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Best-selling author Dan Buettner debuts his first cookbook, filled with 100 longevity recipes inspired by the Blue Zones locations around the world, where people live the longest. Building on decades of research, longevity expert Dan Buettner has gathered 100 recipes inspired by the Blue Zones, home to the healthiest and happiest communities in the world. Each dish--for Best-selling author Dan Buettner debuts his first cookbook, filled with 100 longevity recipes inspired by the Blue Zones locations around the world, where people live the longest. Building on decades of research, longevity expert Dan Buettner has gathered 100 recipes inspired by the Blue Zones, home to the healthiest and happiest communities in the world. Each dish--for example, Sardinian Herbed Lentil Minestrone; Costa Rican Hearts of Palm Ceviche; Cornmeal Waffles from Loma Linda, California; and Okinawan Sweet Potatoes--uses ingredients and cooking methods proven to increase longevity, wellness, and mental health. Complemented by mouthwatering photography, the recipes also include lifestyle tips (including the best times to eat dinner and proper portion sizes), all gleaned from countries as far away as Japan and as near as Blue Zones project cities in Texas. Innovative, easy to follow, and delicious, these healthy living recipes make the Blue Zones lifestyle even more attainable, thereby improving your health, extending your life, and filling your kitchen with happiness.


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Best-selling author Dan Buettner debuts his first cookbook, filled with 100 longevity recipes inspired by the Blue Zones locations around the world, where people live the longest. Building on decades of research, longevity expert Dan Buettner has gathered 100 recipes inspired by the Blue Zones, home to the healthiest and happiest communities in the world. Each dish--for Best-selling author Dan Buettner debuts his first cookbook, filled with 100 longevity recipes inspired by the Blue Zones locations around the world, where people live the longest. Building on decades of research, longevity expert Dan Buettner has gathered 100 recipes inspired by the Blue Zones, home to the healthiest and happiest communities in the world. Each dish--for example, Sardinian Herbed Lentil Minestrone; Costa Rican Hearts of Palm Ceviche; Cornmeal Waffles from Loma Linda, California; and Okinawan Sweet Potatoes--uses ingredients and cooking methods proven to increase longevity, wellness, and mental health. Complemented by mouthwatering photography, the recipes also include lifestyle tips (including the best times to eat dinner and proper portion sizes), all gleaned from countries as far away as Japan and as near as Blue Zones project cities in Texas. Innovative, easy to follow, and delicious, these healthy living recipes make the Blue Zones lifestyle even more attainable, thereby improving your health, extending your life, and filling your kitchen with happiness.

30 review for The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to Live to 100

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader

    Have you heard of the Blue Zones? Those regions of the world known for the longevity of their populations? Ever since reading and listening to How Not to Die by Dr. Michael Greger, I am all about using food as medicine and living a longer, healthier life as a result. Im a vegetarian who eats many plant-based meals, and all of these recipes are not vegetarian or plant-based; however, from the 100 recipes, there are many Id love to try. Sweet potatoes and lentils are staples in our house, and I Have you heard of the Blue Zones? Those regions of the world known for the longevity of their populations? Ever since reading and listening to How Not to Die by Dr. Michael Greger, I am all about using food as medicine and living a longer, healthier life as a result. I’m a vegetarian who eats many plant-based meals, and all of these recipes are not vegetarian or plant-based; however, from the 100 recipes, there are many I’d love to try. Sweet potatoes and lentils are staples in our house, and I could eat them at most every meal. As with any National Geographic book, the photography and presentation are both stunning. It drives you to want to make the food as soon as you can. Overall, I’m pleased to have this cookbook in my arsenal and can’t wait to try some recipes out soon. I received a gifted copy from the publisher. All opinions are my own. Many of my reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com and instagram: www.instagram.com/tarheelreader

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Gilpin

    I made a list of all the ingredients that are used by the various areas of Blue Zone. And I have started making several of the recipes. All are so good--so far. They are all high in protein and NO meat. One of my favorite cookbooks for sure.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Briana

