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This eBook features the unabridged text of ‘The Complete Short Stories’ from the bestselling edition of ‘The Complete Works of Anton Chekhov’. Having established their name as the leading publisher of classic literature and art, Delphi Classics produce publications that are individually crafted with superior formatting, while introducing many rare texts for the first time This eBook features the unabridged text of ‘The Complete Short Stories’ from the bestselling edition of ‘The Complete Works of Anton Chekhov’. Having established their name as the leading publisher of classic literature and art, Delphi Classics produce publications that are individually crafted with superior formatting, while introducing many rare texts for the first time in digital print. The Delphi Classics edition of Chekhov includes original annotations and illustrations relating to the life and works of the author, as well as individual tables of contents, allowing you to navigate eBooks quickly and easily. eBook features: * The complete unabridged text of ‘The Complete Short Stories’ * Beautifully illustrated with images related to Chekhov’s works * Individual contents table, allowing easy navigation around the eBook * Excellent formatting of the text


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This eBook features the unabridged text of ‘The Complete Short Stories’ from the bestselling edition of ‘The Complete Works of Anton Chekhov’. Having established their name as the leading publisher of classic literature and art, Delphi Classics produce publications that are individually crafted with superior formatting, while introducing many rare texts for the first time This eBook features the unabridged text of ‘The Complete Short Stories’ from the bestselling edition of ‘The Complete Works of Anton Chekhov’. Having established their name as the leading publisher of classic literature and art, Delphi Classics produce publications that are individually crafted with superior formatting, while introducing many rare texts for the first time in digital print. The Delphi Classics edition of Chekhov includes original annotations and illustrations relating to the life and works of the author, as well as individual tables of contents, allowing you to navigate eBooks quickly and easily. eBook features: * The complete unabridged text of ‘The Complete Short Stories’ * Beautifully illustrated with images related to Chekhov’s works * Individual contents table, allowing easy navigation around the eBook * Excellent formatting of the text

30 review for The Complete Short Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Vit Babenco

    There are thirty-four stories by the master in this volume and I might write about every single one in the book – they’re all like pearls: some just a little bit bigger and some just a little bit smaller… Vanka Zhukov, a nine-year-old boy, sent three months earlier to be apprenticed to the shoemaker Aliakhin, did not go to bed on Christmas eve. He waited till master and apprentices went to church, then took a bottle of ink and a pen with a rusty nib from the master’s cupboard, spread out a rumple There are thirty-four stories by the master in this volume and I might write about every single one in the book – they’re all like pearls: some just a little bit bigger and some just a little bit smaller… Vanka Zhukov, a nine-year-old boy, sent three months earlier to be apprenticed to the shoemaker Aliakhin, did not go to bed on Christmas eve. He waited till master and apprentices went to church, then took a bottle of ink and a pen with a rusty nib from the master’s cupboard, spread out a rumpled sheet of paper in front of him, and began to write. Before tracing the first letter, he looked fearfully several times at the doors and windows, cast a sidelong glance at the dark icon, surrounded on both sides by long shelves of shoe lasts, and heaved a choking sigh. The paper lay on a bench, and he himself knelt down by the bench. “Dear grandpa, Konstantin Makarych!” he wrote. “So I’m writing you a letter. I wish you a Merry Christmas and all good things from the Lord God. I have no father or mother, you are the only one I have left.” The stories are sad and they are funny… They are full of laughter and they are full of tears… “And yesterday they gave me what-for. The master dragged me out to the yard by the hair and thrashed me with a belt, because I was rocking their baby in the cradle and accidentally fell asleep. And last week the mistress told me to clean a herring, and I started with the tail, so she took the herring and began shoving its head into my mug…” The tales are sweet and they are bitter. The tales are bittersweet. The compassion is blended with irony and misery is mixed with hilarity… In the evening, while we were having tea, the cook served a full plate of gooseberries. They weren’t bought, they were his own gooseberries, the first picked since the bushes were planted. Nikolai Ivanych laughed and gazed silently at the gooseberries for a moment with tears in his eyes – he couldn’t speak for excitement; then he put one berry in his mouth, glanced at me with the triumph of a child who has finally gotten his favorite toy… Humans are quite different – some wish for the stars in their pockets and for some a plateful of gooseberries is enough…

  2. 4 out of 5

    Usman Hickmath

    If a writer who told the stories of ordinary people like you and me, using only few pages, in the 1800s can make us read him in this day and age, he is a true master. Whenever you feel like you are stuck in the world of fantasies, super natural stories and average romance novels, go to Chekhov. He will bring you back to reality.

