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The Stars in Our Pockets: Getting Lost and Sometimes Found in the Digital Age

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What shapes our sense of place, our sense of time, and our memory? How is technology changing the way we make sense of the world and of ourselves? The human brain's ability to adapt has been an evolutionary advantage for the last 40,000 years, but now, for the first time in human history, we're effectively living in two environments at once--the natural and the digital--and What shapes our sense of place, our sense of time, and our memory? How is technology changing the way we make sense of the world and of ourselves? The human brain's ability to adapt has been an evolutionary advantage for the last 40,000 years, but now, for the first time in human history, we're effectively living in two environments at once--the natural and the digital--and many of the traits that help us online don't help us offline, and vice versa. Drawing on his experience of acclimating to a life of solitude in the woods and then to digital life upon his return to the city, Howard Axelrod explores the human brain's impressive but indiscriminate ability to adapt to its surroundings. The Stars in Our Pockets is a portrait of, as well as a meditation on, what Axelrod comes to think of as "inner climate change." Just as we're losing diversity of plant and animal species due to the environmental crisis, so too are we losing the diversity and range of our minds due to changes in our cognitive environment. As we navigate the rapid shifts between the physical and digital realms, what traits are we trading without being aware of it? The Stars in Our Pockets is a personal and profound reminder of the world around us and the worlds within us--and how, as alienated as we may sometimes feel, they were made for each other.


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What shapes our sense of place, our sense of time, and our memory? How is technology changing the way we make sense of the world and of ourselves? The human brain's ability to adapt has been an evolutionary advantage for the last 40,000 years, but now, for the first time in human history, we're effectively living in two environments at once--the natural and the digital--and What shapes our sense of place, our sense of time, and our memory? How is technology changing the way we make sense of the world and of ourselves? The human brain's ability to adapt has been an evolutionary advantage for the last 40,000 years, but now, for the first time in human history, we're effectively living in two environments at once--the natural and the digital--and many of the traits that help us online don't help us offline, and vice versa. Drawing on his experience of acclimating to a life of solitude in the woods and then to digital life upon his return to the city, Howard Axelrod explores the human brain's impressive but indiscriminate ability to adapt to its surroundings. The Stars in Our Pockets is a portrait of, as well as a meditation on, what Axelrod comes to think of as "inner climate change." Just as we're losing diversity of plant and animal species due to the environmental crisis, so too are we losing the diversity and range of our minds due to changes in our cognitive environment. As we navigate the rapid shifts between the physical and digital realms, what traits are we trading without being aware of it? The Stars in Our Pockets is a personal and profound reminder of the world around us and the worlds within us--and how, as alienated as we may sometimes feel, they were made for each other.

30 review for The Stars in Our Pockets: Getting Lost and Sometimes Found in the Digital Age

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    My review for the Chicago Tribune: https://www.chicagotribune.com/entert... Often, after I finish reading a book that I admire, I’ll snap a photograph of the cover and tweet a recommendation, tagging the author. When I completed “The Stars in Our Pockets: Getting Lost and Sometimes Found in the Digital Age,” though, I could not do so because the author, Howard Axelrod, adheres to his own convictions and does not participate on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or any other such platform. Advisedly, I d My review for the Chicago Tribune: https://www.chicagotribune.com/entert... Often, after I finish reading a book that I admire, I’ll snap a photograph of the cover and tweet a recommendation, tagging the author. When I completed “The Stars in Our Pockets: Getting Lost and Sometimes Found in the Digital Age,” though, I could not do so because the author, Howard Axelrod, adheres to his own convictions and does not participate on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or any other such platform. Advisedly, I do not say that Axelrod, a faculty member at Loyola University Chicago, practices what he preaches; for despite his brief and bracing book’s decidedly critical stance on technology, his tone is not a preachy one. Instead, his take tends more toward the poetic, as