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It's the Economy, Stupid

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Since the end of World War II, most people around the world regarded the United States as the land of opportunity. The baby boomers and Generation X knew it best as "the land of milk and honey." It was a place where people could easily raise a family and with hard work could achieve anything they set their mind to. The American Dream, a dream of a land where life is Since the end of World War II, most people around the world regarded the United States as the land of opportunity. The baby boomers and Generation X knew it best as "the land of milk and honey." It was a place where people could easily raise a family and with hard work could achieve anything they set their mind to. The American Dream, a dream of a land where life is better, richer and fuller for everyone, was alive. Much has changed, though, in the past four decades. Most Americans today do not realize that since the early 1990s, when the world markets began to merge and globalization took place, America went through a major transformation. Today, the America of yesterday, a place where children grew up to ultimately earn more than their parents, is no longer reality but, in most cases, just wishful thinking. In today's globalized world, working in America no longer feels any different than earning a living in Europe or Japan. Indeed, income levels and employment opportunities now appear to be similar. Are they, though? Do Americans still have the edge or has the American Dream finally slipped away? Is it possible to conceive that American workers could be disadvantaged when compared to those living and working in other countries? While most people live their everyday lives never knowing, one thing is clear. Anxiety about the future is in the air, but what causes it? Can the past be restored? One thing is certain. Americans cannot afford to remain complacent with the status quo.


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Since the end of World War II, most people around the world regarded the United States as the land of opportunity. The baby boomers and Generation X knew it best as "the land of milk and honey." It was a place where people could easily raise a family and with hard work could achieve anything they set their mind to. The American Dream, a dream of a land where life is Since the end of World War II, most people around the world regarded the United States as the land of opportunity. The baby boomers and Generation X knew it best as "the land of milk and honey." It was a place where people could easily raise a family and with hard work could achieve anything they set their mind to. The American Dream, a dream of a land where life is better, richer and fuller for everyone, was alive. Much has changed, though, in the past four decades. Most Americans today do not realize that since the early 1990s, when the world markets began to merge and globalization took place, America went through a major transformation. Today, the America of yesterday, a place where children grew up to ultimately earn more than their parents, is no longer reality but, in most cases, just wishful thinking. In today's globalized world, working in America no longer feels any different than earning a living in Europe or Japan. Indeed, income levels and employment opportunities now appear to be similar. Are they, though? Do Americans still have the edge or has the American Dream finally slipped away? Is it possible to conceive that American workers could be disadvantaged when compared to those living and working in other countries? While most people live their everyday lives never knowing, one thing is clear. Anxiety about the future is in the air, but what causes it? Can the past be restored? One thing is certain. Americans cannot afford to remain complacent with the status quo.

51 review for It's the Economy, Stupid

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Connor

    I wasn't really sure what to expect when I requested this book from Netgalley, but it turns out this was a good pick for me. If, like me, you're sick and tired of non-stop partisan propaganda, this book will provide you with unbiased facts. The fact that I have to specify unbiased facts, as if there are any other kinds of facts, is really much of the problem. And it's embarrassing to admit this, as I consider myself well-educated enough to be logical and objective, but even I have fallen prey to I wasn't really sure what to expect when I requested this book from Netgalley, but it turns out this was a good pick for me. If, like me, you're sick and tired of non-stop partisan propaganda, this book will provide you with unbiased facts. The fact that I have to specify unbiased facts, as if there are any other kinds of facts, is really much of the problem. And it's embarrassing to admit this, as I consider myself well-educated enough to be logical and objective, but even I have fallen prey to the machinations of the media. Don't get me wrong. I am disgusted by the lack of coverage of issues that really matter. But I have allowed myself to watch discussion panels to obtain differing points of view. I have a tendency to shut down when people use inflammatory language, and I'm realizing maybe that's because I instinctively know that when someone resorts to insults and repetition of sound bytes, they've probably been brainwashed already. This book made me realize just how prevalent that is — and it goes both ways. Overall, I would have to say this book was both enlightening and depressing. The author points out that if the minimum wage had risen along with worker productivity and inflation since the early 1950s, today it would have been set at $21.72 per hour! And, this little factoid was particularly depressing: “Due to the rising debt, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that in the next twenty years, the annual income of a family of four (when adjusted for inflation) will be worth $16,000 less than today! A disturbing estimate not only for the 44 percent of people whose earnings today can buy less than the minimum wage in 1968, but to every American, since within the next two decades, with the value of the dollar going down and the cost of living going up, millions more will be joining those already struggling to make ends meet.” No discussion of the economy would be complete without addressing the military industrial complex as well as propaganda. This quote from Hitler's propaganda chief, Herman Goering was particularly chilling: “Of course the people don't want war. But after all, it's the leaders of the country who determine the policy, and it's always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it's a democracy, a fascist dictatorship, or a parliament, or a communist dictatorship. Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked, and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to greater danger.” The book is chock-full of charts and graphs and numbers to prove the points, and he even finishes with a list of very sensible suggestions to fix things. The problem is that groups have become so polarized to one another that it's difficult to find people who are willing to listen. And it may be even more difficult to effect change at the federal level because the people in power don't want to change anything because it's working for them. Ultimately, I finished this book with very mixed feelings: anger, frustration, despondency, and maybe a little bit of hope. I’m trying to hold on to the hope. I recommend the book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chris Schultz

