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American Fix: Inside the Opioid Addiction Crisis - and How to End It

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Nearly every American knows someone who has been affected by the opioid crisis. Addiction is a trans-partisan issue that impacts individuals from every walk of life. Millions of Americans, tired of watching their loved ones die while politicians ignore this issue. Where is the solution? Where is the hope? Where's the outrage? Ryan Hampton is a young man who has made addicti Nearly every American knows someone who has been affected by the opioid crisis. Addiction is a trans-partisan issue that impacts individuals from every walk of life. Millions of Americans, tired of watching their loved ones die while politicians ignore this issue. Where is the solution? Where is the hope? Where's the outrage? Ryan Hampton is a young man who has made addiction and recovery reform his life's mission. Through the wildly successful non-profit organization Facing Addiction, Hampton has been rocketed to the center of America's rising recovery movement--quickly emerging as the de facto leader of the national conversation on addiction. He understands firsthand how easy it is to develop a dependency on opioids, and how destructive it can quickly become. Now, he is waging a permanent campaign to change our way of thinking about and addressing addiction in this country. In American Fix, Hampton describes his personal struggle with addiction, outlines the challenges that the recovery movement currently faces, and offers a concrete, comprehensive plan of action towards making America's addiction crisis a thing of the past.


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Nearly every American knows someone who has been affected by the opioid crisis. Addiction is a trans-partisan issue that impacts individuals from every walk of life. Millions of Americans, tired of watching their loved ones die while politicians ignore this issue. Where is the solution? Where is the hope? Where's the outrage? Ryan Hampton is a young man who has made addicti Nearly every American knows someone who has been affected by the opioid crisis. Addiction is a trans-partisan issue that impacts individuals from every walk of life. Millions of Americans, tired of watching their loved ones die while politicians ignore this issue. Where is the solution? Where is the hope? Where's the outrage? Ryan Hampton is a young man who has made addiction and recovery reform his life's mission. Through the wildly successful non-profit organization Facing Addiction, Hampton has been rocketed to the center of America's rising recovery movement--quickly emerging as the de facto leader of the national conversation on addiction. He understands firsthand how easy it is to develop a dependency on opioids, and how destructive it can quickly become. Now, he is waging a permanent campaign to change our way of thinking about and addressing addiction in this country. In American Fix, Hampton describes his personal struggle with addiction, outlines the challenges that the recovery movement currently faces, and offers a concrete, comprehensive plan of action towards making America's addiction crisis a thing of the past.

30 review for American Fix: Inside the Opioid Addiction Crisis - and How to End It

  1. 4 out of 5

    Marla

    This book is dangerous in my opinion. Through the first 3 chapters, you learn of Hampton's descent into opioid drug addiction. Never once did I hear him accept any accountability on his part. He cast blame on his counselors, insurance companies (well let's face it, insurance companies deserve it), 12 Step programs he claims never work, family and friends who desert the addicts in their lives, rehab clinics that he says are scams...he never acknowledged his own role in his addiction. I was hoping This book is dangerous in my opinion. Through the first 3 chapters, you learn of Hampton's descent into opioid drug addiction. Never once did I hear him accept any accountability on his part. He cast blame on his counselors, insurance companies (well let's face it, insurance companies deserve it), 12 Step programs he claims never work, family and friends who desert the addicts in their lives, rehab clinics that he says are scams...he never acknowledged his own role in his addiction. I was hoping to learn more about drug addiction...why does one person get addicted and another doesn't...is there any measurable difference between opioid addiction and heroin use (or is addiction just addiction?)...why is the recidivism rate the same for expensive rehabs as those for less expensive facilities? How do we get affordable rehab services for everyone? But he only had blame to cast, he took responsibility for nothing. Addiction just happened to him, like getting cancer or diabetes. No matter how you get cancer or become drug dependent, a person should be treated...healthcare should be mandatory. I understood his frustration and anger (lots of anger) at the shame he'd encountered, the unfairness of it all. But he should have left "-and How to End It" out of his title. It was one big rant without solutions. Thankful for the library loan on this one.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

