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A Small Fiction

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At night, the trees whispered. Told ghost stories, their leaves trembling. Remembered the fallen. Joked. Dry laughter rustled the dark. A Small Fiction is what happens when a writer wants to tell a hundred stories but doesn't have the time to write a hundred books. Instead, he writes the seeds of them and casts them to the wind. What started as an exercise in creativity on socia At night, the trees whispered. Told ghost stories, their leaves trembling. Remembered the fallen. Joked. Dry laughter rustled the dark. A Small Fiction is what happens when a writer wants to tell a hundred stories but doesn't have the time to write a hundred books. Instead, he writes the seeds of them and casts them to the wind. What started as an exercise in creativity on social media has grown to become a wonderful compendium of thoughts on humanity, storytelling and finding the absurd in the everyday. Every story in the collection is distinct, and while some play on common themes each story stands on its own. Through the genre lenses of science fiction, fantasy, contemporary fiction, folklore, and humour each of these small fictions is a peephole that reveals a bigger story.


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At night, the trees whispered. Told ghost stories, their leaves trembling. Remembered the fallen. Joked. Dry laughter rustled the dark. A Small Fiction is what happens when a writer wants to tell a hundred stories but doesn't have the time to write a hundred books. Instead, he writes the seeds of them and casts them to the wind. What started as an exercise in creativity on socia At night, the trees whispered. Told ghost stories, their leaves trembling. Remembered the fallen. Joked. Dry laughter rustled the dark. A Small Fiction is what happens when a writer wants to tell a hundred stories but doesn't have the time to write a hundred books. Instead, he writes the seeds of them and casts them to the wind. What started as an exercise in creativity on social media has grown to become a wonderful compendium of thoughts on humanity, storytelling and finding the absurd in the everyday. Every story in the collection is distinct, and while some play on common themes each story stands on its own. Through the genre lenses of science fiction, fantasy, contemporary fiction, folklore, and humour each of these small fictions is a peephole that reveals a bigger story.

30 review for A Small Fiction

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mary Catelli

    A collection. Of very short stories. SF. Fantasy. Mundane. Surreal. Horror. Some clunkers. Most with bite.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tonyia Little

    I loved this. I only read a few pages everyday, so that I could fully enjoy each little story. I follow him on instagram, and there is always something thought provoking, funny, or both. My daughter and I both gifted this book to each other for Christmas. And that was NOT a planned exchange.

  3. 5 out of 5

    E.Y.E.-D

    This was a super fast and very fun read. I backed this project on unbound.com and am very happy I did so. There are so many great little stories in here, some make you think and some just make you happy. I recommend this to anyone who wants to smile.

  4. 4 out of 5

    John Warner

    A quick read but an enjoyable one. Crafted micro-stories that in three lines often tell more than 300 page novels.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    4.5/5

  6. 5 out of 5

    Glenna

    Wonderful small fictions and accompanying illustrations. Each little gem has a something special to recommend it: humor, wit, pathos, insight, prescience, tenderness, etc. Marked quite a few to read again and again!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Johnny

    A book full of tweet-sized stories that give you a lot to think about. They look so simple and short, but I am constantly surprised how deep they can go. I enjoyed reading them very much and will often return just to reread a few random stories.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Denise Cardoza

    I’m so happy I supported the pre-sale funding of this gem of a book. Two brothers, author and illustrator, 200 little stories (140 characters or less) that made me appreciate the power of words like never before! This book is substantial in your hand with a beautiful cover and glossy pages! It would make a wonderful gift for the upcoming holiday season. You won’t be disappointed!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Peer Sangngern

    This may be a late review, but no book has made me feel sooooo many different things with such few words. It is by no means a hard or long read, but the way each "small fiction" is written, makes you think and feel such different things. Each entry is usually not related to any other but it doesn't detract from the overall sense while reading it. If someone asked me for a book recommendation for absolutely anyone, it would be this book. So in short, READ THIS BOOK.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Heathermomo

    A charming little book of super short tales with delightful illustrations. I came across this on Instagram and treated myself to the book. It's an ideal book for the smallest room where you can pick it up, read a few tales, then set aside for a later visit 😊

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    A unique microstory format that can be previewed on the A Small Fiction twitter account, with some stories accompanied by clever illustrations. Covered the full range of emotions, from hilarious to spooky, with some repetition of themes grouped together (e.g. AI, ghosts). A really fun short read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matt J. King

    Ricky short fiction - and totally worth it Mostly funny and often poignant, these terse tales are entertaining, full of wit, and will make you stop and go "hmm." If you're not sure if you're ready to commit to that next novel, this little gem is a breath of fresh air for you.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chantal Jandard

