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A witty and irresistible celebration of one very cool and boundary-breaking moms Indian-ish cookingwith accessible and innovative Indian-American recipes Indian food is everyday food! This colorful, lively book is food writer Priya Krishnas loving tribute to her moms Indian-ish cookinga trove of one-of-a-kind Indian-American hybrids that are easy to make, clever, A witty and irresistible celebration of one very cool and boundary-breaking mom’s “Indian-ish” cooking—with accessible and innovative Indian-American recipes Indian food is everyday food! This colorful, lively book is food writer Priya Krishna’s loving tribute to her mom’s “Indian-ish” cooking—a trove of one-of-a-kind Indian-American hybrids that are easy to make, clever, practical, and packed with flavor. Think Roti Pizza, Tomato Rice with Crispy Cheddar, Whole Roasted Cauliflower with Green Pea Chutney, and Malaysian Ramen. Priya’s mom, Ritu, taught herself to cook after moving to the U.S. while also working as a software programmer—her unique creations merging the Indian flavors of her childhood with her global travels and inspiration from cooking shows as well as her kids’ requests for American favorites like spaghetti and PB&Js. The results are approachable and unfailingly delightful, like spiced, yogurt-filled sandwiches crusted with curry leaves, or “Indian Gatorade” (a thirst-quenching salty-sweet limeade)—including plenty of simple dinners you can whip up in minutes at the end of a long work day. Throughout, Priya’s funny and relatable stories—punctuated with candid portraits and original illustrations by acclaimed Desi pop artist Maria Qamar (also known as Hatecopy)—will bring you up close and personal with the Krishna family and its many quirks.


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A witty and irresistible celebration of one very cool and boundary-breaking moms Indian-ish cookingwith accessible and innovative Indian-American recipes Indian food is everyday food! This colorful, lively book is food writer Priya Krishnas loving tribute to her moms Indian-ish cookinga trove of one-of-a-kind Indian-American hybrids that are easy to make, clever, A witty and irresistible celebration of one very cool and boundary-breaking mom’s “Indian-ish” cooking—with accessible and innovative Indian-American recipes Indian food is everyday food! This colorful, lively book is food writer Priya Krishna’s loving tribute to her mom’s “Indian-ish” cooking—a trove of one-of-a-kind Indian-American hybrids that are easy to make, clever, practical, and packed with flavor. Think Roti Pizza, Tomato Rice with Crispy Cheddar, Whole Roasted Cauliflower with Green Pea Chutney, and Malaysian Ramen. Priya’s mom, Ritu, taught herself to cook after moving to the U.S. while also working as a software programmer—her unique creations merging the Indian flavors of her childhood with her global travels and inspiration from cooking shows as well as her kids’ requests for American favorites like spaghetti and PB&Js. The results are approachable and unfailingly delightful, like spiced, yogurt-filled sandwiches crusted with curry leaves, or “Indian Gatorade” (a thirst-quenching salty-sweet limeade)—including plenty of simple dinners you can whip up in minutes at the end of a long work day. Throughout, Priya’s funny and relatable stories—punctuated with candid portraits and original illustrations by acclaimed Desi pop artist Maria Qamar (also known as Hatecopy)—will bring you up close and personal with the Krishna family and its many quirks.

30 review for Indian-ish: Recipes and Antics from a Modern American Family

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shagufta

    This was an Eid present and so far everything I've made from this book has been easy to make and turned out yum. Its a gorgeous book and so far the authors clapbacks to those using terms like chai tea and naan bread and trying to appropriate kitchri may be my favourite part. Five stars. This was an Eid present and so far everything I've made from this book has been easy to make and turned out yum. It’s a gorgeous book and so far the author’s clapbacks to those using terms like chai tea and naan bread and trying to appropriate kitchri may be my favourite part. Five stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    I loved the familial story more than I loved the recipes. The twist on many of the recipes was kind of disappointing to my taste buds, but does not in any way mean that someone else wouldn't love it. I still recommend this one. There are a lot of specialty ingredients required that may be easier to acquire in a larger city than I live in, so that was another issue for me. 3/5 for me

  3. 5 out of 5

    Halle

    Indian food is my favorite food on the fucking planet and Priya is so cool and cute so sign me up fam

  4. 5 out of 5

    Eh?Eh!

