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Stanley Yelnats' Survival Guide to Camp Green Lake

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Imagine your misfortune if, like Stanley Yelnats, you found yourself the victim of a miscarriage of justice and interned in Camp Green Lake Correctional Institute. How would you survive? Thoughtfully Louis Sachar has learnt his knowledge and expertise to the subject and created this wonderful, quirky, and utterly essential guide to toughing it out in the Texan desert. Spic Imagine your misfortune if, like Stanley Yelnats, you found yourself the victim of a miscarriage of justice and interned in Camp Green Lake Correctional Institute. How would you survive? Thoughtfully Louis Sachar has learnt his knowledge and expertise to the subject and created this wonderful, quirky, and utterly essential guide to toughing it out in the Texan desert. Spiced with lots of information about the characters in "Holes", as well as lots of do's and don'ts for survival, this is an essential book for all those hundreds of thousands of "Holes'" fans.


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Imagine your misfortune if, like Stanley Yelnats, you found yourself the victim of a miscarriage of justice and interned in Camp Green Lake Correctional Institute. How would you survive? Thoughtfully Louis Sachar has learnt his knowledge and expertise to the subject and created this wonderful, quirky, and utterly essential guide to toughing it out in the Texan desert. Spic Imagine your misfortune if, like Stanley Yelnats, you found yourself the victim of a miscarriage of justice and interned in Camp Green Lake Correctional Institute. How would you survive? Thoughtfully Louis Sachar has learnt his knowledge and expertise to the subject and created this wonderful, quirky, and utterly essential guide to toughing it out in the Texan desert. Spiced with lots of information about the characters in "Holes", as well as lots of do's and don'ts for survival, this is an essential book for all those hundreds of thousands of "Holes'" fans.

30 review for Stanley Yelnats' Survival Guide to Camp Green Lake

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chantal

    I found this book to be a cash grab for the author. I had the idea this was only sold because of the success of book 1. It really wasn't a good story, not many new facts about the first story. It missed a coherent story or sequel idea. A very low 3.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Josiah

    "You can't let anybody else tell you what your choices are. Sometimes they won't give you the right choice." —Stanley Yelnats, Stanley Yelnats' Survival Guide to Camp Green Lake, P. 13 This book is a true diamond in the rough, and I'm genuinely sorry that more people won't end up reading it. Never has the wit, timing, creativity and sensitive styling of Louis Sachar been better than in this miniature novel disguised as a survival guide. Louis Sachar melds so successfully into the personage of St "You can't let anybody else tell you what your choices are. Sometimes they won't give you the right choice." —Stanley Yelnats, Stanley Yelnats' Survival Guide to Camp Green Lake, P. 13 This book is a true diamond in the rough, and I'm genuinely sorry that more people won't end up reading it. Never has the wit, timing, creativity and sensitive styling of Louis Sachar been better than in this miniature novel disguised as a survival guide. Louis Sachar melds so successfully into the personage of Stanley Yelnats as to make the two one person, and we the reader are the recipient of the ensuing literature treat. I love the hilarious survival tests that are proctored by Stanley Yelnats, and the fact that even though the questions seem so innocuous, it is extremely difficult to give more than a couple of lucky correct answers. Embedded in the wonderful humor is an inconspicuous wisdom that really made an impression on me, especially as tucked away in the smart comments as it is. No matter what you want in a short book, try reading this one, and I'm certain that you will not be disappointed. Stanley Yelnats' Survival Guide to Camp Green Lake packs a lot of punch for its size, and I would eupeptically recommend it. "But don't forget who you really are. And I'm not talking about your so-called real name. All names are made up by someone else, even the one your parents gave you. You know who you really are. When you're alone at night, looking up at the stars, or maybe lying in your bed in total darkness, you know that nameless person inside you...Your muscles will toughen. So will your heart and soul. That's necessary for survival. But don't lose touch with that person deep inside you, or else you won't really have survived at all." —Stanley Yelnats, P. 84