    Cute, thoughtful and fun.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sean Dolan

    A naturally quick read, but a lot of fun with some excellent stories included and charming minimal art.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Zuz reads

    Funny. Smart. Full of word play and smile inducing references to pop culture, fairy tales and mythology. Quick enjoyable read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Federico

    Nice, little stories

  17. 4 out of 5

    Remo

    Doscientas historias contadas en lo que ocupaba un antiguo tuit, 140 caracteres. Las hay de todos los tipos: Humor negro: As he put the hat on the snowman, it came to life. “Why do I exist?” it asked. “If I melt, do I die?” “Whoops,” he said, and took the hat. No one had come to his Halloween party. That or all his guests had dressed as ghosts, and their costumes were amazing. “Will I always be unhappy?” he asked. The oracle plucked and peered at the threads of his fate. “No,” she said, “eventually Doscientas historias contadas en lo que ocupaba un antiguo tuit, 140 caracteres. Las hay de todos los tipos: Humor negro: As he put the hat on the snowman, it came to life. “Why do I exist?” it asked. “If I melt, do I die?” “Whoops,” he said, and took the hat. No one had come to his Halloween party. That or all his guests had dressed as ghosts, and their costumes were amazing. “Will I always be unhappy?” he asked. The oracle plucked and peered at the threads of his fate. “No,” she said, “eventually you will die.” “See? Faster is better,” said Hare, after easily winning the race. “Maybe. Rematch?” said Tortoise. “You’re on. When?” “In fifty years.” Greguerías: The dog’s tail wagged. It was his tail’s job: to synchronize all nearby moods to the measure of his joy. A metronome of happiness. Reflexiones buenistas: “People are still good, mostly,” she said. “Not from what I’m hearing,” he said. “Love is quieter than gunshots. But there’s more of it.” And God said, “Let there be dog,” and there was dog. God saw that dog was good, and said, “Who’s a good dog?” And it was dog. Yes it was. Humor (o intentos de humor) Ownership is an illusion, the cat knew. Nothing is forever. They needed to learn. He began pushing another cup toward the table’s edge. “Oh, but Grandma, what large eyes you have!” exclaimed Red. “Thank you?” “And what large EARS you have!” “This is getting super rude.” “Can’t talk now, I’m driving,” I texted. “k, drive safe,” he replied. “I think you mean drive safely,” I typed as I veered off the bridge. “Mom, I think there’s a monster in my closet!” said Jeremy. “Go to sleep, Jeremy,” she said. “Yeah, shut up Jeremy,” said the closet. “Better to have loved and lost,” he said, “than never love at all.” “Is it?” she asked. “How so?” “Hm,” he said. “Well. Goodbye, anyhow.” “I challenge you to a duel!” “Very well. The weapon?” “Compliments.” “A capital choice.” “Thank you, I– oh! I see you’ve dueled before!” We scattered our signals across the cosmos, searching for life. When the reply came from the stars, it decoded to one word: “Unsubscribe.” Humor basado en obras clásicas: “How curious,” Alice said, “this bottle says ‘Drink Me’ on it!” And so she did, because apparently her parents had done a very poor job. The rose on the mantle lost another petal. Time was running out, and the Beast had begun to panic. “I should just swipe everyone right.” “Kiss me,” said the frog, “and I’ll turn into a prince!” The princess thought it over. “I don’t see the upside for me “Well, I am rich where it counts: in friendship,” I said. Robin Hood, clearly disappointed, shoved my friends in his bag. “It’ll have to do.” “Well you know, whenever one door closes, another opens,” he said. “Does it? What a strange house you have.” “We think it may be haunted.” Reflexiones menos buenistas y más íntimas: “I suppose this is goodbye.” “Maybe, but we’ll always have Rome.” “We never went to Rome.” “I know. Regrets last longer than memories.” If time was a river, she felt like a skipped stone. Memories of touching here, here, here. Her flight too fast, too brief. Too soon sunk. Humor con referencias no explícitas (es muy probable que más de una de ellas se me haya pasado por alto): Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one that my phone’s GPS said was shorter by two minutes. And that has made all the difference. “But, Jesus,” the man said, “when I look back I see only one set of tracks.” “Those are train tracks,” Jesus said. “Stop walking on those.” El libro se lee con una sonrisa. Aparezco entre los mecenas, lo cual le da puntos (a mis ojos, anyway). Un últimi detalle: el autor usó uno de los textos, en los que el narrador le pide a la lectora que se case con él, para declararse de verdad a su mujer: I did.— A Small Fiction (@ASmallFiction) April 22, 2019

