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Looking back at the last thirty-five years of Vanity Fair stories on women, by women, with an introduction by the magazine's editor in chief, Radhika Jones Gail Sheehy on Hillary Clinton. Ingrid Sischy on Nicole Kidman. Jacqueline Woodson on Lena Waithe. Leslie Bennetts on Michelle Obama. And two Maureens (Orth and Dowd) on two Tinas (Turner and Fey). Vanity Fair's Women on Looking back at the last thirty-five years of Vanity Fair stories on women, by women, with an introduction by the magazine's editor in chief, Radhika Jones Gail Sheehy on Hillary Clinton. Ingrid Sischy on Nicole Kidman. Jacqueline Woodson on Lena Waithe. Leslie Bennetts on Michelle Obama. And two Maureens (Orth and Dowd) on two Tinas (Turner and Fey). Vanity Fair's Women on Women features a selection of the best profiles, essays, and columns on female subjects written by female contributors to the magazine over the past thirty-five years. From the viewpoint of the female gaze come penetrating profiles on everyone from Gloria Steinem to Princess Diana to Whoopi Goldberg to essays on workplace sexual harassment (by Bethany McLean) to a post-#MeToo reassessment of the Clinton scandal (by Monica Lewinsky). Many of these pieces constitute the first draft of a larger cultural narrative. They tell a singular story about female icons and identity over the last four decades--and about the magazine as it has evolved under the editorial direction of Tina Brown, Graydon Carter, and now Radhika Jones, who has written a compelling introduction. When Vanity Fair's inaugural editor, Frank Crowninshield, took the helm of the magazine in 1914, his mission statement declared, "We hereby announce ourselves as determined and bigoted feminists." Under Jones's leadership, Vanity Fair continues the publication's proud tradition of highlighting women's voices--and all the many ways they define our culture.


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Looking back at the last thirty-five years of Vanity Fair stories on women, by women, with an introduction by the magazine's editor in chief, Radhika Jones Gail Sheehy on Hillary Clinton. Ingrid Sischy on Nicole Kidman. Jacqueline Woodson on Lena Waithe. Leslie Bennetts on Michelle Obama. And two Maureens (Orth and Dowd) on two Tinas (Turner and Fey). Vanity Fair's Women on Looking back at the last thirty-five years of Vanity Fair stories on women, by women, with an introduction by the magazine's editor in chief, Radhika Jones Gail Sheehy on Hillary Clinton. Ingrid Sischy on Nicole Kidman. Jacqueline Woodson on Lena Waithe. Leslie Bennetts on Michelle Obama. And two Maureens (Orth and Dowd) on two Tinas (Turner and Fey). Vanity Fair's Women on Women features a selection of the best profiles, essays, and columns on female subjects written by female contributors to the magazine over the past thirty-five years. From the viewpoint of the female gaze come penetrating profiles on everyone from Gloria Steinem to Princess Diana to Whoopi Goldberg to essays on workplace sexual harassment (by Bethany McLean) to a post-#MeToo reassessment of the Clinton scandal (by Monica Lewinsky). Many of these pieces constitute the first draft of a larger cultural narrative. They tell a singular story about female icons and identity over the last four decades--and about the magazine as it has evolved under the editorial direction of Tina Brown, Graydon Carter, and now Radhika Jones, who has written a compelling introduction. When Vanity Fair's inaugural editor, Frank Crowninshield, took the helm of the magazine in 1914, his mission statement declared, "We hereby announce ourselves as determined and bigoted feminists." Under Jones's leadership, Vanity Fair continues the publication's proud tradition of highlighting women's voices--and all the many ways they define our culture.

