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Dial H for Hero Vol. 1: Enter the Heroverse

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What would you do if you could become any superhero for just an hour? The catch? Who you become is absolutely random. The H-Dial returns to the DC Universe courtesy of Sam Humphries as part of Brian Michael Bendis' new imprint for young heroes: Wonder Comics! When teenager Miguel Montez was ten years old, Superman saved his life--and since then, he's spent every waking hour What would you do if you could become any superhero for just an hour? The catch? Who you become is absolutely random. The H-Dial returns to the DC Universe courtesy of Sam Humphries as part of Brian Michael Bendis' new imprint for young heroes: Wonder Comics! When teenager Miguel Montez was ten years old, Superman saved his life--and since then, he's spent every waking hour trying to recapture the thrill of that moment. Unfortunately, life in the sleepy town of Devil's Canyon, California, is hardly an adrenaline rush--especially when you're stuck working at your uncle's mayonnaise-themed food truck. But Miguel is about to get more excitement than he can handle. When a mysterious rotary phone appears in a life-or-death moment, a strange voice comes over the line saying that it has the power to transform him into a never-before-seen costumed champion--all he has to do is dial "H"! Suddenly, Miguel becomes a superhero--or, more specifically, a bunch of different superheroes, with each new "call" lasting a single hour. But he also becomes a target--because the villainous Thunderbolt Club knows all about the power of the H-Dial, and its members will stop at nothing to get their hands on it. Now it's up to Miguel and his new friend Summer to get the H-Dial into the hands of the one man who can protect it--a certain Man of Steel! Crafted by writer Sam Humphries (and artist Joe Quinones(Wednesday Comics), Dial H for Hero Vol. 1: Enter the Heroverse launches a new era of action with an astounding array of young superheroes and an incredible variety of art styles! Collects issues #1-6 of the acclaimed new series from DC's Wonder Comics--curated by comics legend Brian Michael Bendis!


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What would you do if you could become any superhero for just an hour? The catch? Who you become is absolutely random. The H-Dial returns to the DC Universe courtesy of Sam Humphries as part of Brian Michael Bendis' new imprint for young heroes: Wonder Comics! When teenager Miguel Montez was ten years old, Superman saved his life--and since then, he's spent every waking hour What would you do if you could become any superhero for just an hour? The catch? Who you become is absolutely random. The H-Dial returns to the DC Universe courtesy of Sam Humphries as part of Brian Michael Bendis' new imprint for young heroes: Wonder Comics! When teenager Miguel Montez was ten years old, Superman saved his life--and since then, he's spent every waking hour trying to recapture the thrill of that moment. Unfortunately, life in the sleepy town of Devil's Canyon, California, is hardly an adrenaline rush--especially when you're stuck working at your uncle's mayonnaise-themed food truck. But Miguel is about to get more excitement than he can handle. When a mysterious rotary phone appears in a life-or-death moment, a strange voice comes over the line saying that it has the power to transform him into a never-before-seen costumed champion--all he has to do is dial "H"! Suddenly, Miguel becomes a superhero--or, more specifically, a bunch of different superheroes, with each new "call" lasting a single hour. But he also becomes a target--because the villainous Thunderbolt Club knows all about the power of the H-Dial, and its members will stop at nothing to get their hands on it. Now it's up to Miguel and his new friend Summer to get the H-Dial into the hands of the one man who can protect it--a certain Man of Steel! Crafted by writer Sam Humphries (and artist Joe Quinones(Wednesday Comics), Dial H for Hero Vol. 1: Enter the Heroverse launches a new era of action with an astounding array of young superheroes and an incredible variety of art styles! Collects issues #1-6 of the acclaimed new series from DC's Wonder Comics--curated by comics legend Brian Michael Bendis!