    DNF - the author refuses to take responsibility for any of his actions. I kept reading, waiting for the moment in which he accepts even a fraction of the blame for his addiction and downward spiral of his life, but it didn’t happen. Even when he admitted that he lied about still having ankle pain to get more prescription pills, it was still the doctor’s fault. This book had potential as prescription painkillers really were/are handed out like candy and many “treatment centers” had/have unqualifi DNF - the author refuses to take responsibility for any of his actions. I kept reading, waiting for the moment in which he accepts even a fraction of the blame for his addiction and downward spiral of his life, but it didn’t happen. Even when he admitted that he lied about still having ankle pain to get more prescription pills, it was still the doctor’s fault. This book had potential as prescription painkillers really were/are handed out like candy and many “treatment centers” had/have unqualified people caring for those admitted, resulting in death in several cases. However, the author plays the victim and even worse, encourages others to as well. This clouded the author’s message and made the book too irritating to finish.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Hampton

    Hampton doesn't only reveal his candid and undisguised personal journey; better yet, he pushes the reader's understanding of this national health crisis. Penned with convincing passion, Hampton pushes for change and solutions. After reading American Fix one can't help but feel outrage and conviction to take action and become part of the solution for this horrific epidemic crippling families, entire towns, cities, and our nation as a whole.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    Ryan Hampton, the author, is a person in recovery from addiction. He also has a background in political organizing, which makes him uniquely qualified to write this political 'call to action.' While its light on the history of the epidemic -- and the solution/bright-spots are vaguer than I'd like, this still works nicely as a primal scream to wake America up to the crisis it finds itself in.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    The scary thing about this book is that some people reading it are actually going to think that everything the author says has merit. He might actually be making some valid points but I found it impossible to get past the sanctimonious, condescending tone and the complete and utter lack of accountability on the authors part. Somehow even him deliberately lying to a doctor about an injury to get more medication (which I do understand was an attempt to maintain an addiction) was the doctor's fault The scary thing about this book is that some people reading it are actually going to think that everything the author says has merit. He might actually be making some valid points but I found it impossible to get past the sanctimonious, condescending tone and the complete and utter lack of accountability on the authors part. Somehow even him deliberately lying to a doctor about an injury to get more medication (which I do understand was an attempt to maintain an addiction) was the doctor's fault for not seeing through his lie? Somehow the author was always a blameless victim. I also looked up the "sources" the author cited for some of his statistics and I was unable to verify his numbers. For example, his assertion on page 143 that "96 percent of college students, ages 18 to 22, use alcohol on an average day. More than half use marijuana" was not supported by the source he mentioned (NIDA). Others were misleading, cited only partial findings of the studies he mentioned or paraphrased and summarized to the point of changing the meaning or context entirely. This was upsetting to me because as I mentioned in the first paragraph, many of the author's points I actually do think were worthwhile, especially about the culpability of companies like Perdue pharmaceuticals. I feel like the author's sensationalistic style negates the struggles of the people he is allegedly trying to help. The author talks about how we need criminal justice reform when it comes to drug sentences, but either he didn't do his research or left out facts that didn't fit his narrative about the multiple counties and cities that offer drug court programs or Drug Dorm programs- the jail in Chesterfield that he refers to briefly and in condescendingly mocking tones is hardly a one-of-a-kind facility. Most local jails in Virginia (the state in which I practice) and several state prisons here offer those programs. Many more have drug task forces that comprise of members from the local community service boards, law enforcement, court services unit, social services, probation and other affiliated professionals whose goals are to provide services not obtain criminal convictions. Does the author not know that because he didn't do his research, or does it just not suit his angry victim blame the system narrative to discuss it? Also, as a social worker in the addiction treatment industry, I'd really like to know where my $1,000 bonuses, luxury cars, mansions, and Aspen ski vacations are. Because all I get from my job is another memo about how due to budget cuts we won't be getting a cost of living increase yet again this year. The author assumes all treatment centers and programs are run by unscrupulous profit-seeking villains. It's as if he believes himself to be Robin Hood and sees all professionals as unequivocal Sheriffs of Nottingham who gatekeep the masses access to recovery. The most frustrating part about this is, on the whole, I do agree it's a broken system and treatment options for persons struggling with addiction are insufficient. Likewise, I believe that the struggles people seeking recovery are overwhelmingly misunderstood and minimized by most people. However, this author, in my opinion, placed too much of an emphasis on his own personal agenda throughout the book which renders his ability to inspire any lasting social change completely ineffectual. This book almost reads like a wannabe political manifesto full of meaningless sound bytes without any actual content. If you are looking for a book with a more balanced understanding of the opiate crisis in America, check out Barry Meier's Pain Killer: A "Wonder" Drug's Trail of Addiction and Death, Beth Macy's Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors, and the Drug Company that Addicted America or Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic by Sam Quinones.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Sankey