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nickie

    Super quick read. Sometime after the end of Holes, Camp Green Lake has reopened. Main character Stanley Yelnats would like to share some of his wisdom that he gained from his experiences in Holes. Now some of the "chapters" are about detail specific things from Holes such as the yellow spotted lizards. But what I really took from the book was certain life lessons that everyone should learn at some point. One of the morals of the story was that the correct choice is not always one given. If you o Super quick read. Sometime after the end of Holes, Camp Green Lake has reopened. Main character Stanley Yelnats would like to share some of his wisdom that he gained from his experiences in Holes. Now some of the "chapters" are about detail specific things from Holes such as the yellow spotted lizards. But what I really took from the book was certain life lessons that everyone should learn at some point. One of the morals of the story was that the correct choice is not always one given. If you only do what other people tell you, that is no way to live. That there are bad guys in life and no matter what you will have people around you that are going to make your life hell. Stick up for your friends especially the ones you make now because they could be your best friends for decades. Anyway it was a pretty uplifting book if you look at if from the morally philosophic side like I did. There were references to almost every character from Holes, so make sure you are familiar with them if you want to enjoy the connections.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Blake

    It was fun to visit Camp Green Lake again. I started reading Small Steps, which is a loose sequel to Holes, and I didn't know if there was anything in this Survival Guide that had any bearing on Small Steps. There isn't. I think this book was published more in conjunction with the release of the movie.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amk Aung Zaw

    Stanley yelnat is from poor family. He found the hidden treasure one day and make a rich family.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Srikanth Sreedharan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This thin survival guide may be a bit incomprehensible to those who have not read "Holes". Yet, it is in itself a great summary of Four Life Lessons that Stanley has learnt from his stay at Camp Green Lake: 1. Don't complain 2. Don't ask too many questions 3. Try to make the right choices. 4. Dig the perfect Hole "I don't complain. I don't ask too many questions. I try to make the right choices. And I'm still trying to dig the perfect hole." The whole situation at Camp Green Lake is a metaphor for lif This thin survival guide may be a bit incomprehensible to those who have not read "Holes". Yet, it is in itself a great summary of Four Life Lessons that Stanley has learnt from his stay at Camp Green Lake: 1. Don't complain 2. Don't ask too many questions 3. Try to make the right choices. 4. Dig the perfect Hole "I don't complain. I don't ask too many questions. I try to make the right choices. And I'm still trying to dig the perfect hole." The whole situation at Camp Green Lake is a metaphor for life itself. "Everyone suffers equally. You're all in this together. Race, skin color, the grades you got at school, whether you were one of the popular kids; none of that matters. You will earn the respect of the others by doing your job without grumbling." Thus, Camp Green Lake is the world, life, living...Whatever. In this sense all of us are in some form or the other at Camp Green Lake. We don't like that we''re doing; we are paid less and over-worked; we don't like digging holes. But digging holes is what we do. Doing a great job in whatever we do is "Digging the Perfect Hole." Stanley says he's still trying to Dig the Perfect Hole! "I know that sounds really weird. Who cares if your hole is perfect? But if you're going to be out there six hours a day, you have to give yourself a purpose. You can either groan about how stupid is to dig a hole, or you can tell yourself you're doing something important. You Are digging the best hole anyone's ever dug It also helps physically. If you can make a perfect circle, exactly five feet in diameter and five feet deep, with sides that are perpendicular to the ground, you will have dug the absolute minimum amount of dirt required. No one's ever done that, not even Zero, but he's come close When you're done, stand over your hole. Take time to admire it, no matter how tired and sore you feel. You worked hard digging that hole, and you should take pride in a job well done. And then spit in it." Digging a hole is purpose. Doing it well is courage. Spitting into it is detachment. "Because, after all, it's just a stupid hole, and you are better than that." In other words you are better and bigger than the challenge demanded by your current job. Look for greater things to do. Stretch yourself. You are not proving anything to others its just between you and that "nameless person inside you". Choices "You can't let anybody else tell you what your choices are. Sometimes they won't give you the right choice. If you're going to survive at Camp Green Lake, you must always make the right choice, whether it's given to you or not." In other words, you should choose for yourself. Life is not an easy MCQ. The correct answer may not be one of the choices! Many of the things we regret doing are because of allowing others to decide what we choose! Finally "Holes" is about self-discovery. "But don't forget who you really are. And I'm not talking about your so-called real name. All names are made up by someone else, even the one your parents gave you. You know who you really are. When you're alone at night, looking up at the stars, or maybe lying in your bed in total darkness, you know that nameless person inside you."