  3. 5 out of 5

    David Fleming

    The Short Stories of Anton Chekhov Of course, any fan/writer/enthusiast of the short story should read this book! I would recommend reading this in conjunction with either Stephen King's Graveyard Shift or Edgar Allan Poe's collected works. That probably sounds like a strange recommendation but Anton Chekhov was a very caring writer that, as a medical doctor, obviously had access to both the upper and lower rungs of society. His emphasis is more on the broad sweep of society and on emotion. Both The Short Stories of Anton Chekhov Of course, any fan/writer/enthusiast of the short story should read this book! I would recommend reading this in conjunction with either Stephen King's Graveyard Shift or Edgar Allan Poe's collected works. That probably sounds like a strange recommendation but Anton Chekhov was a very caring writer that, as a medical doctor, obviously had access to both the upper and lower rungs of society. His emphasis is more on the broad sweep of society and on emotion. Both King and Poe have a very strong inclination toward the lower depths of mankind and, unlike Chekhov, their stories show a very strong inclination toward structure, particularly toward plot and definite endings. So, by reading a couple collections, someone new to short stories could get a decent feel for the spectrum of possibilities. Of course, there are many other collections to choose from such as "You've Got to Read This" and "Fifty Great American Short Stories." I really can't say enough about this collection. It's to be admired and not imitated. Chekhov's style is one of an infinite number of possibilities. But academic teachers of the short story seem to have been treating it for the past ten years or so as if it were the end-all-be-all. Teaching Chekhov to eager college freshman and first year MFA students who long to pen the next great novel is about the dumbest thing a teacher could do. The reason for this is that Chekhov has no style. So trying to teach a Chekhovian style is obviously a fool's errand. His genius is an outgrowth of both his physician-like caring for all of his countrymen and his encyclopedic knowledge of the places and times in which he lived. 'About Love' may very well be my favorite all-time story and 'Gooseberries' is definitely in my top-five.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dimitris

    I had never read anything by Chekhov before. He's most famous for his plays and I never read those either - I believe plays must be experienced in the theatre and not read at home (I don't like the theatre at all). This is an old volume of some of his shorter works, translated into Greek in the late 60s. OK, what can I write here? The man was a genius and it's a real literary disaster we lost him so young - he died of TB aged 44. I particularly loved the one novel in this collection, Ένα παιδάκι I had never read anything by Chekhov before. He's most famous for his plays and I never read those either - I believe plays must be experienced in the theatre and not read at home (I don't like the theatre at all). This is an old volume of some of his shorter works, translated into Greek in the late 60s. OK, what can I write here? The man was a genius and it's a real literary disaster we lost him so young - he died of TB aged 44. I particularly loved the one novel in this collection, Ένα παιδάκι στην απέραντη Στέπα [“Степь„ ~ The Steppe] (1888), the longest piece in this book (100 pages), but I also adored some of the very short stories like Νύχτα στο νεκροταφείο [“На кладбище„ ~ In the Graveyard] (1884), Βολόντια [“Володя„ ~ Volodya] (1887) and Ο Γιούσεβ [“Гусев„ ~ Goussiev] (1890). Very difficult to create full, three-dimentional characters and to make the reader care about them within 4 pages, Chekhov is a Master at this. The one thing I must say made an impression is how traditional these stories felt. They make old rural Russia of the last decades of the nineteenth century come alive in a loving way and are filled with extremely religious language and attitude (I absolutely loved that!). This volume started with a long literary critique of Chekhov by the Chairman of the Soviet Authors' Committee, written in Stalinist USSR in the early 50s. This author went on and on about how Chekhov was all about Socialism and hate for the Czarist Russian Empire he lived in and all its old customs and beliefs and how it was so sad that he died before witnesing the Revolution a decade later and how contemporary Soviet citizens can appreciate his very insightful writings that foreshadow the new Soviet Motherland... I got nothing of all of that reading these stories! They felt almost moralistic studies of manner! All the characters had God in their mouths at least every second paragraph of every single story. Anything that happened was only because God allowed it and we should all bow to His will. (Russia is so close to Greece!) If there is a willful irony in these portrayals, if he supposedly showed that the Russian people's great Orthodox faith was in reality superficial and fake or that they were not 'woke', I didn't get that at all. I didn't want to either. But it's so interesting that literature can be interpreted in so many different ways.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cátia Vieira