when he writes of how the spread of cellphones leads to the sensation of every public space becoming “a version of a ghost town, inhabited by people who were there but who also weren’t.” His previous book, “The Point of Vanishing: A Memoir of Two Years in Solitude,” gave an account of his Thoreau-style time alone in the woods of Vermont in the wake of losing the sight in one eye in a pickup basketball accident during his undergraduate years at Harvard University. There in his cabin, he had “no TV, no cell phone, and no computer,” but not out of any Luddite resistance. Rather, he sought — in his state of partial blindness — to explore “how the world entered me and how I entered the world.” Upon his return to Boston in 2001, he finds “the sidewalk had changed” because “cell-phone use had doubled in the two years” he spent away. Of course, 19 years after that, everyone knows that the smartphone-fueled states of public distractedness, news-based anxiety, and shrinking attention spans have only deepened. As Axelrod notes, not without dismay, “the signs are everywhere” in that the capacity for empathy is “down 40 percent in college students over the past 20 years,” we have an “inability to be alone (six minutes without a phone and subjects chose to receive electroshocks rather than confront ‘solitude’),” and “in the U.S. people swipe or tap an average of 2,617 times a day.” Fortunately, this book — continuing some of the ruminations he began in his previous one — is neither a screed nor a jeremiad; He’s not some “Walden”-type neckbeard screaming at Silicon Valley to get off his lawn. Lyrical and nonlinear, blending such scientific concepts as “neural Darwinism” and route knowledge versus survey knowledge with astute personal observations and witty anecdotes, Axelrod examines how the supreme adaptability of the human brain can be both a bug and a feature, depending on what it happens to be adapting to. Coining the term “inner climate change” to describe the threats the digital world poses to our physical, emotional and spiritual ones, Axelrod organizes the book’s six chapters around the various endangered traits he most fears humanity surrendering to the machines. These qualities include everything from firsthand experience to curiosity to the ability to get lost in a true flow state to wonder itself. “Wonder Google-style bypasses personal experience, bypasses how our memories are imperfect in personal and even wondrous ways,” he writes of a phone conversation with an old friend, reminiscing about such 1980s coming of age movies as “St. Elmo’s Fire.” “I didn’t really care about the full cast list. I cared about what each of us did or didn’t remember, and how browsing those memories could be like flipping through a photo album of our high school minds.” Timely, essential, generous and never bitter, assembled with the roving structure of a book-length essay, “The Stars in Our Pockets” is not just a gentle exploration of the costs of living digitally; it is also a subtly prescriptive look at benefits of unplugging. With examples from William James, Mary Oliver, Virginia Woolf, Oliver Sacks, Hannah Arendt and many more woven alongside his own, Axelrod offers a measured but urgent argument that “the portals in our pockets” are “ too good at responding to our immediate needs, too efficient at doing our bidding, for us to be getting lost in something larger than ourselves.” Put down your phone and read this book. Maybe even get your friends to read it, too, and then have the kinds of conversations about it that can’t be had on social media.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kogiopsis

    If there is one thing I can say of this book, it's this: it did, indeed, get me thinking... just not in the way Axelrod perhaps expected. To give credit where credit is due, Axelrod is very up-front in the introduction about the fact that this book will not be universally applicable. He describes it as a "personal map" of traits he worries about losing in the digital age, and personal it most certainly is, in large part because of his own unique relationship with technology. One of the touchstone If there is one thing I can say of this book, it's this: it did, indeed, get me thinking... just not in the way Axelrod perhaps expected. To give credit where credit is due, Axelrod is very up-front in the introduction about the fact that this book will not be universally applicable. He describes it as a "personal map" of traits he worries about losing in the digital age, and personal it most certainly is, in large part because of his own unique relationship with technology. One of the touchstones of this book and, it seems, his life, is his loss of vision in one eye and subsequent decision to spend two years in rural Vermont doing some serious introspection. (The Point of Vanishing: A Memoir of Two Years in Solitude) Where that intersects with the digital world is this: those two years occurred during a time of rapid technological development, meaning that while Axelrod was estranged from technology, it moved on without him and he came back to a vastly