    This book will bring you to the sober realization that the United States is not the great country that you think it is. So many of our perceptions of our economic well being are sorely misplaced. Through some historical perspective and hard factual statistics, Djonis presents us with irrefutable facts that show how we as a country have lost our compass and thus, our standing in the world. He backs these observations with nearly 22 pages of sources, including many government bureaus and leading This book will bring you to the sober realization that the United States is not the great country that you think it is. So many of our perceptions of our economic well being are sorely misplaced. Through some historical perspective and hard factual statistics, Djonis presents us with irrefutable facts that show how we as a country have lost our compass and thus, our standing in the world. He backs these observations with nearly 22 pages of sources, including many government bureaus and leading economists. This should be required reading for all college entrants. Far from having an agenda for or against capitalism, the book is filled with charts and graphs that provide the reader with hard facts, letting the reader come to his/her own conclusions.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Vincent Schaefer

    I won this in a good reads giveaway. I enjoyed this book. It was well researched. I did learn some facts I was not aware of. Other reviewers mentioned the author had an agenda. I did not feel that way. Sadly, everything today gets put in a political party bucket.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nan Williams

    The author clearly has an agenda for pushing socialism as a replacement for the American capitalist economy. He has lots and lots of charts throughout the book. It was not enjoyable and disturbing rather than enlightening. I can not recommend this book and will not seek others by this author. NetGalley and the publisher, Page Publishing, Inc., made this ARC available to me in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carol Turner

    The most readable economics book I've seen in a long while. While Djonis has a political slant, he generally explains well enough that even those who don't agree with him will read on - and maybe be convinced. If I weren't convinced by what he says, the bibliography could keep me busy for weeks.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Timothy

    A must read! This book details all of the economic woes and how we got there. It offers advice on how to fix the problems. Depressingly, we will never get there when the voting public only seeks confirmation of what it already believes and closes its mind to new ideas.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cristina

    // I received this book free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This short book is a quick n' easy dive into the economy of United States. How did our democracy achieve this level of corporatism? What effects have the booming military-industrial complex and the War on Drugs had on our budget? And of course, what is the state of our welfare system and what are some options for correcting the course of our deficit? The text has clearly been well researched, but it was a bit // I received this book free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This short book is a quick n' easy dive into the economy of United States. How did our democracy achieve this level of corporatism? What effects have the booming military-industrial complex and the War on Drugs had on our budget? And of course, what is the state of our welfare system and what are some options for correcting the course of our deficit? The text has clearly been well researched, but it was a bit disappointing to only hear one side of every argument. Overall, Djonis has presented his statistically informed opinions in this "passion project" while steering clear of other perspectives. Still an interesting and clearly well-researched read, but it leaves me wanting more information, really just a more critical dissection of the economic solutions posited.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Connie Flynn

    This book should be read by everyone in the country who is over twelve. This is a political book, but not political. Instead it lays out the problems and then does something very rare. Suggest intelligent solutions. I recommend this book to anyone interested in understanding what our crazy economy is about. Afterwards, you'll never cast an uneducated vote.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Melinda M

    It's the Economy, Stupid by Christos A. Djonis and is about the economy. It was disappointing as it pushes a socialism agenda. Christos A. Djonis offers only one side of the argument . It is a quick read. the best part of the book is that Christos A. Djonis does a good job of explaining economy terms. I received a copy thru a Goodreads Giveaway.