    My first Chekhov ever. I really liked this short story collection! I have a thicker book at home but my brother gifted me this shorter edition a while back so I decided to try this one first! I am obsessed with Russian literature so I am rarely disappointed by a Russian author (*thinking about Gogol*). These short stories have themes in common such as sickness and despair. All of his characters are real, fascinating and universal. And, then, there’s the writing style that is formidable and super My first Chekhov ever. I really liked this short story collection! I have a thicker book at home but my brother gifted me this shorter edition a while back so I decided to try this one first! I am obsessed with Russian literature so I am rarely disappointed by a Russian author (*thinking about Gogol*). These short stories have themes in common such as sickness and despair. All of his characters are real, fascinating and universal. And, then, there’s the writing style that is formidable and super literary yet highly readable. For more reviews, follow me on IG: @booksturnyouon

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jonfaith

    This one recalls beery evenings when I still shuddered from the emotional impact of such simple stories. I suppose most folks at the time - the early 1990s - were swayed by Carver or Bukowski. I worked ALL the ime but recall buying this new at hawley Cooke and then being floored. The Grasshopper is the one which lingers, assuming a parallel position with Joyce's Araby and tales from Sherwood Anderson as the haunting foundation of a life spent between pages.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tess van Brummelen

    "I am going to order you to do something new, if you haven’t done it already. Get a collection of the short stories of Chekhov and read every one. Then read “Youth” by Joseph Conrad. I’m not suggesting that you do these things. I am ordering you to do them." - Kurt Vonnegut's life-advice to his children

  8. 4 out of 5

    Realini

    Anton Pavlovici Cehov aka Chekhov, political commentary That Chekhov is one of the greatest writers it is not for humble me to confirm, emphasize. I am glad that I started reading him from a tender age. For some reason, I remember reading Chekov stories in the mountains, in Predeal. I was in a room near the Orizont hotel, waiting for something and someone to appear. In the meantime I was reading Chekhov, that’s about all I can recall. It is a strange thing, happening to me once in a while- anothe Anton Pavlovici Cehov aka Chekhov, political commentary That Chekhov is one of the greatest writers it is not for humble me to confirm, emphasize. I am glad that I started reading him from a tender age. For some reason, I remember reading Chekov stories in the mountains, in Predeal. I was in a room near the Orizont hotel, waiting for something and someone to appear. In the meantime I was reading Chekhov, that’s about all I can recall. It is a strange thing, happening to me once in a while- another time and place, another book: I have been reading Wuthering Heights, an audio book version, in the Baneasa Forest, some 3-4 years ago. It was raining and I was walking with my borzoi…at that time there were only three of them, now there are five of them. Near the Baneasa forest I have been reading Fathers and Sons and many other books: that’s an area where I walk my dogs every morning and as a side show, I have one book or another. Why I distinctly remember these two? Beats me… Coming back to Chekhov- I have a love hate relationship with the Russians, almost all things Russian. Their literature marked me from the age of 16, when I started reading Dostoyevsky, Gogol and Tolstoy. But this was also a time, when I was enduring shortages, the oppression of the Communist regime brought in by the…Russians. I love my Russian Hounds, bred by the Russian Czars and nearly exterminated by the Bolsheviks. The politics of today’s Russia are horrible. They have a despot ruling the country who stands for everything I hate. There are many similarities between Romanians and Russians, apart from sharing the same Orthodox religion. In fact, I feel that my people are in many ways closer to the Russian “soul „than to the Western spirit, way of thinking. I may be wrong, obviously. Many of the stories of Chekhov have an international flavor; we identify universal values, issues. But many of the twists and plots could have taken place (indeed they actually do) where I live.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Angela Paquin