different world. And this, in retrospect, is where I think this book started to lose me, because for all that he's written about the impact of the digital world... Axelrod feels very much like a stranger to it. As another review points out, he doesn't have a social media presence - and while there's nothing wrong with that, per se, it is emblematic of one of the difficulties of this book. Axelrod writes about the digital age from the perspective of someone who barely participates in it, who indeed seems to actively shun it, and again, that's a valid personal choice, but an authority on virtuality he is not. There's also something very interesting about reading this book now. You see, like every other writer who expresses deep concern over how cell phones are changing our relationships to each other, Axelrod presents an image of two people, physically in proximity, but both absorbed in their phones such that they aren't 'in the moment' with one another. And yet, as I read that chapter, my state and much of the world were under shelter-in-place orders to slow the spread of a global pandemic, with technology as our primary means of reaching out to family and friends without literally putting lives at risk. As someone who is both queer and socially anxious, I have always found this 'we're not talking to each other anymore!' argument to be disingenuous - the internet is often a literal lifeline for young queer people who are geographically or socially isolated, and I've formed or strengthened many a great friendship online. Now, in light of COVID-19, when being able to reach out regardless of distance is more important than ever... can we finally put this talking point to rest? The thing that irritated me most, however, was Axelrod's chapter on wonder (titled 'Frames'). The following excerpt explains things rather well: Real wonder tends to come, even for adults, when the unknowable flashes through the known - the mystery of our place in the universe made tangible in a meteor shower, or a sudden silence in the trees that seems to let us in, or even in a grasshopper. But Google makes everything appear fully knowable, indeed already fully known, so all we need to know is reference and cross-reference intelligently and efficiently. Wonder is in your hands! Wonder isn't a potent mind/body swirl of curiosity and awe. Wonder doesn't take time, or have anything to do with the unknowable, or grace you with the humility to kneel down in the grass. Wonder is control. Wonder is over twenty-four million results for praying mantis in under .5 seconds. Wonder is the answer, not the question, and not the questioning. Because in these two paragraphs, Axelrod is not just disparaging Google... he's disparaging the entire undertaking of science, which is all about turning wondering into knowing into more wondering. The unknowable and the known aren't discrete categories; there is always interplay between what we already know and what we wonder about, and that's why scientific inquiry exists. That is why any inquiry exists! And having the knowledge of the world at our fingertips only expands our capacity to wonder at it, because each new answer raises new questions in turn. There is nothing wrong with being comfortable, as Axelrod clearly is, in not knowing, but the sheer patronizing tone of the above paragraphs, treating not knowing like some kind of Platonic ideal, is incredibly galling. Ultimately, this book felt like pure navel-gazing. Axelrod does not have much direct experience with the digital world, so he puts forth conjecture. He speculates about the interior life of high school students who have grown up with it, but never bothers to actually ask them about it, never treats their perspectives as equally valid to his own. Despite the nearly 20 years which have passed since his return from the wilderness into the technological world, he puts himself forth as if he has not adjusted or tried to understand the new reality whatsoever, and with that much time elapsed it just seems like willful ignorance. (A prime example is the following aside in the last chapter, which demonstrates a staggering lack of understanding of search engines: "Modern footnote: A Google search for "pause for humility" gets a little less than two million results; a Google search for "rush to anger' gets over twenty-seven million, with videos of Rush Limbaugh topping the list." Gee, I wonder if that might have something to do with the fact that Rush is the man's name, or with the fact that 'pause for humility' isn't actually a commonly used phrase?) If you are interested, for whatever reason, in Howard Axelrod's extremely specific view of the world, this book will impart plenty of information about Howard Axelrod's extremely specific view of the world. If you, like me, were looking for a nuanced reflection about our complex relationship with technology, you will probably not find it in a book explicitly structured around "endangered traits [Axelrod] fear[s] losing". Honestly, looking back on that introduction, I don't know why I'm surprised that this turned out to be almost pure technophobia. Oh well. p.s. please do yourself a favor and look at Goodreads' "Readers Also Enjoyed" list for this book. It's hilarious right now.