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Following the massive success of THE ART OF HAPPINESS, the Dalai Lama & Howard Cutler now bring their bestselling message to our working lives. Of the many Dalai Lama titles on sale, THE ART OF HAPPINESS - written with western psychiatrist Howard Cutler - is by far the biggest bestseller of them all. A huge international success, it has sold over 2 million copies worldwide Following the massive success of THE ART OF HAPPINESS, the Dalai Lama & Howard Cutler now bring their bestselling message to our working lives. Of the many Dalai Lama titles on sale, THE ART OF HAPPINESS - written with western psychiatrist Howard Cutler - is by far the biggest bestseller of them all. A huge international success, it has sold over 2 million copies worldwide, with nearly 300,000 of these in the UK alone. Now, this inspirational new book brings the successful East-meets-West pairing together again to provide a practical application of Tibetan Buddhist spiritual values to the world of work. In this wise and practical book, the Dalai Lama shows us how to place our working lives into the context of our lives as a whole. Rather than striving to find a role which suits us, we should allow our work to arise naturally from who we are - and what is most important to us. From here we reach a pathway that can lead us to true life fulfilment and purpose.


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Following the massive success of THE ART OF HAPPINESS, the Dalai Lama & Howard Cutler now bring their bestselling message to our working lives. Of the many Dalai Lama titles on sale, THE ART OF HAPPINESS - written with western psychiatrist Howard Cutler - is by far the biggest bestseller of them all. A huge international success, it has sold over 2 million copies worldwide Following the massive success of THE ART OF HAPPINESS, the Dalai Lama & Howard Cutler now bring their bestselling message to our working lives. Of the many Dalai Lama titles on sale, THE ART OF HAPPINESS - written with western psychiatrist Howard Cutler - is by far the biggest bestseller of them all. A huge international success, it has sold over 2 million copies worldwide, with nearly 300,000 of these in the UK alone. Now, this inspirational new book brings the successful East-meets-West pairing together again to provide a practical application of Tibetan Buddhist spiritual values to the world of work. In this wise and practical book, the Dalai Lama shows us how to place our working lives into the context of our lives as a whole. Rather than striving to find a role which suits us, we should allow our work to arise naturally from who we are - and what is most important to us. From here we reach a pathway that can lead us to true life fulfilment and purpose.

30 review for The Art of Happiness at Work

  1. 5 out of 5

    Laura Lynch

    This book was inspiring, so much so that I read it twice. The comments of the Dalai Lama on happiness at work are relevant and based on common sense and spirituality. One idea is that you have freedom to choose how you approach your career and your co-workers, although other aspects may be beyond your control.. Attitude and balance are also key along with finding your purpose at work. It can be as simple as smiling at people and offering encouragement. Lastly, look at problems both job and life This book was inspiring, so much so that I read it twice. The comments of the Dalai Lama on happiness at work are relevant and based on common sense and spirituality. One idea is that you have freedom to choose how you approach your career and your co-workers, although other aspects may be beyond your control.. Attitude and balance are also key along with finding your purpose at work. It can be as simple as smiling at people and offering encouragement. Lastly, look at problems both job and life related as opportunities to be pro-active in a positive way.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    This helped me to deal with a situation at work of being bullied by a co-worker. I also shared some of the principals with middle and high school students I work with, specifically the concept of working for the money vs. career aspirations/fame vs. a calling; that one must follow a calling to be truly happy and can combined with the other factors but not excluded.