    The Blue Zones Kitchen includes recipes from the so-called blue zones, areas where the residents (particularly older ones who adhere to the more traditional diets) live longer than anywhere else on Earth, largely because of what they eat. Ive tried three of the recipesroasted vegetables, sweet potato tarts, and a ratatouilleand all were approachable and included ingredients I was easily able to find at my local grocery store (some ingredients might be a little tougher). The sweet potato tart The Blue Zones Kitchen includes recipes from the so-called “blue zones,” areas where the residents (particularly older ones who adhere to the more traditional diets) live longer than anywhere else on Earth, largely because of what they eat. I’ve tried three of the recipes—roasted vegetables, sweet potato tarts, and a ratatouille—and all were approachable and included ingredients I was easily able to find at my local grocery store (some ingredients might be a little tougher). The sweet potato tart recipe did tell me to use far more potatoes than I actually needed for the filling, but otherwise the recipes worked and were delicious. I would be interested in making more or even purchasing a copy of the book to consult, since I initially borrowed it from the library. I’ve seen some complaints in other reviews that the recipes aren’t “really” healthy because they sometimes include things like white rice and sugar, but the book is a record of what people in these areas actually eat—and they sometimes eat sugar. If you want a zero sugar diet, that’s a different cookbook. However, in addition to the recipes, The Blue Zones Kitchen includes information on the general diet of each area, the staple foods in each area that promote longevity (such as olive oil or sourdough bread), and other habits that the residents have. This means that, while sugar is eaten, the people don’t have dessert every day. (Also, the sweet potato tarts I made had no sugar in the actual sweet potato filling, just some brown sugar sprinkled on top, so it’s clear how this would be a much healthier dessert option than, say, a cupcake.) Similarly, the people in these areas do eat meat but rarely, so the authors decided to make all recipes vegetarian (though I think fish might be mentioned occasionally). A communal approach to food and strong social networks all also important for longevity, and the book clarifies this time and again. It’s not just about cutting out bad foods or eating the “superfoods;” it’s a whole approach to food and living. If you’re looking for a straightforward cookbook with simple whole ingredients and approachable recipes, I would recommend this. I don’t personally cook a lot simply because I find it a bit boring and I have other people in my life who actually enjoy cooking, but I had no problem with any of the recipes I attempted so far, and I thought the meals turned out great. (I also generally do like vegetables and prefer them to meat, however, so I can see how that might play a factor.) More reviews at Pages Unbound.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Really great cookbook. Simple recipes with very few and very simple ingredients. The book is divided, very interestingly, into the blue zone areas with the corresponding recipes (instead of by meal type). Some ingredients might be harder to find depending on where you live.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Esther King

    More than just a cookbook, this provided overviews of the parts of the world where living to 100 is not a miracle but instead expected. The recipes involved are all plant based and provide reasoning as to why they are so important for a healthy diet. Theyre largely simple and look pretty darn delicious, and are well worth a try. Some of the ingredients are a little left of field for some readers so keep it in mind that there may be some difficulties with sourcing. More than just a cookbook, this provided overviews of the parts of the world where living to 100 is not a miracle but instead expected. The recipes involved are all plant based and provide reasoning as to why they are so important for a healthy diet. They’re largely simple and look pretty darn delicious, and are well worth a try. Some of the ingredients are a little left of field for some readers so keep it in mind that there may be some difficulties with sourcing.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Karista Bennett

    I've been intrigued by the subject of The Blue Zones, so when this book released, I had to have it. Beautifully written with lovely photos and loaded with information and inspiration. Not only is it filled with recipes but also the most delightful stories. A great read!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Antonette

    Thought I'd enjoy it since I'd read Blue Zones and loved it...not the case. Very disappointed in the recipes. They were full of ingredients that should not be included in whole food plant based eating, i.e. white sugar, white flour and white rice. In addition, they seemed to include items regular grocery stores in smaller cities would not have. It was a Christmas gift that will now be returned.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    The Blue Zones Kitchen is a lovely cookbook, with recipes that sound delicious, and is a worthy addition to the Blue Zones library. The cover is striking. The recipes manage to be both healthful and delicious (sounding, haven't tried any of them yet). And the sections on each Blue Zone region, complete with lovely food, people, and scenery photography, interviews, regional history and culture, and versions of local recipes are all fascinating. There ARE a lot of recipes that contain gluten, many The Blue Zones Kitchen is a lovely cookbook, with recipes that sound delicious, and is a worthy addition to the Blue Zones library. The cover is striking. The recipes manage to be both healthful and delicious (sounding, haven't tried any of them yet). And the sections on each Blue Zone region, complete with lovely food, people, and scenery photography, interviews, regional history and culture, and versions of local recipes are all fascinating. There ARE a lot of recipes that contain gluten, many of which would be difficult to make gluten free substitutions. But overall it's just really a great cookbook, to the extent that I'm going to buy it and try a bunch of the recipes. I just hope some of the profit/ benefits from these books go back to the communities who inspire Buettner's work.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    Great book , great recipes!!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Di Richardson