30 review for Vanity Fair's Women on Women

  1. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Vanity Fair’s Women on Women is a 2019 Penguin Press publication. Fascinating women, fascinating lives! This is a strong collection of profiles of the women who appeared in Vanity Fair Magazine over the years. All were influential in their way, some were controversial, all are interesting and unique! I’ve been a long-time subscriber to Vanity Fair and today it is the only magazine I still take. While I may have read some of these profiles over the years, there were many that were before my time- Vanity Fair’s Women on Women is a 2019 Penguin Press publication. Fascinating women, fascinating lives! This is a strong collection of profiles of the women who appeared in Vanity Fair Magazine over the years. All were influential in their way, some were controversial, all are interesting and unique! I’ve been a long-time subscriber to Vanity Fair and today it is the only magazine I still take. While I may have read some of these profiles over the years, there were many that were before my time- such as Emily Post. I was most surprised by the profile on Barbara Bush. Matronly grandmother? I think not!! Others profiled included several other first ladies, including Michelle Obama, and the royals- Grace Kelly, Princess Diana and Queen Elizabeth. Actresses and musicians from Tina Turner to Meryl Streep and important feminist icons like Gloria Steinem. From Cher to Lady Gaga, the book covers roughly four decades. The book also includes articles examining two of the most prominent feminist issues of today- The #MeToo movement and the Silicon Valley Boy’s Club. The book also serves as a profile of the magazine itself, showing the various ways the publication as evolved and changed and the influence it has had on society from a feminine standpoint. Overall, this a very interesting compilation of profiles and articles. It is a short book, an easy read, and is a book one can put down and pick back up easily, read between other books, or while sitting in waiting rooms, or on your lunch break. But, once I started reading it, I couldn’t put it down!! Great history, strong women, thoughtful, eye-opening articles-all reminding me of why I continue to support this publication! Thank you, Vanity Fair!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stefanie

    One of those fun to dip into when you have a few minutes books.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Robin Shilling

    Especially liked reading the essays written a while back - i.e. Hillary Clinton, Princess Diana, etc. - and compare them to now and what we know. Easy to jump around, skim, or even skip if you want.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bibiana Krall

    Vanity Fair's Women on Women, edited by Radhika Jones with David Friend is an interesting collection of articles and essays from the past thirty-six years previously published in Vanity Fair about women you might think you know, but there are some big surprises in here. I came away from reading this book with admiration and a renewed sense of sisterhood. Making Whoopi by Janet Coleman Whoopi Goldberg is a rebel to the core, “The critics hadn’t seen any black woman doin’ what I’m doin.” She’s an a Vanity Fair's Women on Women, edited by Radhika Jones with David Friend is an interesting collection of articles and essays from the past thirty-six years previously published in Vanity Fair about women you might think you know, but there are some big surprises in here. I came away from reading this book with admiration and a renewed sense of sisterhood. Making Whoopi by Janet Coleman Whoopi Goldberg is a rebel to the core, “The critics hadn’t seen any black woman doin’ what I’m doin.” She’s an artistic genius with humility and a refreshing lack of ego. By being herself back in the day and pressing cultural and social issues with her “Spook Show” she became the woman we all know and love. What Tina Wants by Maureen Dowd Tina Fey comes off as hard working and the good kind of old fashioned with deep integrity that leads by doing the work herself and a woman who makes her personal relationships and family a priority. Household names you know such as Barbara Bush, Emily Post, Frida Khalo, Michelle Phillips all had their say. To summarize the message: women with drive, talent and ambition 'the struggle is real,’ just might be the understatement of the century. Topics run the gamut from celebrity parenting, to being the “good wife,” feminism, and being a trailblazer are covered with aplomb, verve and style. The #MeToo movement is also discussed and I was truly glad to see more brave women in the finance world talking about their stories and shaking their fists at the old establishment in order to do so. It is impossible to comment on all of the pieces in this book, but it was well worth my time. Taking it slow gave me the opportunity to truly enjoy the style, message and voice of each individual piece. My favorite quote was from Tina Turner, “I am happy that I’m not like anybody else. Because I really do believe that if I was different I might not be where I am today. You asked me if I ever stood up for anything. Yeah I stood up for my life.” Say it louder for everyone in the back Tina! If you are curious about interesting, empowered women and who they are below the surface, along with some juicy commentary from people who knew or know them you will truly enjoy reading, Vanity Fairs Women on Women.” Many thanks to Penguin Press and Ms. Radhika Jones for proving this ARC to me via Netgalley.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    A compilation of profiles of women written by female contributors to Vanity Fair magazine, going back to the 1980s. Many of the pieces are outstanding, a few, well, not so much to my taste. The subjects are household names and icons – everyone from Audrey Hepburn to Whoopi Goldberg to Emily Post and Julia Child – as are, mostly to a lesser degree, the writers, including outstanding journalists like Gail Sheehy, Leslie Bennets and Marie Brenner, and a few who write as guest contributors. I particu A compilation of profiles of women written by female contributors to Vanity Fair magazine, going back to the 1980s. Many of the pieces are outstanding, a few, well, not so much to my taste. The subjects are household names and icons – everyone from Audrey Hepburn to Whoopi Goldberg to Emily Post and Julia Child – as are, mostly to a lesser degree, the writers, including outstanding journalists like Gail Sheehy, Leslie Bennets and Marie Brenner, and a few who write as guest contributors. I particularly enjoyed the piece on Audrey Hepburn, written by Amy Fine Collins, which described her rise as both an actress and a woman of unique style. The profile of Michelle Phillips, by Sheila Weller, gave wonderful insights into the folk and pop music scene of the 60s and 70s. I learned a great deal about Emily Post, as written by Laura Jacobs, and how she impacted so much beyond America's social mores. Those articles have a timeless feeling about them and need no explanatory notes or references. Others, written at a certain moment of history, serve as background to what these women accomplished in later years. Hillary Clinton and Gloria Steinem are the perfect examples. The benefit of a collection like this is that you can skip past anybody that you are not interested in without missing anything – I read them all, but it's completely unnecessary. You can cherry pick as you like. My one overall criticism to this collection is that the pieces are arranged by "types", "The Comedians", "The Renegades", and so forth. I would have preferred to read them in the chronological order in which they were originally published, as that would have made the book also function more effectively as a social history, which it very much is. The odd concession to this is the final grouping, "In Their Own Words", which is the section afforded to the non-journalists writing in 2017 and 2018. The outstanding piece among those, for me, was by Lucy McBath, who was elected to the House of Representatives in 2018. She is truly an inspiration, and what we saw of her in sound bites on TV during that race, is so much less than the sum total of who she is. I'm hoping to hear more from her in both our national conversation, and hopefully, on the printed page.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Angelica LeMinh