30 review for Dial H for Hero Vol. 1: Enter the Heroverse

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    This is what comics should be, fun. The teenager, Miguel, finds a mysterious phone that when he dials H-E-R-O is transformed into a random superhero. People who have used the phone before become addicted to it and are trying to steal it from him and his friend Summer. Joe Quinones does a lot of heavy lifting in this book. Everytime a new hero appears, he changes his artstyle to mimic the type of hero he is. Manga, Vertigo, Sin City, Moebius, Quinones does a phenomenal jab of mimicking different This is what comics should be, fun. The teenager, Miguel, finds a mysterious phone that when he dials H-E-R-O is transformed into a random superhero. People who have used the phone before become addicted to it and are trying to steal it from him and his friend Summer. Joe Quinones does a lot of heavy lifting in this book. Everytime a new hero appears, he changes his artstyle to mimic the type of hero he is. Manga, Vertigo, Sin City, Moebius, Quinones does a phenomenal jab of mimicking different genres and artists. I do think the creative team missed an opportunity with the book though. When this book was published in the 80's the heroes and villains were created by fans who sent in their designs, even getting a credit. I thought that was the coolest thing as a kid. With the ease of using the internet for submissions, they could have done something similar with this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    Dial H for Hero is absolutely phenomenal. Sam Humphries is not an author Im normally a huge fan of, but he transcended himself as a writer on this book by writing an absolutely joyous comic that is everything superhero comics should aspire to be fun, creative and inspiring. But Joe Quinones is the real star of the show here, his art is something from another world he switches and adapts his art to anything Humphries throws at him, utilizing multiple different styles in every single issue. This Dial H for Hero is absolutely phenomenal. Sam Humphries is not an author I’m normally a huge fan of, but he transcended himself as a writer on this book by writing an absolutely joyous comic that is everything superhero comics should aspire to be — fun, creative and inspiring. But Joe Quinones is the real star of the show here, his art is something from another world — he switches and adapts his art to anything Humphries throws at him, utilizing multiple different styles in every single issue. This book is an absolute spectacle and one of the best comics of the year in a year that is already overflowing with amazing books, and it’s unlike anything I’ve ever read before. I am eagerly looking forward to new issues of Dial H every month, and I can’t believe I am saying all these things about a Sam Humphries comic. Dial H for Hero is unbelievably good.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Eli

    Oddly enough, didn't hate this. It got more interesting as it went along. I'm not really into the new Wonder Comics stuff (pretty mediocre and too campy a tone for me), but I'm mildly interested in seeing what happens here.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    China Mieville wrote a Dial H: Deluxe Edition that is likely to never be equaled. It upped the craziness and it developed a mythology. Sadly, Humphries ignores Mieville's foundational mythology, but he does a great job of creating some craziness of his own and also resolves the one flaw with Mieville's run by (once more) tying "Dial H" back into continuity. This version of "Dial H" (the fifth by my count) returns to the early days of having young, wish-fulfillment heroes but also has wacky heroes China Mieville wrote a Dial H: Deluxe Edition that is likely to never be equaled. It upped the craziness and it developed a mythology. Sadly, Humphries ignores Mieville's foundational mythology, but he does a great job of creating some craziness of his own and also resolves the one flaw with Mieville's run by (once more) tying "Dial H" back into continuity. This version of "Dial H" (the fifth by my count) returns to the early days of having young, wish-fulfillment heroes but also has wacky heroes and recognizes "Dial H" as a great story to break the fourth wall and treat the comic as a something happening in a comic book. It's a good combination, and something that might be more approachable than Mieville's amazing but complex run. I look forward to volume 2.

  5. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Dial H for Hero is back! This time I liked this story a lot more than New 52 one. SO Miguel, our main hero here, stumbles on a magical phone. Once dialed he becomes a HERO! And what this story bases itself on is Miguel always wanted to be like Superman. When he was a child he was rescued by the hero and looks up to him. But he also has a pretty shitty life at the moment. Till he finds the phone! Then everyone is after him and between him and his new friend they must escape their clutches. What Dial H for Hero is back! This time I liked this story a lot more than New 52 one. SO Miguel, our main hero here, stumbles on a magical phone. Once dialed he becomes a HERO! And what this story bases itself on is Miguel always wanted to be like Superman. When he was a child he was rescued by the hero and looks up to him. But he also has a pretty shitty life at the moment. Till he finds the phone! Then everyone is after him and between him and his new friend they must escape their clutches. What works really well here is the art. Obviously the major throwbacks to many comics from different genres is awesome. On top of that Miguel is a fun protagonist and he's pretty funny too as is his company. I thought the pacing was a bit off though and the ending didn't work as well for me as the first few issues. I also thought the ending tied it up and confused where it'll go. Either way though it's something pretty different. For the art alone I'd give it a 5 but the story isn't as strong, so I'll settle on a 3.5 out of 5.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dubzor