    Hampton was well educated, middle class and a driven achiever when he injured his ankle and got a prescription for opioids. The drugs worked wonders--no pain, no anxiety, and highly addictive, until he gave up trying to treat the original injury and sent more and more time at pill mills and pain clinics getting new prescriptions. When the legal prescriptions got too expensive, he went the route of many--injecting heroin. Hampton is in a position to tell us about this, as well as the inside story Hampton was well educated, middle class and a driven achiever when he injured his ankle and got a prescription for opioids. The drugs worked wonders--no pain, no anxiety, and highly addictive, until he gave up trying to treat the original injury and sent more and more time at pill mills and pain clinics getting new prescriptions. When the legal prescriptions got too expensive, he went the route of many--injecting heroin. Hampton is in a position to tell us about this, as well as the inside story of treatment centers (venture-capitalized profit centers, outdated treatment model, no regulatory oversight--what could go wrong?) and the marketing onslaught of Purdue Pharma. As localities debate whether to have EMTs carry narcan at public expense to revive people, it is worth reviewing how we got to this public health crisis, one which threatens rural white people, and how American concepts of illness as weakness and public services as mooching collide with catastrophic consequences.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elyse

    While I learned a lot about how a person with substance abuse disorder in recovery views the disease and recovery options, I had to put the book down for a while to take a break from the constant blame on everyone and everything else. One train of thought that really irked me in reading this is that the author in the majority of the book tries to make claims that everyone in active addiction is seeking help and is not getting it. This is untrue for most. And for those it is true for - that is a h While I learned a lot about how a person with substance abuse disorder in recovery views the disease and recovery options, I had to put the book down for a while to take a break from the constant blame on everyone and everything else. One train of thought that really irked me in reading this is that the author in the majority of the book tries to make claims that everyone in active addiction is seeking help and is not getting it. This is untrue for most. And for those it is true for - that is a huge problem, but don't speak as if everyone wants help or to get better. I was also frustrated with the lack of understanding of why and how family and friends get to the point where they must remove themselves from an addicts life. From personal experience and witnessing others, family especially does not turn on an addict at first exposure. Most must set boundaries once they realize how much the addict is also pulling them down or how innocent actions are only fueling poor behavior. It is a disease and should be treated similarly to cancer, but there is a big difference in the daily impact suffered due to the consequences of an addicts actions. I did appreciate the actual thoughts and plans laid out around harm reduction, community, etc. But it took up about 20 pages of a 270 page book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Friscomama

