counter create hit Casanova: Actor Lover Priest Spy - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Casanova: Actor Lover Priest Spy

Availability: Ready to download

In Casanova, noted author Ian Kelly traces the life of Giacomo Casanova, a man whose very name is synonymous with sensuality, seduction and sexual prowess. But Casanova was more than just a great lover. A businessman, diplomat, spy, and philosopher, he authored more than twenty books, including a translation of The Iliad. Confidant to many infamous characters—including Mad In Casanova, noted author Ian Kelly traces the life of Giacomo Casanova, a man whose very name is synonymous with sensuality, seduction and sexual prowess. But Casanova was more than just a great lover. A businessman, diplomat, spy, and philosopher, he authored more than twenty books, including a translation of The Iliad. Confidant to many infamous characters—including Madame de Pompadour, Voltaire, and Catherine the Great—Casanova was undoubtedly charismatic. But how exactly did he seduce himself into infamy? In this richly drawn portrait, Casanova emerges as very much a product of eighteenth-century Venice. He reveled in its commedia del arte and Kelly posits that his successes as both a libertine and a libertarian grew from his careful study of its artifice and illusion. Food, travel, sex: Casanova’s great passions are timeless ones and Kelly brings to life in full flavor the grandeur of his exploits. He also articulates the fascinating personal philosophy that inspired Casanova’s quest to bed all manner of women and also a few men. A riveting look at the life of the most legendary lover of all time, this is destined to become the definitive biography of Giacomo Casanova.


Compare
Ads Banner

In Casanova, noted author Ian Kelly traces the life of Giacomo Casanova, a man whose very name is synonymous with sensuality, seduction and sexual prowess. But Casanova was more than just a great lover. A businessman, diplomat, spy, and philosopher, he authored more than twenty books, including a translation of The Iliad. Confidant to many infamous characters—including Mad In Casanova, noted author Ian Kelly traces the life of Giacomo Casanova, a man whose very name is synonymous with sensuality, seduction and sexual prowess. But Casanova was more than just a great lover. A businessman, diplomat, spy, and philosopher, he authored more than twenty books, including a translation of The Iliad. Confidant to many infamous characters—including Madame de Pompadour, Voltaire, and Catherine the Great—Casanova was undoubtedly charismatic. But how exactly did he seduce himself into infamy? In this richly drawn portrait, Casanova emerges as very much a product of eighteenth-century Venice. He reveled in its commedia del arte and Kelly posits that his successes as both a libertine and a libertarian grew from his careful study of its artifice and illusion. Food, travel, sex: Casanova’s great passions are timeless ones and Kelly brings to life in full flavor the grandeur of his exploits. He also articulates the fascinating personal philosophy that inspired Casanova’s quest to bed all manner of women and also a few men. A riveting look at the life of the most legendary lover of all time, this is destined to become the definitive biography of Giacomo Casanova.

30 review for Casanova: Actor Lover Priest Spy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brittanie

    I got through this by listening to Benedict Cumberbach read it to me and it was probably a lot better that way.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    Casanova is fascinating to people for stories of his romantic/sexual exploits. This bio addresses some of the most notorious of those as well as tell of his adventures throughout Europe and his back and forth relationship with Venice. It shows him as a hedonist and an opportunist with a big ego and an extravagant lifestyle. Very interesting and entertaining and well, Benedict Cumberbatch is a great narrator as well

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I liked this book...it's a 3.5 rounded down to a 3 just because it wasn't written as a story...I'd much rather have read it from the first person. I saw this book as I was browsing the book aisle at Costco, which I do once a week and the title caught my eye. I love historical fiction and I thought to myself I don't know anything about Casanova...besides the obvious. I had no idea he was so many things...or that a person in that time could travel so much. Just reading about him moving around from I liked this book...it's a 3.5 rounded down to a 3 just because it wasn't written as a story...I'd much rather have read it from the first person. I saw this book as I was browsing the book aisle at Costco, which I do once a week and the title caught my eye. I love historical fiction and I thought to myself I don't know anything about Casanova...besides the obvious. I had no idea he was so many things...or that a person in that time could travel so much. Just reading about him moving around from place to place was exhausting. In the beginning I decided I maybe could like him...his mother didn't show him a lot of attention and he got sent away to a tutor where he read like crazy...I felt a little sorry for him. By the time I was 2/3 of the way through the book it is more than obvious he is a rake who will never get a real job or truly commit himself to one woman or take responsibility for his many children scattered about his travels. He was a pathetic man in his core but he had a very interesting life and was able to see many cities and meet many people. Grade: B+