    My favorites: Gooseberries and Lady with a Dog Without sounding too pseudo-intellectual, I now love Chekov. I used to avoid him like I would avoid men with goatees in coffee-bars, because frankly they would either quote from Baudelaire Fleurs de Mal or Chekov or worse yet have a dog-eared copy of Chekov in their hands while sipping a latte in a coffee bar. We did a staged version of Lady with a LapDog at the ART a couple of years ago and Three Sisters last year. Now I understand his importance in My favorites: Gooseberries and Lady with a Dog Without sounding too pseudo-intellectual, I now love Chekov. I used to avoid him like I would avoid men with goatees in coffee-bars, because frankly they would either quote from Baudelaire Fleurs de Mal or Chekov or worse yet have a dog-eared copy of Chekov in their hands while sipping a latte in a coffee bar. We did a staged version of Lady with a LapDog at the ART a couple of years ago and Three Sisters last year. Now I understand his importance in the theatre and with writing in general. Remember he was a doctor first, a writer second. No one unerstands the subtleties of the human condition like Chekov does. It's a great book to have on the bedstand... When I'm not ready to start a whole book or tired of the New Yorker... An anthology of Chekov's shorts is just what I need to clear my head.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Quite liked this little collection. Makes me want go read some more of his works. No story was bad per se, but there were only like two or three that stood out as beyond average. I do really appreciate his writing style with particular reference to his ability to clearly illustrate his characters. They were the soul of each story.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stephan

    Easygoing stories. Epic style. The stories are transmuting all the way to the point of catharsis. I loved the fact that every story had a point, a message, or critics against the wrongs in society and in humanity. Truly healing and magical.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Klawitter

    "People who lead a solitary existence always have something in their hearts which they are eager to talk about." --from the short story, About Love, Chekhov.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Schow

    Of all the books I could've had checked out when my city shut down for a pandemic, I am glad it was this one. Chekhov has a style that would make even the most absurd situation feel relatable and regular. I spent many nights flipping to a random story and reading, and it did well to get me through the worst of these trying times.

  14. 4 out of 5

    James

    This collection contains only thirteen of the hundreds of stories written by Chekhov. It does not contain the longer stories like The Steppe of Ward No. 6, but it does include a judicious selection by the translator Elisaveta Fen. Chekhov's stories portray individuals and their relations with each other in specific situations. These often demonstrate the results of difficult choices with sometimes devastating results. I particularly enjoyed stories like "Enemies", "Teacher of Literature", and "Th This collection contains only thirteen of the hundreds of stories written by Chekhov. It does not contain the longer stories like The Steppe of Ward No. 6, but it does include a judicious selection by the translator Elisaveta Fen. Chekhov's stories portray individuals and their relations with each other in specific situations. These often demonstrate the results of difficult choices with sometimes devastating results. I particularly enjoyed stories like "Enemies", "Teacher of Literature", and "The Cross of Anna". Each of these were a little further developed than some of the briefer sketches. "The Cross of Anna" tells of the loss of innocence of a young girl when she marries a pompous and boring middle-aged man, with the idea of helping her young motherless brothers and a weak father who is a drunkard. At first she is dominated by her older husband, but when noticed by the governor of the province at a charity ball she is launched into provincial society. Her enjoyment of the new pleasures this brings turns her head away from her family and leads her to despise and defy her husband. In response to her success with the governor he awards her husband the cross of Anna, which he wears on a ribbon around his neck. This is the source of the Russian idiom, 'Anna around his neck' describing an unwanted burden. "Teacher of Literature" portrays a favorite Chekhovian theme -- the emptiness of material prosperity and the tedium of provincial life with the gradual erosion of the 'happiness' of a young man. While "Enemies" is the story of a clash between classes with a relatively poor doctor juxtaposed with a wealthy landowner. Surprisingly Chekhov explicitly states the moral of the necessity for greater tolerance and understanding between different types of people at the end of the story. The most notable aspect in my reading was the modern feeling that I encountered in reading Chekhov. These stories, while set in a very different place and time are still relevant in the twenty-first century. The irony and sometimes melancholy nature of the stories shapes the realism that is found throughout Chekhov..