    The three star rating is not based on the message of this book, but the length and repetition. The United States has an opioid addiction problem. The author, Ryan Hampton was a participant. The book presents details of how most people are introduced to opioids (medical prescriptions for pain relief) and how difficult treatment is to find, evaluate or pay for. If you don't know already, you will find out in this book. The book covers many aspects of the current crisis, how the opioids are introduc The three star rating is not based on the message of this book, but the length and repetition. The United States has an opioid addiction problem. The author, Ryan Hampton was a participant. The book presents details of how most people are introduced to opioids (medical prescriptions for pain relief) and how difficult treatment is to find, evaluate or pay for. If you don't know already, you will find out in this book. The book covers many aspects of the current crisis, how the opioids are introduced as medical treatment for pain, and can lead to addiction for many people. The paper book might be easier because you could get through it in less than the eight and a half hours it takes to listen to the audio, and you might want to just scan through some of the repetitive parts. I do recommend that you read it, especially if you or someone you know need to recover, or if you want to know what's going on with this.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lissa

    Ryan Hampton spent ten years of his life addicted to Opioids, beginning with treatment for an ankle injury. Within that time he went from a successful job in politics to burning bridges as his prescriptions for pain medication evolved into a Heroin addiction. He has since been in recovery of his substance use disorder and he is using his experience to educate others on the reality of drug addiction. I recently read Dopesick by Beth Macy and was curious to read a more personal account of the Opio Ryan Hampton spent ten years of his life addicted to Opioids, beginning with treatment for an ankle injury. Within that time he went from a successful job in politics to burning bridges as his prescriptions for pain medication evolved into a Heroin addiction. He has since been in recovery of his substance use disorder and he is using his experience to educate others on the reality of drug addiction. I recently read Dopesick by Beth Macy and was curious to read a more personal account of the Opioid epidemic. It is easily apparent from reading this book that Hampton is a gifted public speaker because most of this reads just like hard-hitting oration. Because of this, it can at times also be repetitive and the narrative could have been tightened up, but I think this is a much needed addition to the national conversation of the Opioid epidemic. I received a digital ARC of this book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Eggbeater

    Somebody needed to write about the solutions to this problem from the perspective of a person familiar with both the inside workings of the political machine and addiction itself. Ryan Hampton has done that. This is an important book. The pharmaceutical industry must not be allowed to continue on like this. This is me. I am a woman in recovery. I got addicted to the pain patches that I was prescribed for severe chronic pain. I have a legitimate illness. I could not accept my disability. I though Somebody needed to write about the solutions to this problem from the perspective of a person familiar with both the inside workings of the political machine and addiction itself. Ryan Hampton has done that. This is an important book. The pharmaceutical industry must not be allowed to continue on like this. This is me. I am a woman in recovery. I got addicted to the pain patches that I was prescribed for severe chronic pain. I have a legitimate illness. I could not accept my disability. I thought narcotics were the answer. I was told by doctors who were told by Perdue Pharma that I could not get addicted to them because my pain was real and therefore the medication would not go to my head, it would only tackle the pain. I was misinformed. I did not mean to become addicted, but I lost many dear things in my life and I almost died. I still itch when I think of those patches. I suspect I always will. I now lead a respectable life and you'd never know it to look at me. I also live with severe chronic pain, no medication, and no solution to it. This book brought up issues with the treatment industry that I was unaware of because I kicked cold turkey. It also has an interesting perspective on anonymity and shaming. Those of us involved in 12 step programs were taught not to reveal our membership at the level of "press, radio, and film" in case we relapse and make the program look bad, but that does have the other effect of the general public not seeing all of the progress we really do make in recovery. Hampton brings up good points about how minorities and people with lower incomes are less able to afford treatment and more likely to be discriminated against and end up in jail where they often don't receive adequate services. I also realized I have some old fashioned thinking about harm reduction that was taught to me when I first got clean and may still have been carried over subconsciously. It is important to meet people where they are at. Too many people have died. I'd rather people live to fight another day and it shouldn't be up to anyone how they choose to do it. In addition, there were some good ideas and points about bipartisanship. Addiction affects people from all walks of life and all belief systems. It's like diabetes, it does not discriminate. Neither should we. Personally, I have a deep, deep hatred for Republican policies. It would be difficult for me to put that aside and work with them because of all the other issues I feel so passionate about, but this is life or death for many of us. We could help save lives. People relapse, so it could even be my life that is saved. It was an excellent book and I really appreciate its existence. There were a few issues I would have liked to hear more about. Like what to do with those of us who have chronic pain and also have substance use disorders. We have to put pressure on doctors and pharmaceutical companies to find alternatives to narcotics for pain treatment. We shouldn't have to make the choice to suffer in physical agony or live in the hell of active addiction. Also, I'd like to see some more emphasis on NON faith-based treatment. Having only faith-based options for people who don't believe in a deity can keep people from getting help and is very frustrating and off-putting. My favorite quote from the book: "If people have a relapse, that doesn't diminish the progress they've made or discount their advocacy. It just means that their disease has exhibited symptoms."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