    This books is getting a lot of hype right now. The narrative is compelling, and the the photos are gorgeous! It is bright, and glossy, and really a beautiful book. So why only three stars? Well, almost every recipe in this book seemed to be centered around chickpeas or sweet potatoes, and those just happen to be two veggies I really do not like. I am willing to include them once in a while, but I am just never going to center my diet around those two foods, so for me, this just isnt going to be This books is getting a lot of hype right now. The narrative is compelling, and the the photos are gorgeous! It is bright, and glossy, and really a beautiful book. So why only three stars? Well, almost every recipe in this book seemed to be centered around chickpeas or sweet potatoes, and those just happen to be two veggies I really do not like. I am willing to include them once in a while, but I am just never going to center my diet around those two foods, so for me, this just isn’t going to be a cookbook I use a lot.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kay

    Got this book from the library just before it closed for Covid19. So many yummy looking food and recipes. I also love the story of each town covered in the cookbook. I would love to try some of them in particular the Okinawa section. But right now it's so depressing with stay at home covid ordeal and we only make one trip to one store for groceries roughly once every 10 days. 😪

  12. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Longevity Diet The author has identified the areas where people live the longest and explored their lifestyles and diet. There are a lot of delicious sounding recipes in this book. I need a copy so I can try these recipes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ahonui

    I would have liked more pictures of the finished meal & dishes.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Martina

    I'm not even a moderately competent cook, and likely won't use many of the recipes in this book. However, I bought-- and I love -- this book for the inspiration it provides (through beautiful photographs and text) to live a good and healthy life, and to savor the local foods in season as nourishing treasures. In many ways, this is not so much a cook book, as a wonderful centering and rejuvenating trip around the world, visiting with wise and joyful people as they celebrate the abundance and I'm not even a moderately competent cook, and likely won't use many of the recipes in this book. However, I bought-- and I love -- this book for the inspiration it provides (through beautiful photographs and text) to live a good and healthy life, and to savor the local foods in season as nourishing treasures. In many ways, this is not so much a cook book, as a wonderful centering and rejuvenating trip around the world, visiting with wise and joyful people as they celebrate the abundance and goodness of the earth. It recalls much of what tends to be overlooked in modern, urban, U.S. life and reminds us to live more thoughtfully, tread more lightly, and appreciate the nourishing foods that grow in the earth.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Debra

