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Resist: 35 Profiles of Ordinary People Who Rose Up Against Tyranny and Injustice

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A perfect tool for young readers as they grow into the leaders of tomorrow, Veronica Chambers’s inspiring collection of profiles—along with Senator Cory Booker’s stirring foreword—will inspire readers of all ages to stand up for what’s right. You may only be one person, but you have the power to change the world. Before they were activists, they were just like you and me. Fr A perfect tool for young readers as they grow into the leaders of tomorrow, Veronica Chambers’s inspiring collection of profiles—along with Senator Cory Booker’s stirring foreword—will inspire readers of all ages to stand up for what’s right. You may only be one person, but you have the power to change the world. Before they were activists, they were just like you and me. From Frederick Douglass to Malala Yousafzai, Joan of Arc to John Lewis, Susan B. Anthony to Janet Mock—these remarkable figures show us what it means to take a stand and say no to injustice, even when it would be far easier to stay quiet. Resist profiles men and women who resisted tyranny, fought the odds, and stood up to bullies that threatened to harm their communities. Along with their portraits and most memorable quotes, their stories will inspire you to speak out and rise up—every single day.


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A perfect tool for young readers as they grow into the leaders of tomorrow, Veronica Chambers’s inspiring collection of profiles—along with Senator Cory Booker’s stirring foreword—will inspire readers of all ages to stand up for what’s right. You may only be one person, but you have the power to change the world. Before they were activists, they were just like you and me. Fr A perfect tool for young readers as they grow into the leaders of tomorrow, Veronica Chambers’s inspiring collection of profiles—along with Senator Cory Booker’s stirring foreword—will inspire readers of all ages to stand up for what’s right. You may only be one person, but you have the power to change the world. Before they were activists, they were just like you and me. From Frederick Douglass to Malala Yousafzai, Joan of Arc to John Lewis, Susan B. Anthony to Janet Mock—these remarkable figures show us what it means to take a stand and say no to injustice, even when it would be far easier to stay quiet. Resist profiles men and women who resisted tyranny, fought the odds, and stood up to bullies that threatened to harm their communities. Along with their portraits and most memorable quotes, their stories will inspire you to speak out and rise up—every single day.

30 review for Resist: 35 Profiles of Ordinary People Who Rose Up Against Tyranny and Injustice