    This was a lot of fun, and really showed what a talent Joe Quinones is. Although I'm skeptical they have enough material here to continue the series.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jesús

    Like most of the titles in DCs new Wonder Comics imprint, Dial H for Hero is shockingly good and beautifully polished (the one exception among the imprints titles is the lackluster Young Justice). Dial H is a wild romp through comics history with likeable characters, a goofy fun plot, and pitch-perfect visual imitations across an array of genres, styles, and eras. [Read in single issues] Like most of the titles in DC’s new Wonder Comics imprint, Dial H for Hero is shockingly good and beautifully polished (the one exception among the imprint’s titles is the lackluster Young Justice). Dial H is a wild romp through comics history with likeable characters, a goofy fun plot, and pitch-perfect visual imitations across an array of genres, styles, and eras. [Read in single issues]

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Who wouldnt love to become a hero for an hour? To embrace their fanciest dreams and save the day? While its easy to think that being a hero doesnt come with much of a workload, young teenager Miguel Montez has to learn this the hard way. As part of superstar creator Brian Michael Bendis deal for joining DC Comics, the major comic book company gladly had to agree in adopting and integrating his Wonder Comics universe, now an official imprint that You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. Who wouldn’t love to become a hero for an hour? To embrace their fanciest dreams and save the day? While it’s easy to think that being a hero doesn’t come with much of a workload, young teenager Miguel Montez has to learn this the hard way. As part of superstar creator Brian Michael Bendis’ deal for joining DC Comics, the major comic book company gladly had to agree in adopting and integrating his Wonder Comics universe, now an official imprint that targets young adults and focuses on coming-of-age stories. Among the series that helped launch this new line-up is the revival of DC Comics’ Dial H for Hero—a play on words derived from director Alfred Hitchcock’s Dial M for Murder. Looking to finally work with his buddy Sam Humphries over at DC Comics, Brian Michael Bendis pitches the idea to him as he takes on the challenge after a bit of research—we can’t know everyone after all—and offers fans the chance to discover what actually happens to those who dare to dial “H”. What is Dial H for Hero: Enter the Heroverse about? Collecting issues #1-6, the story follows teenager Miguel Montez in his everyday life in the mundane town of Devil’s Canyon, California. Young, about ten years old, he was saved by Superman in a freak accident and has been chasing the dragon ever since just to relive the thrill of that moment once again. It’s when he finds himself in a life-or-death situation once again that a mysterious red rotary phone appears and the operator compels him to dial “H” if he wants to live. From that moment forward, life wasn’t the same anymore as he discovers the powers bestowed by this telephone: the person who dials “H” is transformed into a different superhero, every time, for an hour. With the villainous Thunderbolt Club looking to get their hands on this phone, it’s up to Miguel and his rebellious friend Summer to deliver it to the one person who can protect it: Superman. There’s plenty to appreciate in this opening story arc and the direction this series takes as it blows open the multiverse and tosses readers into uncharted territory. The idea behind the heroverse is original and offers plenty of exciting ideas to be explored while keeping the story centered around two teenagers trying to understand what they want to do with their lives as they approach adulthood. This time around, I do have to admit that I couldn’t wrap my head around Miguel Montez’s character, who had a very nagging voice throughout the story and never helped me acclimate myself to his demeanour. If it weren’t for his character, the story in itself would’ve had my utmost praise as it introduces us to a thrilling universe that paves the way to plenty of fun and creative roads to explore. It’s ultimately a quirky, slightly eccentric, and old school story that shows that the writer and artists had fun in expanding creator Brian Michael Bendis’ universe. You have to give it to them. The creative team behind this reboot did a solid job of bringing back to life a series that was lost over time. Perfectly fitting into the Wonder Comics imprint, writer Sam Humphries achieves a sweet and enjoyable story that fans of all ages can enjoy without prior knowledge on the history of this run. While the original series back in the 1980s solicited the fanbase to come up with heroes that could get featured in this story, and credit the person for it too, this pretty cool but missed opportunity can be overlooked by the new direction taken on by the team. In fact, for each new hero introduced following the dialing of “H” allows Joe Quinones and his collaborating artists to change up the artwork—actually giving the inconsistent artwork a raison d’être—to commemorate various styles, from manga to the golden age era, thus allowing this story arc to present countless neat references for the observant to note while reading. Although the base artwork style is a bit cartoonish, it certainly fits well with the story and captures the liveliness of the universe through colourful and bubbly visual designs. Dial H for Hero: Enter the Heroverse is an off-the-wall, exciting, and colourful revival of a series exploring the key ingredient within all to becoming a hero. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ramon

