphic novel BATMAN: DETECTIVE COMICS VOL. 6! Everyone in Batman's orbit is broken somehow--some more than others. For Clayface, keeping the pieces of his psyche together has been a years long struggle...and it's a war he may be about to lose! And as the team tries to pull itself back together, their enemies have learned something from Batman's newfound spirit of cooperation...and have formed a cabal of their own! With the Victim Syndicate on the move and Clayface on the edge, the team faces a crossroads--but Batwoman believes she knows the way forward! The question is...does Batman agree? From writer James Tynion IV (BATMAN/TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES) and a spectacular art team including Alvaro Martinez (BATMAN ETERNAL) comes the newest volume of DETECTIVE COMICS! Collects DETECTIVE COMICS #969-974 and Annual #1.


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Batman's team of vigilantes is on the verge of destruction from within in the epic new graphic novel BATMAN: DETECTIVE COMICS VOL. 6! Everyone in Batman's orbit is broken somehow--some more than others. For Clayface, keeping the pieces of his psyche together has been a years long struggle...and it's a war he may be about to lose! And as the team tries to pull itself back Batman's team of vigilantes is on the verge of destruction from within in the epic new graphic novel BATMAN: DETECTIVE COMICS VOL. 6! Everyone in Batman's orbit is broken somehow--some more than others. For Clayface, keeping the pieces of his psyche together has been a years long struggle...and it's a war he may be about to lose! And as the team tries to pull itself back together, their enemies have learned something from Batman's newfound spirit of cooperation...and have formed a cabal of their own! With the Victim Syndicate on the move and Clayface on the edge, the team faces a crossroads--but Batwoman believes she knows the way forward! The question is...does Batman agree? From writer James Tynion IV (BATMAN/TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES) and a spectacular art team including Alvaro Martinez (BATMAN ETERNAL) comes the newest volume of DETECTIVE COMICS! Collects DETECTIVE COMICS #969-974 and Annual #1.

30 review for Batman: Detective Comics, Volume 6: Fall of the Batmen

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    The First Victim's plan comes to fruition. Once it gets going, you could see exactly where it was headed, I'm not sure why the Dark Knights couldn't. We get lots of focus on Clayface including a beautifully drawn origin story by Eddy Barrows (One of DC's unsung heroes!). Damn you James Tynion for making me care about Clayface! He always had cool powers, but was a one-note "Hulk smash!" type villain. Tim Drake should go see a doctor because he acts very manic in this arc. Stephanie reminds me The First Victim's plan comes to fruition. Once it gets going, you could see exactly where it was headed, I'm not sure why the Dark Knights couldn't. We get lots of focus on Clayface including a beautifully drawn origin story by Eddy Barrows (One of DC's unsung heroes!). Damn you James Tynion for making me care about Clayface! He always had cool powers, but was a one-note "Hulk smash!" type villain. Tim Drake should go see a doctor because he acts very manic in this arc. Stephanie reminds me more and more of one of those people who go off to college and suddenly think they know how to fix the world and everyone else is wrong. Another great volume that keeps building off previous arcs.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea 🏳️‍🌈

    *Read as single issues* This was also a wonderful volume. I had been wondering when they'd give an arc to Clayface and this was it. I can certainly say that Tynion IV didn't waste it. Clayface is supposed to be that sad, Jekyll/Hyde-ish character that you always get on a team. With the Avengers, it was Hulk and for the "Knights" it was Clayface. Basil just wanted to atone for the damage he caused the world as Clayface and this was sort of him realizing he may never get to do that. Again, I am *Read as single issues* This was also a wonderful volume. I had been wondering when they'd give an arc to Clayface and this was it. I can certainly say that Tynion IV didn't waste it. Clayface is supposed to be that sad, Jekyll/Hyde-ish character that you always get on a team. With the Avengers, it was Hulk and for the "Knights" it was Clayface. Basil just wanted to atone for the damage he caused the world as Clayface and this was sort of him realizing he may never get to do that. Again, I am forever bummed that we get Cass trying to connect and redeem a monster rather than the loving and supportive relationship she had with Bruce, Babs and Steph pre 52. I get what was done here for her to relate to Basil but it just doesn't do as much for me as I would have liked. That being sad, I felt bad for her at the end of this book. There was an interesting dichotomy set up at the end of this book and I'll be interested to see if it carries over into the next volume. I wish I could speak to whether I understand Batman's actions in bringing Clayface on the team in the first place but I understand his treatment of Kate in this book. (Although, I can understand why she made the call she did). So, this is definitely a recommend and I'm excited to see where the story goes next. Hopefully I'll get more Batwing and Azrael.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    Basic Plot: The first victim enacts her plan to take down the Bat family. Tim is back, but there are still conflicts as he tries to avoid turning into the version of himself that tried to kill everyone. There are questions of morality and control, and what should be done to stop the bad guys. I really like how central Basil Karlo was to the story. He was integral in both technical detail and in emotional weight. The art was great overall, though there were a few panels where Spoiler in particular Basic Plot: The first victim enacts her plan to take down the Bat family. Tim is back, but there are still conflicts as he tries to avoid turning into the version of himself that tried to kill everyone. There are questions of morality and control, and what should be done to stop the bad guys. I really like how central Basil Karlo was to the story. He was integral in both technical detail and in emotional weight. The art was great overall, though there were a few panels where Spoiler in particular looked off. Nothing huge. Looking forward to seeing where the fallout of this arc will lead.