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kayleigh

    Wow - what a life. Enthralling, mischievous and sometimes a little creep creep. It's a 4.5 from me. Sometimes I find biographies a bit overwhelming with too much detail and research gone into them - not to say that this book did not have all the research but it read so easily like a gripping story on its own. Mind, this might be because it's hard to believe that some of the stuff Cas got up to were anything but fiction - that naughty devil.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    With a reputation that precedes him, without fail, all readers comes to Casanova with a preconceived notion of him either as the suave seducer with little regard for his partners – a description more accurate of Byron – or that of a philandering fraud who lucked his way through the beds and courts of 18th century Europe. Ian Kelly, however, does not cast Giacomo Casanova as either, nor as swashbuckling, depraved, or the loveable rogue. The key lies in Kelly’s observation of Casanova’s sex life, With a reputation that precedes him, without fail, all readers comes to Casanova with a preconceived notion of him either as the suave seducer with little regard for his partners – a description more accurate of Byron – or that of a philandering fraud who lucked his way through the beds and courts of 18th century Europe. Ian Kelly, however, does not cast Giacomo Casanova as either, nor as swashbuckling, depraved, or the loveable rogue. The key lies in Kelly’s observation of Casanova’s sex life, for which the Venetian is famed. For a supposedly ceaseless appetite for everything carnal, Casanova’s sex life was no more or less active than any of the Grand Tourists* at the time. The only difference being that Casanova took the time to write it all down… and perhaps trailed into somewhat less ‘vanilla’ scenarios. Without glorifying libertine escapades or sugar-coating reprehensible details – such as Casanova’s admission of incest and, by modern standards, paedophilia - a story already lucidly told by its author, Kelly has written a well-rounded and candid biographers account of Casanova’s life. Using Casanova’s own memoirs as the primary source Kelly ensures that the same charm filters down to biographer’s page, then using surviving contemporary sources Kelly corrects Casanova’s intended or innocent mistakes, verifies passages that seem fictional, and where possible unveils the characters in Casanova’s life previous hidden under pseudonyms. It could be argued that singled the memoirs down to a single volume cuts too much out but I believe Kelly’s intentions were to give us an insight of the ‘real man’ behind the Chevalier de Seingalt, the context of which such events occur and the subsequent effect, if you want the whole explicit detail perhaps it would be best to start with the memoirs, The Story of My Life. That being said, having not read that memoirs (though, yes, I have seen the 2005 BBC3 miniseries and listened to an abridged audiobook of Casanova’s Venetian years) I still found this book highly accessible. Written in standard third person non-fictional prose Kelly provides a clear context to Casanova’s life, breaking it down to periods or eras to examine as a whole whereas chronologically some things overlap, such as Casanova’s workings with the French government and his involvement in the cabala. Yet it’s not disjointed, and could easily be read alongside the memoirs in the same way you might read a SparkNotes guide to accompany a book report. As others have pointed out the book does wane a little towards the end, yet this appropriately reflects Casanova as by this period. Casanova did not write in detail about his life as the librarian at Dux, whether he intended to and was interrupted by death we’ll never know, leaving Kelly to piece together the last years from note and letters, no longer having the vibrant memoirs to steer the book forwards. That being said, with the socio-historic context offered I would recommend this biography both to newcomers and well versed fans of Casanova. It was an enjoyable read even if my sympathies for Casanova was lost by the time he reaches his forties, a point when his life turns from florid to sordid thanks to apparently a midlife crisis, with the self-propaganda stripped from his memoirs, the Casanova Kelly leaves us with is one you cannot help but pity a little. For all the less admirable instances in Casanova’s life it is a shame he faded out, reduced to a side note in Dux, after having lived so much, a surprise considering there must have been more than one jealous husband willing to kill him. Of course Casanova is both and neither seducer or fraud, but rather and above all a confident actor playing at being nobility or being love; ever the Venetian laughing at the approaching tide. *Men, often of aristocratic families, travelling Europe with no fixed address and more money than they have sense. Content warnings: Major warning for sexual content, incest, paedophilia. Minor warning for language, gambling, references to the occult. Casanova is his own warning… Casanova by Ian Kelly, Paperback £9.99 , also available in ebook formats and as an abridged audiobook.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Oldroses