    Approachable, delicious. Indian cuisine has seemed difficult but this book condenses recipes down to things found in the American grocery store or in a specialty store that may be nearby in most larger urban areas that support immigrants for technical corporations. Anyway. Everything I've tried to make has been easy, including the yogurt. I have visions of making a constant stream of yogurt, such that I will never purchase another plastic container again. It's still more loose than I'd like, but Approachable, delicious. Indian cuisine has seemed difficult but this book condenses recipes down to things found in the American grocery store or in a specialty store that may be nearby in most larger urban areas that support immigrants for technical corporations. Anyway. Everything I've tried to make has been easy, including the yogurt. I have visions of making a constant stream of yogurt, such that I will never purchase another plastic container again. It's still more loose than I'd like, but distinctly tart, refreshing, and stupidly righteous. There are a couple mentions of how this food will give you a great bowel movement. People, don't take this for granted! Seek it out! The only thing I didn't quite like was a mung bean pancake, but I think that's because the person who made it for cookbook club rushed. She also compulsively free-styles, so, yeah, it probably didn't come together correctly.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kurt Fox

    3.5 stars I liked the spunkiness of this book. There is much feeling of love (especially towards mom) and concept of family, and appreciation. The backstories are fun and interesting. This feels like a glimpse into someone's private life, and a family's recipe book that was suddenly made available for everyone. However, this is a book of recipes. As such, I was not terribly impressed with some of the recipes. As the author notes, many Americans tend to think of Indian cooking as the heavy 3.5 stars I liked the spunkiness of this book. There is much feeling of love (especially towards mom) and concept of family, and appreciation. The backstories are fun and interesting. This feels like a glimpse into someone's private life, and a family's recipe book that was suddenly made available for everyone. However, this is a book of recipes. As such, I was not terribly impressed with some of the recipes. As the author notes, many Americans tend to think of Indian cooking as the heavy flavorful dishes in Indian recipes. And, this is what I was looking to find, but, alas, did not. I see 'pizza' made with Indian bread, and (seemingly) pages and pages of toast or salads. Maybe this is what Indians in America eat, but not what I was expecting. I realize that many Indians are vegetarian, even vegan, but with Modern American Family in the title, I was expecting more meat dishes... (the book only has 1 chicken and 3 fish dinners). Granted those recipes look good, I just wish there were more of them. One recipe has 3 ingredients, and the only directions are to toss all into a bowl and mix them together. "That's it." Maybe this is a family favorite, like one sister writing it down for another, but not what I was expecting from cookbook. A final nit is not all finished dishes are pictured. I would like to see some of the more complex dishes pictured, rather than a picture of a cup of tea. The cartoons lend some frivolity, but adds nothing to the cooking or recipes and many seem like inside (family) jokes. Maybe these are good for a website, or magazines, but in book print, I think the space is wasted where more recipes, or more appropriate pictures could have been placed. I liked the book. It's a fun read, but falls a little short as recipe book. Yes, the title says "Recipes and Antics" but the antics are very personnel / familial and, to me, do not translate well to a large unknown-to-the-author audience. A love story of (her) Mom and for (her) Mom, with some of her recipes and memories... but she is not my mom or my memories. While I can relate, it's a little like reading someone else's private diary that's sitting on the kitchen table saying "read me." While invited to read, it seems a bit too private. Maybe it's just me.

  6. 4 out of 5

    thefourthvine

    I wish more people would write these kinds of recipe books the collected recipes of a family, the How The Food Gets On The Table Every Damn Day kind of recipes. This is the food culture of a single family, and its *fascinating*. I love it. Its also what I think of as home fusion: the recipes so many of us have that came from somewhere else, that we make where we live now, with equipment and maybe ingredients our grandparents wouldnt recognize. Will I make all these recipes? Nope. I have made a I wish more people would write these kinds of recipe books — the collected recipes of a family, the How The Food Gets On The Table Every Damn Day kind of recipes. This is the food culture of a single family, and it’s *fascinating*. I love it. It’s also what I think of as home fusion: the recipes so many of us have that came from somewhere else, that we make where we live now, with equipment and maybe ingredients our grandparents wouldn’t recognize. Will I make all these recipes? Nope. I have made a couple, though, and they’ve all been good so far. And I have a few more earmarked. Most of these recipes rely on things I have around the house or can easily get, too, which is nice; no buying a half pound of an ingredient off of Amazon and then using like two tablespoons of it and letting it slowly molder on the shelf. But this isn’t a classic cookbook that lives or dies solely by the utility of the recipes; like I said, it’s a family history, and worth reading even if none of these recipes are your jam. (But do try Priya’s Dal, though. I read that recipe and went, “This is going to be SO BLAH, but she says it’s the best recipe in the book so I will TRY it.” It was truly excellent.) A fun book, totally worth your time if you’re interested in family cooking. (If you’re interested just in true Indian cooking, though, this isn’t the one; the title is telling you exactly what this book is.)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Great introduction to cooking Indian-ish food! I've already tried one recipe and it's a keeper...lot's of approachable ideas for new meals/snacks/desserts!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Krithika