  1. 4 out of 5

    Panda Incognito

    This collection of 35 biographical profiles introduces young readers to a diverse range of heroes who stood up against injustice. Sometimes, I found this book profoundly moving, but I cannot recommend it, because the author omitted and misrepresented facts in some of the chapters. Biographical sketches that span three to five pages can only contain so much information; however, if you undertake the project of educating children about history's heroes, you have a responsibility to include and fac This collection of 35 biographical profiles introduces young readers to a diverse range of heroes who stood up against injustice. Sometimes, I found this book profoundly moving, but I cannot recommend it, because the author omitted and misrepresented facts in some of the chapters. Biographical sketches that span three to five pages can only contain so much information; however, if you undertake the project of educating children about history's heroes, you have a responsibility to include and fact-check the most important elements of their lives and legacies. This book spans from 1429 to the present. Each chapter begins with a beautiful portrait of its subject, and a quote that sums up their ideology or approach to justice. At the end, the author synthesizes that person's legacy into a "Resist Lesson," and even though some of these are cheesy and trite, others are thought-provoking. For example, the one that celebrates Samuel Adams’s labor for American independence states, "The steadiness of commitment can do more in the long term than unsustainable sparks." One of the positive aspects of this book was how thoroughly it covered different forms of resistance, showing that our actions are worthwhile even when they don’t seem glamorous. This book contains a lot of important lessons, and its chapters cover people of different sexes, races, nationalities, sexual orientations, socioeconomic statuses, ages, and personal causes. This diverse approach to the topic of resistance serves as a primer on a vast number of different social issues, but because of this, many people will read and recommend this title without realizing how limited the material actually is. Even though this book seems thorough, many of its chapters leave out important information. Exhibit A: Dietrich Bonhoeffer This chapter begins with the famous quote, “The church… must not simply bandage the victims under the wheel of oppression, but put a spoke in the wheel itself.” Great line! However, according to this book, when Bonhoeffer returned to Germany and got involved in the resistance there, all he did was work against the Gestapo by helping evacuate Jewish refugees. That was a wonderful, brave, humanitarian thing, but do you know what ELSE Bonhoeffer did? This man joined a conspiracy to try to ASSASSINATE HITLER. That fact is JUST SLIGHTLY IMPORTANT. That quote about putting “a spoke in the wheel itself” isn’t just an observation. It crystallizes the reasoning behind Bonhoeffer’s soul-searching decision to put aside his pacifistic convictions and actively engage in efforts to end Hitler’s life. Unfortunately, he and his co-conspirators failed in their repeated efforts, and Bonhoeffer went to prison. The Nazis executed him on April 9, 1945, just shortly before the end of the war. THIS MATTERS. Bonhoeffer is one of my personal heroes, and when you rip out the most important elements of his story, you disrespect his sacrifices. This gentle, studious pastor was willing to take drastic measures to resist the epitome of evil, and he paid for this resistance with his life. Telling his story without these details does injustice to his legacy, misleads readers, and forfeits an opportunity to deeply inspire. Exhibit B: Sitting Bull This chapter ends on a triumphant note, with Sitting Bull and his tribe defeating US General Custer and his troops. That’s nice, but white Americans killed Sitting Bull in a later confrontation, and you can’t just ignore this. Telling a story of resistance requires context, and if you’re asking children to rise up and resist tyranny in their day, you should be honest about the fact that a lot of these people died while doing so. (Note: This was the one thing I had to research after reading the book. I wasn’t 100% sure that he died because of the US government, but all it took was a Google search to learn that he died in an encounter with police.) Exhibit C: Harvey Milk The chapter on this gay-rights advocate and politician fails to mention that he designed the Gay Pride flag. That seemed odd, but then the chapter ended like this: “Harvey had a lot of fun that first year in office. He became known as an effective lawmaker who also loved to pull pranks. Having fun and doing good, that was the Harvey Milk way.” AND THEN SOMEONE ASSASSINATED HIM. Facts matter, folks. You can’t just cut off your chapter at a high point! You have to be honest about what life was actually like for Harvey Milk, and how his advocacy for himself and people like him ultimately cost him his life. This book is an absolute joke. “He had a lot of fun! He liked to play pranks! Pay no attention to the fact-checker behind the curtain!” I just hope no kid ever uses this book as a source for a school assignment, because it's so selective in which facts it thinks young readers should know. Does this woman just have something against death? Does she think that middle grade readers are old enough to start resisting injustice, but too young to grapple with the potential costs? Exhibit D: Martin Luther Now we get to MY FAVORITE! Complete misrepresentation of key facts! Up to this point, I’ve only written about omissions, but in the chapter about Martin Luther, the author sums up his split with the Catholic Church like this: “He dreamed of a simpler way – a church where people could pray in their own language, where men and women could take their prayers directly to their god. He believed forgiveness should be not bought, but earned.” That last sentence is a LIE. Luther believed in grace. He knew that people could never earn forgiveness, because after years of long, painful struggle, trying to attain holiness and atone for his sins through religious