  15. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I won't attempt to review the writing itself, Anton Chekhov is someone anyone interested in good literature should experience for themselves; he's one of my all-time favorite writers. To be honest, I suggest if you really want to read Chekhov, don't look at too many, if any at all, reviews of his work (or at least don't take them to heart), many people have conflicting critical views of himself and his writing, the best way to get to know Chekhov is in a personal way, by delving into his work wi I won't attempt to review the writing itself, Anton Chekhov is someone anyone interested in good literature should experience for themselves; he's one of my all-time favorite writers. To be honest, I suggest if you really want to read Chekhov, don't look at too many, if any at all, reviews of his work (or at least don't take them to heart), many people have conflicting critical views of himself and his writing, the best way to get to know Chekhov is in a personal way, by delving into his work without preconceived notions. Yet now, I will review this collection and translation. First off, any Norton Critical edition is a good buy, there are always great and insightful essays about the writer and the work itself included. This is by no means a comprehensive collection of Chekhov's short stories, not even close, plenty of his better known works are not included, though plenty of them are too. Either way, this is a wonderful introduction to the writing of a very talented man. The translation itself is good in my opinion, though good translation is 'in the eye of the beholder' really, it may not be what everyone considers the best, but it is a translation that captures Chekhov's style well. I suggest that anyone really interested in finding "the best", or rather their favorite, translation of anything, simply look at different ones and compare them; the Garnett translations are all available for free online. Still, there isn't too much difference between many of the popular translations of Chekhov's short stories. I'll end this by once again commending Anton Chekhov, his writing is wonderful and unique, it will really make you think, and every story in this collection is worth reading many times over.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Omar

    I dont know if this review can warrant justice to the magnificence and brilliance of Anton Chekhov. All you need to do is read one story. That's all. And you'll be finding any time possible to read each and every other remaining story. Each of the Russian greats have their talents of analyzing the human psych. For Chekhov, his is the ability to develop characters. You see it in every one of his work. And this talent enables him to delve deep into the souls of these characters, yet still maintain I dont know if this review can warrant justice to the magnificence and brilliance of Anton Chekhov. All you need to do is read one story. That's all. And you'll be finding any time possible to read each and every other remaining story. Each of the Russian greats have their talents of analyzing the human psych. For Chekhov, his is the ability to develop characters. You see it in every one of his work. And this talent enables him to delve deep into the souls of these characters, yet still maintaining fidelity in perspective. And as the reader, it is sometimes overpowering that we start questioning and developing our own character. My one and only advice. Read it!!

  17. 5 out of 5

    John

    A collection of short stories by a great Russian author. And now Checkhov in his own words: "The leaves did not stir on the trees, grasshoppers chirruped, and the monotonous hollow sound of the sea rising up from below, spoke of the peace, of the eternal sleep awaiting us." "Useless pursuits and conversations always about the same things absorb the better part of one's time, the better part of one's strength, and in the end there is left a life grovelling and curtailed, worthless and trivial, and t A collection of short stories by a great Russian author. And now Checkhov in his own words: "The leaves did not stir on the trees, grasshoppers chirruped, and the monotonous hollow sound of the sea rising up from below, spoke of the peace, of the eternal sleep awaiting us." "Useless pursuits and conversations always about the same things absorb the better part of one's time, the better part of one's strength, and in the end there is left a life grovelling and curtailed, worthless and trivial, and there is no escaping or getting away from it - just as though one were in a madhouse or a prison."

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa

    Decided to read Chekov for 'fun'...it's not that fun but I'm broadening my horizons.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Saman Perera

    Brilliant! The "The Lady with the Dog" was exceptional!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mahmoud Adel selem

    Wow, what a great experience

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    Chekhov's short stories are just as good as his full-length plays, as far as I'm concerned.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Countess of Frogmere

    Love "The Lady with the Dog" and "Misery."

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stefano Lissi

    Chekhov's mastery in conveying portraits of complex characters in such a small amount of text defies belief.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Barack Liu