  3. 5 out of 5

    robin friedman

    The Dalai Lama And The Workplace In 1998, the Dalai Lama joined Dr. Howard C. Cutler, an American psychiatrist, in writing a book "The Art of Happiness" which became a best-seller. This book taught the importance of "looking within" and of controlling destructive emotions in living a good life and finding happiness. Dr. Cutler and the Dalai Lama have again collaborated in this follow-up book which applies the insights of the initial volume to life situations which are, typically, the sources of gr The Dalai Lama And The Workplace In 1998, the Dalai Lama joined Dr. Howard C. Cutler, an American psychiatrist, in writing a book "The Art of Happiness" which became a best-seller. This book taught the importance of "looking within" and of controlling destructive emotions in living a good life and finding happiness. Dr. Cutler and the Dalai Lama have again collaborated in this follow-up book which applies the insights of the initial volume to life situations which are, typically, the sources of great conflict. Several additional books, in addition to this book exploring the world of work, are underway. The book is based upon a series of conversations held between the Dalai Lama and Dr. Cutler over the course of several years. Dr. Cutler is responsible for the format and editing of the book. The final product was read and approved by the Dalai Lama's interpreter. Early in the volume, the Dalai Lama reminds Dr. Cutler that the focus of the inquiry is "secular ethics" (p.7) One of the most valuable features of the book is that it shows how the Dalai Lama can use his spiritual tradition to articulate values that can be shared by many people, whether or not they are religious believers. Another feature of the book is the significance of the subject matter. Many people trust and listen to the Dalai Lama where they will be reluctant to accept possibly similar advice from experts, such as psychiatrists, or from teachers in Western religious traditions. The book is deceptively simple in tone and teaching, but hard to realize. In a series of discussions Dr. Cutler explores with the Dalai Lama the reasons why many people tend to be bored or dissatisfied with their jobs. Dr. Cutler brings to bear many anecdotes from his work as a psychiatrist as well has his familiarity with much contemporary literature on job satisfaction. The Dalai Lama brings to bear his wisdom and insight. Time and again during the conversations, the Dalai Lama takes issue with Dr. Cutler, forcing him to redirect and rephrase his questions and assumptions, and to change the tenor of his approach to questions of happiness in the workplace. The Dalai Lama's approach is circumspect. He reiterates that the situation of every individual differs and that questions about work admit of no easy solution. In other words,it is not a case of "one size fits all." With that said the issues and insights in the book are valuable. Chief among these for me are the Dalai Lama's comments on self-understanding. Much difficulty at work is caused by having an overly inflated or an overly deflated view of ourselves and our abilities. This causes discontent because it gives a picture of our abilities and our expectations of ourselves that are out of touch with reality. Similarly, the Dalai's teachings in this book about patience, humility, self-control, and compassion for one's co-workers provide a great deal to think about in approaching the workplace. The Dalai Lama, in common with others who have thought about these matters, distinguishes between views of work as a "job", simply to support oneself, a "career", with the goal of advancement and growth, and a "calling" in which a person does what he or she finds important to be of service to others. People necessarily occupy different spaces on this continuum. For some people, the goal properly should be to learn the value of one's work and to move towards viewing it as a calling. The book also teaches that work and money-making are not the sole source of happiness and urges the reader to develop other interests, particularly a sense of connection to others through family or through interests and activities outside the workplace. Many of the criticisms of this book and its predecessor that I have seen turn on the respective roles of the Dalai Lama and Dr. Cutler. Dr. Cutler serves, I think, as a foil to the Dalai Lama. In the book, the voices of the two principal are distinct, allowing the reader to capture a good deal of the spirit of the Dalai Lama. There is also a tendency to criticize the book for its simplicity. I agree the teachings of the book are simple, but in practice they are difficult of realization. A virtue of the book is its very accessibility which makes it possible for the reader to try to use it for benefit in his or her own case. Finally, it should be pointed out again that this book does not purport to be an introduction to Buddhism. It is a work of secular (or applied) ethics. There are ample books available, including many works of the Dalai Lama, for those who would like a specifically Buddhist study. One can learn from this book regardless of commitment or lack of commitment to any religion. I thought this book helped me with questions that have bothered me for years. I also found that the book would probably be useful to many of my coworkers and, perhaps, useful as well, to management where I work. This book will not solve any person's workplace issues, but it will encourage the reader to reconsider and to sharpen his or her focus to address these issues. Robin Friedman