obligations, he learned that he didn’t have to go through church ritual or his own good works to meet God. Instead, Jesus serves as the mediator between God and man. Jesus lived the perfect life that we could not, and in his death on the cross, he bore the punishment for human sin. When someone accepts Jesus's sacrifice in faith, believing that it is enough to make them right with God, Jesus’s righteousness is credited to their account. They are forgiven, and they have God's approval without having to earn it. As Luther famously claimed, salvation is through Christ alone, through grace alone, through faith alone, for the glory of God alone. This is the gospel that Luther believed and spent the rest of his life propagating. As soon as he understood that salvation came through grace, not works, he experienced tremendous relief, no longer spending his life plagued with doubt and fear. The reason he split with the Catholic Church, and the reason that he had the courage to do so, was because he knew they were peddling a false gospel. He couldn’t stand for that. He wasn’t just concerned about religious freedom in the abstract, or greater equity for common people, although these were important. He believed that the Catholic Church had abandoned the fundamentals of true faith. I don’t expect a short biographical sketch to delve into all those details and implications, but the least it can do is avoid OUTRIGHT FALSEHOOD. It’s understandable that someone would think, “Well, if he didn’t think people should buy forgiveness, he must have thought they should earn it,” but a quick glance at the Wikipedia entry about Martin Luther would show otherwise. Even though it appears that this woman's research didn't even reach Wikipedia-levels of accuracy, she does list recommended resources in the back pages of this book. These include a documentary and graphic novel about Martin Luther, but she must not have paid close attention to either, because how could she miss this key detail? I know nothing about her religious beliefs, but even if Protestant Christianity seems irrelevant to her, she still has a responsibility to present facts accurately, and Martin Luther did NOT think that anyone should earn forgiveness. He knew that no one could. This book is such a disappointment. It has a great concept, beautiful pictures, inspiring quotes, and some great stories, but because I had the historical knowledge to tear apart some of its chapters, I felt no confidence in the rest. Whenever I read a chapter about someone I wasn’t familiar with, I had to keep telling myself, “You don’t know how accurate this is. You don’t know what she’s leaving out, or what she’s misrepresenting.” That’s not a very inspiring experience. Although some chapters in this book are just fine the way they are, this book as a whole does not pass the fact check muster. I wish that I had an alternate title to recommend, but unfortunately, I don’t know of another book that accomplishes the same goal with the same scope and diversity. I hope that other people will write similar projects in the future, because this book is not enough. Kids may read it and feel inspired, and I hope they go on to do great things, but this book is too weighed down with egregious omissions and even outright lies to fill the gap it seeks to address in juvenile literature.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    This is a terrific introduction to themes of social justice for YA readers (or middle-grade listeners), spanning centuries of resistance ranging from Joan of Arc and Martin Luther to the women's marchers and students of Parkland, Fla. Each biography is no more than two or three pages, which is both the book's strength and weakness. On the one hand, this allows children – and adults! – to easily grasp the life and importance of figures they might not learn about in school such as Ida B. Wells or O This is a terrific introduction to themes of social justice for YA readers (or middle-grade listeners), spanning centuries of resistance ranging from Joan of Arc and Martin Luther to the women's marchers and students of Parkland, Fla. Each biography is no more than two or three pages, which is both the book's strength and weakness. On the one hand, this allows children – and adults! – to easily grasp the life and importance of figures they might not learn about in school such as Ida B. Wells or Oscar Romero. On the other hand, for those of us who know the fuller story, it's easy to see where certain aspects are brushed over or ignored. (In what must have been an intentional decision with which I disagree, the martyrdom of several of these subjects – e.g., Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Harvey Milk and Romero – are not mentioned.) There's also a bit of a recency bias at play; surely, more than four people could be found from before the mid-19th century, and I'm not sure we needed six people or groups from the 21st. But any project like this is going to be subject to that sort of criticism, which is part of the fun and I'd argue a sign for hope and further inspiration (and, who knows, maybe an opportunity for a sequel?). The bios themselves are well written for young readers and relentlessly encourage them to find a way of resisting that works for them – whether that's writing, protesting, entering politics or organizing – and to persist despite the inevitable opposition that will face them. As a Christian, I also appreciated that although approaching justice from a secular perspective, it resists painting religion as necessarily opposing justice, including Christians like Bonhoeffer, Romero and William Barber who resisted (or continue to resist) right-wing oppression and violence. Fair warning: If you're opposed to movements for social justice, you will not enjoy this book. And, frankly, if you are, you probably need to spend some time figuring out why you oppose equal treatment for all people anyway. But if you want to introduce your children – or yourself – to a host of characters, some familiar some not, who resisted the forces of oppression in their time and serve as inspiration in our own time, this is a great resource.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