    While I only tagged 5-6 recipes to try out, I thoroughly enjoyed the commentary and the endearingly relatable Krishna family.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    Fun, with great color photos. Not where I would look for traditional recipes, as the title suggests. Definitely a good library book, as I doubt I'll cook many of the recipes.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Priya is one of my faves from the Bon Appetit YouTube channel. This book was warm, cute, and the recipes very accessible. I cooked 5 things from it so far and all delicious! I'm just sad that there are no eggplant dishes *sob*

  11. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    This book is basically "four dozen reasons why my mom is amazing" and I am all here for cookbooks that so heavily feature an author's family

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brianna Sowinski

    Loved this mix of cuisines, great recipes.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tanaya Deshmukh

    Indian-ish: Recipes and antics from a Modern American family- Delightful book filled with mouth watering dishes. I would want to try each and every one of those. I don't usually read cookbooks, but this one was filled with beautiful food pictures and funny little stories of the author about her mom and family. All in all, I enjoyed this one! Would definitely recommend to all, especially those who don't have much time to cook and would want to savour lip smacking dishes in a short time. The Indian-ish: Recipes and antics from a Modern American family- Delightful book filled with mouth watering dishes. I would want to try each and every one of those. I don't usually read cookbooks, but this one was filled with beautiful food pictures and funny little stories of the author about her mom and family. All in all, I enjoyed this one! Would definitely recommend to all, especially those who don't have much time to cook and would want to savour lip smacking dishes in a short time. The illustrations are beautiful too. The food photography is some of the best that I have seen with all the elegant dishware. A great read!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    This rating is based entirely on the writing of the book, and I am prepared to change it up or down depending on the success of the recipes. I really like Priya Krishna whenever I hear her speak, and her relatability and joy of food comes off just as well in her book. Her family seems like a loving, typical family, and I love how much attention she gives to her mom and dad in this book (I really enjoyed her dads chapter on making yogurt). However, it felt as if Priya ran out of things to say, This rating is based entirely on the writing of the book, and I am prepared to change it up or down depending on the success of the recipes. I really like Priya Krishna whenever I hear her speak, and her relatability and joy of food comes off just as well in her book. Her family seems like a loving, typical family, and I love how much attention she gives to her mom and dad in this book (I really enjoyed her dad’s chapter on making yogurt). However, it felt as if Priya ran out of things to say, and some of her recipes didn’t seem to need a story at all (I don’t need one on every page if you’re not telling me something new). I hope the recipes are as delicious and simple to make as she describes.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Stone

    After many bad recipe books, my new policy is to check them out from the library and read them BEFORE I buy them. Groundbreaking, I know. This is 100% a recipe book to buy and love forever. Ive already ordered my very own copy. Excellent recipes and endearing commentary. My fiancé just asked me what I was laughing at while I was reading through this, and I said, Shes just so funny. Its that good of a recipe book. After many bad recipe books, my new policy is to check them out from the library and read them BEFORE I buy them. Groundbreaking, I know. This is 100% a recipe book to buy and love forever. I’ve already ordered my very own copy. Excellent recipes and endearing commentary. My fiancé just asked me what I was laughing at while I was reading through this, and I said, “She’s just so funny.” It’s that good of a recipe book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarina

    This cookbook is perfect for people who want to make simple, vegetarian, Indian-ish food with spices that, depending on your culture, you may not have in your kitchen. With that criteria, Im obviously not the right person for this. But at least Im more open to trying foods that dont sound like my cup of tea! This cookbook is perfect for people who want to make simple, vegetarian, Indian-ish food with spices that, depending on your culture, you may not have in your kitchen. With that criteria, I’m obviously not the right person for this. But at least I’m more open to trying foods that don’t sound like my cup of tea!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alli

    Very sweet (and appropriate to read over Mother's Day weekend!) - I love Indian food, though my experience is often limited to heavy takeout/buffets that leave me needing a nap. As she repeats over and over, "Indian food is everyday food" and I've bookmarked a bunch of recipes (and ordered new spices on Amazon) to give a try for dinner.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chloe H.