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ali Hannah

    The Dali Lama offers timeless wisdom in this book. Great read on the train to the office each day.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    Quotes to remember: “He reminds us that if we can change some of the external conditions at the workplace that contribute to our dissatisfaction, we certainly should. If not, although it is not always easy or quick, it is still possible to be happy at work through reshaping our attitudes and outlook, through inner training.” Look at a tense situation as a way to improve yourself. Stay calm and react with dignity. “Our attitudes about money are more important than the amount we make. As always, in Quotes to remember: “He reminds us that if we can change some of the external conditions at the workplace that contribute to our dissatisfaction, we certainly should. If not, although it is not always easy or quick, it is still possible to be happy at work through reshaping our attitudes and outlook, through inner training.” Look at a tense situation as a way to improve yourself. Stay calm and react with dignity. “Our attitudes about money are more important than the amount we make. As always, in our pursuit of happiness, our inner resources assume a greater role than our material resources, unless of course we exist in abject poverty and are suffering from hunger or starvation.” – Choose the career you love, not where you will make the most money. “One should not just concentrate on job or money. That’s important.” “The principle of adaptation suggests that no matter what kind of success or good fortune we experience, or, alternatively, no matter what adversity or tragedy we encounter, sooner or later we tend to adapt to the new conditions and eventually migrate back to our customary levels of day-to-day and moment-to-moment happiness.” This is to not lose initiative. Need a balanced life. Help others. Job vs. Career vs. Calling. “whether we are obstructed from achieving our goals by overestimating or underestimating our abilities and skills, there is little doubt that the greater our self-understanding and self-awareness, the more our self-concept corresponds with reality, the happier we will be at work or at home.” “So if you’re looking for work and have a choice of a job, choose a job that allows the opportunity for some creativity, and for spending time with your family. Even if it means less pay, personally I think it is better to choose work that is less demanding, that gives you greater freedom, more time to e with your family, or to do other activities, read, engage in cultural activities, or just play. I think that’s best.” “It would seem reasonable that basing one’s identity on the essence rather than the external form would decrease the likelihood that one would be devastated by the loss of any particular role or job – after all, the essence is portable and can be transferred to any activity, any given relationship, hobby, or job.” “If you can, serve others. If not, at least refrain from harming them.” Now, if we sell software and may have had an unproductive day in terms of not having had a single sales, we can still have a sense of accomplishment if we have had some positive interactions with our customers or co-workers, if we’ve made their day just a little bit better. Our day is now transformed into a productive day that we can take pride in. Being of some benefit to others, may provide us with many new sources of satisfaction that can sustain our sense of price and accomplishment even during the inevitable slow periods of our career. “Even a simple smile can have some impact on my overall state of mind. So, everything is interconnected, interdependent. When you appreciate the interconnected nature of all aspects of your life, then you will understand how various factors – such as your values, your attitudes, your emotional state – can all contribute to your sense of fulfillment at work, and to your satisfaction and happiness in life.” Meditate – focus on breathing for 5-10 minutes. Acquire the ability to cultivate a settled mental state that you can then successfully direct to any chosen topic. In this way, you will be able to overcome many of the problems that arise simply as a results of an unfocused, undisciplined mental state.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This seemed like the perfect book to pick up and read. I have deep respect for The Dalai Lama and I really needed some advice on how to be happier at work. I used to really love my job. It was exciting, for the most part, and every day usually held something new and challenging in store. Nowadays, it's not like that. There's a distinct vibe of us vs. them in most cases, IT vs. Accountants. Some of the financial folk chose to think that anyone can program so they'll just take care of what they wan This seemed like the perfect book to pick up and read. I have deep respect for The Dalai Lama and I really needed some advice on how to be happier at work. I used to really love my job. It was exciting, for the most part, and every day usually held something new and challenging in store. Nowadays, it's not like that. There's a distinct vibe of us vs. them in most cases, IT vs. Accountants. Some of the financial folk chose to think that anyone can program so they'll just take care of what they want and ignore us programmers. The work isn't nearly challenging enough either, although the people are. Cutler interviews The Dalai Lama about various aspects of work in regards to happiness. For example, they chat about making money, the human factor of work, whether your job is just a job, a career or a calling, how to overcome boredom, how to have a right livelihood, etc. I appreciated his insight on all of the above. Unfortunately, while I think it's all good advice, it will be difficult to put into practice. In one chapter, and throughout others, the importance of being self-aware is emphasized. I think a lot of people have that problem, to be able to look at themselves and their abilities undistorted and with a critical eye. All in all, the way to achieve happiness, at work or otherwise, is to begin inwards, by readjusting your attitude to all things and remembering that it's just work and that doing good and helping others is more important.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erin Cisewski

    This book leaned heavily toward the experiences of upper class western industrial workers. Many examples seemed to be from corporate ladder climbers. The brief mention of working class women (who work in a supermarket) critiqued their attitude toward the customer/author whom they were serving. It criticized one worker's attitude and demeanor and how it affected the author/customer negatively, without giving space for a larger social analysis of the situation. I want to read the book written by t This book leaned heavily toward the experiences of upper class western industrial workers. Many examples seemed to be from corporate ladder climbers. The brief mention of working class women (who work in a supermarket) critiqued their attitude toward the customer/author whom they were serving. It criticized one worker's attitude and demeanor and how it affected the author/customer negatively, without giving space for a larger social analysis of the situation. I want to read the book written by this working class woman who sits down with the Dalai Lama to discuss the art of happiness at work.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Destiny

    I really enjoyed reading the Dalai Lama's perspective. However, I feel that he just has no concept of what it is like to live and work in the Western world. He never has, of course, so it is hard for me to find what he says helpful in any practical sort of way.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lisa RV

    Somewhat repetitive and redundant

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tara Lynn

    I found the suggestions about Happiness at Work in this book to cover a broad range of jobs and people in a helpful and meaningful way.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ana Sorce

    This review is for the audio edition only. I couldn’t get past the fact that the Dalai Lama’s lines sounded like a parody. I am sure that he is cheerful and giggly in life and it comes from his enlightened state, but when the reader tries to imitate, it sounds silly and distracts from the message.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Elena