    Better than I was expecting, it's funny, clever, and I like the characters the team has come up with. But man, MVP is Quinones, who's just killing it on the art. He's able to integrate and deploy so many styles; he's pretty much the perfect artist for this book at this exact point in time. Great first volume.

  10. 4 out of 5

    John

    A bit silly, a lot stylish, a tad retro and a smidge innovative.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Dial H for Hero's a fairly straight forward concept, but it always seems to get creative teams to do weird and wonderful things with it. My only two exposures to Dial H are this series, and the previous New 52 one, and they couldn't be more different, and yet are equally as entertaining. This series focuses on Miguel Montez, a normal kid who finds the H Dial and tries to get it to Superman, since Supes should know what to do with something dangerous, right? Of course, it's not that easy, as the Dial H for Hero's a fairly straight forward concept, but it always seems to get creative teams to do weird and wonderful things with it. My only two exposures to Dial H are this series, and the previous New 52 one, and they couldn't be more different, and yet are equally as entertaining. This series focuses on Miguel Montez, a normal kid who finds the H Dial and tries to get it to Superman, since Supes should know what to do with something dangerous, right? Of course, it's not that easy, as the illusive Thunderbolt Club are out to steal it from Miguel, and the Operator lurks in the shadows with a truly inspired link to Dial H mythology that will delight fans of the concept. The story's pretty good fun, but this first volume is mostly just setting the stage for what's coming next; I'm surprised at the ambition here, because it doesn't wrap up at all, and if DC hadn't given the book another 6 issues, I might be singing a different tune right now. The art however is utterly phenomenal. Joe Quinones' normal artwork is always gorgeous, but when he turns his hand to the new heroes that pop up in each issue, he manages to be inspired by the heroes in question and turn out something truly special. Some characters are obvious parodies or pastiches of established franchises, while others are entirely new, but they're all wonderfully drawn by Quinones on every page. Dial H is fun with a capital F. This definitely feels like just the beginning of something larger, and I'm glad we're getting to see where Humphries and Quinones are going to take it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Neyebur

    Este cómic ha sido todo un viaje, y no lo digo solo por la odisea que realizan los personajes durante la historia, sino por las constantes referencias a otros personajes e historias del pasado de DC para entender lo que ocurre, sobre todo del pasado del Dial H (Ben Ten tiene mucho que explicar). Me sorprende que este cómic sea parte de la iniciativa para conseguir lectores más jóvenes. Una cosa es hacer que tengan curiosidad por leer otros cómics para saber qué ha pasado, pero otra es obligarles Este cómic ha sido todo un viaje, y no lo digo solo por la odisea que realizan los personajes durante la historia, sino por las constantes referencias a otros personajes e historias del pasado de DC para entender lo que ocurre, sobre todo del pasado del Dial H (Ben Ten tiene mucho que explicar). Me sorprende que este cómic sea parte de la iniciativa para conseguir lectores más jóvenes. Una cosa es hacer que tengan curiosidad por leer otros cómics para saber qué ha pasado, pero otra es obligarles a tener constantemente abierta DC Wikipedia. Sin embargo, fuera de esto, cuando la historia por fin encuentra su camino, al llegar al Heroverse, se vuelve muy interesante la idea que plantea: "Los héroes que crea el H Dial carecen de una motivación, un origen secreto que decida su camino". Una idea que va a hacer que siga leyendo esta historia, además de la "originalidad" de los héroes creados por el H Dial, parodias y homenajes de todo tipo de personajes de cómics. Es muy divertido jugar a tratar de reconocer su inspiración, sobre todo porque no entenderlas no afecta al entendimiento de la historia. El dibujante de la historia hace un gran trabajo, pero también son geniales los cambios de estilos para adecuarse a cada nuevo héroe.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ronald