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rubi

    Omgosh, I LOVED this little throw back to Camp Green Lake. I just discovered its existence and boy am I glad my library had a copy in stock. The survival guide is just tips Stanley feels people heading to Camp Green Laken should know, but he includes "never before seen" stories of other moments during his time there, which was fun to read. We get a little closer glimpse into each D Tent boy's lives and how they each turn out. The only thing that threw me off was that there was still A Camp Green Omgosh, I LOVED this little throw back to Camp Green Lake. I just discovered its existence and boy am I glad my library had a copy in stock. The survival guide is just tips Stanley feels people heading to Camp Green Laken should know, but he includes "never before seen" stories of other moments during his time there, which was fun to read. We get a little closer glimpse into each D Tent boy's lives and how they each turn out. The only thing that threw me off was that there was still A Camp Green Lake. Stanley makes it seem like the criminals of the story basically got off scott free which the original book seemed to imply otherwise. But it was such a good little book I'll let Sachar slide lol Also love how realistically Stanley talks about girls 😂 Great book, totally recommend it for any fan of Holes!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dave P

    This is just a short tie-in to Holes for a bit of fun. Even so, it's completely awful. From the first few pages it seems to completely ignore many of the major plot points of Holes (which I won't spoil). If it weren't so inconsequential it would go some way to ruining Holes itself, and I really don't understand why it was done like this!

  9. 5 out of 5

    H

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Read this a few years ago, and it was a good, fun, short reading tie-in to Holes, which I enjoyed quite a bit. I recall liking things about the lizard, the other boys like X-Ray, and in general, I recall it fitting the tone of the series well enough and paying decent homage to the original with its humor/references.

  10. 5 out of 5

    old account (rl)

    This was pretty boring, and I have to say that I skim read most of it. It was nice to see a little more of the characters, but I didn't really enjoy it. The information in it is very repetitive, we here it all in Holes and I didn't think it added anything to the story. Waste of time, really.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Daphne

    This was a tie-in that was really not necesary. I didn't really enjoy it. It also seemed to ignore the cannon established in Holes which was odd. This was a tie-in that was really not necesary. I didn't really enjoy it. It also seemed to ignore the cannon established in Holes which was odd.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    A funny addition to Holes, but not as entertaining or well written as the original.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Katey

    This was another quick read, and I wasn't sure when I was going to start it. The book is pretty straight forward, and gives the reader information about Camp Greenlake and the characters from Holes.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kim Hampton

    A short guide to life at Camp Green Lake by Stanley Yelnats from the book "Holes." Short but funny. It has info about some of the other characters also.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chrissy

    This was a cute little book. I cant wait to read Small Steps.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lily Cunningham

    Good 3.5 stars

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    2.5 Rather unnecessary.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jana

    Cute, but a little too obviously riding off the success of Holes.

  19. 5 out of 5

    MrsMamfa

    Thoroughly enjoyed the trip back to Camp Green Lake. Very quick read and easy to do in one sitting. Fun to reminisce over the characters and the their personalities. Makes me want to reread Holes.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Arby

    Rating: ★★★½

  21. 4 out of 5

    Read Between The Vines

    I think I expected too much from this, it was fine, it was the same as any other book survival guide, I was expecting more for some reason

  22. 4 out of 5

    Drew Graham

    (Maybe 2.5) Stanley Yelnats, now home from his adventures at Camp Green Lake Juvenile Correctional Facility, has decided to write a survival guide to help future campers to better endure their time spent there (since it has apparently re-opened?...). I have no idea why exactly, but for some reason every time I heard about this book in recent years I figured it was a movie tie-in/adaptation from back in the day, so I didn't have much interest. Then when I read the excerpt included at the end of the (Maybe 2.5) Stanley Yelnats, now home from his adventures at Camp Green Lake Juvenile Correctional Facility, has decided to write a survival guide to help future campers to better endure their time spent there (since it has apparently re-opened?...). I have no idea why exactly, but for some reason every time I heard about this book in recent years I figured it was a movie tie-in/adaptation from back in the day, so I didn't have much interest. Then when I read the excerpt included at the end of the pseudo-sequel Small Steps , I realized it wasn't, so I picked it up one afternoon. What I found when I did was a slim volume, short on pages, but also on substance. It basically read like a combination of recycled (some probably by now irrelevant) survival tips and extended/deleted scenes that weren't quite interesting or necessary enough to include in Holes (with just a little bit of behind-the-scenes info on camp life). The appendix was especially odd, as it was essentially a "where are they now?" list of all the characters from the previous book, almost as if in response to a lot of fans writing in and wondering what happened to everyone after they left Camp Green Lake, in which case I think an official statement online or something would have been more than sufficient. There were some interesting little character moments, but they didn't do a whole lot to expand the characters or relationships. The excerpt at the end of Small Steps was the most engaging part, which was a little misleading as a teaser. It tried to teach some life lessons, and naturally tried to capture some of the combination of down-to-earth and whimsical that Holes, but ended up just feeling vague and just a teeny bit pretentious. This slender companion piece to Holes is harmless, but it's also totally unnecessary and a little self-indulgent. I think the general rule for sequels or tie-ins is that they should have something to add to or enrich the story or the world, but this book didn't really. I'm not sorry I read it or anything, but I don't feel like I gained anything much by reading it either.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dana Salman