    I enjoyed listening to this on Audio, especially since it’s done in semi-interview manner and the addition of B. D. Wong’s accent helped to make it feel like I was directly listeni

  13. 4 out of 5

    Unnur

    No new wisdom but inspiring nonetheless. The text flows easily which makes it even more of a pleasant read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    After much success with his first book in collaboration with the Dalai Lama, The Art of Happiness, Howard Cutler decided to write another book. In this book Cutler wanted to explore some ideas and topics not touched upon in the first one. Namely, since work takes up an overwhelming amount of the day for most people, how can we find happiness at work? After all, most of us cannot sit around all day in a cave without venturing out into the real world. If we have no practical way to take our spirit After much success with his first book in collaboration with the Dalai Lama, The Art of Happiness, Howard Cutler decided to write another book. In this book Cutler wanted to explore some ideas and topics not touched upon in the first one. Namely, since work takes up an overwhelming amount of the day for most people, how can we find happiness at work? After all, most of us cannot sit around all day in a cave without venturing out into the real world. If we have no practical way to take our spiritual practice into the real world then what good is it? The first thing that becomes readily apparent to the reader is that the Dalai Lama feels that cultivating inner values contributes to the greatest possibility of being happy at work. Obviously if you have a bitter attitude about work it doesn't matter what type of career you have you are probably going to be dissatisfied. Also, cultivating inner values like compassion and kindness can help you get along with other co-workers and this contributes to happiness as well. Later in the book other topics are brought up which are rendered as conversations that took place between Cutler and the Dalai Lama. After these conversations end Cutler usually provides his own commentary about them as the chapter ends. Some of the topics are; making money, work boredom, job career and calling, right livelihood. Many of the practical suggestions center around maintaining an optimistic outlook, calm mind, and a realistic perspective. For instance, having your self-identity tied up with the money you make is not a realistic perspective. You are not your money and what happens if you suddenly stop making money. You are all of a sudden a worthless person because you no longer have a high income? So a realistic perspective is crucial. The Dalai Lama encourages us to even take jobs that pay less money but that leave for more time to spend with family, friends, and doing things we enjoy. It's hard to be happy when you are a slave to work. Many of the other suggestions in the book I felt centered around common-sense objectives. For instance, have a self-understanding of your strengths and weaknesses so you won't be devastated if you are not great at certain aspects of your job. Also, try to do your job with a sense of meaningfulness and skill so you gain a feeling of satisfaction from doing a good job. Despite this book having a fair amount of good advice for all of us I did find myself becoming a bit bored with it. Some of the conversations seemed to ramble on and became somewhat monotonous. I think if some of the more redundant conversations were cleaned up a bit it would have been a better read. Nevertheless, it's still enjoyable for the most part as most books concerning the Dalai Lama with his practical advice and good attitude tend to be.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Carrie Kellenberger

    How do we stay happy at work? In our fast-paced world when work seeps into every aspect of our lives, we are seeing more and more people that are unhappy with work or that have little satisfaction in their jobs. If we aren't happy or satisfied with what we spend more than half our lives doing, what does this say about us as individuals? From learning to get along with the people we work with and going through periods of dissatisfaction and disappointment with work to dealing with what motivates How do we stay happy at work? In our fast-paced world when work seeps into every aspect of our lives, we are seeing more and more people that are unhappy with work or that have little satisfaction in their jobs. If we aren't happy or satisfied with what we spend more than half our lives doing, what does this say about us as individuals? From learning to get along with the people we work with and going through periods of dissatisfaction and disappointment with work to dealing with what motivates us at work (financial aspects, social status, or work as a calling), the Dalai Lama XIV challenges us to answer this question: Where does work fit into our overall quest for happiness? If the purpose of life is happiness and happiness is determined by our state of mind, rather than external events, then the key to happiness is in our hands. We are all capable of finding happiness with work once we know what is in our hearts and what brings us the most satisfaction. We have the freedom to choose how we look at our careers and how we deal with co-workers. Balance and attitude are instrumental in finding a purpose in our career, and how to balance our work life within the context of our entire life. Rather than looking for something that suits us, we should look for situations that come from who we are and what is most important to us as individuals. Best Takeaway Quotes: "We should take special care to pay attention to the human relationships at work, how we interact with one another, and try to maintain basic human values, even at work.... Be a good person, a kind person. Relate to others with warmth, human affection, with honesty and sincerity. Compassion." "The general view of productive activity has to do with somehow making an impact on one's environment, producing something, or accomplishing something in the world. It seems to be more outer directed, accomplishing things that can be measured or quantified." "Although it is not always easy, nor even always possible, we must to do our best to assure that our work brings some benefit to others. For the Dalai Lama, that is the surest way to force an unbreakable bond between our work and the deep and lasting happiness that we all seek."