  18. 4 out of 5

    Liam

    I rather liked this collection of hyper-short stories. It reminded me of reading "Oyster Boy" by director Tim Burton as a teenager: charmingly illustrated, superficially naive yet with a dark underbelly. Like that, but more grown up, yet not totally. It's themes are satisfyingly narrow. That is to say, that one returns to the same ideas again and again in a way that pleases, like a running joke. Such recurrent themes include: Death visiting the living; ghosts haunting (this is a very populous cat I rather liked this collection of hyper-short stories. It reminded me of reading "Oyster Boy" by director Tim Burton as a teenager: charmingly illustrated, superficially naive yet with a dark underbelly. Like that, but more grown up, yet not totally. It's themes are satisfyingly narrow. That is to say, that one returns to the same ideas again and again in a way that pleases, like a running joke. Such recurrent themes include: Death visiting the living; ghosts haunting (this is a very populous category); wizards granting wishes, dogs talking to humans; children reckoning with unseen monsters; men setting out on a long and dusty (/snowy/leafy) road; writers struggling with a blank page; robots with human emotions; and such other familiar setups. Miller often writes mere joke, often heavy with literary wordplay ("little death said it would be a good date", "stared daggers bounced off thick skin", "he screamed but the soil above his coffin remained unmoved"). Often they are very good ones... "Will you share your wisdom, Owl?" said Lark. "Is wisdom shared? Or earned?" said Owl. "So wise!" Owl couldn't believe that kept working. p. 84 ...and worse ones (often being more at home in pop-culture obsessed meme humour than a literary work)... "Are those Sesame Street figurines?" he asked. "Yup," she said. "You've got so many! Is it a complete collection?" "Oh, I've lost Count." ... but can also access profundity when he turns cliches into philosophy: The wizard waved his hand. "Done. You'll never be sad again." "Will I be happy?" she asked. He shrugged. "Joy is a simpler magic than mine" p.16 His future branched ahead, a tree of possibility. With each failure, a branch was severed. Pruned, he hoped, so better things could grow. p.52 Yet one thing that I did not enjoy so much was the recurrent theme of aliens visiting the earth to shame us for our misdeeds. Because the stories rely on such archetypal foundations, we are asked to presume a sort of kinship with the aliens: as with much science fiction, aliens are beings who are more advanced and more intelligent. The presumption of superiority and smirking condescension towards mankind began to irk me the more it was, without much elaboration, repeated, sometimes with Aliens; sometimes with enlightened future humans. The odd thing was that the other themes - equally familiar concepts and equally small in their variation -gave me delight to see crop up time and time again. Yet this single extra terrestrial theme got under my skin the more it came up: "Are you here to conquer Earth?" The aliens exchanged a look. "No," one said, "this is more like an intervention. You guys need to relax." p. 34 We broadcast a message into space. One word. "Help," it said. Ships showed up the next day. Scores of them. "We thought you'd never ask." p.67 "We saw your distress flares, get in!" the aliens said. "They're fireworks. To celebrate?" "Oh. We've been watching you and just assumed." p.98 The plague spread across the world, killing everything it touched. But it turned inward, self-destructed. The humans, at last, died out. p. 68 "What's this?" "That's an ancient map." "Then what are these lines?" "'Borders'. The ancient ones used them to decide who to care about." p. 139 When the ships appeared we thought they wanted war, to conquer Earth and take all we'd built. It was worse. They ignored us, and moved on. p. 188 The work is quite dark in other aspects, but the terrestrial example seem to touch upon unhappiness and disappointment with more good humour and self-consciousness. Those others seem to shine a light on an unhappiness inherent to the world. These, on the other hand, seem more sincere statements of a sort of unhappiness inherent to the author: how he regards humankind. Still, I was intrigued -though displeased- by this inclination of the author, and otherwise pleased to see into Miller's curious world; and would be pleased to read more serious poetry or prose from him. I shall end this review with two of my favourites, from the perspective of language: He'd had enough of sky and grass, he left them on the shore. He built a ship of stone and glass, and sailed the ocean floor. p. 147 "They always try to cheat," said Death "But have no hope of winning. And so they lose, and cry, and yet - Inside, their skulls are grinning." p.159

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tsh Oxenreider

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mariya

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jason RB

  22. 4 out of 5

    Maryam Majed

  23. 4 out of 5

    John Farmer

  24. 4 out of 5

    Clarke O'gara

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

  26. 5 out of 5

    Monika

  27. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

  28. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

  29. 4 out of 5

    James Goux

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kieran

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