    I think this is an important perspective. Having worked in the thick of the opioid epidemic for the last 18 months, his voice fills in many gaps. "If you're not at the table, you're on the menu" rings true to me. And from experience with loved ones and their personal journeys through addiction/recovery, I agree that much about the whole system is broken. I hope many will read this, and do so with an open mind and an open heart. Substance Use Disorder is a disease, and recovery matters.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tressa

    We need to treat those with substance abuse disorder with compassion. That is the main point of this book. I agree with this, but the solutions he suggests are not cheap. He calls it an illness and makes the point frequently that those with cancer are not treated the same way. With this, I disagree. Many people are not given the care they need until their cancer has progressed past the point of healing. This idea that our health care system is equal is laughable, and so discredits most of his bo We need to treat those with substance abuse disorder with compassion. That is the main point of this book. I agree with this, but the solutions he suggests are not cheap. He calls it an illness and makes the point frequently that those with cancer are not treated the same way. With this, I disagree. Many people are not given the care they need until their cancer has progressed past the point of healing. This idea that our health care system is equal is laughable, and so discredits most of his book. I do not know what the correct answer is to our epidemic. I am still curious how he can negate all personal responsibility for the addicted. As I said in my earlier review, I do believe the drug companies share the blame. The idea that opium products are not addictive is ludicrous, and I can’t believe they got away with saying that. But it isn’t a one and done addiction. It takes time. So, I have mixed feelings about the whole thing. One thing I do know is that people are hurting. Opium takes away those feelings. As someone who was prescribed these painkillers, I know they make you feel good, but it is false. Pain and suffering is part of this world. We need to quit lying to ourselves and telling ourselves that 100% happiness is the goal. It is unattainable. I wish I knew what to tell people with chronic pain. I think modern medicine doesn’t know what to tell them either. But I am wondering if a magic pill isn’t the answer, but it is the fast and cheap answer. Insurance companies like fast and cheap. This book just convinced me that there are no easy answers to this problem.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    I have so many problems with this book, I don't even know where to start: - I really disagree with the obsession with person first language. Just call them addicts for god's sake rather than "people who are experiencing addiction" or whatever. It's so clunky and it seems like pure virtue signaling to me. - The author's addiction story and how it's all his doctors' fault for giving him pills blah blah blah but he still was able to work and he met Obama brag brag brag - The whole book is written in t I have so many problems with this book, I don't even know where to start: - I really disagree with the obsession with person first language. Just call them addicts for god's sake rather than "people who are experiencing addiction" or whatever. It's so clunky and it seems like pure virtue signaling to me. - The author's addiction story and how it's all his doctors' fault for giving him pills blah blah blah but he still was able to work and he met Obama brag brag brag - The whole book is written in this incredibly smug, sanctimonious way that is really off-putting, even though there are some points I agreed with (harm reduction, etc.) - The HYPOCRISY of being so critical of every other treatment program and organization related to addiction, and then discussing your own, flawless nonprofit that has all the answers.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Karl

    I read the entire book. Ryan is an irresponsible person. Constantly blaming society for his addiction. Instead of admitting. It's his fault.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Guy had a total axe to grind. He might have had some interesting solutions but I couldn't wade through the whining to get to them.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Boston Bostian