    075-Anton Chekhov's Short Stories-Chekhov-Novel-1880 Barack —— "When people are tired of silence, they want a storm. When they are tired of sitting solemnly, they want to make a mess." "Selection of Chekhov Short Stories" is a collection of some of Chekhov's short stories. Novel books. Anton Chekhov was born in Taganrog, Rostov region in 1860 and died in 1904. He is an outstanding writer of critical realism. Chekhov studied at the Russian University's Department of Medicine. In 1880, due to family d 075-Anton Chekhov's Short Stories-Chekhov-Novel-1880 Barack —— "When people are tired of silence, they want a storm. When they are tired of sitting solemnly, they want to make a mess." "Selection of Chekhov Short Stories" is a collection of some of Chekhov's short stories. Novel books. Anton Chekhov was born in Taganrog, Rostov region in 1860 and died in 1904. He is an outstanding writer of critical realism. Chekhov studied at the Russian University's Department of Medicine. In 1880, due to family difficulties, he began to write some short humorous works to maintain his life. He graduated from Chekhov University in 1884 and obtained a bachelor's degree in medicine and a license to practice medicine. This year, he published short stories such as "Chameleon". In 1893, he contracted tuberculosis. In 1904, he developed symptoms such as asthma and heart failure. Representative works: "Chameleon", "Suitable Man", "Uncle Vanya", "Cherry Orchard", etc. Even today, most of the mental work is more economically rewarded and respected by society than ordinary physical work. Although most of the mental work is still a mechanically repeated matter. People only need to use their statute mode to recite memory to apply. I think real brain work should be a constant creation. It takes a lot of wisdom and effort. But it is not painful, but gives pleasure from the joy of creation. This is the joy of the creator. This part of the behavior is an important difference between humans and animals. Otherwise, only mechanical repetition is diligent. Isn't the arable cow more diligent than humans? The work of manual labor is not only underpaid but also lacks social status. The decent people are trying every means to tuck the children into the institution. So that they can stay in the office every day, move the pen to read the newspaper. Not only can you get a good salary, but also relatively easy. It can also win the respect of society. Isn't the arrangement like this one very understandable? Physical fatigue and mental emptiness make people cruel and indifferent. People who are disgusted with life have nerves that are numb enough to obtain some satisfaction and happiness from the suffering of others or the suffering of other creatures. However, in the social division of labor, the division of physical labor, and the division of mental labor are indeed inevitable. Manual workers are responsible for the production of resources. And mental workers often control the redistribution of resources. Why didn't the distributor cut his big cake? The so-called class solidification refers not only to the flow from the lower to the upper level but also to great resistance. And for the very few people who want to flow from the upper to the lower level, they will also be hindered. After a minute I walked out of the door and walked into the city, trying to explain to my father. "Love is always beautiful, and marriage has all kinds of problems and contradictions. In marriage, it is annoying that one party will arbitrarily handle the private affairs of the other party according to its wishes. I also think that if one day we can hand over all these basic, necessary and heavy agricultural and animal husbandry jobs to machines. Mankind will make life happier. One party in love fell in love with the other party because of a certain passion. When this passion subsided, this love came to an end. The man who once fascinated her now turned awful. Ignorance and poverty, like a pair of twins, are intertwined with each other and are inseparable. This vicious circle continues from generation to generation, just like a play that has been repeatedly performed. The repertoire has not changed, only the actors have been changed. Love is like a gust of wind. When it came, it was fearless and mighty. But when it was about to leave, it was equally determined and unrelenting and opened the hand you tried to hold in a hurry. In the eyes of parents, children are like lost lambs. Willing to act alone, and not listening to the admonishment, when he has tasted the bitter fruits he has planted, he comes to plead for mercy. 16/06/18 20/05/30

  25. 4 out of 5

    Books by the seashore

    I had already read “White Nights” by Dostoevsky at high school, but for the literary challenge "Reading the World" I decided to discover another Russian author. I casually found a collection of short stories by Chekhov at home, and I was super excited to start reading it. Unfortunately, I didn’t like most of the short stories selected in this book. (Chekhov wrote around 650 short stories, but this collection consists of only 38.) The short stories offer an interesting view of the Russian society I had already read “White Nights” by Dostoevsky at high school, but for the literary challenge "Reading the World" I decided to discover another Russian author. I casually found a collection of short stories by Chekhov at home, and I was super excited to start reading it. Unfortunately, I didn’t like most of the short stories selected in this book. (Chekhov wrote around 650 short stories, but this collection consists of only 38.) The short stories offer an interesting view of the Russian society of that period, but the plots are somehow weak (in my humble opinion). Since I didn’t enjoy Dostoevsky either, I wonder: is it me that I can’t appreciate Russian literature? Nevertheless, I have promised myself to give Russian writers another chance, so I’m all ears if you have any recommendations! ITA Avevo già affrontato la letteratura russa al liceo con “Le notti bianche” di Dostoevskij, ma per la sfida letteraria "Leggendo il mondo" ho deciso di scoprire un altro autore russo. Ho casualmente trovato in casa una raccolta di racconti di Cechov ed ero entusiasta di cominciare la lettura. Purtroppo, la maggior parte dei racconti selezionati in questo libro non mi sono piaciuti. (Cechov scrisse circa 650, ma nella mia raccolta ne compaiono solo 38.) I racconti offrono un interessante spaccato della società russa dell’epoca, ma le trame mancano di consistenza (secondo il mio modesto parere). Dato che anche Dostoevskij non mi aveva fatto impazzire, mi domando: sono forse io che non riesco ad apprezzare la letteratura russa? Nonostante ciò, mi sono ripromessa di dare agli scrittori russi un’altra possibilità, quindi sono tutta orecchi se avete qualche libro o autore da consigliarmi.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Hart