    There's that Tolstoy quote that goes "Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way." When it comes to cookbooks, I could not be less interested in your happy family and how wonderful they are...just show me the food. On the other hand appreciated Krishna's efforts to encourage the reader to incorporate more Indian flavors and techniques into everyday cooking and to get out of the mindset that all Indian food = rich curries. There are one or two recipes that I'll There's that Tolstoy quote that goes "Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way." When it comes to cookbooks, I could not be less interested in your happy family and how wonderful they are...just show me the food. On the other hand appreciated Krishna's efforts to encourage the reader to incorporate more Indian flavors and techniques into everyday cooking and to get out of the mindset that all Indian food = rich curries. There are one or two recipes that I'll take away from this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Incredibly written, this book draws you in and makes you want to cook every single recipe. It's in between a cookbook and an introduction to the author and her family. You really feel like you know them by the end, in a slow and lovely reveal. And every recipe looks more delicious than the last. I want to take off two weeks, invite Priya and her family over, and cook each recipe with them.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Monorina

    This is the only cookbook I've read cover-to-cover, and will probably look lots of recipes from (making 2 this week!) Ritu Krishna is my hero and I would totally watch a lifestyle show about her.

  21. 5 out of 5

    E.

    Charming cookbook that shows not just a love of food but the love of a family loving food! Can't wait to make the olive tapenade!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shipshapeeatworthy