  4. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    James really pumping it up at the end of his Detective Run. Nearly 50 issues in now we got some great moments from the Batmen (the team who works with Batman) but this might be the end of it all. I mean, the title is Fall of the Batmen. So what happens when Clayface, a fan-favorite now, and also interesting character, loses all control. Well, he becomes a gigantic Dinosaur like creature and wrecks Gotham. The team of Batman have to stop him, on top of all the internal drama happening at the same James really pumping it up at the end of his Detective Run. Nearly 50 issues in now we got some great moments from the Batmen (the team who works with Batman) but this might be the end of it all. I mean, the title is Fall of the Batmen. So what happens when Clayface, a fan-favorite now, and also interesting character, loses all control. Well, he becomes a gigantic Dinosaur like creature and wrecks Gotham. The team of Batman have to stop him, on top of all the internal drama happening at the same time. What will finally happen at the end of it all? Good: Everything with clayface worked well, even the annual. This is a gigantic focus on a character I before, never gave a shit about. Cass once again steals the spotlight, having some of the best moments overall. I also thought the ending, and the drifting of the team, worked very well and the emotions felt really high. Bad: Some over-explaining at points and also some subplots, mostly to due with the children, wasn't that done. Also, Stephanie is acting really out of character for some reason. Overall a great, fast paced, fun volume of Detective comics. While the last remains my favorite this one is still good stuff. A 3.5 but I'll push it to a 4 out of 5.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Malum

    This was a pretty middle-of-the-road issue for me. I find Anarky and The Victim Syndicate both to be pretty lame villains, but there is a much better super-villain fight towards the end. Much of this volume is whining, complaining, and in-fighting within the bat army and between the heroes and the city. I kind of hope they are moving toward disbanding the team because the idea seems to have run its course. Also, loner Batman is the best Batman.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Stewart

    Im still thoroughly enjoying Tynions Rebirth run on Detective Comics, and this is one of the better volumes to date. Vol. 6 has some real gut punches and Ive become so invested that they landed pretty hard. 4.25/5 I’m still thoroughly enjoying Tynion’s Rebirth run on Detective Comics, and this is one of the better volumes to date. Vol. 6 has some real gut punches and I’ve become so invested that they landed pretty hard. 4.25/5

  7. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    Poignant, but troubling. I'm not sure I like where Tynion is taking Tim Drake, either, and now we have a giant rift in the Batfamily. Drama for drama's sake? Still, it's pretty riveting reading, even though Tynion, like most Americans, doesn't really understand anarchism and does a poor job transmitting those ideas through the character of Anarky. That could have very well been a major subplot to the book, the never ending clash of ideas over whether Batman is a fascist or not, but it's gone now Poignant, but troubling. I'm not sure I like where Tynion is taking Tim Drake, either, and now we have a giant rift in the Batfamily. Drama for drama's sake? Still, it's pretty riveting reading, even though Tynion, like most Americans, doesn't really understand anarchism and does a poor job transmitting those ideas through the character of Anarky. That could have very well been a major subplot to the book, the never ending clash of ideas over whether Batman is a fascist or not, but it's gone now and probably soon forgotten. The last issue, focusing on the origin of Clayface, was particularly moving, and the art by Eddy Barrows was top notch as always.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    Review - https://youtu.be/tiCfXJ4tdCk

  9. 4 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    It's a culmination that is emotionally choppy and void. World: The art is solid, par for the course for this series. There are dead eyes on the characters and I kinda want more emotion from them and kinetic movement but oh well. The world building is solid, it's a continuation of everything since Rebirth and a full circle of the idea of the Batmen. The pieces we play with are fine and internally the logic is pretty sound with a few issues here and there but the world is good. Story: A choppy, It's a culmination that is emotionally choppy and void. World: The art is solid, par for the course for this series. There are dead eyes on the characters and I kinda want more emotion from them and kinetic movement but oh well. The world building is solid, it's a continuation of everything since Rebirth and a full circle of the idea of the Batmen. The pieces we play with are fine and internally the logic is pretty sound with a few issues here and there but the world is good. Story: A choppy, wordy, janky mess of a story that should be more heavy than it was. The pacing is a bit off and draggy and the pieces for the downfall of the Batmen was not really well out together. On paper it's all there but the pieces don't really end up well into a nice unit. As I said the story is fractured making the story flow wrong. The tragic story of Basil is okay but it's been very draggy for a while and the dialog is just sometimes too much...it's wordy. The victim syndicate is an okay concept but the execution makesnit hard for regular people to believe and support so yeah there's that part. Add to that the expected though still kinda wonky character of Kate made for a sad and unsatisfying end. Characters: Let's talk about the main characters for this arc. Tim is a bit much and his execution was choppy and bordering on obsessive and it's kinda not the Tim I like but oh well. Then Steph as not really been that we'll thought out since New52 and her stance is somewhat of a stretch. Her relationship with Tim should have been done better and more fleshed out. Kate is inconsistent and being the Lynch pin for this arc it should not have been. We've had the choppy characterization of her and her dad since Rebirth and it's really did not favors with her characterization. Her decision should have made sense to her but with her being so against Colony this should not have ended the way it did, it's as bad as Carol Danvers in Civil War II. Basil was a tragic story and also tragically realized, redundant, repetitive and bogged down by too much dialog it made his journey a chore. Cassandra...the best and most consistent and solid. She needs her own series. Then the other two Bat family characters are forgettable. Oh the Victim Syndicate is poorly done and though their mission and manifesto us sympathetic they were visually terrible and uninspired. A not so good end to the idea of the Batmen...I love Tynion but other than Lonely Place of Living this has not been a good large arc for him. Onward to the next book!