    These lively, sometimes somber short stories admit little of ethereal matters, and yet they are bound up in the dance of life, brash life, life and all it's facets. Chekhov's writing is perfectly unpretentious, tracing the tragedies of middle age, the sweetness of childhood, or the wanderings of a wolf; each time indulging us, the readers, in a world profoundly our own. By the end of his tales, life may seem joyous or bleak, but along comes sleep, like death, the great leveller -- and here we re These lively, sometimes somber short stories admit little of ethereal matters, and yet they are bound up in the dance of life, brash life, life and all it's facets. Chekhov's writing is perfectly unpretentious, tracing the tragedies of middle age, the sweetness of childhood, or the wanderings of a wolf; each time indulging us, the readers, in a world profoundly our own. By the end of his tales, life may seem joyous or bleak, but along comes sleep, like death, the great leveller -- and here we rest for a while before the next story is told.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bryce Doty

    This was my bus book for the past couple months. His earlier storied are well suited for such a purpose as they are all less than five pages and my commute is quite short. I enjoyed my daily dive into Chekhov's short stories for about a month, but the prospect of inching my way, five or so pages a day through his world grew less and less appealing and I quickly finished the last ten stories in a day. And what kind of world is the world of his short stories? My first impression is it is a world o This was my bus book for the past couple months. His earlier storied are well suited for such a purpose as they are all less than five pages and my commute is quite short. I enjoyed my daily dive into Chekhov's short stories for about a month, but the prospect of inching my way, five or so pages a day through his world grew less and less appealing and I quickly finished the last ten stories in a day. And what kind of world is the world of his short stories? My first impression is it is a world of dreariness and unfulfilled or unsatisfied desire. In as much as his stories resolve, they really just resolve in a way that life resolves. Things happen. Beauty and grace burst through the commonplace. Life and death occur with plenty of injustice along the way. In riding the 15 bus, a particularly rowdy bus for Denver, I couldn't help thinking that all the myriad of riders on it would have served as character fodder for Chekhov.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alan Gerstle