    Bad writing. Righteous tone. Hard to finish. I could only read 15-20% but I'm not spending more time on it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    Ryan Hampton has a dream: for the American people to recognize addiction as a disease, and for them to prioritize the treatment of individuals suffering from it. Hampton is open and honest about his own struggles with addiction. His story, like so many, start with a painkiller prescription for an injury that goes horrendously wrong. He loses so much – friends, family, jobs, homes – and eventually turns to heroin when prescription medication becomes too expensive. It takes a couple attempts before Ryan Hampton has a dream: for the American people to recognize addiction as a disease, and for them to prioritize the treatment of individuals suffering from it. Hampton is open and honest about his own struggles with addiction. His story, like so many, start with a painkiller prescription for an injury that goes horrendously wrong. He loses so much – friends, family, jobs, homes – and eventually turns to heroin when prescription medication becomes too expensive. It takes a couple attempts before rehab is successful for him, and he works hard to maintain in recovery today. While all of this sounds pretty typical of an addiction memoir, Hampton puts a different spin on his book. Yes, he points out where the system fails, but he actually offers solutions on how to improve the way addiction is treated at the local level. My House and Fallen Up Ministries in Alaska, Families of Addicts in Ohio, Rebel Recovery in Florida, the Center for Open Recovery in California, and the Alano Club in Oregon are all great examples of grassroots movements. The Chesterfield Jail in Alaska also demonstrates how local jails can be utilized in aiding individuals suffering from addition and in recovery without criminalizing the process. At times, Hampton’s tone can be preachy, but it’s clear he’s passionate about his call to action. His experience in Washington, D.C. and running for a Democratic National Convention delegate position in California illustrate his background in the political process. It’s not surprising for him to want to rally people behind addiction as an issue (or what he believes should be THE issue) for political candidates to discover. His argument at the end seems to be fighting on a national level. Local governments, however, might be the best target to start seeing changes occur.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Book Him Danno

    This book is hard hitting facts that will rip off the band aid people have been using to fix the Opioid Addiction that is killing Americans and destroying families. Ryan Hampton has a view point unlike many other who have written or dicuses the opioid addiction because he has an addiction to Opioiod and this is his candid story as well as passion to fixing what is destroy the United States. As a read Ryan Hampton will come off angry to the point of offending those who want to hid in the sand. Than This book is hard hitting facts that will rip off the band aid people have been using to fix the Opioid Addiction that is killing Americans and destroying families. Ryan Hampton has a view point unlike many other who have written or dicuses the opioid addiction because he has an addiction to Opioiod and this is his candid story as well as passion to fixing what is destroy the United States. As a read Ryan Hampton will come off angry to the point of offending those who want to hid in the sand. Than again he has seen all side of the epidemic and witness what isn't being done. His passion can be seen as angry but it is passion to fix the problem and not hide from it. I remember hearing as a teen Marijuana is the grate way drug but really the grate way drug is sitting in most american's homes and used all the time. This is a must read! https://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse... " Roughly 21 to 29 percent of patients prescribed opioids for chronic pain misuse them. Between 8 and 12 percent develop an opioid use disorder. An estimated 4 to 6 percent who misuse prescription opioids transition to heroin. About 80 percent of people who use heroin first misused prescription opioids Opioid overdoses increased 30 percent from July 2016 through September 2017 in 52 areas in 45 states. The Midwestern region saw opioid overdoses increase 70 percent from July 2016 through September 2017. Opioid overdoses in large cities increase by 54 percent in 16 states. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher All Points Books for the advance copy of Ryan Hampton American Fix. Thank you to Ryan Hampton for his open and candid book!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Donnie