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    I won a copy of this book. Put down your phone and see how long you can go without checking it. Seriously, face down on the table. Within reach, but not touching it. Are you comfortable enough in your skin to leave it there for more than 5 minutes? Sit in silence for a moment. Will you allow the voice in your head to wander where ever it may take you? Howard Axelrod asks the reader to slow down, observe the pace of everyday life. Take a walk around your neighborhood and go a different way. Watch I won a copy of this book. Put down your phone and see how long you can go without checking it. Seriously, face down on the table. Within reach, but not touching it. Are you comfortable enough in your skin to leave it there for more than 5 minutes? Sit in silence for a moment. Will you allow the voice in your head to wander where ever it may take you? Howard Axelrod asks the reader to slow down, observe the pace of everyday life. Take a walk around your neighborhood and go a different way. Watch things and find their patterns. Question and wonder, but think before looking up the answers on Google. This book was a good reminder to just stop and center yourself daily.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Luke Goldstein

    Looking back over the past generation you could easily be tempted to describe its entirety in a single word: progress. Time progressed, technology progressed, and society progressed right alongside, but author Howard Axelrod asks in his new book, "The Stars in Our Pockets: Getting Lost and Sometimes Found in the Digital Age", has our humanity and our empathy gone the other way? Axelrod returned from a two-year escape into the Vermont wilderness to find a society eagerly rushing into online commun Looking back over the past generation you could easily be tempted to describe its entirety in a single word: progress. Time progressed, technology progressed, and society progressed right alongside, but author Howard Axelrod asks in his new book, "The Stars in Our Pockets: Getting Lost and Sometimes Found in the Digital Age", has our humanity and our empathy gone the other way? Axelrod returned from a two-year escape into the Vermont wilderness to find a society eagerly rushing into online communities in an effort to be more connected, all while not looking up from their phones at the people sitting across the dinner table. He warns that in a world of instantaneous answers we are forgetting how to ask the right questions. "The Stars in Our Pockets" builds an elegant window for us to look through and see what we are in danger of becoming. Our social structure is becoming increasingly frayed and “growing up” no longer holds the same meaning as “evolving” or even “learning”. At a time when all information is literally at our fingertips, the internet and those who profit from it are building stronger, and more invisible, echo chambers for us to live in. Part memoir, part treatise, Axelrod reminds us of all the things we stand to lose if we continue to head in this direction. Without the silence of being truly disconnected from the constant beeps, chirps, and ever-changing vibrations in your pockets clamoring for our attention, we lack the ability to think deeply on any one thing. Our attention span retreats and dissolves until it is no longer a span of time, but instead a mere moment. While admitting his escape into the woods more than a touch Thoreau, he doesn’t shout from his soapbox for everyone to unplug and immigrate out of cyberspace for good. There are incredibly positive attributes to the technology powering our future if we only take the time to see them and properly evangelize them. Towards the end of the book he even lays out a very reasonable and achievable blueprint for creating a new digital platform centered around voter education and participation. "The Stars in Our Pockets: Getting Lost and Sometimes Found in the Digital Age" plays a dual role as map to the past and blueprint of our future. It will serve those well who put down their phone long enough to read it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sasha

    It’s either to Howard Axelrod’s credit or to my blame (or both) that I was able to read so far into The Stars in Our Pockets before registering how purely technophobic the book is. Its tone is much more thoughtful than strident, much more open-minded than polemical. So much so that it took me several chapters to realize that the phrases listed in insets at the beginning of each chapter represent precious human capacities Axelrod asserts are being lost to technology, and that each chapter is subs It’s either to Howard Axelrod’s credit or to my blame (or both) that I was able to read so far into The Stars in Our Pockets before registering how purely technophobic the book is. Its tone is much more thoughtful than strident, much more open-minded than polemical. So much so that it took me