    It's hard to rate a collection, because some articles are always going to be stronger that others-in terms of writing and relevance. Perhaps it's the distance, but I am truly surprised that I came for Lena Waithe and left thinking about Barbara Bush. This came up when I searched Lena Waithe in my public library's database (probably because I had just seen Queen & Slim, but always and consistently since Master of None). The concept was interesting enough, and so, I gave it a try. Increasingly, I b It's hard to rate a collection, because some articles are always going to be stronger that others-in terms of writing and relevance. Perhaps it's the distance, but I am truly surprised that I came for Lena Waithe and left thinking about Barbara Bush. This came up when I searched Lena Waithe in my public library's database (probably because I had just seen Queen & Slim, but always and consistently since Master of None). The concept was interesting enough, and so, I gave it a try. Increasingly, I believe that collections should be organized by decades, or movements, but I understand we're going for a span of catalogues, and am glad this exists, because who knows how fleeting second thoughts on this articles have been discarded (or Marie Kondo'd) with the editions that have housed them. It's interesting how many times Michelle was referred to as "Mrs. Obama" in the article that came out before Barack was president, and thus, at the time that she was the primary breadwinner in her household. Michelle Williams making $80 a day recently really resonates with me. I still viscerally experience the image of Diego Rivera eating Frida's ashes at her funeral, and still not at all interested in Confederate first ladies or the "society" section. The last section, on #metoo and Wall Street was the most interesting, and most relevant to real life.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Carole V Bell

    Vanity Fair editor in chief Radhika Jones has put together a compelling mix of essays written by women about women. The subjects are famous, but they represent a wide range of walks of life, from Mexican artist Frida Kahlo to legendary Hollywood actress Meryl Streep to former First Lady Michelle Obama and England's Queen Elizabeth II. The essays are divided into eight groups: The comedians, The White House, Society and Style, The Renegades, The Musicians, The House of Windsor, The Stars and Thei Vanity Fair editor in chief Radhika Jones has put together a compelling mix of essays written by women about women. The subjects are famous, but they represent a wide range of walks of life, from Mexican artist Frida Kahlo to legendary Hollywood actress Meryl Streep to former First Lady Michelle Obama and England's Queen Elizabeth II. The essays are divided into eight groups: The comedians, The White House, Society and Style, The Renegades, The Musicians, The House of Windsor, The Stars and Their Own Words, a final section of public figures engaged in self-reflection. What pulls them together and sets them apart from other celebrity profiles is what Jones herself characterizes as the "unflinching nature of the writer's gaze." Vanity Fair doesn't do light. They do deep dives with impeccable prose. They aren't breaking new ground here-- all of the essays were previously published in the magazine--but their insight and instincts as cultural observers are top tier.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Molly Wilcox

