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Repealing the 8th: Reforming Irish Abortion Law

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Available Open Access under CC-BY licence. Irish law currently permits abortion only where the life of the pregnant woman is at risk. Since 1983, the 8th Amendment to the Constitution has recognised the “unborn” as having a right to life equal to that of the “mother”. Consequently, most people in Ireland who wish to bring their pregnancies to an end either import the abort Available Open Access under CC-BY licence. Irish law currently permits abortion only where the life of the pregnant woman is at risk. Since 1983, the 8th Amendment to the Constitution has recognised the “unborn” as having a right to life equal to that of the “mother”. Consequently, most people in Ireland who wish to bring their pregnancies to an end either import the abortion pill illegally, travel abroad to access abortion, or continue with the pregnancy against their will. Now, however, there are signs of change. A constitutional referendum will be held in 2018, after which it will be possible to reimagine, redesign, and reform the law on abortion. Written by experts in the field, this book draws on experience from other countries, as well as experiences of maternal medical care in Ireland, to call for a feminist, woman-centered, and rights-based radical new approach to abortion law in Ireland. Directly challenging grounds-based abortion law, this accessible guide brings together feminist analysis, comparative research, human rights law, and political awareness to propose a new constitutional and legislative settlement on reproductive autonomy in Ireland. It offers practical proposals for policymakers and advocates, including model legislation, making it an essential campaigning tool leading up to the referendum.


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Available Open Access under CC-BY licence. Irish law currently permits abortion only where the life of the pregnant woman is at risk. Since 1983, the 8th Amendment to the Constitution has recognised the “unborn” as having a right to life equal to that of the “mother”. Consequently, most people in Ireland who wish to bring their pregnancies to an end either import the abort Available Open Access under CC-BY licence. Irish law currently permits abortion only where the life of the pregnant woman is at risk. Since 1983, the 8th Amendment to the Constitution has recognised the “unborn” as having a right to life equal to that of the “mother”. Consequently, most people in Ireland who wish to bring their pregnancies to an end either import the abortion pill illegally, travel abroad to access abortion, or continue with the pregnancy against their will. Now, however, there are signs of change. A constitutional referendum will be held in 2018, after which it will be possible to reimagine, redesign, and reform the law on abortion. Written by experts in the field, this book draws on experience from other countries, as well as experiences of maternal medical care in Ireland, to call for a feminist, woman-centered, and rights-based radical new approach to abortion law in Ireland. Directly challenging grounds-based abortion law, this accessible guide brings together feminist analysis, comparative research, human rights law, and political awareness to propose a new constitutional and legislative settlement on reproductive autonomy in Ireland. It offers practical proposals for policymakers and advocates, including model legislation, making it an essential campaigning tool leading up to the referendum.

30 review for Repealing the 8th: Reforming Irish Abortion Law

  1. 5 out of 5

    Aine

    Could not recommend this book any more. It is very clear and understandable for people without a legal background. If we win the referendum, it will still be relevant in setting our thinking straight about the legislation we want.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Dean

    The story of how we got to the 8th amendment is beyond the scope of a book of this length. However, the book does provide a huge depth of literature that the reader can look into should they wish. It makes a normally complex topic much easier to understand. It scares me to read cases such as Sheila Hodgers who died after being denied treatment for cancer because it might harm her unborn child. This book describes so many cases where the individuals rights were snatched away. It saddens me to hea The story of how we got to the 8th amendment is beyond the scope of a book of this length. However, the book does provide a huge depth of literature that the reader can look into should they wish. It makes a normally complex topic much easier to understand. It scares me to read cases such as Sheila Hodgers who died after being denied treatment for cancer because it might harm her unborn child. This book describes so many cases where the individuals rights were snatched away. It saddens me to hear that the power is given to someone else who will not carry, endure pain (whether that be psychological or physical) or go through the journey of pregnancy and birth. In the words of Nigel Rodley, the abortion law sends the message that a woman is a ‘vessel and nothing more’. This books primary focus is on abortion but it does dip beyond that too. All in all, this is a must read for anyone who has an interest in the topic and is especially important with the referendum to remove the 8th from the constitution coming up. Reviewer note: received a free copy of this book in return for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Patch Thompson

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    Claire

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    Eibhlinn

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    Sarah

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    Vilde

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    Jana Meyer

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    Hannah

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    Elizabeth McGeown

  13. 5 out of 5

    Aoife

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    Sarah

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    Ciara Dunne

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    Dervla

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    Aoife Riach

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    Kelly Kiolbasa

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    Maria

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    Laurie Bertram

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    Künt

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    Jessica Haney

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    B

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    Charlotte

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    Charlotte Potter

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    Laura

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    Colette Dempsey

  29. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Mokdessi

  30. 5 out of 5

    Anne Jensen

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