  10. 4 out of 5

    RG

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Im really enjoying this. The confilct within the group dynamic was great. The solo issue at the end was great as well.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    [Read as single issues] Red Robin may be back, but that doesn't mean the team are going to be ready to deal with the return of the Victim Syndicate! Bringing the Spoiler storyline that's been explored in the few one-and-done issues throughout this run to the fore is a good move, smashing it together with the ongoing plot in explosive ways. The Victim Syndicate were really interesting the first time around, and while they lose a bit of their impact here, they're still suitably creepy, especially [Read as single issues] Red Robin may be back, but that doesn't mean the team are going to be ready to deal with the return of the Victim Syndicate! Bringing the Spoiler storyline that's been explored in the few one-and-done issues throughout this run to the fore is a good move, smashing it together with the ongoing plot in explosive ways. The Victim Syndicate were really interesting the first time around, and while they lose a bit of their impact here, they're still suitably creepy, especially the issues set inside Arkham Asylum. You can tell that James Tynion has been building towards this story (and the next) because all the pieces he's set up across the run come into play here with an especially powerful conclusion. Also included is an annual which puts the focus onto the ill-fated character from the main story and retells their origin for the Rebirth era, again weaving in the rest of Tynion's continuity into the past as well as the present so it works as both an epilogue and a 'see how far we've come' kind of story. The art is a bit more uneven than previously; Joe Bennett takes two issues, Miguel Mendonca has another two, Phil Briones has one, and Jesus Merino also snags one too. They're all similar enough to blend well in collection, but they lack the distinctive style of Alvaro Lopez who has defined this series, and Eddy Barrows who returns for the beautifully rendered annual. The Batmen fall, and Tynion and friends race towards their conclusion. I'm going to really miss this.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    "Fall of the Batmen" does an amazing job of bringing together all the disparate plot pieces from the Detective Comics Rebirth run: Stephanie's reluctance with vigilantism, Basil's problems with sanity, Kate's increasing militarism, Tim's desire to make up for lost time. It's all here, and the story even makes great use of the First Villain and Anarchy, both of whom were less effective in their earlier appearances. Though this volume feels inevitable, it's also shocking to see how much things fall "Fall of the Batmen" does an amazing job of bringing together all the disparate plot pieces from the Detective Comics Rebirth run: Stephanie's reluctance with vigilantism, Basil's problems with sanity, Kate's increasing militarism, Tim's desire to make up for lost time. It's all here, and the story even makes great use of the First Villain and Anarchy, both of whom were less effective in their earlier appearances. Though this volume feels inevitable, it's also shocking to see how much things fall (apart).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Emmett Spain