    I received a digital review copy through Edelweiss+ in exchange for an honest review. This brief, collected biography includes not only common, household names from history, but lesser-known people as well (a few I had not heard of before). While it's always nice to read about the usual important people, it is refreshing to read about other courageous people I probably never would have otherwise. Overall, a decent collection of biographies of tenacious people. Something important I feel is missin I received a digital review copy through Edelweiss+ in exchange for an honest review. This brief, collected biography includes not only common, household names from history, but lesser-known people as well (a few I had not heard of before). While it's always nice to read about the usual important people, it is refreshing to read about other courageous people I probably never would have otherwise. Overall, a decent collection of biographies of tenacious people. Something important I feel is missing are the dates/years the subjects lived, and their locations. This information would have been nice to have at the beginning of the subject's section along with their name. The hashtag #Resist and one date is included with each subject's name, though, which does add a bit of reference. The phrase #ResistLesson at the end of each section was also a little much, partially because hashtags are over-used and partially due to the very overt attempt at edification.

  4. 4 out of 5

    LeeAnne

    This is a wonderful introduction to many historical figures and their contributions to society. The author chose a diverse group of people to highlight, with beautiful portraits of them before each chapter. At the end of each chapter, I wanted just a little bit more information about the heroes, and I’m happy that the author provided additional information at the end of the book - books, movies, and podcasts are included. I realize this is a book for middle grade/young adult, but I think there c This is a wonderful introduction to many historical figures and their contributions to society. The author chose a diverse group of people to highlight, with beautiful portraits of them before each chapter. At the end of each chapter, I wanted just a little bit more information about the heroes, and I’m happy that the author provided additional information at the end of the book - books, movies, and podcasts are included. I realize this is a book for middle grade/young adult, but I think there could have been a bit more information in each of the chapters. My favorite stories were about Chiune Sugihara, a Japanes ambassador to Lithuania during WWII who granted thousands of visas to Jewish people, saving thousands of lives, and Hedy Lamarr, a beautiful Hollywood actress who invented a device during WWII that jammed radio signals by frequency hopping. She gave this invention to the Navy and it soon became standard in military communications. She said, “Any girl can be glamorous. All you have to do is stand still and look stupid.” I loved the format of the book - moving in chronological order, a quote from each hero, and their “Resist” lesson at the end. It is an inspiring book that will make you shake your head in not understanding some actions by oppressors and cheering for those that refuse to be oppressed. I could see this being used in Lit Circles and broken up into pieces for different groups to concentrate on. This would make a good addition to the Texas Lone Star List.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Trinity Fier

    “The books we read can change our lives—and the world” This book is probably one of my favorites. Just reading about all of these “normal” people that grew up to be a part of something is so inspiring. This book will show you that despite your age, gender, religion, and nationality, you can do anything. I am just a child and i’m often put down because of my age. This book has helped me to realize that if I am determined, and if I put my mind to something, I can do it. I Highly recommend this boo “The books we read can change our lives—and the world” This book is probably one of my favorites. Just reading about all of these “normal” people that grew up to be a part of something is so inspiring. This book will show you that despite your age, gender, religion, and nationality, you can do anything. I am just a child and i’m often put down because of my age. This book has helped me to realize that if I am determined, and if I put my mind to something, I can do it. I Highly recommend this book ❤️

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lartemis

    In addition to the Covid 19 pandemic, my country is now rocked by the horrendous killing of George Floyd, the most recent death of too many deaths of young black people killed by racists, both police and civilian. In support of the protests, several news sites have published lists of books that parents, teachers, and grandmothers like me, can use with children to help them understand. This book, Resist, was on one of those lists. The author has picked 35 people, predominately but not exclusively In addition to the Covid 19 pandemic, my country is now rocked by the horrendous killing of George Floyd, the most recent death of too many deaths of young black people killed by racists, both police and civilian. In support of the protests, several news sites have published lists of books that parents, teachers, and grandmothers like me, can use with children to help them understand. This book, Resist, was on one of those lists. The author has picked 35 people, predominately but not exclusively American, who over the last 600 years have stood up to tyranny and injustice. The people range from Joan of Arc to Malala, from Galileo to Gandhi. Designed primarily for 4th-8th graders, the author uses #Resist as a catch-phrase. At the end of each profile she writes: #Resist Lesson: followed by what the student can learn from that person. Some of my favorites are: It is just one word, but these 6 letters are enough to start a revolution: Enough!; We must speak for the voiceless; Sometimes you have to break the rules to do what's right; and You are not too young (and I might add: You are not too old). If I were still teaching, especially upper elementary and middle school kids, I could see using one essay a week as a starting off place for a classroom discussion. I would not use all the essays, but some are excellent. It might be prudent to clear it with the principal first as some of the essays deal with subject which might make some parents uncomfortable: gay rights and gender reassignment to name two. I see that these essays about people, some very famous, and some less so, could be a starting place for discussions of bullying, racism, sexism, homophobia, and other issues that are people of all ages are facing. I listened to the audiobook on my Hoopla account. I'm glad I spent the day with this book. Do read some of the other reviews, especially Panda Incognito, who speaks out against the book. That reviewer makes valid points that I also agree with. My review reflects my feelings today and at this time.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I love this book! It has a variety of diverse biographies about people who have resisted injustice throughout history. I like how it included people I had not heard of before and included more recent people. A perfect book for the classroom :)