    It's been a while since I have participated in a  TLC Book Tour.   My last stopover was for  The Art of Escapism Cooking all the way back in October.  I'm glad to have had the opportunity to receive a copy of The Blue Zones Kitchen for an honest review.  (As always, all opinions and rants are my own.) I've been intrigued by the whole Blue Zones phenomenon for a while now so I was excited to receive a copy of The Blue Zones Kitchen.   It's a beautiful book, full of National Geographic quality It's been a while since I have participated in a  TLC Book Tour.   My last stopover was for  The Art of Escapism Cooking all the way back in October.  I'm glad to have had the opportunity to receive a copy of The Blue Zones Kitchen for an honest review.  (As always, all opinions and rants are my own.) I've been intrigued by the whole Blue Zones phenomenon for a while now so I was excited to receive a copy of The Blue Zones Kitchen.   It's a beautiful book, full of National Geographic quality photographs, not only of the food, but of the people who cook it in their environments. As stated in the blurb above, these are areas where the life expectancy and health is above that found in the rest of the world.   Their longevity experiences do go beyond food though.  In these four areas---Sardinia; Okinawa; Loma Linda; Ikaria, Greece; and the Costa Rican Peninsula of Nicoya---it's the entire lifestyle and sense of community. People aren't lonely, because it simply isn't an option.  If after a few days people don't show up to the town festival, church, or even the village cafe, someone will generally check in on them.  Electronic gadgets haven't yet taken over.  People talk face-to-face instead of on Facebook.  (20) Buettner also maintains that these communities are full of movers and shakers---they don't set idle.  They walk where they need to go and grow what they need to eat---"their surroundings nudge them into the right behaviors" (19). It's a great premise and full of ideas to ponder and act on. As a cookbook, however, I have to offer a few suggestions to Buettner and his editors. Let's start with the structure.  There is a table of contents that lists the recipes, but there is no index.   I was wanting to start my cooking experience with this book off with a soup and I guess that because there was not an index to consult, I did find other recipes worth trying as I perused through the entire book. Next, there's the recipes themselves.  So far, I have tried two recipes, neither needing any culinary expertise; however, I did need a working cooking knowledge to make them turn out. It was definitely soup weather so I tried one of three hearty minestrone recipes from the Sardinian section. This makes a lot of healthy and life-preserving soup.    (It freezes well, too.) The second recipe I made was from the Greek section:  Parsley with Hummus (224).  It is a very basic recipe without tahini as an ingredient.  I honestly prefer hummus made like this.   The ingredients are simple and straight forward:   chickpeas, garlic, olive oil, red wine vinegar, and parsley.   The directions (again) would have left one with a gloppy mess that didn't resemble (at all) the accompanying photo in the book.    But, if you knew to add the olive oil, vinegar, and the parsley to the food processor (along with a bit the Aquafaba, chickpea "juice"), you could have a very good hummus as I did. The recipe states to sprinkle 1/4 c. parsley on top.   The next time I make this recipe, I will add it to the food processor as well. All-in-all, I enjoyed the book.  I loved the stories and appreciated the resources at the end of the book:  "How to Cook Beans" and the top longevity ingredients from each of the regions highlighted. Sardinia:  barley, Cannonau wine (made from sun-stressed Grenache grapes), fava beans, kolhrabi, fennel, olive oil, potatoes, rosemary, sourdough bread, and tomatoes Okinawa:  Imo ("supercharged" purple sweet potatoes), dashi broth, green onions, miso, sesame oil, bitter melon, seaweed and kelp, mushrooms, tofu, and turmeric. Nicoya:  small sweet peppers, black beans, ground corn, cilantro, coconut, culantro (Mexican coriander), chilero sauce, papaya, squash (especially chayote), and yuca. Ikaria:  Beans (especially chickpeas and black-eyed peas), fennel, wild greens (purslane, dandelion, arugula), lemons, olive oil, oregano, sage, rosemary, potatoes, and honey. Loma Linda:  soy milk, Weetabix (an English whole grain cereal), corn flakes, brewer's yeast, nuts, oatmeal, avocado, vegemite, beans, spinach I would recommend this book, especially as a reference for starting and maintaining the Blue Zones diet.   I would recommend it as a cookbook with the caveat that you may need to modify the recipe directions.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Zohar - ManOfLaBook.com

    For more reviews and bookish posts please visit: http://www.ManOfLaBook.com The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to Live to 100 by Dan Buettner is a cook book / travel book which publishes recipes from the worlds Blue Zone locations around the world. Mr. Buettner is a National Geographic fellow and bestselling author. I have always had interest in the worlds Blue Zones, frankly I dont understand who wouldnt. Blue Zones are geographical areas around the world in which people average longer and For more reviews and bookish posts please visit: http://www.ManOfLaBook.com The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to Live to 100 by Dan Buettner is a cook book / travel book which publishes recipes from the worlds Blue Zone locations around the world. Mr. Buettner is a National Geographic fellow and bestselling author. I have always had interest in the world’s Blue Zones, frankly I don’t understand who wouldn’t. Blue Zones are geographical areas around the world in which people average longer and healthier lives than in other places. It is not unusual for someone in a Blue Zone to live to by 100 years old. In The Blue Zones Kitchen: 100 Recipes to Live to 100 by Dan Buettner the author gives recipes and a short write up (several pages) about each zone (Sardinia in Italy, Nicoya in Costa Rica, Loma Linda in California, Okinawa in Japan, and Icaria (or Ikaria) in Greece). The photographs are gorgeous and the write ups are very interesting. It is important to note that the diet of Blue Zone residents is only part of the reason for their longevity, climate, reasonable amount of exercise, family, work, and relationships all have a big say in getting to old age.It is difficult to imagine that in today’s worlds such zones still exist. In our society we don’t have to lift a finger to turn off the lights, it’s unthinkable to walk a mile to the store, and it’s much cheaper to eat garbage then good food. Worst of all, you can go for moths on end without seeing any of your friends or neighbors. The recipes look simple with few ingredients. I have made two of them (falafel and smoothies) just to see if the directions are clear, and they were. Full disclosure: I have made these dishes before using different, but very similar recipes. Many of the recipes are simply mixing in the right amount of ingredients without the need to cook or bake, fast and simple. I do, however, have to complaints, one is small, the other not so. First of all, it seems to me that the author setup to write a cookbook and ended up with a cookbook / travel book hybrid. There is no index in the book for the recipes, they are listed by country, so if you have a certain ingredient on hand there is no way for you to find out which recipe you can make unless going through the whole book. The second is that several ingredients are very difficult to find and the author did not include any substitutions (I had to look up what mirin is), but that’s just me being a bit pedantic because I don’t have enough experience cooking to know how to replace ingredients .