  16. 4 out of 5

    Eve Kay

    There are several reasons for me to dislike this book so I'll do my best to keep it short. Firstly, I read it in the hopes of finding any kind of an answer to my current job situation. I did not find any. Also, it was apparent from the beginning I wasn't going to. Dalailama says on several occasions in the book that he hasn't got an answer to a question or that the question he is asked needs to be viewed from the person's view whom it concerns. He also gave vast amounts of answers I already knew m There are several reasons for me to dislike this book so I'll do my best to keep it short. Firstly, I read it in the hopes of finding any kind of an answer to my current job situation. I did not find any. Also, it was apparent from the beginning I wasn't going to. Dalailama says on several occasions in the book that he hasn't got an answer to a question or that the question he is asked needs to be viewed from the person's view whom it concerns. He also gave vast amounts of answers I already knew myself without having read any kind of book like this before. Which made me question my need for such books. I learned from the first chapter that I need to adjust my attitude to my work but there was no advice given what to do with colleagues who are aholes and do not care are you nice to them or not. Secondly, many of the topics discussed in this book do not concern me. For example the whole chapter on money. When there is a topic that I'd be intrested in, it's discussed from the wrong point of view for my case so it doesn't apply to me! For example they discussed how nice it is to have nice colleagues but my problem are colleagues who seem to do too much yacking and too little working. I go to work to work not to explain in detail what I did over the weekend, hence, I end up doing most of the work. There is also too much focus on things like the state of mind called flow state and it just went on for way too long. Lastly, I just hate the way the book is written and put together. I find it so annoying that the author has spent words and pages on describing how they had tea with Dalailama or how there was a pause before he answered or there was a certain look on his face. Just get to the point! What I did enjoy was Dalailama's honesty. What I got out of the book was that I just need to trust my inner voice. Dalailama's best advice to me was that I should get an easy job where I could have more time to myself and my hobbies, even if it pays less, and that is something I have been dreaming about for a long time.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    The book took me quite a while to get through. Part of it was my own distraction with other books, but another part was the fact I didn't find this book quite as enlightening and enthralling as plain old Art of Happiness was. That book I could barely put down. If I did it was to ponder what I'd just read and let it sink in. I could genuinely relate to the material and found the compiling of the meetings to be very well done. Art of Happiness at Work didn't have quite the same punch for me. Part o The book took me quite a while to get through. Part of it was my own distraction with other books, but another part was the fact I didn't find this book quite as enlightening and enthralling as plain old Art of Happiness was. That book I could barely put down. If I did it was to ponder what I'd just read and let it sink in. I could genuinely relate to the material and found the compiling of the meetings to be very well done. Art of Happiness at Work didn't have quite the same punch for me. Part of it may be my gross unhappiness with my current "career" situation. And I did find a majority of the book to be useful and interesting. Certain parts however felt repetitive and unoriginal. They also seemed to lack conclusion or usefulness. I was left going "Huh. Oookkkkk" after them. Additionally, one must realize that this book isn't going to transform a horrible job situation that makes you miserable into one you just love and enjoy day in and day out. I think the largest take away I got from the book is the fact I can at least make things more bearable for myself by using some of the meditative and attitude change practices found in the book. But still. If a new job is what you really need, a new job is what you need to get. This book also addresses, in brief, what type of things to look for in finding a job too. Those sections definitely made me ponder my own career decisions. I recommend this book for anyone interested in furthering their reading on Buddhist thought, and how those practices may relate to our attitudes about work, with the caution that a ridiculously miserable work situation isn't going to be "fixed" by simply reading this. Sometimes, the art of finding happiness at work is in finding work that has the potential to make you happy. If your job fundamentally lacks that nothing is going to help! Started: November 1, 2009 Finished: March 21, 2010

  18. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Sears

    The Art of Happiness at Work comes from a series of conversations between the author and the Dalai Lama. I am aware that the Dalai Lama shares credit for the book, but the format of the book makes it clear that the Dalai Lama did not do much writing of the book. However, I don't blame the Howard Cutler or the Dalai Lama for this misrepresentation. I found that the format of the book worked well for its intent. Cutler includes his own dialog with the Dalai Lama's which gives the book an intimate f The Art of Happiness at Work comes from a series of conversations between the author and the Dalai Lama. I am aware that the Dalai Lama shares credit for the book, but the format of the book makes it clear that the Dalai Lama did not do much writing of the book. However, I don't blame the Howard Cutler or the Dalai Lama for this misrepresentation. I found that the format of the book worked well for its intent. Cutler includes his own dialog with the Dalai Lama's which gives the book an intimate feel. The Dalai Lama is not a wise, unapproachable sage at the top of a mountain. He is a person with the same feeling and needs as us. That makes is wisdom easier to accept. The format also serves to show the contrast between the Dalai Lama's point of view and our own. Cutler is acting as a surrogate for the reader. This is most apparent when Cutler is asking the Dalai Lama about productive work. They take some time to decide on what "productive" means. Cutler defines "productive" to mean making things. The Dalai Lama defines it to be helping others. If you are looking for some deep, mystical path to being happy at work, this is not the book for you. The message of the book can be boiled down to "help other people at work and you will be happy" and "change comes from within." The rest of the book is about answering the "Yeah, but..." that we want to throw into the message. Perhaps the person looking for the mystical path will realize that such a path is not needed. The only concrete instructions in the book are on meditation. Meditation comes up in the course of the conversations, and is never emphasized as an activity in which the reader should engage.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Betsy Ng