  8. 4 out of 5

    aarifa

    It's always great to learn about these amazing and inspiring people again and again!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    This book is a nice overview of people throughout history and from several different cultures who fought against various forms of oppression. Several of these stories have rather sad, even tragic endings that the author tends to gloss over or skip altogether in pursuit of the greater thesis on the power of resistance. This book is definitely middle reader, and not YA. This is a 5th-6th grade level book. As such, it is a great introduction to its concept, and does a good job of being inclusive of This book is a nice overview of people throughout history and from several different cultures who fought against various forms of oppression. Several of these stories have rather sad, even tragic endings that the author tends to gloss over or skip altogether in pursuit of the greater thesis on the power of resistance. This book is definitely middle reader, and not YA. This is a 5th-6th grade level book. As such, it is a great introduction to its concept, and does a good job of being inclusive of different races, genders, and causes. There is probably not a lot for older readers, except perhaps to introduce them to a few less famous, but still important and interesting figures from recent history.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Gorial

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 4 Stars About the book: This book contains 35 mini-biographies profiles of ordinary people who have fought against a lot of wrong things in this world, and succeed in making it a better society and world in which we live in today. Including Martin Luther, Joan of Arc, Susan B. Anthony, Frederick Douglass, Malala Yousafzai, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Mohandas Gandhi, and so many more incredibly brave and courageous people who shared a common factor; Resisting against injustice! Each biography ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 4 Stars About the book: This book contains 35 mini-biographies profiles of ordinary people who have fought against a lot of wrong things in this world, and succeed in making it a better society and world in which we live in today. Including Martin Luther, Joan of Arc, Susan B. Anthony, Frederick Douglass, Malala Yousafzai, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Mohandas Gandhi, and so many more incredibly brave and courageous people who shared a common factor; Resisting against injustice! Each biography in this book starts with a black and white picture of the activists and their famous saying in bold, along with their biography which is between 3 to 4 pages at most, and it gives a little insight about the activities beginning in their journey, how the fought against their obstacles and how they succeeded in that process. And finally, it ends the individuals' biography with a '#Resis lesson' to conclude and some chapters/biographies will ask questions to the readers that you can apply to your journey in life. Things I didn't like: 👎🏻 Each biography is too short, not too much detail. Just enough to know the starting and accomplished/succeeded points of their journey of becoming an activist. Things I liked: 👍🏻 I like that this book is consistent with its THEMES, and such as courage, bravery, strength, in each biography, (obviously, since these people are activist and have made a difference) but its also encouraging and inspiring to be reminded and reinforced. 👍🏻 Something that was in the back of my mind whilst reading this book was the importance of believing that you have the power to change within yourself, and the power to change the world around you. It doesn’t have to be as global or macro as some other people, it just has to be according to your level of change and power you believe needs to happen. Whether that's stand up and steak out to a bully, stand up and speaking out about mental health, social concerns, the environment, whatever you feel on fire about, that's your impact and your imprint in this world. To make a change and to inspires and motivate others. 👍🏻 Easy read! In conclusion: YES! Grab yourself a copy. If your interesting in learning and reading about extraordinary people who have stepped out of their comfort zone completely stood up and spoke up against everyone and everything that claimed to be 'impossible', and still continued to make an impact of the difference in the world which you live today, I highly suggest you pick up a copy of this book. Some great quotes: 📚“We all have the power to speak up and speak out.” (P.41) 📚“The world may look at you and say, “You can’t.” You must know in your heart that you can.” (P.189)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    I have never wanted to get a book removed from a library before, but because this book is supposed to be historical and is also geared for middle grades, and was also featured at my local branch, I’m actually concerned that it’s misinformation. How can you even talk about Black Lives Matter without mentioning police violence or white supremacy? And also erase Trayvon’s murder? And then have a whole paragraph about All Lives Matter and “reverse racism.” How do you feature Janet Mock but not explai I have never wanted to get a book removed from a library before, but because this book is supposed to be historical and is also geared for middle grades, and was also featured at my local branch, I’m actually concerned that it’s misinformation. How can you even talk about Black Lives Matter without mentioning police violence or white supremacy? And also erase Trayvon’s murder? And then have a whole paragraph about All Lives Matter and “reverse racism.” How do you feature Janet Mock but not explain what being transgender means or that transphobia exists? These biographies are so sanitized that they are without context & often just … inaccurate. There’s features of people who helped Jews escape, but no mention of the Holocaust. Or Hitler. And no one’s assassination is ever included. That feels disrespectful to people who risked death to resist oppression. Also erases queerness, only features one disabled person, and as a supercrip, with an actual “so people don’t see her disability but her abilities” line. This book is so weird. I don’t get it. And it’s offensive that it’s called Resist.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lollie George