    Like most people, when I hear the name Casanova, I think of sex. Ian Kelly offers a more rounded view of a fascinating man who has come to be defined by a single facet of his complex life. Casanova’s autobiography, “The History of My Life”, offers more than the story of one man’s life. It allows us a unique glimpse into the life of people from all walks of life during the eighteenth century. He mingled with prostitutes and kings, actors and bishops, a Tsarina and famous courtesans, nobility and t Like most people, when I hear the name Casanova, I think of sex. Ian Kelly offers a more rounded view of a fascinating man who has come to be defined by a single facet of his complex life. Casanova’s autobiography, “The History of My Life”, offers more than the story of one man’s life. It allows us a unique glimpse into the life of people from all walks of life during the eighteenth century. He mingled with prostitutes and kings, actors and bishops, a Tsarina and famous courtesans, nobility and tradesmen. He wrote about all of them, detailing their lives and loves, their triumphs and travails. He seemed to be in perpetual motion, travelling throughout Europe and into Russia, never living anywhere for more than two years. Even his mode of travel was unique. He used public transportation rather than the private coaches used by most travelers of the day. He hitchhiked and even sailed on slave-galleys. He wrote about it all, a veritable treasure trove of information for historians. He details the inns, apartments, castles and prisons where he stayed or was forced to stay. He loved food, leaving a record of hundreds of meals, many of which featured dishes that are mentioned nowhere else and would have been lost to history if not for Casanova’s writings. As for his supposedly insatiable sexual appetite, Mr. Kelly rightly points out that his sex life was normal for men who had no fixed address, constantly moving around. More than a few of his contemporaries recorded more numerous encounters than Casanova. Just like modern times, he contracted sexually transmitted diseases over and over. In fact, syphilis may have caused his death. He was apparently bisexual, enjoying encounters with the occasional man, both singly and as part of group sex. Perhaps the most shocking act he committed was the possible incest with one of his daughters leading to the birth of a son that may or may not have been his. This is an extremely well written book that brings to life both a man and his times. I found it to be totally engrossing for the details it provided of Europe and Russia during the eighteenth century.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Charlie

    The name Casanova comes with a lot of baggage. After reading this book, it turns out Giacomo Casanova was not that different than the others guys in his time, he just took the time to write it all down. He did not sugarcoat it most of the time either, if he messed up, he wrote about it. Casanova's life reads like an 18th century travelogue. There were not many travellers back then, so when an individual visited the staggering amount of cities he did, people can learn many things from his writing The name Casanova comes with a lot of baggage. After reading this book, it turns out Giacomo Casanova was not that different than the others guys in his time, he just took the time to write it all down. He did not sugarcoat it most of the time either, if he messed up, he wrote about it. Casanova's life reads like an 18th century travelogue. There were not many travellers back then, so when an individual visited the staggering amount of cities he did, people can learn many things from his writings about them. Casanova wrote prolifically about food, theatres, books, plays, and yes, women. He writes about meeting Voltaire, Frederick the Great, and Catherine the Great. He was arrested by the Venice Inquisition but escaped from jail. He starts in Venice, goes all over what is now Italy, Paris, most of the Germanic states, St. Petersburg, London, Constantinople, just an amazing number of locales in a time when the vast majority of humans stayed put. This was a very enjoyable read. Ian Kelly obviously spent years combing through the letters and books Casanova left behind and even fact checked them making sure people were where he said they were throughout the 18th century. I learned a lot about 18th century travel and European states of affairs from this book, but it certainly can be shocking with the intense detail of some of his female conquests.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Quirkyreader

    See my review on my book blog: http://quirkyreader.livejournal.com/2... See my review on my book blog: http://quirkyreader.livejournal.com/2...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Latanya (Crafty Scribbles)