    It was a revelation to learn that Chekhov wrote in Spanish.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    This is a book best taken in small doses. The stories are somewhat dark, a bit depressing. I wanted to read it to get an impression of Anton Chekhov's writing. I think I've gotten a good impression of that now, less than half way through, but I'd like to continue slogging through it one story at a time, just to say I've read it. (view spoiler)[ 1.The Death of a Clerk - After sneezing on a general at the opera, the clerk apologizes. The general says it's nothing, but the clerk can't let it go. He r This is a book best taken in small doses. The stories are somewhat dark, a bit depressing. I wanted to read it to get an impression of Anton Chekhov's writing. I think I've gotten a good impression of that now, less than half way through, but I'd like to continue slogging through it one story at a time, just to say I've read it. (view spoiler)[ 1.The Death of a Clerk - After sneezing on a general at the opera, the clerk apologizes. The general says it's nothing, but the clerk can't let it go. He repeatedly apologizes until the general becomes infuriated & yells for him to get out. The clerk went home, lay on the sofa and died. 2.Small Fry - Nevyrazimov, feeling his life hopeless, trying to write a letter to someone he hated, squashed a cockroach & threw it into the fire of the lamp. Then he felt better. 3.The Huntsman - Yegor, a fine huntsman & a free spirit & Pelageya, peasant woman, have been married for 12 years but have never been together. A jealous count got Yegor drunk & married him, but Yegor'll have nothing to do with his wife. 4.The Malefactor - Grigoriev unscrewed a nut from a railway tie to use as a sinker. Before the magistrate, he honestly didn't understand that removing nuts might make a train derail & couldn't understand why he was sentenced to prison. 5.Panikhida - Andrei sent a note for his daughter's funeral, "For the departed servant of God, harlot Maria." His daughter was an actress & for some reason that bothered him. 6.Anyuta - Anyuta lives with male college students, one after another. Her current roommate gets jealous that she was kept so long with the art student to whom he'd lent her. He kicks her out. As she's leaving, crying, he feels a pang of sympathy & angrily tells her to go or stay, he doesn't care. She stays. 7.Easter Night - Ferry person, leronym, mourned the death of another monk, Nikolai, & extolled his gift for writing akathists. Unnamed author was sad that leronym couldn't attend to appreciate the beauty of the Easter celebration. 8.Vanka - 9.Sleepy - 13-yr old nanny Varka must tend to the crying baby all night, work all day, then do it all over again the next day 10.A Boring Story: From An Old Man's Notes - Renowned Nikolai Stepanych reflects on his life, his souring temperament and his growing disinterest in all things as he nears death. Nov. 1889 11.Gusev - Gusev, a discharged soldier, is being taken back to Russia by ship. He and four others, including a cantankerous Pavel Ivanych are in sick bay. One by one they die & are buried at sea. Dec. 1890 12.Peasan Women - Filipp Ivanovich Kashin (Dyudy), wife Afanasyevna, son Fyodor & Sofya, son Hunchbacked Alyoshka & Varvara live together. Traveler Matvei Savvich & his adopted son Kuzka spend the night in their wagon in front of the house. Matvei tells story of how he got Kuzka. Dyudy charges rent. Varvara had an affair with the priest's son. June 1891 13.The Fidget - Olga Ivanovna married Dr. Osip Stepanych Dymov, a simple, very ordinary, unremarkable man. Olga idolized celebrities & befriended all the famous & great. Olga went away with Ryabovsky, a landscape painter, for the summer & still chased after him upon return to her husband. On the day that Olga was finally ready to break off with Ryabovsky & start afresh with Dymov, he came home & told her that he had caught diphtheria from a patient. Dymov's good friend Korostelev (the fidgety one) stayed by his sickbed. Krostelev lamented what a loss it is that this great, extraordinary, gifted, kind, pure, loving, selfless man was dying. Olga finally realized that Dymov was, indeed, an extraordinary, rare, great man - and she missed it. Jan. 1892 14.In Exile - Old Semyon, the Explainer, advocates that one does not need anything or anyone. If you wish to be happy, wish for nothing. The young tartar says that God created man to be alive & experience joy, sorrow, grief. If you want nothing, you're as dead as a stone. May 1892 15.Ward No. 6 - 16.[story] - 17.[story] - 18.[story] - 19.[story] - 20.[story] - 21.[story] - 22.[story] - (hide spoiler)]

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lora Grigorova

    Anton Chekhov's Short Stories: http://readwithstyle.wordpress.com/20... I am into Russian literature mood. Most specifically into Russian literature from the 19th century mood. After the historical The Captain’s Daughter by Pushkin I turned to a rather different topic – the short stories of the master Chekhov. Until now I had read just a few, mostly in literature classes, where I needed to analyze them endlessly. For the first time now, though, I read 10 short stories in a row and I loved all of Anton Chekhov's Short Stories: http://readwithstyle.wordpress.com/20... I am into Russian literature mood. Most specifically into Russian literature from the 19th century mood. After the historical The Captain’s Daughter by Pushkin I turned to a rather different topic – the short stories of the master Chekhov. Until now I had read just a few, mostly in literature classes, where I needed to analyze them endlessly. For the first time now, though, I read 10 short stories in a row and I loved all of them. Chekhov’s stories follow the daily life of ordinary Russian people from the 19th century. The author is not concerned with the rich and the wealthy; he finds the simple people: the peasants, the poor, the beggars, the sufferers more interesting, more challenging, more revealing. The Russian genius portrays the depths of human joy, confusion, dissatisfaction, and sorrow. Using irony and satire, he condemns human characteristics such as greed, avarice, stupidity, jealousy, and egocentrism. His protagonists are not absolute people in absolute situations; they are common ones who suffer common problems – lack of money, unhappy love, separation, marriage problems, etc. Reading Chekhov I could relate his personages not only to 19th century people but also to contemporary ones. The author ingeniously captures the anguish of the human soul, the clash between what the heart wants and what the heart needs, and the controversies that shape our everyday life. It is easy to recognize yourself in one or more of Chekhov’s short stories. They are written to be understood, to be felt, to be studied, and to learned from. Read more: http://readwithstyle.wordpress.com/20...

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