    As Padma Lakshmi points out in her forward: "This is not a cookbook of traditional Indian food"(VIII) and then Krishna explains in the introduction: "Indian-ish describes my mom's cooking -- 60 percent traditional Indian, 40 percent Indian-plus-something else"(5). It's what she offers from her "family's unique culinary canon" that makes this cookbook so wonderful. Recipes like the Chaat Masala-Almond Butter Toast and the Indian-ish Baked Potatoes are good examples of what Krishna describes as As Padma Lakshmi points out in her forward: "This is not a cookbook of traditional Indian food"(VIII) and then Krishna explains in the introduction: "Indian-ish describes my mom's cooking -- 60 percent traditional Indian, 40 percent Indian-plus-something else"(5). It's what she offers from her "family's unique culinary canon" that makes this cookbook so wonderful. Recipes like the Chaat Masala-Almond Butter Toast and the Indian-ish Baked Potatoes are good examples of what Krishna describes as the "Indian-plus-something else" dishes. This could be the longest I've ever had a cookbook before writing a review. At first, I thought I'd begin with making my own batch of Dad's Yogurt (something that has yet to happen) but it was the internet darling of a recipe, the Spinach and Feta Cooked Like Saag Paneer, that I led with. Like everything in Krishna's book, it is delicious and, in my mind, one of the best ways to prepare and serve feta. You start by making the "spinach gravy" and once it's ready you add in the cubed feta and let it simmer and soften. It also soaks up a bit of the spinach sauce which turns this basic ingredient into something special. My family kept clamouring for this dish so I kept making it until I realized I should probably quit lingering and try some other recipes. After cooking many recipes from Indian(-ish) what Krishna emphatically says in her introduction is true: INDIAN FOOD IS EVERYDAY FOOD. (8) The ingredients are easy to source, with most being found in my local grocery store or market and a few coming from one of my favourite food stores here in Halifax. I took along my copy of Indian(-ish) and they advised me on what to buy (not all brands are created the same). I came away stocked with asafetida (Krishna describes the flavour as being "oniony, pungent, MSG-like") and Chaat Masala ("funky, salty"). I really appreciate how approachable the recipes are -- with many of the recipes being perfect for those busy weeknights where prep and cooking time is at a premium. So, getting back to the fact that I've had Indian(-ish) in my possession for awhile, I think it's because instead of cooking to review it I began to cook from it because it made my task of cooking for my family easier. The food is easy to make and incredibly delicious, so I just kept making and remaking recipes (not to mention that everything has been a big hit with my family). Being the cook of a vegetarian family of three I'm glad for the many vegetarian recipes Krishna offers. And, I think the reason why the recipes are so good is because they're the recipes of her family, tried and true. The recipes are organized into 10 main chapters: Essentials, Mother Sauces, Vegetable Mains, Vegetable Sides, Breads, Beans + Lentils, Grains + Noodles, One Chicken + Three Fish Recipes, Desserts, and Drinks. I really appreciate how time is a consideration, for example when I make the Khichdi, I use her suggestion to make it in the Instant Pot. The Instant Pot can be such a time saver and, after making this recipe several times I have halved the amount of water called for to just a scant 3 cups. With just a 1/2 cup of rice and a half of mung beans I find that 3 cups give me the perfect porridge-like texture. I've taken her advice from the notes and top it with a fried egg. This is one of my favourite recipes from the book -- it's one that I can make quickly for lunch and the whole dish feels like you're eating a hug. Some of the most comforting food around. While I haven't tried to make Dad's Yogurt, I have made Shrikhand (Sweet Cardamom Yogurt) which is, in fact, a beautifully decadent dessert using plain Greek yogurt as a base. Lightly sweetened with sugar and delicately spiced with ground saffron and cardamom, I loved this recipe so much it has become a favourite breakfast dish for me. Well, who am I kidding? I could pretty much eat Shrikhand any time. Definitely a recipe you want to make more of rather than less (a double batch is good). Another of her dessert recipes that you can eat almost anytime is the Quinoa Kheer. I can't believe that such a creamy dessert can be made using whole milk and quinoa. It's like magic! In her notes she compares the Quinoa Kheer to chia pudding but in my mind, I found it more like rice pudding but so much better! The quinoa lends a nuttiness which is complimented by the cardamom. With the holidays approaching I've bookmarked this recipe so that I can make it for my dad who is a HUGE fan of rice pudding and I feel like this is something he would totally love. It feels like in every review I talk about the pack of cauliflower-haters I live with. When my daughter was learning to talk, some of those first words were used to describe her feelings on this vegetable "Mummy, this is horrible." So, over the years I've looked for recipes to entice my people back to feeling a bit more love for this delicious (in my mind) ingredient. Enter Krishna's recipe for Roasted Aloo Gobhi (Potatoes and Cauliflower), a recipe so wonderful and delicious I've made it (what feels like) a gazillion times. They can't get enough of the oven-roasted potatoes and cauliflower seasoned with turmeric, cumin, asafetida, fresh ginger, caramelized onion, lime, and fresh cilantro. I always make a bit extra when I make this recipe so that I can enjoy it the next day for lunch. Family is at the heart of this cookbook. Krishna has shared her family through the stories and food found within Indian(-ish). And, I think what makes this cookbook such a treasure is that Krishna's whole family -- from her parents, sister, brother-in-law, aunts, and uncles -- had a hand in shaping the recipes in this book. From the illustration of Krishna's mom on the cover urging the home cook to give it a try, all the recipes offer an easy and approachable way (not to mention extremely delicious) to get a beautiful meal on the table. The recipes have become a fixed part of our week and I'm starting to cook our Indian(-ish) favourites by heart now. Please note that this is an excerpt of a review posted to www.shipshapeeatworthy.wordpress.com I would like to take this opportunity to thank Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and Raincoast Books for providing me with a free, review copy of this book. I did not receive monetary compensation for my post, and all thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Richard Thompson

    I have a lot of cookbooks, but I mostly just use them for cooking, not reading. When I received this book as a gift, I started by browsing the recipes, and had an initial reaction that it was nothing more than a bunch of faux Indian/American fusion dishes that would not interest me, but then I started reading the introductory patter that accompanies each recipe, and I fell in love with Priya Krisha. She has a lively, fun authorial voice. I want her to come over to my house and cook with me and I have a lot of cookbooks, but I mostly just use them for cooking, not reading. When I received this book as a gift, I started by browsing the recipes, and had an initial reaction that it was nothing more than a bunch of faux Indian/American fusion dishes that would not interest me, but then I started reading the introductory patter that accompanies each recipe, and I fell in love with Priya Krisha. She has a lively, fun authorial voice. I want her to come over to my house and cook with me and then have dinner with my family. So this set me off on a journey of reading the entire book, cover to cover, loving the illustrations and design of the physical book and getting to know Priya's family. I don't think that I am going to start reading all of my cookbooks this way, but this one was worth the effort. The next time I decide to cook Indian food, I'm still more likely to grab Pushpesh Pant than Priya Krishna, but I did get well past my inital aversion to the recipes and found more than one that I want to get around to trying. I also came to appreciate the advice on combining flavors in Indian dishes, which may be more useful for me in the long run than any of the specfic dishes.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bookworm