    I really enjoyed this book. Many students, however, will be turned off at the idea of reading about 35 different people who aren't pop stars. I love the main theme of "resistance" and the way Veronica Chambers ties together people whose lives span almost 600 years, and dozens of countries of the world. The 35 lives are presented in chronological order. Each biographical sketch is 2-3 pages in length. Beautiful charcoal-like portraits begin each persons chapter, but Paul Ryding the illustrator is I really enjoyed this book. Many students, however, will be turned off at the idea of reading about 35 different people who aren't pop stars. I love the main theme of "resistance" and the way Veronica Chambers ties together people whose lives span almost 600 years, and dozens of countries of the world. The 35 lives are presented in chronological order. Each biographical sketch is 2-3 pages in length. Beautiful charcoal-like portraits begin each persons chapter, but Paul Ryding the illustrator isn't given visible credit. The design and font graphics will speak to my middle school students because it is easy to decipher the main point Chambers is making with each person's entry. I found it very helpful in reminding me of important people I have learned about, but forgotten and it introduced me to important people that were previously unknown to me. I think a fun project for a group of kids would be to find a web site on each of these people and create a QR code to put on a sticky note and include in each chapter of the book. Chambers includes many resources for more information on each person in the back.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dan Allbery

    One voice can shake the earth. The books we read can change our lives--and the world. You are not too young. Resist is such a fitting text for the time we are living in. There are so many things I appreciate about this book. It is an opportunity to help young minds get their feet wet. A dip into what is resistance and why it is invaluable, both historically and today. These short profile pieces are great entry points for young people to get a snapshot of "good trouble[makers]" that could possibly b One voice can shake the earth. The books we read can change our lives--and the world. You are not too young. Resist is such a fitting text for the time we are living in. There are so many things I appreciate about this book. It is an opportunity to help young minds get their feet wet. A dip into what is resistance and why it is invaluable, both historically and today. These short profile pieces are great entry points for young people to get a snapshot of "good trouble[makers]" that could possibly build interest and launch further research and reading. From a teachers perspective, these are great mentor texts and could easily be used for jigsaw activities and writing launches. I particularly liked the profiles of Sitting Bull, Ida B. Wells, Emiliano Zapata, the Dalai Lama, Fannie Lou Hamer, and the Million Women of the Women's March. A great text to have in young readers' hands. Recommended GR 5-7.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Cochran

    What I appreciate most about this collection is its balance. It features the profiles of well-known historical figures such as Susan B. Anthony, Mohandas Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr., but also lesser-known figures such as Lozen the Apache Warrior, Chiune Sugihara, and Wangari Maathai. Resisters are fighting against discrimination based on gender, race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, as well as fighting for the right to be educated, the right to vote, or the right to fair representatio What I appreciate most about this collection is its balance. It features the profiles of well-known historical figures such as Susan B. Anthony, Mohandas Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr., but also lesser-known figures such as Lozen the Apache Warrior, Chiune Sugihara, and Wangari Maathai. Resisters are fighting against discrimination based on gender, race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, as well as fighting for the right to be educated, the right to vote, or the right to fair representation. It also includes six profiles of individuals, or groups, whose resistance made a great impact on society over the past decade. This book serves as a great primer for young people beginning to explore social activism and is probably best-suited for middle grade readers.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Resist by Veronica Chambers offers 35 short summaries of ways that ordinary people stood up to injustice. Chambers organizes her book chronologically and usually spends 2-4 pages per resister. Although reading short biographical pieces on different people isn't in my reading wheelhouse, I really appreciated all of the parallels that Chambers was able to highlight in resistors from Samuel Adams to Sitting Bull to Ghandi to Chavez to Garza, Cullors, and Tometi. She highlighted the idea that anyone, Resist by Veronica Chambers offers 35 short summaries of ways that ordinary people stood up to injustice. Chambers organizes her book chronologically and usually spends 2-4 pages per resister. Although reading short biographical pieces on different people isn't in my reading wheelhouse, I really appreciated all of the parallels that Chambers was able to highlight in resistors from Samuel Adams to Sitting Bull to Ghandi to Chavez to Garza, Cullors, and Tometi. She highlighted the idea that anyone, no matter their age, gender, social class, or background, can cause change. I think this book has a great place in a classroom library, and I could see it being used as a reference, especially at the beginning of a unit of study on groundbreakers or change-makers.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Angela King