    Really nice art, some interesting developments and character stuff, but the super repetitive exposition got to me after a while. Surely there was a better way to deal with Basil Karlos crisis than to have him yapping on every issue about how he cant go on, then have all the characters around him yapping on about how he can. By the end I was just sighing to myself and wishing hed turn evil already. Really nice art, some interesting developments and character stuff, but the super repetitive exposition got to me after a while. Surely there was a better way to deal with Basil Karlo’s crisis than to have him yapping on every issue about how he can’t go on, then have all the characters around him yapping on about how he can. By the end I was just sighing to myself and wishing he’d turn evil already.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    So much happened in this volume! So much to review! Let's start by just staring at this beautiful cover art for #969 by Guillem March and Tomeu Morey. ... Ok, so the argument made by Mayor Akins & the people of Gotham against the Gotham Knights, is that they look like a batarmy or batsquad... The Mayor can support Batman as a lone vigilante, but the second he creates a squad of bats, people are scared that they're a strike force with no accountability. That sort of makes sense, except that So much happened in this volume! So much to review! Let's start by just staring at this beautiful cover art for #969 by Guillem March and Tomeu Morey. ... Ok, so the argument made by Mayor Akins & the people of Gotham against the Gotham Knights, is that they look like a batarmy or batsquad... The Mayor can support Batman as a lone vigilante, but the second he creates a squad of bats, people are scared that they're a strike force with no accountability. That sort of makes sense, except that there are other superhero teams in the world plus Batman is his own strike force, but for the purpose of the story, I get the issue. Stephanie...is well, she's still being kinda stupid. She's visiting Anarky in jail, and ignoring the batfamily...until she's reunited with Tim, and then she comes back to the team just for Tim, just waiting to step back out again when Tim is ready... But he's not ready, and it's starting to look like he might not ever be ready. So, Stephanie walks. I really liked seeing Tim in this volume. He's frantic with energy and ideas for the team. He's smart and driven and maybe even a little manic. #cantstopwontstop Batman. I loved his efforts to rehabilitate Clayface, and stand up for him. Mayor Akins: "Clayface belongs in this asylum. You've indulged the fantasy of his rehabilitation for too long. He's a monster, Batman. Batman: "So am I." The flashback to Tim setting up the Belfry was great. (Double page/Side by side) Left page: Right page: Look at that! Even Batman is smiling! Their double page at the end though is heartbreaking. Tim sees his future as the crappy future Batman solidifying in front of him. Tim's tears and Batman's sad frown is just so sad. I like the resurgence of The Victim Syndicate. They really F**k shit up for Batman and the Knights this volume. And I was wondering about Azrael and the Batman AI. Glad to see it in action for a second! Clayface's story here is absolutely tragic. He's so close to the cure when the Victim Syndicate find him. So close. And when the mudroom spills... I honestly don't know how they would have stopped him without the bullet... But there's always another way, right? Right? And Oy, Cass. Cass and Clayface were my favorite pair. They understood each other and they complimented each other. Cass shouting: "He could be good. He could be saved." I'm so glad she was the one to rip the bat symbol off Batwoman. I was waiting for it (I thought Batman would have done it), and I'm glad she did it. Batwoman... Cass asks why she did it, and I know exactly why. She's a soldier, and soldiers take lives. That's OK, that's their job. But that's not Batwoman's job. I do have a question about Colonel Kane. Wasn't he the bad guy who betrayed Batwoman and her team the last time we saw him? Why did she talk to him, allow him near here, accept a gun from him etc.?! I didn't love the Clayface origins story at the end of this volume. Basil's dad was upsetting (the Renu/clay must have been making him crazy), but his line "nobody really loves a monster" was an important part of Clayface's psyche on the team. I like how Batman played his part in Clayface's story. I bet his words to Basil were similar that first time to when Batman came to him with the team idea. "And so you have a choice, Basil. You can just be what you think the world sees when they look at your face. You can be the monster... Or you can...be something more."

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ma'Belle

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 4.5 stars I jumped back into this series after going a while without reading much, due to starting a new job *at the library!* This is the volume that finally gets to the climax that various events have been leading to since the beginning [of this run]. Actually, it was seeing the plotspoiler of this volume, in an adjacent Bat-comic series, that prompted me to go back and read this run of Detective Comics in the first place! Clay Face has been one of my favorite Bat-villains since watching 4.5 stars I jumped back into this series after going a while without reading much, due to starting a new job *at the library!* This is the volume that finally gets to the climax that various events have been leading to since the beginning [of this run]. Actually, it was seeing the plotspoiler of this volume, in an adjacent Bat-comic series, that prompted me to go back and read this run of Detective Comics in the first place! Clay Face has been one of my favorite Bat-villains since watching episodes featuring him on Batman The Animated Series as an elementary and middle school student. I recently was wondering why I'd never seen Clay Face in action as a mini-boss in any of the Batman Arkham ______ video games. No more than a week later, I'm getting further in Arkham City (having previously played all the other games - Asylum, Origins, and Knight) and all of a sudden I'm facing off against Clay Face, though he really wasn't used well in my opinion, and the battle was brief and almost impossible to lose. Anyway, back to the book. I was tempted to give this 5 stars, simply because Tynion writes so many of these characters so well, and the story is woven beautifully, with facial expressions drawn with so much clear emotion. The one thing that kept bugging me was how little sense it made for the Possible Future Tim try to kill Batwoman in order to stop this foretold and foreboding cascade of catastrophic events. Merely by telling the Bat-family (or at least Present Tim and Bruce) "Hey, protect and save Clay Face right fucking now so Batwoman isn't pushed to murder him, as she's done in my timeline!" so many other strategies could have been put into play to prevent it, and maybe find a way to save or benefit Future Tim as well? I had to silence that internal voice that was irate about this plot point that only served as an absurd means to an end (the plot itself). There are two panels - I think a conversation between Dr. [Victoria] October, Batman, and/or Red Robin - that I read as foreshadowing a not-too-distant return/resurrection of Clay Face. They're discussing an advanced retreat (or, I think, strafe of a sort) they'd been working on with Clay Face in their training sessions over the past 6 months to a year. Batman ends up blasting Clay Face with Mr. Freeze's Ice Gun (!!!) and then shattering him (presumably to collect and seal in a hundred small containers until he thaws?), only to confirm that his sentience had left a massive fighting shell or "husk" behind while moving along into the sewers, probably making some really gross sound that we don't have a word for yet. Splooching? So what if part of Clay Face had been alerted or prompted to send off a safety portion of himself elsewhere that could lie dormant with his essence or whatever. That's my theory, and as far as I know, it could have already been revealed in the ongoing comics that I don't read. I enjoyed imagining James Tynion IV and Tom King and some of the others producing this generation of Bat-comics, standing around talking and coming to terms on interwoven plans between the titles.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Blindzider