    Loved the title and thought it would be an interesting read. Not a great cook by measure but I was intrigued by the premise and always love books of this genre: a combo cookbook/food history/memoir was thoroughly enjoyable with some lovely pictures. I wasn't familiar with Krishna beforehand so I went into this not knowing what to expect. It's not dissimilar to many other books that are like this. There's a lot about Indian food, her family, insights on recipes, explainers on what ingredients are, Loved the title and thought it would be an interesting read. Not a great cook by measure but I was intrigued by the premise and always love books of this genre: a combo cookbook/food history/memoir was thoroughly enjoyable with some lovely pictures. I wasn't familiar with Krishna beforehand so I went into this not knowing what to expect. It's not dissimilar to many other books that are like this. There's a lot about Indian food, her family, insights on recipes, explainers on what ingredients are, where you can find them, how they are used, etc. For me it was a fun read but it's also not something I would keep. I learned a lot but I would probably compliment this with other recipe books, too. One downer was that despite the emphasis on recipes the book won't open flat (it's nice but it's not that type of book) so you'll have to either photocopy or wear out the binding or some other workaround. Borrowed from the library and that was best for me. Probably useful to take a look before deciding if you want to have it in your own collection.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Janet Martin

    Conversational style, and plenty of information on using Indian ingredients and techniques in American kitchens made this a fun read. I did have some problems--the author described a "small onion or potato as the size of her fist--well my Germanic, Scandinavian, and British antecedents gave me a fist somewhere between the "medium," ie, tennis ball, and "large,"ie, softball sizes. Or maybe I don't know how to measure my fist--looking down, from the side, thumb in or out? It would be helpful to be Conversational style, and plenty of information on using Indian ingredients and techniques in American kitchens made this a fun read. I did have some problems--the author described a "small onion or potato as the size of her fist--well my Germanic, Scandinavian, and British antecedents gave me a fist somewhere between the "medium," ie, tennis ball, and "large,"ie, softball sizes. Or maybe I don't know how to measure my fist--looking down, from the side, thumb in or out? It would be helpful to be more specific, like using a kitchen scale or ruler to make these definitions useful to all. And I've no idea where to find frozen--or fresh, for that matter--lotus root. I live in a rural area at least 75 miles from an Asian market. That said, there are certainly some delicious dishes in this book, most of them creative vegetable recipes: sides, mains, and snacks. My family particularly liked a spicy potato-tomato soup, which was as economical as delicious, and the Tumeric-Yogurt Soup turned into another family fave. The sauce recipes are exceptional.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Juli Anna

    What an awesome cookbook. It seems like everyone is out to find the most "authentic" world recipe books, and I tend to think that's bosh. It doesn't matter where you live, our cuisines are full of borrowed foods and fusion cooking, and I wish more foodies would accept that, rather than striving for some sort of purity that doesn't exist. I hope that "ethnic" cookbooks take a note out of Krishna's book; while studded with helpful techniques and ingredients from "traditional" Indian cooking, this What an awesome cookbook. It seems like everyone is out to find the most "authentic" world recipe books, and I tend to think that's bosh. It doesn't matter where you live, our cuisines are full of borrowed foods and fusion cooking, and I wish more foodies would accept that, rather than striving for some sort of purity that doesn't exist. I hope that "ethnic" cookbooks take a note out of Krishna's book; while studded with helpful techniques and ingredients from "traditional" Indian cooking, this book celebrates the ways in which Indian cooking can inform foods from all over the world. Her authorial voice is playful and enthusiastic, but not cloying, and these recipes look absolutely fantastic. I cannot wait to try a whole host of foods from this book. In addition, while there are a few bigger weekend-project recipes here, the majority are wholesome and simple enough for any time. Vegans and vegetarians will rejoice at the lack of emphasis on meat/dairy ingredients here, too! Truly excellent.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kaileigh