    Reading this book, I'm hoping to find my happiness at work. If you are looking for an answer, this book does not provide you with an explicit answer. Rather, it opens up to various perspectives of finding meaning in your work and valuing your work. I like the way he shared about 3 different ways of perceiving your work: 1) do you see your work as a job that provides your financial needs; 2) do you see your work as a career for progression though pay may not be that good; 3) do you see your work Reading this book, I'm hoping to find my happiness at work. If you are looking for an answer, this book does not provide you with an explicit answer. Rather, it opens up to various perspectives of finding meaning in your work and valuing your work. I like the way he shared about 3 different ways of perceiving your work: 1) do you see your work as a job that provides your financial needs; 2) do you see your work as a career for progression though pay may not be that good; 3) do you see your work as a calling and this is not easy. He also talked about his definition of productive work and how one can develop and train his mind as well as make positive changes. It is important to make progress and find inner satisfaction. Given the complexity of human beings, there are a lot of variables that can affect happiness at work. A handful of potent variables such as biological, social, economic or demographic variables can influence human happiness. According to Dalai Lama, his view of happiness is based on ancient Buddhist philosophy - we begin by turning inward, by reshaping our attitudes and outlook. This book is highly recommended as it entails the science of happiness in 9 easy-to-read chapters: 1) transforming dissatisfaction at work; 2) the human factor; 3) making money; 4) striking a balance: boredom and challenge; 5) job, career, and calling; 6) self-understanding; 7) work and identity; 8) right livelihood; 9) happiness at work.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Brad McKenna

    More useful advice from The Dalai Lama! I read The Art of Happiness years ago and if you have not, read that one first. This book finds Dr. Cutler talking with His Holiness again, specifically about being happy at work. Ever the pragmatist the Dalai Lama admits that not everyone can have a job they love. So his advice focusing on having a positive attitude and thinking about how your work, even if it seems mundane and paltry, can indeed do good. One of his examples is a working on an assembly li More useful advice from The Dalai Lama! I read The Art of Happiness years ago and if you have not, read that one first. This book finds Dr. Cutler talking with His Holiness again, specifically about being happy at work. Ever the pragmatist the Dalai Lama admits that not everyone can have a job they love. So his advice focusing on having a positive attitude and thinking about how your work, even if it seems mundane and paltry, can indeed do good. One of his examples is a working on an assembly line. She may be just packing crates of Orange Juice or something, but that juice could go on to become part of the balanced breakfast for the next Nobel Peace Prize winner. It's all about perspective. One chapter that really struck home with me was the one on Right Livelihood, which is a step no the Noble Eightfold path. It states that you shouldn't do a job that harms but rather helps people. I felt this acutely when at my last job. I really did not believe the company was helping people. Now, as a librarian, I help people all the time. It's gone a long way towards establishing my happiness at work. But again, the Dalai Lama admits that not everyone is so lucky. He gives advice on how to cope in those cases. Would this be a good read for you? I'd was say so. You don't have to be Buddhist to put his advice into action. It certainly helps you see where he's coming from, but I'd say even and Atheist could find use int his book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    The 14th Dalai Lama and Howard C. Cutler, M.D., had multiple conversations about how to find happiness at work, and this book is an edited transcription of that work. The transcriptions are narrated and editorialized from the perspective of Howard Cutler, resulting in a significant amount of writing about how Dr. Cutler reflected on the Dalai Lama's responses. Happiness at work may be possible for those who can align their work (or career) with their personal philosophical views on what is impor The 14th Dalai Lama and Howard C. Cutler, M.D., had multiple conversations about how to find happiness at work, and this book is an edited transcription of that work. The transcriptions are narrated and editorialized from the perspective of Howard Cutler, resulting in a significant amount of writing about how Dr. Cutler reflected on the Dalai Lama's responses. Happiness at work may be possible for those who can align their work (or career) with their personal philosophical views on what is important in their own life, and this may be achieved by methodological lifelong meditation on how to best take care of oneself. Some readers may criticize the book for focusing more on Dr. Cutler's reflections than the Dalai Lama's thoughts, while other readers may appreciate the narrator's perspective as a novice in Tibetan Buddhist philosophical thought. This book does not provide explicit answers to finding happiness at work as much as this book recreates how the Dalai Lama responds to general questions about unhappy experiences at work. This is not an introduction to Tibetan Buddhist philosophy. Interested readers may want to see the co-authors' two other publications which, as a trio, discuss a larger idea of what happiness is. Readers interested in reading the experience of having a conversation with the Dalai Lama, may also enjoy this work.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Frankly, I was sort of disappointed with the contents of this book. Although the Dalai Lama does rationalize how Buddhist tenets can help deal with frustration at work, the author's rhetoric is basically built upon him asking questions that I considered to be simple logic rather than spiritual direction. By delivering to the holy man a list of pre-determined questions and agreeing on the constrictions and assumptions in the examples, the Dalai Lama gives his insight into how he would feel or act Frankly, I was sort of disappointed with the contents of this book. Although the Dalai Lama does rationalize how Buddhist tenets can help deal with frustration at work, the author's rhetoric is basically built upon him asking questions that I considered to be simple logic rather than spiritual direction. By delivering to the holy man a list of pre-determined questions and agreeing on the constrictions and assumptions in the examples, the Dalai Lama gives his insight into how he would feel or act in the same situation. Hardly an answer for anyone who is looking to deal with extreme work-related anxiety. The book offers an easy read, and at best would probably serve to reinforce what any decent, logical and experienced professional should already know. In summation, this is pretty much the whole book. "I hate my job, how can I overcome this feeling?" The response, "Just don't think about it too much, and see all the good your salary is doing to help your family. If this still doesn't help then get another job".