    While mostly entertaining a lot of this story consists of the main character whining about, well, everything. Not just that but the whining is just copy / pasted word for word from issue to issue / chapter. It gets old and if I wanted to just read about the rantings of a whiny teenager I could just read a Marvel Comic like Spider-Man or any number of X-Men books. My other problem with the book is the whole "A new hero you will never see again" is just annoying and seems to ignore the whole joy of While mostly entertaining a lot of this story consists of the main character whining about, well, everything. Not just that but the whining is just copy / pasted word for word from issue to issue / chapter. It gets old and if I wanted to just read about the rantings of a whiny teenager I could just read a Marvel Comic like Spider-Man or any number of X-Men books. My other problem with the book is the whole "A new hero you will never see again" is just annoying and seems to ignore the whole joy of most of the old Dial H books, you could see these heroes again. I mean the comic is not terrible and Crush errr I mean Lo Lo Kick You is kind of a fun hero so far. But how many times are we going to have another story from DC of a young boy living in a dead end small town with no prospects, abused by relatives, forced to work for relatives that with the help of his sidekick (girl Friday - who is much much much cooler than the guy). They find sudden powers and adventure all while complaining about how unfair the world has treated them. Don't let my nit picking scare you away, there are plenty of little gems in this comic. Check it out!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Christian Zamora-Dahmen

    There is something about the H Dial that I always found captivating. The sole concept: dialing a phone and becoming a hero is the absolute dream of most comic book fans, but then again, "Dial 'H' for Hero" has had some weird runs that never satisfied my expectations. Of course, this is my personal appreciation. This time, we have these endearing kids (Miguel and Summer), some fantastic art by Joe Quiñones, and the dial. So far so good. But whenever the dial is actually used, the story gets There is something about the H Dial that I always found captivating. The sole concept: dialing a phone and becoming a hero is the absolute dream of most comic book fans, but then again, "Dial 'H' for Hero" has had some weird runs that never satisfied my expectations. Of course, this is my personal appreciation. This time, we have these endearing kids (Miguel and Summer), some fantastic art by Joe Quiñones, and the dial. So far so good. But whenever the dial is actually used, the story gets disrupted somehow. The writer, Sam Humphries, set every new hero under a different narrative style (both in art and text). As an idea, I like it, as part of the story, this creates a break into the story that I find hard to deal with. It's like watching a movie and then, all of a sudden, in the actual climax, the one sitting next to you yells "This is fake". Of course, this little "yell" jumps at me with every issue, and it seriously began to bug me. As for the story, it was nice, a bit slow, but quite enjoyable. I read it in single issues (and now I'm onto the second set of this series).

  15. 4 out of 5

    Scratch

    I stopped reading any DC comic made after Flashpoint. Including Flashpoint, really. So this was an interesting choice to pick up randomly. I figured it wouldn't feature mainstream DC heroes too much, and I was pretty spot on. This was adjacent to mainstream action, featuring bit players like Snapper Carr and the two teen n00bz, Miguel and Summer. Pleasant enough diversion. Nice message about being inspired to become a hero. Really reminded me of the Shazam movie, which may have been intentional I stopped reading any DC comic made after Flashpoint. Including Flashpoint, really. So this was an interesting choice to pick up randomly. I figured it wouldn't feature mainstream DC heroes too much, and I was pretty spot on. This was adjacent to mainstream action, featuring bit players like Snapper Carr and the two teen n00bz, Miguel and Summer. Pleasant enough diversion. Nice message about being inspired to become a hero. Really reminded me of the Shazam movie, which may have been intentional on their part. Capitalize on the movie audience. The best thing about this series is that the artists try out a bunch of different tongue-in-cheek parody styles. The first hero Miguel turned into was a potshot at gritty 90s characters, with most of the cliches (and artistic trademarks) jammed together at once. If you look closely, you can spot a lot of other homages in the background. Generic plot, comforting familiarity.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Adel Eslami