    This books is awesome, I've already made a few recipes and I'm planning more. I read the book cover to cover since I really enjoyed hearing about the author's family and how the recipes were developed. No professional chefs were involved in the making of these recipes, so it's very accessible home cooking. I'm very picky about cookbooks since I get a lot of recipes online and don't like keeping a whole book around if I only need it for one or two recipes, but I'm strongly considering buying a This books is awesome, I've already made a few recipes and I'm planning more. I read the book cover to cover since I really enjoyed hearing about the author's family and how the recipes were developed. No professional chefs were involved in the making of these recipes, so it's very accessible home cooking. I'm very picky about cookbooks since I get a lot of recipes online and don't like keeping a whole book around if I only need it for one or two recipes, but I'm strongly considering buying a copy of this book after I have to return it to the library. It's full of recipes that I would like to try out, and staple recipes I can imagine myself making over and over again. The book is also full of shortcuts, substitution guides and flowcharts to emulate the cooking style of the author's mother, the originator of so many of the recipes in the book. It also doesn't hurt that there are great illustrations, photographs and asides from various family members sprinkled throughout the book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Adams

    Reading as many Goodreads Choice Nominees as I can. I will be the first to admit that my star/numerical ratings are largely mood-based and arbitrary (a huge reason I gave up doing them for a long time), but I really enjoyed this! I'm a big fan of Indian food, but to say that it seemed way too complicated to make from scratch at home would be an understatement. That being said, this is absolutely not a "traditional" or classic Indian cookbook, nor does it claim to be. The author shares with us her Reading as many Goodreads Choice Nominees as I can. I will be the first to admit that my star/numerical ratings are largely mood-based and arbitrary (a huge reason I gave up doing them for a long time), but I really enjoyed this! I'm a big fan of Indian food, but to say that it seemed way too complicated to make from scratch at home would be an understatement. That being said, this is absolutely not a "traditional" or classic Indian cookbook, nor does it claim to be. The author shares with us her family's recipes, which range from simplified traditions to loosely Indian-inspired. Soo many things in here sound delicious. I can't promise I'll ever make any of it but she really made me feel like I could. I loved how we were eased into the recipes with some basics and pantry tips. The family stories and recipe blurbs were great. Pictures (and even some illustrations) were great.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Haider

    Indian-ish is a charming, humorous and completely approachable cookbook. The author clearly loves her mom and has a great relationship with her and lots of food-related memories. The book is a sort of ode to her mom & the food she (the author) grew up with as an Indian-American. This book doesn't have many of the staples that you will find on Indian restaurant menus here in the states. There is no chicken tikka masala or tandoori chicken to be found in this cookbook! Instead it has (as the Indian-ish is a charming, humorous and completely approachable cookbook. The author clearly loves her mom and has a great relationship with her and lots of food-related memories. The book is a sort of ode to her mom & the food she (the author) grew up with as an Indian-American. This book doesn't have many of the staples that you will find on Indian restaurant menus here in the states. There is no chicken tikka masala or tandoori chicken to be found in this cookbook! Instead it has (as the title states) Indian-ish recipes. While the recipes for the most part are at their core Indian (in flavor profile, and ingredients) you will find some unexpected twists...like goat cheese. Or ramen. I've bookmarked a few recipes to try. I will update my review once I've given them a go.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    So I really cant write a review of a cookbook in most cases because its a collection of recipes and I dont know how to properly review that. What I will say is that I love being able to explore other cultures by browsing through their cuisine. And I really enjoyed the stories that Priya Krishna told. Plus I learned to be more sensitive and less colonial when Im talking about Indian food. Now, full disclosure, I probably would only make a handful of these dishes. I grew up with a Southern expat So I really can’t write a review of a cookbook in most cases because it’s a collection of recipes and I don’t know how to properly review that. What I will say is that I love being able to explore other cultures by browsing through their cuisine. And I really enjoyed the stories that Priya Krishna told. Plus I learned to be more sensitive and less colonial when I’m talking about Indian food. Now, full disclosure, I probably would only make a handful of these dishes. I grew up with a Southern expat mom so I’m much more meat and potatoes and stick to your ribs soul food. The recipes in this book require a lot of spices that I don’t want to invest in because I’d only use them once, maybe twice. But the food looks delicious and has me craving Indian food for dinner.

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