    (Review courtesy of http://www.craftyscribbles.com) The story of Casanova writes as myth outweighing reality. In his time, he rattled pearls and purses as he swaggered through eighteenth century societal balls and beds, leaving intrigue to knock on my door. Giacomo Casanova begins his life as a young cleric, only to begin a scandalous affair with a married woman and forced to run to Constantinople. From there, he creates scandal after scandal as he shares his travelogues and conquests with men and (Review courtesy of http://www.craftyscribbles.com) The story of Casanova writes as myth outweighing reality. In his time, he rattled pearls and purses as he swaggered through eighteenth century societal balls and beds, leaving intrigue to knock on my door. Giacomo Casanova begins his life as a young cleric, only to begin a scandalous affair with a married woman and forced to run to Constantinople. From there, he creates scandal after scandal as he shares his travelogues and conquests with men and women. Escaping jail, meeting people centuries from infamy, and raking lovers, far from a gentleman, he leads an interesting yet disarming life (Two moments he describes would be considered rape).  Thankfully, Benedict Cumberbatch holds my attention (as if I'd turn away...pssh...) because Casanova's exploits feel quite creative, almost imagined, leading me to seek other pleasure. I guess for his lovers he came off as delectable and charming (Denial on my part...maybe).  To wander eighteenth century Europe without need for a passport enthralled me. But, to me, he's a hustler, drunken off his on playboy buffoonery: one of which I cannot hide my curiosity. The first half intrigues, but prepare for an inevitable slowdown dragging the pace. Nevertheless, I cannot lie. For his charm and wit alone, lie back (cheeky) and have a read or listen. Then, have a go with someone close. He would have wanted it that way. Benedict Cumberbatch: Yum, er, 5/5. I love that man. Casanova: 3/5 and a cold shower

  10. 5 out of 5

    MAP

    This book follows the life and sexual escapades of Giacomo Casanova, using Casanova's own memoirs as Ian Kelly's main primary source, often backed up or enhanced by other contemporary letters, memoirs, diaries, etc. Casanova's charm immediately shines through on the page, and it's hard not to like him almost instantly. He is the ultimate lovable rake, who doesn't just use and throw away women, but falls a little in love with all the women he beds and often cares for them and protects them along t This book follows the life and sexual escapades of Giacomo Casanova, using Casanova's own memoirs as Ian Kelly's main primary source, often backed up or enhanced by other contemporary letters, memoirs, diaries, etc. Casanova's charm immediately shines through on the page, and it's hard not to like him almost instantly. He is the ultimate lovable rake, who doesn't just use and throw away women, but falls a little in love with all the women he beds and often cares for them and protects them along the way (arranging abortions, marriages, money, etc) and women often came to him for help when they had nowhere else to go (and got a bedding in the process.) Casanova, as is less well known, was also very intelligent and enjoyed discussing philosophy with Voltaire, science with Benjamin Franklin, and astronomy with Catherine the Great. The book clipped along at an exciting pace for the first half of the book, but after Casanova visits London, the books slows down a lot and becomes monotonous -- at this point Casanova is the quintessential wanderer, and the stories and people quickly begin to blend together. There are also times where you get the sense that a certain anecdote or description would have been much more entertaining in Casanova's own original words rather than Kelly's summary. I admit to skimming the last 100 pages. Despite that, I loved and was surprised by Casanova's charm, wit, and personality from this passage on: "Typical of the the young [18 year old] Casanova, his predominant emotion on entering the San Cipriano was to feel slighted by the institution in which he found himself. He was 'insulted' by the need to sit an exam, insisting, correctly, that he was already a doctor [of law], and decided to act the imbecile. He was placed in a class of nine-year-olds studying grammar, until his physics master from La Salute in Venice recognized him."

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    Note: I don't know if the version I read is abridged or not. I only heard the audiobook version because of Benedict Cumberbatch. I honestly had no interest in this type/genre of books, but once in a while a random book may come in my way and when I read it, I fall in love with it, and want more. However, if this was read by any other person I may have lost interest in it from the first chapter. It wasn't as appealing as I thought. There's not much to say. It's just so.. overdramatic. It's as if Ca Note: I don't know if the version I read is abridged or not. I only heard the audiobook version because of Benedict Cumberbatch. I honestly had no interest in this type/genre of books, but once in a while a random book may come in my way and when I read it, I fall in love with it, and want more. However, if this was read by any other person I may have lost interest in it from the first chapter. It wasn't as appealing as I thought. There's not much to say. It's just so.. overdramatic. It's as if Casanova was some person of importance, but not regarded as someone as such. Well he's not. And what's with his obsession with the lottery. Well. That's me ranting. All in all, I don't recommend it, unless it's read by BC.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    It's a miracle! I'm finally finished with this book. Although I liked parts of this book it was dense and long. I chalk it up as good for me because of the history, which I'll admit was very interesting. I did learn quite a bit about life in the 1700s - like how they traveled, lived, and a little about the food. It was also fascinating to learn about the use of condoms back then and some of the names for them. I'm excited for some fiction!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Analee