    I really got a lot out of this book. My rating would actually be more like a 4.5 instead of a 4.0. I have read a lot of books on this topic by either former opioid addicts or therapists working with addicts. This book made some of the same points but something about it was different. I felt like it actually confronted my own biases towards people who get labeled as opioid addicts in a way the other books didn't. My personal experiences are limited to friends who have children or friends kid's wh I really got a lot out of this book. My rating would actually be more like a 4.5 instead of a 4.0. I have read a lot of books on this topic by either former opioid addicts or therapists working with addicts. This book made some of the same points but something about it was different. I felt like it actually confronted my own biases towards people who get labeled as opioid addicts in a way the other books didn't. My personal experiences are limited to friends who have children or friends kid's who have friends that ended up being addicted to opioids. The majority of them did get started using prescription opioids for an injury that led to their abuse. I think the point he makes that this problem is so big it affects everyone--rich and poor, blacks and whites, republicans and democrats. He makes the interesting case that the need to solve this problem might be one of the few things right now that everyone can agree on. I think he presents several programs that appear to be working and he summarizes many of the steps necessary to solve the problem in a very logical and realistic way at the end of the book. If you are interested in learning more about this epidemic, this is a useful book to read.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jimmacc

    Interesting book. Changed my thinking on several items. I was very ... surprised... by the response the author provided when hearing Bill Maher make a joke at Rush Limbaugh’s addiction issues. It drove home some of his points regarding addiction being a disease. Author is very blunt about this not being the strong suit of any political party, and that very effective solutions are coming from a variety of sources. The beginning of the book, when the author was talking through his addiction journe Interesting book. Changed my thinking on several items. I was very ... surprised... by the response the author provided when hearing Bill Maher make a joke at Rush Limbaugh’s addiction issues. It drove home some of his points regarding addiction being a disease. Author is very blunt about this not being the strong suit of any political party, and that very effective solutions are coming from a variety of sources. The beginning of the book, when the author was talking through his addiction journey, I was reminded of the book “American Pain”. Taken together they provide a very damning testimony about the medical system. The arguments made regarding punishing users reinforces the need to address root causes, and not sweep people into corners. Author is passionate in promoting addiction solutions being driven by those affected by the disease. Developing a group comparable to NRA, or NOW, but focused on these issues makes a lot of sense. I read several of the criticisms/reviews regarding responsibility. I think they are missing at least one of the author’s arguments. For me this was a very thought provoking book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jean Moore

    When I began reading American Fix, I thought I had a pretty good handle on the issues. I was in for an awakening. Because Hampton has lived the nightmare--and the recovery--he knows what is at stake. He knows where the deep flaws are in the system. And because he has traveled and talked and studied those flaws, he has great insight into what it will take to fix a system that is deeply broken. Although much of what Hampton reveals comes from his own struggle to recover, his reach has extended to When I began reading American Fix, I thought I had a pretty good handle on the issues. I was in for an awakening. Because Hampton has lived the nightmare--and the recovery--he knows what is at stake. He knows where the deep flaws are in the system. And because he has traveled and talked and studied those flaws, he has great insight into what it will take to fix a system that is deeply broken. Although much of what Hampton reveals comes from his own struggle to recover, his reach has extended to many he considers to be his brothers and sisters on the journey to recovery. And for every one who has not made it, Hampton’s heart breaks more. This is a book filled with heart and commitment and wisdom. The last part of the book, written forcefully and with great insight, outlines steps to provide solutions for this tragic American nightmare.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    This provides a decent and necessary examination of the idea that AA is the only way. I believe there are quite a lot of people who care about this issue more than any other political topic today and not all of them are they themselves in recovery. 2017 was a brutal year for overdose deaths, capping somewhere around 72,000 dead Americans. Hampton describes about 1 in 3 people just waiting for the chance to talk with him about the opioid epidemic. I find this to be true in my life as well, whenev This provides a decent and necessary examination of the idea that AA is the only way. I believe there are quite a lot of people who care about this issue more than any other political topic today and not all of them are they themselves in recovery. 2017 was a brutal year for overdose deaths, capping somewhere around 72,000 dead Americans. Hampton describes about 1 in 3 people just waiting for the chance to talk with him about the opioid epidemic. I find this to be true in my life as well, whenever I bring it up in conversation with generally anyone. It's an issue that is boiling beneath the surface for most people. There is just that whole issue of stigma that keeps it beneath the surface, despite the fact that it is boiling.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cathy Schillaci