    This book is great. Heartbreaking, inspiring, enlightening, troubling, and important. Reading stories about women, written by women gives light to details of their existence you wouldn’t otherwise uncover. You read about royalty, stars, politicians, activists, renegades, artists, and culture-disrupters who all share one thing: womanhood. Unpacking what that is and the sacrifices women make for other people is provoking and frustrating - then reading how these women overcame that at some point in This book is great. Heartbreaking, inspiring, enlightening, troubling, and important. Reading stories about women, written by women gives light to details of their existence you wouldn’t otherwise uncover. You read about royalty, stars, politicians, activists, renegades, artists, and culture-disrupters who all share one thing: womanhood. Unpacking what that is and the sacrifices women make for other people is provoking and frustrating - then reading how these women overcame that at some point in their lives is liberating. With every woman I read about I learned so much more about them, myself, culture, and our shared experiences as women. And no this is not a book FOR women, it’s a book ABOUT women. A book e v e r y o n e should read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jenny GB

    I received a free copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways. Thank you! I enjoyed reading this great collection of stories about women. Some I knew and some I didn't, but I learned a lot about all the women in the book and I had a great time reading the stories. The stories written a while ago about women who are still in the public eye were especially fascinating since I could compare that point in time with where they are now. Some stories are stronger than others, but overall I enjoyed the I received a free copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways. Thank you! I enjoyed reading this great collection of stories about women. Some I knew and some I didn't, but I learned a lot about all the women in the book and I had a great time reading the stories. The stories written a while ago about women who are still in the public eye were especially fascinating since I could compare that point in time with where they are now. Some stories are stronger than others, but overall I enjoyed the collection.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    Full disclosure, I did not read the entire book. This is a collection of articles from Vanity Fair written by women journalists, about women. I read over half the book, but skipped a few articles that did not interest me. The collection includes articles about Emily Post, Audrey Hepburn, Michelle Obama, Barbara Bush, Monica Lewinsky, Hillary Clinton. and a host of others. I believe there are 35 articles. The essays I read were excellent, interesting and thought provoking.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Marie

    The idea of a collection of articles written by women and about women was amazing to me. Unfortunately, this just didn't do it for me. I've actually never read Vanity Fair, and a lot of these articles seemed to be long just for the sake of taking up space, and lacked enough substance to keep me interested.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Annarella

    This collections of articles is an interesting and entertaining read that talks about women and it's full of food for thought. I liked the well written articles and was happy to read about famous women and women in general. An interesting read, highly recommended! Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Herndon

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It covered comedians, white house people, society and style, renegades, musicians, royalty, stars. To be honest, I have never read Vanity Fair. I think that is my loss. The glimpses into the lives of these woman sparked an interest to find out more and perhaps even more surprising to me, many of these are women I would not have thought twice about.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Roberta Weiner

    This is a compilation of articles from Vanity Fair, mainly profiles of famous women (there are a few first-person #metoo articles at the end. For the most part, they are compelling reading. It’s not to be read in one giant swoop, but individually, piece by piece. Some you’ll find page turners, other not so much. I read them over the course of a month and glad I did

  15. 5 out of 5

    Pooja

    With a variety of women portrayed, I was intrigued by how their stories were different but in some ways similar. Each women so unique in their own. From Whoopi to Meryl, I enjoyed reading their stories!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    This is my favorite book this year which really surprised me. It has to be read a little at a time. The profiles of women from all walks of life almost well known was fascinating and in every case presented a side that was unexpected.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Patti

    I read a lot of books and this didn’t click. Maybe it’s my unfamiliarity with Vanity Fair, perhaps it’s being 66 years old and geared towards young feminists. I may pick it up again from my library.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emily Lapham

    Women are great.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chris Selin

    Enjoyable book of essays written across the decades about women by women that will spur various emotions from ‘amens!’ to heavy sighs to chuckles to shudders to ‘hmm, I didn’t knows’.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    2.5 stars. Some of the profiles I could've done without, while others were really interesting.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elbrackeen Brackeen

    8/15/19 Kirkus

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cassi

    All ladies MUST read

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tessa

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carol

  25. 5 out of 5

    Laurinda Dunn

  26. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gads300

  28. 4 out of 5

    Evan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Westwood

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

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