    The ONLY reason I give this book four stars instead of five was because it was that much of a disappointment (a HUGE disappointment, in other words) that it was just so short. I really hate Louis Sachar right now for not making this a little bit longer (especially considering I paid a totally unfair 41 dirhems for it, but that's just the fault of the cheapskates who own the bookshop). You know it's funny, you'll hate a really good author alot more than you'll hate a totally lousy author because The ONLY reason I give this book four stars instead of five was because it was that much of a disappointment (a HUGE disappointment, in other words) that it was just so short. I really hate Louis Sachar right now for not making this a little bit longer (especially considering I paid a totally unfair 41 dirhems for it, but that's just the fault of the cheapskates who own the bookshop). You know it's funny, you'll hate a really good author alot more than you'll hate a totally lousy author because in the case of the former you have expectations. And right now I am so angry I need a moment to compose myself before I continue this review; breathing in...breathing out Okay, done. Now let me just say that, in alot of ways, this book was even better than Holes. Sachar does a better (well, more entertaining) job in first-person than third, and this book is told from Stanley's point of view. He (Stanley) wrote it a little while after the events of Holes and he reveals things about Camp Green Lake and the people in it that we hadn't known before, so it's sort of a sequel and a prequel. It's also a hilariously funny read at some points (or most), and then at other times Stanley says something that really makes you think. There are survival test questions, and these are interesting because you'll think that one is a trick question like its predeccesor but then turn out to have a totally obvious yet clever answer to it. Besides giving the basics of how things run around Camp Green Lake, Stanley also recalls events that take place both during his time at Camp Green Lake and after he left. Regretfully there is no mystery twist to it like there was to the plot in Holes, but then, this is a survival guide. Had Camp Green Lake actually been a real Correction Facility (and we can thank our lucky stars that it isn't) this would be the perfect thing to take along if you find yourself sent down there. I know because while I was reading it I imagined myself sitting in a cot in one of the tents, tired and sore after a whole day of digging.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jeanna

    Hearing about this book, I would have expected it to be fairly pathetic (sorry, Sachar). But then I read a couple reviews that said it was actually quite good, so I decided to read it anyway. And then I read it and ended up thinking it was somewhere in between. Not amazing, but not the awful piece of shameless coasting-on-the-awesomeness-of-the-previous-book book that I originally expected. I think, really, the highlight of the book is something that Sachar does really well in most of his stuff: Hearing about this book, I would have expected it to be fairly pathetic (sorry, Sachar). But then I read a couple reviews that said it was actually quite good, so I decided to read it anyway. And then I read it and ended up thinking it was somewhere in between. Not amazing, but not the awful piece of shameless coasting-on-the-awesomeness-of-the-previous-book book that I originally expected. I think, really, the highlight of the book is something that Sachar does really well in most of his stuff: Telling readers, without being preachy, that they control their destinies. (view spoiler)[ He's got these survival quizzes in the book, and they are multiple choice, but he keeps messing with them. They're not standard multiple choice. (hide spoiler)] The point he makes is that you can't let other people tell you what your choices are; you have to think for yourself. I especially like this because, of course, Stanley had very little control over a lot of the physical events in his life. But he did have control over how he looked at and dealt with them. Anyway, based solely on that element of the book and a couple other good "morals to the story" (again, without feeling annoyingly preachy), I would have rated it higher. But for me there wasn't enough other substance backing it up. On the other hand, it's so exceptionally short that it's probably worth the read anyway, if you liked Holes. Rating: G