    This book was an assignment to create a report for a study group to which I belong. It was fascinating! The amount of traveling Casanova did in the 1700s is alone remarkable. Add to this his adventures, both sexual and otherwise, and you can't help but have an interesting read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Guestford_junkie

    I came to this book full of pre-conceptions about what would be contained within the pages. I felt I already knew what I'd read, however I was wrong. It turns out that he was no different to most of the men of that period; he just took the time to write down his escapades. A surprisingly good read!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Elly Sands

    It's not quite fair to give a rating to a book you could only get halfway through. The most interesting part of the book was the history of Venice during the 18th century. Unfortunately,and to my surprise, I found Casanova to be an unlikeable man so I got bored reading about him.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michelle M.

    Really quite difficult to read. Very boring. I know it's a biography and all, but the actual memoirs are by far more interesting to read. The intermezzos although were quite fullfilling and informational about 18th century history in a general perspective.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bella Flynn

    Great book but it lost its charm near the end unfortunately. However I stuck it out and over all it was a good read and interesting. I would still recommend this to anyone with an interest in Giacomo Casanova and his antics. Still worth the 5 stars.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    What an interesting life did Casanova lead. I had no idea he was such a world traveller. Interestingly written biography, yet made ever more vibrant and intriguing by the power and eloquence of Benedict Cumberbatch and his pleasant voice.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Again, the rating reflects my appreciation for the text as if I'd read it, not the fact that I listened to it being read by the heavenly voice of Benedict Cumberbatch.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cody

    Not a bad read, more interesting then i originally thought, but super sexual overall. He was a priest, a spy and over all just very good with blending in with society, but he was also a man-hoe.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Just a lovely, well written, thoughtful, informed and impressively researched book. Casanova will charm you.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Leigh Roberts

    Excellent, best historical biography I've ever read

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brandi

    Casanova was a very interesting man. And gross. He slept with his daughter. Voluntarily. Ew.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Anja Breest

    While part of it was interesting it was a little dry as well. But I enjoyed the voice...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Raven

    Yep, doesn't matter, I'd listen to him read it all.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    Listened to Benedict Cumberbatch narrate the abridged version. Felt like being back in history class when they try to entertain you. Definetely an interesting life!

  27. 5 out of 5

    T.J.