  17. 4 out of 5

    CJ Katz

    Some great stuff here, especially if you're looking to improve your health and introduce more plant foods into your diet. Beans are the cornerstone of Blue Zone eating and a majority of recipes in the book include legumes of some sort. I love the overview of each zone and how the book is divided into the Zones. Look for additional bits of info scattered throughout the recipes sections, including the pictoral overview of the foods defining each Zone at the end of the book. Now I'm off to make Some great stuff here, especially if you're looking to improve your health and introduce more plant foods into your diet. Beans are the cornerstone of Blue Zone eating and a majority of recipes in the book include legumes of some sort. I love the overview of each zone and how the book is divided into the Zones. Look for additional bits of info scattered throughout the recipes sections, including the pictoral overview of the foods defining each Zone at the end of the book. Now I'm off to make sour dough starter and soak some beans!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    I am all about blue zone fare so this book was right in my wheelhouse! The recipes all looked delicious and the photos in this book are stunning. I'm most excited to try out all the greens recipes from the different regions. I'm Greek, Italian and Puerto Rican so I grew up eating a variety of greens, and yet there are still so many variations to try! Gimme all the greens. I gots ta have'em! Nom nom nom!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    Its useful that the Blue Zones book came out with a recipe companion book, but the recipes were not too appealing to me (even as a vegan). Since Blue Zones covers international regions, some of the recipes for those regions have ingredients that are hard to come by in the US. I only ended up flagging 2 that Ill likely try and 5 that I might try. It’s useful that the Blue Zones book came out with a recipe companion book, but the recipes were not too appealing to me (even as a vegan). Since Blue Zones covers international regions, some of the recipes for those regions have ingredients that are hard to come by in the US. I only ended up flagging 2 that I’ll likely try and 5 that I might try.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    Great pictures. Interesting, delicious, recipes. I love this kind of simple, plant-based food. I haven't tried any of the Okinawan recipes, perhaps because they don't seem as accessible to me. Tonight's dinner - cabbage with sun-dried tomato, from Sardinia, with a glass of red wine, yum! My only criticism: I firmly believe a cookbook is only as good as its index, and this book has none.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jean Wiseman

    This beautifully illustrated cookbook features plant-based recipes from the Blue Zones. Some of the recipes featured ingredients that would be difficult to acquire in my small town. The recipes I tried were easy, delicious, and healthy. This book has to go back to the library tomorrow, but I am considering purchasing my own copy.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mackay

    An unexpected gift from a friend. While I don't want to live to be 100, I am endeavoring to eat in a way that lightens my personal impact on the planet - less meat (and that ethically raised and slaughtered), more plant-based mains, etc. This is a beautiful book with some interesting things to say, lavishly illustrated and full of good ideas. Worthwhile.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    Wonderful photos and interesting read, all most like a travel journal with insights into the culture and lifestyles in each of these "zones". Have only tired one recipe so far but will definitely be trying more.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Laura Cason

    This is a beautiful book! I enjoyed the photos as much as the recipes. I tried a few of the smoothie recipes and am looking forward to trying some of the cold pasta salad recipes in the summertime. It was a visually, stunning and also fun read.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    Probably worth buying not just for healthy recipes, but if youre at a loss for new meals and not creative. Pasta Puttanesca with wine sauce would never have occurred to me, even though Ive made the tomato sauce version many times. Probably worth buying not just for healthy recipes, but if you’re at a loss for new meals and not creative. Pasta Puttanesca with wine sauce would never have occurred to me, even though I’ve made the tomato sauce version many times.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    This is book is a thing of beauty and inspiration! I have it sitting by my favorite chair and pick it up when I have a few minutes several times a day to browse and read. So informative and inspiring! Highly recommended!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This was a lot more practical than I thought it was going to be. I think the recipes in the section for the Okinawan diet are going to be the hardest to pull off in a Midwestern kitchen. But a lot of the rest is very possible here.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I'm not a great cook but have been looking for simple recipes to make healthier meals. I found a few in hear that I plan to try. Lots of delious recipes that would be great for a vegan or vegetarian.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sherry

    Interesting, many recipes used ingredients common in that region but not so much in my area. I did not feel excited to try any of recipes which is a hallmark of a good cookbook in my opinion.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    I don't know what I was expecting, but it wasn't this.

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