  10. 5 out of 5

    J

    As the subtitle says, this book is a "quick evaluation" of some important issues in the U.S. economy. It's easy to read, fairly short, not dry, explains jargon, and has plenty of graphics to make the info easier to understand. It'd be a great read for anyone who knows very little about the economy but would like to start to understand it better.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Seth

    This book is pretty much a summary of the current state of the U.S. economy; save yourselves some money and google the chapter titles and you’ll get the same info. The author’s solutions are very general, and show no original insight into the issues. He also does not connect the state of the economy to how Trump won. I got this book via a goodreads giveaway.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tena

    I won a kindle version #GoodreadsGiveaway

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    Djonis admits right away that he is not a professional economist. He is a business owner and avid researcher. He wanted to better understand what voters thought of the 2016 presidential candidates, the federal court, and the economy. This book is the result. He begins by helping readers understand economic terms and the fundamentals of the U S economy and how the actions of politicians affect it. I found the definitions a bit hard to understand and had to reread some several times before they Djonis admits right away that he is not a professional economist. He is a business owner and avid researcher. He wanted to better understand what voters thought of the 2016 presidential candidates, the federal court, and the economy. This book is the result. He begins by helping readers understand economic terms and the fundamentals of the U S economy and how the actions of politicians affect it. I found the definitions a bit hard to understand and had to reread some several times before they became clear. However, the rest of the book was great. I did not know to the degree the quality of life in the U S had declined in the last forty years. With stagnating wages, one in three Americans “cannot sustain themselves without some form of government assistance.” (110/1281) In other words, they live below the poverty line. Employee benefits are not regulated in the U S so the U S employee benefits rank at the bottom of industrialized nations. (141/1281) Djonis writes about corporations, their lobbying and how government policy is manipulated. There is a great amount of well presented information included in this book. I can tell he has done a great deal of research. He gives many graphs and charts to illustrate his findings. He adds what he thinks should be done to strengthen the U S economy and draw down the ever growing national debt. I recommend this book to readers who would like to understand how the U S economy works. You'll find lots of information on corporations, wages, medical expenses and more. You'll also be encouraged to take action. Unfortunately, most of that action would need to be taken by our representatives and senators. I think the economic future of the U S looks dim. I received a complimentary egalley of this book through NetGalley. My comments are an independent and honest review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  15. 4 out of 5

    Heatherton

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cristy

  17. 5 out of 5

    Katline Craig

  18. 5 out of 5

    Paul Vittay

  19. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Olechowski

  21. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cristina

    This short book is a quick n' easy dive into the economy of United States. How did our democracy achieve this level of corporatism? What effects have the booming military-industrial complex and the War on Drugs had on our budget? And of course, what is the state of our welfare system and what are some options for correcting the course of our deficit? The text has clearly been well researched, but it was a bit disappointing to only hear one side of every argument. Overall, Djonis has presented This short book is a quick n' easy dive into the economy of United States. How did our democracy achieve this level of corporatism? What effects have the booming military-industrial complex and the War on Drugs had on our budget? And of course, what is the state of our welfare system and what are some options for correcting the course of our deficit? The text has clearly been well researched, but it was a bit disappointing to only hear one side of every argument. Overall, Djonis has presented his statistically informed opinions in this "passion project." Still an interesting and clearly well-researched read, but it leaves me wanting more information, really just a more critical dissection of the economic solutions posited.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gabe

  24. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Carol

  26. 5 out of 5

    Micielle

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Heare Watts

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kara Lauren

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kim Ellis

  31. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Baker

  32. 4 out of 5

    Siddharth Honnihal

  33. 5 out of 5

    Lewis Isaacs

  34. 5 out of 5

    Fran Whitley

  35. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  36. 5 out of 5

    Debee Sue

  37. 5 out of 5

    Clipinchick

  38. 5 out of 5

    Abbie

  39. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Lackey

  40. 4 out of 5

    As The Page Turns

  41. 4 out of 5

    Heatherton

  42. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

  43. 5 out of 5

    Erin

  44. 4 out of 5

    Eric Railine

  45. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  46. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Lane

  47. 5 out of 5

    Peg

  48. 5 out of 5

    Pam Furmon

  49. 4 out of 5

    Joan

  50. 4 out of 5

    Alexandria

  51. 4 out of 5

    Vitus Liske

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