    There are at least two aspects of this book to recommend it. The first is its recreation of life in the gilded cities of 18th century Europe--Venice, Paris, London, Rome, St. Petersburg. The second, of course, is the account of all the romantic adventures, with all the salacious details one would hope, that made Casanova the lover of legend. The story opens in the most serene republic of Venice, a city filled with actors, singers, dancers, and masked revelers, and the author claims that while Casa There are at least two aspects of this book to recommend it. The first is its recreation of life in the gilded cities of 18th century Europe--Venice, Paris, London, Rome, St. Petersburg. The second, of course, is the account of all the romantic adventures, with all the salacious details one would hope, that made Casanova the lover of legend. The story opens in the most serene republic of Venice, a city filled with actors, singers, dancers, and masked revelers, and the author claims that while Casanova was never an actor on a stage, he was ingrained with a kind of theatricality. One telling historical detail: "There was mandatory mask-wearing in Venice, for an entire city, day and night, from October to Ash Wednesday, with a brief break for Christmas; a further fifteen days of carnival was added in the early eighteenth century, around Ascension Day." In addition to getting really tiresome, that's got to mess with you in some way. Venice, also had a dark side. While ostensibly ruled by the doge, or Duke, it was really an oligarchy of rich patrician families enforced by the Council of Ten, and, it’s sub-committee, the Council of Three, referred to more often by their feared ecclesiastical title, The Inquisition. After being expelled from a seminary for alleged homosexual acts, allegedly selling himself and his cabbalistic healing powers to the rich and famous, he is finally arrested and imprisoned. His real crime seems to be transgressing class lines. His escape made him a celebrity and an exile. As he gallivants across Europe, he hob nobs with the greats of the era, Voltaire, Lady Pompadour, Federick the Great of Prussia, Tsarina Catherine the Great and a few popes, all the while bedding the rich and famous, the married and the single, and actresses and courtesans. We read about how he lost his virginity to two sisters, how he was a voyeur in Constantinople, feel in love with a male-impersonator, had his heartbroken by his one true love, and had an affair with a rich nun named M.M. that would make E.L. James blush. In the end, he confesses to at minimum 122 love affairs (less than Lord Byron), six bouts of gonorrhea, and a handful of illegitimate children. The problem, though, with Casanova, and ultimately the book, is that behavior that is wild, roguish, and charming in youth, becomes increasingly despicable later in life. (One of the pleasures in the book is reading all the synonyms for libertine: roue, rake, voluptuary,sybarite, catamite, gadabout ; another is reading all of the 18th century slang for ...other things: Merryland, English riding coats, the school boy's solution). Early in his life, Casanova is a lover, who rescues women, protects them, treats them with chivalry and seduces them with pleasure; by middle age, he is a con man, swindling old ladies, purchasing a Russian serf (he named Zaire!), advertising for mistresses in English newspapers, passing on venereal disease, and even committing two murders (one is an accidental overdose; the other was probably self-defense.) But it is his alleged incest and his political treachery that are most disturbing. I'll end with one funny anecdote that captures the two sides of Casanova's personality--his wit, intelligence, humor, and his cruelty, selfishness, and pettiness: After a particularly tension-filled romance gone wrong, he bought a parrot, which he left at London's Royal Exchange once he had taught it to say, ‘Mademoiselle Charpillon is more of a whore than even her mother.’

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jule

    I gave it an extra star just because it was read to me by Benedict Cumberbatch and that's literally a dream come true.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    Ian Kelly's fascinating biography of the world's most famous lover and libertine. Published by Hodder & Stoughton on 26 Jun 2008. Blurbification - Giacomo Casanova: one of the most beguiling and controversial individuals of his or any age. Braggart or perfect lover? Conman or genius? He made and lost fortunes, founded two state lotteries, wrote various plays, philosophical and mathematical treatises, opera libretti, poetry, and forty-two books. His 3,600 pages of memoirs recorded hundreds of meals Ian Kelly's fascinating biography of the world's most famous lover and libertine. Published by Hodder & Stoughton on 26 Jun 2008. Blurbification - Giacomo Casanova: one of the most beguiling and controversial individuals of his or any age. Braggart or perfect lover? Conman or genius? He made and lost fortunes, founded two state lotteries, wrote various plays, philosophical and mathematical treatises, opera libretti, poetry, and forty-two books. His 3,600 pages of memoirs recorded hundreds of meals as well, of course, as his affairs and sexual encounters with dozens of women and a handful of men and have bought him two centuries of notoriety. Now, in CASANOVA, Ian Kelly reveals previously unpublished documents by Giacomo himself, as well as his friends and lovers, which give new insights into his life and his world. From his devotion to the Kaballah to his collaboration with Mozart on his opera Don Giovanni, from his vast appetite for food and sex to his training for priesthood, this is the fascinating story of an icon of his age and ours.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeana Salman

    This is hard to rate. While is had elements that I respect and enjoy: great writing and meticulously executed research, it also faced the challenge of condensing a whole life full of adventure into one mere volume. On this, I would have preferred a different approach. It simply had too much detail in places to read non-stop. I read this over a few weeks. Sections were fascinating, particularly about the political and thought culture at the time, however I could rarely read a whole chapter withou This is hard to rate. While is had elements that I respect and enjoy: great writing and meticulously executed research, it also faced the challenge of condensing a whole life full of adventure into one mere volume. On this, I would have preferred a different approach. It simply had too much detail in places to read non-stop. I read this over a few weeks. Sections were fascinating, particularly about the political and thought culture at the time, however I could rarely read a whole chapter without having to resist the urge to skim read.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.