    Tynion has been setting up the pieces his entire run and now the final conflict between Batman's new team and the Victim Syndicate comes to its conclusion. It certainly isn't perfect, but what I like most about Tynion's work is that he gives some psychological motivation for the characters, allowing the reader to see how they are feeling or what's driving them. The focus for this series has been primarily Tim and Clayface, but Cassandra has had some of the spotlight as well. Spoiler's story was Tynion has been setting up the pieces his entire run and now the final conflict between Batman's new team and the Victim Syndicate comes to its conclusion. It certainly isn't perfect, but what I like most about Tynion's work is that he gives some psychological motivation for the characters, allowing the reader to see how they are feeling or what's driving them. The focus for this series has been primarily Tim and Clayface, but Cassandra has had some of the spotlight as well. Spoiler's story was never really clear to me. Perhaps if I read this entire series in one sitting I might have picked it up better. There's a backup feature giving the origin of the Basil Karlo Clayface, and it is fantastic. Barrows art is simply beautiful to look at and Tynion recounts the tragedy of how Clayface was born. Really outstanding stuff.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Adam Roll

    This is my second time including comics I've read as a part of my reading challenge. I think I won't list every comic I read, but this Batman collection was incredibly good and deserves some good reviews. The story has a lot to do with Clayface and Red Robin, both parts of the Batman ethos I have always loved. The Tim Drake character is just always trying too hard, and I relate to that in a personal way. James Tynion IV is a fantastic young talent I can't wait to read more of.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Meh. The final stand alone issue that retold Clayface's origin was a good one, the rest not so much.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shelly

    I'm still really enjoying this series!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sina Tavoosi

    Most Batman villains are tragic, and in this volume we get to see Clayface face the worst of his fears. Another great story by Tynion IV. The Bat team in this Detective run continues to be amazing.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Butcher

    Love the Clayface chapter and questions about his state of mind.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Adam Graham

    This book collects Detective Comics #969-974 and the Annual #1. Tim Drake is back and determined not to become future crazy Tim Drake and willing to do anything to strengthen his Batmen program. Meanwhile, the Victim Syndicate returns with a plan that begins by kidnapping Clayface inside Arkham Asylum and the Mayor wants Batman alone to deal with him. This is the type of story that makes it worth it having stuck through the more mediocre second to fourth Volumes. This has a lot of great action and This book collects Detective Comics #969-974 and the Annual #1. Tim Drake is back and determined not to become future crazy Tim Drake and willing to do anything to strengthen his Batmen program. Meanwhile, the Victim Syndicate returns with a plan that begins by kidnapping Clayface inside Arkham Asylum and the Mayor wants Batman alone to deal with him. This is the type of story that makes it worth it having stuck through the more mediocre second to fourth Volumes. This has a lot of great action and wonderful visuals but at the same time, it tells a great story and it's full of emotional moments that address who the lead characters are and who they're becoming. In addition, this story explores some ideas or questions such as forgiveness and the possibility of redemption, but does it an open and subtle way. Overall, this is a splendid story, well worth a read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gareth Brown