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nina

    all the dalai lama books are quick, cheap therapy for when you're feeling depressed and sad. i flew through this book when i was unsure about work and my career and the path i wanted to pursue. it immediately put things in perspective and i found myself feeling better about things so i stopped reading it. ha. the things he says are obvious and rational. we (westerns, first world countries) put too much emphasis on what we do for a living and how it need not be where we derive our happiness from. all the dalai lama books are quick, cheap therapy for when you're feeling depressed and sad. i flew through this book when i was unsure about work and my career and the path i wanted to pursue. it immediately put things in perspective and i found myself feeling better about things so i stopped reading it. ha. the things he says are obvious and rational. we (westerns, first world countries) put too much emphasis on what we do for a living and how it need not be where we derive our happiness from. other sad stuff like how people in china are grateful for any job (low wages, very long hours, far from home) because they need the money and here we are in the US complaining about jobs that we most likely have chosen for ourselves. i think his point was that we should be grateful for what we have and if it really makes us unhappy then it's our responsibility to do something about it. i really should finish reading this!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

    Mostly fluff. Maybe it was the format of the book that didn't do it for me. The entire book is a series of conversations that the author has with the Dalai Lama on the topic of work. This style gave it a bit of an unprofessional feel. Most of the dialog was not relevant or useful, hence fluff. Too much time was spent trying to explain modern work office problems to someone that has not worked in an office. While I have not yet read the original, Art of Happiness, I can imagine what it covers base Mostly fluff. Maybe it was the format of the book that didn't do it for me. The entire book is a series of conversations that the author has with the Dalai Lama on the topic of work. This style gave it a bit of an unprofessional feel. Most of the dialog was not relevant or useful, hence fluff. Too much time was spent trying to explain modern work office problems to someone that has not worked in an office. While I have not yet read the original, Art of Happiness, I can imagine what it covers based on other similar readings. The Work book seems to be delving into a topic that is a bit too specific for the Dalai Lama's general lessons to be very applicable. From the entire book, I found a few chestnuts worth remembering. These are most likely covered in the original Art of Happiness book, or at least should be.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Janelle

    The narrative takes the form of a discussion between Cutler and the Dalai Lama on the nature of finding satisfaction in one's occupation. The content is great and provoked a lot of thought for myself; I also found that my attitude toward work was greatly improved on the days that I listened to this on my way there and back. A lot of their postulations came down to that: simply adjusting your individual expectations and attitude toward your work, as well as weighing your values and how they corre The narrative takes the form of a discussion between Cutler and the Dalai Lama on the nature of finding satisfaction in one's occupation. The content is great and provoked a lot of thought for myself; I also found that my attitude toward work was greatly improved on the days that I listened to this on my way there and back. A lot of their postulations came down to that: simply adjusting your individual expectations and attitude toward your work, as well as weighing your values and how they correspond with giving meaning and purpose to your work and life. Cutler has a nasally, rather dull voice; B.D. Wong affects a sort of Chinese accent, which is comical and gimmicky at first but ultimately is a performance that does give the essence of the Dalai Lama.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hoan

