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Marriage Militant: Twenty-Five Wedding Homilies

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For far too long Christians have carried on as though marriage is merely a sentimental, sappy photo op—all about cute flower girls and the perfect bridal dress—and now we find ourselves backed into a cultural corner of thoroughgoing perversion and confusion on every side. Christian marriage has always been an act of war, but now it has become far more obvious. The dominant For far too long Christians have carried on as though marriage is merely a sentimental, sappy photo op—all about cute flower girls and the perfect bridal dress—and now we find ourselves backed into a cultural corner of thoroughgoing perversion and confusion on every side. Christian marriage has always been an act of war, but now it has become far more obvious. The dominant theme of the messages in this book is a plea, a charge to embrace the warfare of Christian marriage. Our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but it is a struggle, one that requires great faith. But we are not fighting a losing war. Jesus died and rose again. Our King reigns in heaven. He has sent us out into the world to make disciples of every nation—teaching them to obey everything He has commanded. And some of the central commands have to do with embracing our callings to be male and female, to leave and cleave, to love and obey, to be fruitful and multiply as we fill this world with the beauty and glory of the gospel which is at the heart of Christian marriage—which is necessarily a militant marriage.


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For far too long Christians have carried on as though marriage is merely a sentimental, sappy photo op—all about cute flower girls and the perfect bridal dress—and now we find ourselves backed into a cultural corner of thoroughgoing perversion and confusion on every side. Christian marriage has always been an act of war, but now it has become far more obvious. The dominant For far too long Christians have carried on as though marriage is merely a sentimental, sappy photo op—all about cute flower girls and the perfect bridal dress—and now we find ourselves backed into a cultural corner of thoroughgoing perversion and confusion on every side. Christian marriage has always been an act of war, but now it has become far more obvious. The dominant theme of the messages in this book is a plea, a charge to embrace the warfare of Christian marriage. Our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but it is a struggle, one that requires great faith. But we are not fighting a losing war. Jesus died and rose again. Our King reigns in heaven. He has sent us out into the world to make disciples of every nation—teaching them to obey everything He has commanded. And some of the central commands have to do with embracing our callings to be male and female, to leave and cleave, to love and obey, to be fruitful and multiply as we fill this world with the beauty and glory of the gospel which is at the heart of Christian marriage—which is necessarily a militant marriage.

11 review for Marriage Militant: Twenty-Five Wedding Homilies

  1. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Kyriosity

    I am convinced that the most significant semper reformandaing coming out of Moscow, Idaho, is the teaching on marriage and family. This from Toby Sumpter is the latest weapon in the fray. May those whose marriages these messages helped found be faithful in the battle, and may those husbands and wives who read these messages be encouraged to fight on.

  2. 5 out of 5

    John Weis

    Toby Sumpter's collection of wedding homilies is a treasure trove of gospel-saturated discourses on the charge presented by God to both man and wife on their wedding day. Blending themes from the garden, cross, and tomb, he calls these couples to image forth the glory of God in their own marriage, which as he almost always reminds, is an act of war. Not a war between husband and wife, but a war in which husband and wife are set by God against the powers of darkness. Sumpter's writing style is Toby Sumpter's collection of wedding homilies is a treasure trove of gospel-saturated discourses on the charge presented by God to both man and wife on their wedding day. Blending themes from the garden, cross, and tomb, he calls these couples to image forth the glory of God in their own marriage, which as he almost always reminds, is an act of war. Not a war between husband and wife, but a war in which husband and wife are set by God against the powers of darkness. Sumpter's writing style is pastoral yet variegated, avoiding so many of the common tropes in most wedding sermons and bringing real, incarnated substance for contemplation. Perhaps the greatest example of his superb writing is found in Homily 19, "The Words Say Glory", in which he surveys all of creation as the latent speech of the Creator, which is still speaking today. He opens as follows: “God is all-powerful. In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth. In the beginning God commanded, and words crackled and burst into flowers and leopards and stars and Eve. In the beginning God spoke, and the words were obedient and became flesh and then they kept on speaking. In the beginning, the words became light and heavens, moons and seas, dragons and chickadees, chipmunks and a man. And since they are words, they speak. They speak with their fins and their claws and their snouts and their molecular compositions. They speak in obedience, in submission, under the thrall of their Omnipotent Speaker. And they all have the same message in their varying tongues; they all say the same word in their pentecostal way. They all say glory. They all thunder and chirp and buzz and clap and shout the word glory.” Developing the theme of God's power, Sumpter again unleashes a litany of creation themes that instantly blend into redemption. “But God’s power, God’s might, His freedom and strength and authority, is creation. It bursts with light and life, it is full of gifts and magic, and though it is fierce and terrible, it is not capricious or random or vacillating. And His power is certainly not materialistic. It is not brute force, mass and pressure multiplied and eternally crushing the world into the mold of His will. And this is evident by the simple fact that it is God’s Word that is His power. His Word robed in the glory of the Spirit, His Word carried on the music of the Spirit. God’s power is His love that woos the world into His glory. God’s authority and might are evidenced in the fact that His rule is found in the poetry of the universe. Day and night, sea and land and strawberries, stars and sun, birds and fish, raccoons and people—that is God’s power and might, that is God’s rule, His authority, His commanding words echoing through the ages, to the ends of the world. And what do they say? They say glory. And at the end of the ages, the Word became flesh, wrapped in the “in the glory of the Spirit, revealing the glory of the Father. Here is the glory and power of God—unbounded, limitless, crying in a manger, feeding the hungry, healing the blind, making fun of the proud, bleeding on Calvary, walking in a garden alive again—which is a like a bridegroom coming out of his chamber and rejoicing like a strong man to run his race.”

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lukas Mason

  4. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Bartee

  6. 5 out of 5

    Danette

  7. 4 out of 5

    David West

  8. 4 out of 5

    Harrison Bowlin

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gregory Minz

  10. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Malchert

  11. 4 out of 5

    Pedro Camino

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