    Things come to a head, and while its more a 3.5 due to some lackluster moments there's a powerful ending that I didn't think would occur.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. One of the most interesting aspects of comics revolving around Batman is the exploration of villains. From their psychology to how they answer to the lawor Batmanthese stories allow fans to ponder certain questions of right and wrong as well as ideas such as second chances and rehabilitation. James Tynion IV continues to deliver some excellent stories throughout his Detective Comics series and, this time around, presents us a story that examines You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. One of the most interesting aspects of comics revolving around Batman is the exploration of villains. From their psychology to how they answer to the law—or Batman—these stories allow fans to ponder certain questions of right and wrong as well as ideas such as second chances and rehabilitation. James Tynion IV continues to deliver some excellent stories throughout his Detective Comics series and, this time around, presents us a story that examines the possibility of rehabilitating a villain and getting the community to accept him. Although he has already introduced the idea of collateral damage caused by superheroes, he now pushes the reflection further along by delving into a conflict within the Bat Family where some decisions will have unforgivable consequences on everyone’s lives. What is Batman: Detective Comics: Fall of the Batmen about? Picking up where things were left off in A Lonely Place of Living, this volume shines its light on a particular character that has never ever really been explored as thoroughly as James Tynion IV attempts to achieve here: Clayface. While the Victim Syndicate continue their efforts to rally the people in order to take down the vigilantes who cooperate with Batman, they also uncover new information that will inevitably feed the fear of Gothamites. Within Batman’s new squadron of heroes, conflict also surges to the surface as their goals don’t overlap with one another and their hopes for the future remain incompatible. Convinced that she’s right, it is a decision by Batwoman that will ultimately be the final straw that will determine how the Bat Family will move forward. Collecting Detective Comics #969-974 and Annual #1, this volume presents fans with the most destructive finale that will change the face of this family. As rare as it is nowadays, this volume successfully collects a story arc that has a beginning, a middle and an end. Throughout each issue, fans get a glimpse at the different dilemmas that each hero is facing on an individual level, while the threat that will essentially bring them to unite their efforts to stop the impending chaos is slowly being built up. Completely new and unique, this story gives Batman’s well-known supervillain Clayface the chance to be in the spotlight from the beginning to the end. In this Rebirth Detective Comics series, Clayface was brought into the team by Batman to give him a second chance at life as a superhero. He has quickly shown how much of a fantastic comic relief he is and how he can be useful in saving lives in Gotham. As guilt gnaws on his conscious, this volume shows him struggling to remain sane as one of the members of the Victim Syndicate puts into action a masterplan to destroy Batman through Clayface. While the plot was predictable, it was also a bit unnecessarily wordy, especially with some characters who had intense moments of just complaining and odd shifts in personality—yes, you, Spoiler. The development of the plot that led to the climax with a huge boss battle also seemed very convenient and coincidental. Every piece of the puzzle would simply fit until chaos reigned in Gotham and pushed some heroes to take some decisions that could never be taken back again. There are also multiple artists that worked on this story arc but the final result wasn’t as suffocating as it could’ve been. Playing with the panel structure and making sure to exploit Clayface’s ugliness when necessary, the art style did its job in conveying the story without any confusion. The annual issue placed after the epilogue, called “The Curse of Clayface”, however, turned out fantastic and focuses on Clayface’s origin. In this story, we find ourselves with Basil Carlo (Clayface) as a child, when he learns an important lesson from his dad about faking it till you make it, explaining how it is important to hide the monster within everyone, from everyone, because no one will love a monster. As his origin story unfolds, Basil’s character, unfortunately, evolves into the monster that he was told to hide. This character development proved to be quite brilliantly executed, and even integrates an underlying sub-plot regarding one of the members of the infamous villain gang, The Victim Syndicate. This stand-alone story elevates the quality of this volume tenfolds and adds an emotional edge to this volume, especially when you know how it all ends. Batman: Detective Comics: Fall of the Batmen is a study of character where the forces of good and evil struggles within a villain which leads to a schism within the Bat Family. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brian Poole

    The Rebirth era of Detective Comics hits a crucial turning point with Fall of the Batmen. With Red Robin back in the fold and desperate to prevent the bleak future glimpsed in the previous arc, the Gotham Knights team becomes more aggressive, sparking concern as the teams activities come into the public eye. After lying low, the Victim Syndicate, allied with Batman foe Anarky, seizes Arkham Asylum and sets off a series of anti-Batman protests at the same time they capture the reformed Clayface The Rebirth era of Detective Comics hits a crucial turning point with Fall of the Batmen. With Red Robin back in the fold and desperate to prevent the bleak future glimpsed in the previous arc, the “Gotham Knights” team becomes more aggressive, sparking concern as the team’s activities come into the public eye. After lying low, the Victim Syndicate, allied with Batman foe Anarky, seizes Arkham Asylum and sets off a series of anti-Batman protests at the same time they capture the reformed Clayface and weaponize him against his teammates. Facing a dire situation, Batwoman makes a brutal choice that fractures the Knights and pushes the city to the edge of a crisis that could destroy it. James Tynion IV’s run on Detective Comics has been one of the unqualified successes of the Rebirth era. The writer has a strong feel for the concept of “Batman as mentor” and surrounds him with a dynamic cast that he uses to powerful effect. Those contrasting viewpoints and interlocking relationship dynamics have been driving the drama for almost two years and much of what Tynion’s been building comes to a head in this arc. At the outset, Clayface’s place in the ensemble wasn’t entirely clear, even if his inclusion was rather intriguing. As the character’s run hits its crescendo, it stands as the emotional high point of Tynion’s tenure. The writer has a fascinating take on the villain trying hard to reform, digging into the psychological scars that drove his actions but demonstrating the true possibility for redemption. The tragedy at the heart of the story comes across powerfully in this climax, but isn’t the end. Indeed, the clash that results between Batman and Batwoman has been building from the outset, the events of this story starkly delineating the differences between the cousins, with Bruce’s inflexible moral code contrasted against the military-trained Kate’s more relativistic ethics. Tynion works similar ground playing the twisted idealism of Anarky off of the fanatical First Victim, with the latter willing to sacrifice hundreds of innocents to discredit Batman. Add in a powerful emotional conflict between Red Robin and Spoiler and Orphan’s devastating reaction to Clayface’s fate and Tynion has constructed a powerful dramatic mix that adds depth and texture to his original take on superhero action. As has become standard with books on DC’s twice monthly schedule, Fall of the Batmen has a small army on art duty. Pencillers Joe Bennet, Miguel Mendonca, Jesus Merino, Philippe Briones and Eddy Barrows all contribute first rate work, in collaboration with a multitude of talented inkers and colorists. All of the art team combinations work in a similar clean, classic style, so that there are no real outliers in the mix. That allows for a smooth transition from chapter to chapter, without any unnecessarily distracting contrasts. Instead, fans get dynamic visuals that move the drama along with a true sense of momentum and impact. It’s one of the more successful examples of managing a multi-artist approach without sacrificing an identity for the series in the name of scheduling. With Detective Comics building to Tynion’s grand finale, anyone who’s read previous installments needs Fall of the Batmen, though if you haven’t been following the title, you really should start with the earlier volumes, in sequence, to get the full impact.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Zohar - ManOfLaBook.com