    Grades 3-6 Biography This book includes powerful short biographies of some of the most inspiring people this Earth has known... from Joan of Arc, to Fredrick Douglas, to Lozan the Apache Warrior. Each of the bio's are paired with a quote, a moral, and a # if students want to connect with others that were inspired by the same person over the internet. This book could be a great jumping off place for students to become inspired by, research, and learn more about these brave men and women. Following s Grades 3-6 Biography This book includes powerful short biographies of some of the most inspiring people this Earth has known... from Joan of Arc, to Fredrick Douglas, to Lozan the Apache Warrior. Each of the bio's are paired with a quote, a moral, and a # if students want to connect with others that were inspired by the same person over the internet. This book could be a great jumping off place for students to become inspired by, research, and learn more about these brave men and women. Following student's individual explorations, they can create a final project to share with the class. During sharing time, student's should have an opportunity to discuss why they were inspired by the particular person.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    I wish I could recommend this, but it is difficult to do that when there are no citations for the information presented. In addition, it is a very rose-colored glasses book. With Joan of Arc, readers find out that she was burned at the stake, but multiple other people were assassinated and that is never mentioned. I know that would take a bit of the shine off for those thinking about resisting, but it just really seemed that should be part of the stories. There are some amazing people highlighte I wish I could recommend this, but it is difficult to do that when there are no citations for the information presented. In addition, it is a very rose-colored glasses book. With Joan of Arc, readers find out that she was burned at the stake, but multiple other people were assassinated and that is never mentioned. I know that would take a bit of the shine off for those thinking about resisting, but it just really seemed that should be part of the stories. There are some amazing people highlighted and some of them seldom get to be seen on the pages of a book, but readers walk away with very incomplete information even beyond the deaths. There were other omissions too. It was a rose-colored glasses type of view.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mary Thomas

    I logged in, anticipating giving a 5 star review because of how much I enjoyed this book, and then I read a review about some of the misrepresentations and falsehoods in the book. Eek. Well, I'm still giving it five stars because I liked the varied selection of people well-known and obscure, from all walks of life. I'd like to have my sons listen to some if not all of these to give them a quick snapshot into heroic people's lives. We could also pick some to research or read about more in depth. I logged in, anticipating giving a 5 star review because of how much I enjoyed this book, and then I read a review about some of the misrepresentations and falsehoods in the book. Eek. Well, I'm still giving it five stars because I liked the varied selection of people well-known and obscure, from all walks of life. I'd like to have my sons listen to some if not all of these to give them a quick snapshot into heroic people's lives. We could also pick some to research or read about more in depth. I will say that the two main ones that deal with LGBTQ issues are Harvey Milk and Janet Mock. The one on the women's march also touches briefly on it. So, 5 stars not because the book is perfect but because I enjoyed it and learned from it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ju

    While I did enjoy this book as an introduction to these people and I did find it inspiring, I wasn't a fan of how some of the profiles were written. A few had a "happy ever after" feel to them, and some just didn't seem to make a lot of sense as to why that person was resisting...like, they were just written so vaguely and it made me wonder why the author even chose those people if she wasn't going to add a bit more about why they resisted. I do plan on reading more about the people featured in While I did enjoy this book as an introduction to these people and I did find it inspiring, I wasn't a fan of how some of the profiles were written. A few had a "happy ever after" feel to them, and some just didn't seem to make a lot of sense as to why that person was resisting...like, they were just written so vaguely and it made me wonder why the author even chose those people if she wasn't going to add a bit more about why they resisted. I do plan on reading more about the people featured in this book by reading other books about them (either a memoir, autobiography, or biography)