    Great concepts. I really loved the Dalai Lama's good nature and open heart. It really reminds us all to treat each other better and equally. I think it's an area in today's society that still needs much improvement. I did not however enjoy the author's interpretations all to much and it was a slow read. I loved the insight the Dalai Lama provided and the examples of how he touched people or crowds - that was moving. But overall - I did not find this to be the most helpful guide to finding happin Great concepts. I really loved the Dalai Lama's good nature and open heart. It really reminds us all to treat each other better and equally. I think it's an area in today's society that still needs much improvement. I did not however enjoy the author's interpretations all to much and it was a slow read. I loved the insight the Dalai Lama provided and the examples of how he touched people or crowds - that was moving. But overall - I did not find this to be the most helpful guide to finding happiness at work. In theory - it's great however, in practice it would be much much more difficult to put into play.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Winnie

    If you are a Christian and you read Bible regularly, I'd suggest you skip this one. The few insights draw from the long paragraphs in the Q&A manner are just one sentence as you can find in the Bible. I don't think it worth the time unless you are interested in knowing the richer context/details from Buddhist perspective. One key takeaway tho: if you view work as just a job, the primary focus is on the financial rewards; if you view work as a career, the focus is on advancement; if you view work If you are a Christian and you read Bible regularly, I'd suggest you skip this one. The few insights draw from the long paragraphs in the Q&A manner are just one sentence as you can find in the Bible. I don't think it worth the time unless you are interested in knowing the richer context/details from Buddhist perspective. One key takeaway tho: if you view work as just a job, the primary focus is on the financial rewards; if you view work as a career, the focus is on advancement; if you view work as a calling, you will see your work as meaningful, having a higher purpose, making a contribution to society or the world.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mia

    While appreciating the thoughts of the Dalai Lama and finding some helpful input regarding job satisfaction, I was still left wondering the steps to find a better feeling regarding one's work. The states of mind naturally are important. Attitude we know is critical to success and happiness; however in what way can a person find the 'calling' or the work that would fit us in such a satisfactory way that happiness at work is possible. Identifying sources of dissatisfaction in work was covered in t While appreciating the thoughts of the Dalai Lama and finding some helpful input regarding job satisfaction, I was still left wondering the steps to find a better feeling regarding one's work. The states of mind naturally are important. Attitude we know is critical to success and happiness; however in what way can a person find the 'calling' or the work that would fit us in such a satisfactory way that happiness at work is possible. Identifying sources of dissatisfaction in work was covered in this book. That can be helpful to know what to avoid. I found no practical advise here but it was a decent philosophical inspection of attitudes towards work.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marko

    There is no denying that when Dalai Lama talks of issues that we face in the west, he sees them from a distance and through a cultural filter. Howard C. Cutler comes to aid here and interestingly blends the thought of the west and thought of the east in form of dialogues with Dalai Lama on work, happiness and how they are connected to each other. Each chapter is a daily dialogue on a specific topic related to happiness at work. I'm not sure to what extent the presented guidelines are applicable There is no denying that when Dalai Lama talks of issues that we face in the west, he sees them from a distance and through a cultural filter. Howard C. Cutler comes to aid here and interestingly blends the thought of the west and thought of the east in form of dialogues with Dalai Lama on work, happiness and how they are connected to each other. Each chapter is a daily dialogue on a specific topic related to happiness at work. I'm not sure to what extent the presented guidelines are applicable to an average working person in the west, but they can certainly put some things we take for granted and do daily in perspective. The book is mostly secular and does not go too much into Buddhism.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gloria

    A rather rapid read, actually, if you are somewhat familiar with some Buddhist concepts, but a life-time to master.... The book is "written" by the Dalai Lama, but essentially it is this doctor's interviews with the Dalai Lama, with a lot of his own commentary added. While it does seem a little of a bit of a misrepresentation, I don't think, if you can get over that, it is a *terrible* book, but a decent book. Actually, the interviewer gets to play the part of the naif, and one can appreciate it A rather rapid read, actually, if you are somewhat familiar with some Buddhist concepts, but a life-time to master.... The book is "written" by the Dalai Lama, but essentially it is this doctor's interviews with the Dalai Lama, with a lot of his own commentary added. While it does seem a little of a bit of a misrepresentation, I don't think, if you can get over that, it is a *terrible* book, but a decent book. Actually, the interviewer gets to play the part of the naif, and one can appreciate it in a weird way. A good reminder during tough times.

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