    For more reviews and bookish thoughts please visit: http://www.ManOfLaBook.com Batman Detective Comics Vol. 6: Fall of the Batmen by James Tynion IV (illustrated by Eddy Barrows, Miguel Mendonca, Phil Briones, and Jesus Merino) is supposedly the second to last graphic novel in the saga. This graphic novel collects Detective Comics #969-974 and Annual #1. The Victim Syndicate has turned all of Gotham against Batman and his team in protest. They also kidnapped Clayface while threating to release For more reviews and bookish thoughts please visit: http://www.ManOfLaBook.com Batman – Detective Comics Vol. 6: Fall of the Batmen by James Tynion IV (illustrated by Eddy Barrows, Miguel Mendonca, Phil Briones, and Jesus Merino) is supposedly the second to last graphic novel in the saga. This graphic novel collects Detective Comics #969-974 and Annual #1. The Victim Syndicate has turned all of Gotham against Batman and his team in protest. They also kidnapped Clayface while threating to release dangerous criminals from Arkham Asylum unless Batman unmasks himself on live TV. As Clayface becomes more unhinged, the team is trying to stop him before he destroys the whole city. This whole Detective Comics run has had put the character of Clayface (Basil Karlo) either in the center, or off center, of the story-line, Batman – Detective Comics Vol. 6: Fall of the Batmen by James Tynion, IV (illustrated by Eddy Barrows, Miguel Mendonca, Phil Briones, and Jesus Merino) makes no bones about the fact that he is the main character of this graphic novel. Mr. Tynion has created Clayface as a character who fights with two sides of his identity, but in this graphic novel he makes no bones about putting him front and center. I enjoyed the art, but I thought that it was uneven due to the stylistic differences of the artists doing this graphic novel as opposed to the style I have become accustomed to which defined the series (this is, after all, a visual medium). I have no real complaints, however, as the art accommodated the story-line very well. Everything in this graphic novel which had to do with Clayface worked very well together. Mr. Tynion made him a tragic figure begging for a resolution. The one thing I didn’t understand was the Batmen (the whole team), opposing Batwoman’s solution to the problem. Frankly, I don’t see any other solution but I’m looking to find out what the author had in mind when he put the words “another way”, in their mouths. I really enjoyed the Annual, which tells the history of Clayface. It would have made much more sense, however, to put the issue in the front of this graphic novel, instead of the back, as is done customarily.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Detective Comics: Fall of the Batmen picks up where the previous volume left off and collecting the next six issues (Detective Comics #969974) of the 2016 on-going series and covers two stories: "Fall of the Batmen" and "Knights Fall". "Fall of the Batmen" is a five-issue storyline (Detective Comics #969973) has the Team, now named Gotham Knights, with a returning Tim Drake as Red Robin and Stephanie Brown as Spoiler has the team once again, going against the Victim Syndicate with Lonnie Machin Detective Comics: Fall of the Batmen picks up where the previous volume left off and collecting the next six issues (Detective Comics #969–974) of the 2016 on-going series and covers two stories: "Fall of the Batmen" and "Knights Fall". "Fall of the Batmen" is a five-issue storyline (Detective Comics #969–973) has the Team, now named Gotham Knights, with a returning Tim Drake as Red Robin and Stephanie Brown as Spoiler has the team once again, going against the Victim Syndicate with Lonnie Machin as Anarky joining the organization. This mission would end with the death of a member of the team, by the hands of another. "Knights Fall" (Detective Comics #974) is a one-issue storyline that has Tim Drake as Red Robin trying his best to keep the Gotham Knights together especially after Katherine Kane as Batwoman assassinates Basil Karlo as Clayface, but it seems the task of keeping the Team may be an impossible task and the team disbands. James Tynion IV penned the entire trade paperback. For the most part, it is written rather well, the disbandment of the Gotham Knights where Bruce Wayne as Batman and Katherine Kane as Batwoman co-lead disbanded as Katherine Kane as Batwoman kills Basil Karlo as Clayface – the result of such is the Bat insignia ripped from her suit and the team disbanding. While it is known that this team wouldn’t last forever, I still wished that there were more stories about them, but it was well written run. Joe Bennett (Detective Comics #969–970), Miguel Mendonça (Detective Comics #971–972), Jesús Merino (Detective Comics #973) and Philippe Briones (Detective Comics #974) penciled the trade paperback. For the most part, their penciling styles are rather distinct and somewhat meshed well with each other, making the artistic flow rather rough. All in all, Detective Comics: Fall of the Batmen is a good continuation to what would hopefully be a wonderful series.