  20. 5 out of 5

    Natasha

    This is good for an introduction, but it does feel lacking. I kept waiting for Marsha P Johnson to be mentioned, and for IdleNoMore. The mention of the the Million Women March and history of women marches... but no mention of #MMIW... I know the history of resisting is large and you can't include everything or everyone but... to open with Joan of Arc and exclude the more timely and relevent... It feels off. Would still recommend for students, but with the added recommendation to look into these This is good for an introduction, but it does feel lacking. I kept waiting for Marsha P Johnson to be mentioned, and for IdleNoMore. The mention of the the Million Women March and history of women marches... but no mention of #MMIW... I know the history of resisting is large and you can't include everything or everyone but... to open with Joan of Arc and exclude the more timely and relevent... It feels off. Would still recommend for students, but with the added recommendation to look into these people and movements more. Because it def doesn't end with this book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline

    Inspiring book with a good choice of subjects. The forward by Cory Booker was excellent. Each profile provided just enough information to make the reader want to learn more. I really enjoyed the quotes at the end of each section, particularly Fannie Lou Hamer's p. 132 "Our vote is one of the most valuable things we own." I was a little surprised that the entries for Harvey Milk, Gandhi, Martin Luther King, and Malcolm X did not mention their deaths by assassination.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I listened to this as an audiobook with my kids in the car. I loved the 35 stories of courageous humans from all over the world. It’s kid friendly, really, it’s written for late elementary schoolers. Of the characters I knew, I really appreciated the message. I have read that some folks would have appreciated more details on certain characters. Either way, I think it’s a great introduction to the Resistors for kids!! As always, I learned something new as an adult reading with my kid!!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Anne Schmitt

    Must read for middle school students to have role models to make a difference! What a diverse group of activists. It highlights people students may not know in an engaging way. For each chapter, it gives an appropriate amount of background knowledge on the person and the injustice they fought. Every chapter ends with a resist lesson that readers can take and apply to their lives.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    This book has inaccurate information and is wrought with bias. Because of this, I highly caution purchasing it. Some of the biographical summaries are misleading or the facts are wrong. One chapter includes historic information on nine Washington DC marches prior to the 2017 Women’s March but failed to mention the March for Life, which has occurred every year since 1974; Martin Luther did not believe forgiveness should be earned; Archbishop Oscar Romero did not preach or embrace liberation theol This book has inaccurate information and is wrought with bias. Because of this, I highly caution purchasing it. Some of the biographical summaries are misleading or the facts are wrong. One chapter includes historic information on nine Washington DC marches prior to the 2017 Women’s March but failed to mention the March for Life, which has occurred every year since 1974; Martin Luther did not believe forgiveness should be earned; Archbishop Oscar Romero did not preach or embrace liberation theology. Once I knew these chapters were misleading or gave erroneous information, I began to question the accuracy of the information in the other chapters and read them with skepticism. I finished reading the entire book and I appreciated the diverse people who are highlighted and the number of centuries these individuals represent. I am concerned, however, with the politically left agenda which permeates the book. I found it interesting that School Library Journal’s reviewer Clara Hendricks came up with a similar conclusion, “While the informal tone and inspiring message may appeal to readers, they would be better served elsewhere with more complete and accurate portrayals of the lives of these important individuals.” (Hendricks) Our young people deserve non-fiction books that provide them with reliable facts that will challenge them to discern the political issues without a blatantly left or right political bias. Hendricks, Clara. “Resist: 35 Profiles of Ordinary People Who Rose Up Against Tyranny and Injustice.” School Library Journal, School Library Journal, 1 Aug. 2018, www.slj.com/?reviewDetail=resist-35-p....

  25. 5 out of 5

    Aidan

    I thought that this book was really good. I really liked learning about many important people, and what they did. I liked how there were so many people and how each story was short. This was a great book that taught a lot of lessons.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany MacSlarrow

    I really wanted to love this book. I enjoyed the short story format & the ”lesson learned” at the end of each. And while I did learn plenty, my girls weren't into it. it was not my favorite ”read aloud ” choice. Perhaps when they're older? I really wanted to love this book. I enjoyed the short story format & the ”lesson learned” at the end of each. And while I did learn plenty, my girls weren't into it. it was not my favorite ”read aloud ” choice. Perhaps when they're older?

  27. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Very inspiring stories. I hope teen/tweens find their way to this book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Stephens

    Inspirational!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Monique

    35 profiles of extraordinary leaders and how they led the charge of the resistance.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alana "Loni"

    I like the people profiled, and the different forms of resistance, but it seems weird that so many of these people literally were killed for their beliefs and these deaths aren't mentioned?

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