    بنظرم مینیسری خوبیه. داستانش کشش کافی رو نداره و حتی گاهاً خطی روایت میشه اما از کمیک هایی هستش که مخاطبِ خودش رو می شناسه و به اندازه از خودش نوآوری نشون میده. از این بهتر شیوهی خاص طراحی و نحوهی تاثیر فضای هر ایشو توی کاره به عنوان مثال در یک شماره تمرکز اصلی کمیک روی سیکرت اریجین سوپرهیروهاست و داستان در بین صفحات کمیک های عصر طلایی و دورههای بعدی روایت میشه یا حتی در یک ایشو فضای حاکم بر کمیک تم مانگا داره و عملاً ریپ آف هایی از کارهایی مثل دراگون بال صورت میگیره. با این وضع نچندان متعادل دیسی بنظرم مینی‌سری خوبیه. داستانش کشش کافی رو نداره و حتی گاهاً خطی روایت می‌شه اما از کمیک هایی هستش که مخاطبِ خودش رو می شناسه و به اندازه از خودش نوآوری نشون می‌ده. از این بهتر، شیوه‌ی خاص طراحی و نحوه‌ی تاثیر فضای هر ایشو توی کاره، به عنوان مثال در یک شماره تمرکز اصلی کمیک روی سیکرت اریجین سوپرهیروهاست و داستان در بین صفحات کمیک های عصر طلایی و دوره‌های بعدی روایت می‌شه، یا حتی در یک ایشو فضای حاکم بر کمیک تم مانگا داره و عملاً ریپ آف هایی از کارهایی مثل دراگون بال صورت می‌گیره. با این وضع نچندان متعادل دی‌سی در زمینه‌ی کمیک های متناسب با درجه‌ی سنی پایین‌تر، بنظرم این مینی‌سری باید خونده بشه واقعاً؛ حتی اگه صرفاً طرفدار دی‌سی باشیم.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Murphy

    This is one of the most enjoyable comics I've ever read. Humphries is incredibly skilled in balancing humor with emotion to create engaging stories and characters that you can't help but love, and I was awestruck by Quinones' artistic talent and ability to switch between styles. I'm grateful the title was renewed for a few more issues and I'd recommend it to anyone who has even a minimal interest in superheroes.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Rounding up from 2 1/2 stars. I could have done with more story and fewer gags and weird-for-the-sake-of-weirdness. It would have helped if it spent some more time developing the heroes the characters dial into with the magic H-dial, but the variety of art styles and obvious homages to various other comics are enjoyable. The main characters are reasonably interesting and I was actually enjoying it by the end of the volume and mildly curious about what comes next.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    A story that plays with the history of DC comics and the comics medium as a whole while also playing with the technical aspects of comics, doing the sort of storytelling you can only do in comics? This is basically my perfect superhero comic.

  20. 5 out of 5

    James

    I've always loved this premise and the people that get to become a superhero for an hour. Lifting a Cadillac might become easier but not the emotional baggage. The protagonists are well-developed while also going through real emotional growth thanks to the H-Dial's entry into their lives.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Butcher

    Interesting and at times sarcastic new take on the Dial that really works, and works at having young adult leads.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    I loved everything about this. Joe Quinones' art and homages are amazing and the story was heartfelt and fun.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Travis Webber

    The stakes for the characters felt low.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    Surprisingly good, and a very satisfying read. It's fun and slightly meta and clever.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Yas

    actual rating: 3.5!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Greg Peterson

    Such a fun book with great callbacks to comics and animation. I tend to enjoy contained DC stories compared to ones tied to the current event and this volume of Dial H delivers!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  28. 4 out of 5

    J.R.

  29. 4 out of 5

    JHat

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rob Schamberger

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