  28. 5 out of 5

    DoctorWoofWoof

    OMG! Seriously?!? * one more time * OMG! That volume's ending was off the ever-lovin' Feels scale! I knew it was coming (Yaay! Browsin' on the interwebs!), but still, the death of [Spoiler] packed a lot of emotion as well as distaste towards [Spoiler - Part Deux] for not following B-Man's direction or that of the team as a whole! And, I would like to correct my statement in the other two reviews, that this was the final book of Tynion's 'TEC run. There is, in fact, one last volume, VOL. 8: BATMAN OMG! Seriously?!? * one more time * OMG! That volume's ending was off the ever-lovin' Feels scale! I knew it was coming (Yaay! Browsin' on the interwebs!), but still, the death of [Spoiler] packed a lot of emotion as well as distaste towards [Spoiler - Part Deux] for not following B-Man's direction or that of the team as a whole! And, I would like to correct my statement in the other two reviews, that this was the final book of Tynion's 'TEC run. There is, in fact, one last volume, VOL. 8: BATMAN ETERNAL, which I bought digitally the night before, and I will be tackling that one tonight in what has been a great ride, full of fun and excitement, helping to remind that Batman is still cool (despite all of Tom King's efforts)! In my reviews, I always try to acknowledge the artist(s), whether good or not so good. In this case, there were two Joe Bennett (did the first couple of the arc), followed by Miguel Mendonça, winding down with Jesus Merina (he was on the finale issue of "Fall of the Batmen"), and finishing up with Philippe Briones (handled the epilogue issue, "Knights Fall"). Oh, and Eddy Barrows worked on the last book in this volume, DETECTIVE ANNUAL #2, which I skimmed over, as it was a retread of Clayface's origin/beginnings. But, yeah, those artists were on fire! Such grand attention to detail, facial expressions, and brilliant use of shadows! They are all names I will be keeping an eye out for going forward! All in all, this was a truly memorable, and emotional, story arc. It was another winner for James Tynion IV, but come on, they were all winning arcs, as far as I'm concerned! And that, my loyal readers (are there really that many who genuinely follow my reviews? I dunno, but I am still going to go that phrasing), is that! Peace!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Scott Lee

    This one is hard to review without spoiling it. The spreading effectiveness of Batman's team, which has been the focus of this book all along, becomes its own kind of problem as its military precision leads the larger community of Gotham to question just how much Batman they're willing to tolerate. The people are especially worried when Clayface's presence on the team becomes common knowledge. Tim in particular falls into behavior driven by fear, attempting to expand and control more and more. This one is hard to review without spoiling it. The spreading effectiveness of Batman's team, which has been the focus of this book all along, becomes its own kind of problem as its military precision leads the larger community of Gotham to question just how much Batman they're willing to tolerate. The people are especially worried when Clayface's presence on the team becomes common knowledge. Tim in particular falls into behavior driven by fear, attempting to expand and control more and more. He starts exploring how to bring in still others as part of his system to fight crime in Gotham and goes so far as to talk about using Batgirl--in Oracle mode--to access the police scanners and direct the police to less dangerous crimes etc., placing himself/the team in control of/in place of the police. Batman wanted Batwoman to lead the team because of her military background as a trainer/team leader and that mentality as an approach also contributes heavily to the story. This is a fantastic arc, and I love how the problems the heroes are facing grow out of their own flaws, although I don't think it could be said that they've done anything wrong per se. I can't really indicate why I'm at four instead of five without completely spoiling the volume.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    This Volume pulls no punches, never backs down, and gets right in your face most of time... Continuing their battle against the First Victim and the Victim Syndicate, Batman and crew are becoming a kind of paramilitary force. Led by the logistics and ideas of Red Robin (returned to the team from seeming death), they seem to have things well in control. The police force and city hall don't like this though. When it is discovered that Clayface is part of the team, the people of Gotham begin to turn This Volume pulls no punches, never backs down, and gets right in your face most of time... Continuing their battle against the First Victim and the Victim Syndicate, Batman and crew are becoming a kind of paramilitary force. Led by the logistics and ideas of Red Robin (returned to the team from seeming death), they seem to have things well in control. The police force and city hall don't like this though. When it is discovered that Clayface is part of the team, the people of Gotham begin to turn on Batman, but of course they are being led and manipulated by the First Victim... and eventually, Clayface is captured. Removing his bracelet, and being tortured by Glory Griffin, they seek to have Clayface lose his control fully and attack the city... which obviously happens. What wasn't counted on, was Batwoman shooting him in the head, killing Baslo Carlo's chances of ever being human again. Cass loses it, and Batwoman leaves the team (possibly taking Batwing and Azrael with her... unknown at this time). Kate ends up back under her father's influence... will she be an enemy soon? The pacing of this Volume was excellent and really kept my attention. Detective Comics, slowly making its way towards that issue #1000.... still a great comic after all these years. Recommend.

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