    I have had the privilege to read Ryan Hampton's unedited version of this book. It covers every corner of the addiction crisis in this country. His book shows all the wrong turns that have contributed to this epidemic and what is needed to turn it around. Ryan's story brings you along his journey of addiction, recovery and it will inspire you, as it did me. Ryan has become a voice for our sons, daughters, loved ones and those who no longer have a voice. I highly recommend ordering, reading and sh I have had the privilege to read Ryan Hampton's unedited version of this book. It covers every corner of the addiction crisis in this country. His book shows all the wrong turns that have contributed to this epidemic and what is needed to turn it around. Ryan's story brings you along his journey of addiction, recovery and it will inspire you, as it did me. Ryan has become a voice for our sons, daughters, loved ones and those who no longer have a voice. I highly recommend ordering, reading and sharing his book! Thank you Ryan Hampton for all that you have done and continue to do. You are making a difference!!!! Cathy Schillaci

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nick Gardner

    A great book detailing America's need to take a different look at recovery and addiction. Nearly everyone is affected by addiction in some way or another, and the current way it's being handled is not working. Ryan Hampton gives the reader his firsthand account on addiction as well as detailing many ways we can work together to end it. Though the language can seem a little harsh, this is a pandemic and people are dying. Hampton's rhetoric can sound a bit too angry, but if you know much about the A great book detailing America's need to take a different look at recovery and addiction. Nearly everyone is affected by addiction in some way or another, and the current way it's being handled is not working. Ryan Hampton gives the reader his firsthand account on addiction as well as detailing many ways we can work together to end it. Though the language can seem a little harsh, this is a pandemic and people are dying. Hampton's rhetoric can sound a bit too angry, but if you know much about the current drug crisis, it is exactly the anger we need.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ed Kohinke sr.

    I had a vague idea of what the opioid crisis is all about but wanted to know more, and I just happened to walk into my library one day and found this on the new book shelf. If you want to get up to speed on this issue, this book will get you there without putting you to sleep! You might even finish it, like me, inspired to learn more and figure out how to be part of the solution. It's a good read, highly recommended!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I just couldn't finish this... Not what I was expecting at all. Perhaps you need to be in recovery to find this book interesting but for me, it was just a slog. Each chapter felt like it was saying the same thing.... Treatment centers don't work; addicts aren't viewed as humans; what if we treated cancer patients like we treat people in recovery....I just didn't find anything actionable or enlightening here.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    Hampton is clearly passionate and knowledgeable, both from personal experience and professional. He makes some excellent points about the inefficacy of current approaches to treatment and the way addiction and addicts are viewed. However, I found that he made the same points again and again in each chapter and I lost track of the supposed thesis for each. The book became a bit repetitive and muddled by page 180, and from there on there was no real new information conveyed.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn

    I thought that this was done really well. I would have liked to have heard even more stories in the piece, but that’s just my personal preference. There are a lot of critics of this book, but reading their reviews, they clearly done understand addiction or have compassion for those affected by it. I loved how this was organized and how the author mapped out clear steps this country needs to take.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    The most informative writing I’ve read about the severity of the current opioids crises in America. I strongly recommend this if you want first-hand and insightful accounts of those with substance use disorders. The proposed solutions to sustain long term recovery are brilliant and backed by real world evidence.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joy Alferness

    Ugh. DNF. The navel gazing of this book. He could have said what he needed to say in a long form essay, instead he simply repeats the same points over and over and over again. If you want to read a great book about the opiod crisis, Dopesick is miles better than this one. This book really just reads like someone who is using his writing as his therapy.

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