  25. 5 out of 5

    Evan North

    This is the proper follow-up to "Holes", and I'm very pleased to give this book a good review. If you've read my review for "Small Steps", the second sequel to "Holes", you know I thought it was a good book, but I didn't care for it all that much because of how drastically the tone changed between the books. This book, however, while the tone has changed from "Holes", the change is not nearly as drastic as it is in "Small Steps". I should mention that this book is just 90 pages long and can be r This is the proper follow-up to "Holes", and I'm very pleased to give this book a good review. If you've read my review for "Small Steps", the second sequel to "Holes", you know I thought it was a good book, but I didn't care for it all that much because of how drastically the tone changed between the books. This book, however, while the tone has changed from "Holes", the change is not nearly as drastic as it is in "Small Steps". I should mention that this book is just 90 pages long and can be read in a day, but I beyond enjoyed this book. It felt so good to have another book, which is more or less a guide to life at Camp Green Lake, that featured the characters that were in my favorite book of all time. This book definitely is a survival guide, but it also features more stories of what Stanley and the rest of the guys went through at Camp Green Lake, and fills in some of the gaps from "Holes". While short, this book is still very well written by Louis Sachar, and I very much enjoyed reading it. If you like "Holes", then I definitely recommend it to you.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Devon

    Not as good as Holes, of course, but it's pretty damn good. The Survival Guide is very short. I read it in about a half hour. But...my copy was only $5. So it's totally worth it. In fact, I already own it...but I can't find it so I bought it again today. I have this thing with nostalgia. Anyway...So, yeah. It's wonderful. At the end there is back story on each and every character we've come to know and love throughout the Holes extravaganza. There are cute little quizzes throughout and lots of l Not as good as Holes, of course, but it's pretty damn good. The Survival Guide is very short. I read it in about a half hour. But...my copy was only $5. So it's totally worth it. In fact, I already own it...but I can't find it so I bought it again today. I have this thing with nostalgia. Anyway...So, yeah. It's wonderful. At the end there is back story on each and every character we've come to know and love throughout the Holes extravaganza. There are cute little quizzes throughout and lots of little stories about the other campers sprinkled throughout (there is LOTS of Zigzag love. Also, a story about Magnet and one about X-Ray and a whole chapter devoted to Twitch. Armpit, Squid and Zero don't get as much love. But Zero got half of Holes, basically, and Armpit has Small Steps so it's only Squiddly who gets the short end of the stick here.) and it's wonderful. So, I'm rating it high....although some others might not. I just love the whole Holes universe.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

    What the... Shows what elementary school librarians know about my preferences. *shrug* I mean, I read encyclopedias, but this isn't even real. (Before I start accidentally elbowing Louis Sachar out of the business, let me just state that I think things are either fiction or not-fiction, and anything that assumes to the contrary - "nonfiction" books about psi-phenomenae, perhaps, or encyclopedias of false worlds - is in for criticism. The author's fine. I have a grudge against the format, is all. What the... Shows what elementary school librarians know about my preferences. *shrug* I mean, I read encyclopedias, but this isn't even real. (Before I start accidentally elbowing Louis Sachar out of the business, let me just state that I think things are either fiction or not-fiction, and anything that assumes to the contrary - "nonfiction" books about psi-phenomenae, perhaps, or encyclopedias of false worlds - is in for criticism. The author's fine. I have a grudge against the format, is all.)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    As indicated by the "1.5," this is a filler book that just adds on to the original work. It acts as a "survival guide" for anyone going to the camp, and we learn a little bit more about the characters and what happened in Holes. I actually think I might have read this before - I remember the end bit where Stanley and X-Ray talk after getting out. It's nice for people who want more material from the series, but that's it. As indicated by the "1.5," this is a filler book that just adds on to the original work. It acts as a "survival guide" for anyone going to the camp, and we learn a little bit more about the characters and what happened in Holes. I actually think I might have read this before - I remember the end bit where Stanley and X-Ray talk after getting out. It's nice for people who want more material from the series, but that's it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Amber the Human

    Well, if you just read Holes and you really don't want to leave that world, but you're not yet ready to read the sequel (sort of sequel), this is the book for you. If you haven't read Holes, then this book will make no sense at all to you. If it's been a couple of years since you read Holes (like me) this book will still confuse you, because it focuses on a lot of details you may not remember.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    A very quick read that should only be read if you've read Holes. This book has a few new stories about the characters from Holes but is mostly a fun little extra to that book. I think children reading this series would enjoy this book, I give it 2 1/2 stars for me. A very quick read that should only be read if you've read Holes. This book has a few new stories about the characters from Holes but is mostly a fun little extra to that book. I think children reading this series would enjoy this book, I give it 2 1/2 stars for me.

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