several chapters to realize that the phrases listed in insets at the beginning of each chapter represent precious human capacities Axelrod asserts are being lost to technology, and that each chapter is subsequently divided into sections labeled “Why It Matters,” “Threats,” and “What You Can Do.” It does not help to clarify the book’s technophobic stance that the contents of these sections are not always in line with their headings. It seems as if Axelrod may have started out with a survivalist-manual structure, but filled in that structure with something quite different. Most content is anecdotal and meditative, but in the aggregate comes off profoundly sad. Axelrod clearly feels a keen loss in today’s society, part of which is the loss of getting lost — as he himself did for a couple of years of isolation that resulted in his previous The Point of Vanishing. He laments that, technologically enhanced as we are now, we almost always follow preconceived routes (of travel and of thought) and experience fewer happy accidents as a result. It is true that every advance in technology obviates circumstances that were previously available for rendering into the type of story and song that stir people’s hearts. In 2020, Friar Lawrence’s message to the exiled Romeo would surely find its mark in time to save us from the beauty of the heroic couple’s tragic death. Led Zeppelin’s “Fool in the Rain” would never be written in the age of the cell phone, when the most lyrical possible eventuality of mistaking one’s rendezvous point is a few minutes’ delay in meeting up. The Israelites would never wander in the desert with proper GPS. But is there anything intrinsically valuable about being lost, about being less than omnipotent? Or is the value available in such experiences just as available, by choice, to the empowered? Why, with perfect knowledge at my fingertips of the whole universe, could I not choose to disregard that knowledge and meander occasionally? Axelrod doesn’t really take this question on. Likewise, Axelrod bemoans the way modern life layers the blogosphere atop people’s day-to-day existence, causing vertigo in him and others he has known. But what about the possibility, for which evidence abounds, that we have always been always multiplanar, individual as well as collective? In that case, technology can help us adapt to our own reality by allowing us to transition our focus more easily between the two. The book never makes much distinction between the fact of such technology and the approach taken by the particular technologies that dominate today atop a rotting mound of capitalism, until the final chapter. At that point it imagines a kind of wholesome, sustainable social media engine, on which users can engage in long-form discussion free from manipulation for profit. Why oh why don’t we have such an engine, taught in schools and free to everyone? I can hear Axelrod wondering. But the obstacle is plain: not technology but capitalism. In the end, the questions this book should be asking, born of the sincere bereavement Axelrod clearly feels, are the ones Jaron Lanier asks, and answers, in Who Owns The Future. I recommend it to him. Potential exists for technology that honors Axelrod’s (and our) every human capacity at the same time as it expands our reach and power evermore — but I fear this book is too grief-stricken to conceive of it. That is too bad.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    “What I want us to protect isn’t just the distinctive range of consciousness within each of us but also the ability to share that distinctiveness with each other. That’s the only way I’ve found to feel less alone. That’s the deepest way to look at the stars together. To recognize how fundamentally alone each of us is, locked in a separate body and a separate mind, and in that recognition to have the chance to feel all that reaches across the space between us, all the earth-deep connections among “What I want us to protect isn’t just the distinctive range of consciousness within each of us but also the ability to share that distinctiveness with each other. That’s the only way I’ve found to feel less alone. That’s the deepest way to look at the stars together. To recognize how fundamentally alone each of us is, locked in a separate body and a separate mind, and in that recognition to have the chance to feel all that reaches across the space between us, all the earth-deep connections among us that are real.” This felt like reading Henry David Thoreau but in the digital age. And it really, really works.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Revolinski

    Favorite thought-provoking/philosophical read of 2020, so far. I am having a love-hate relationship with the hyper-connected phone/internet/social media world, and this explores many of the concerns quite nicely. I don't feel a need to throw it all away, but it definitely is time to practice a bit of what's being preached here. So marvelously written and bringing in unforgettable personal experiences of the author as well as great outside sources (several of which I am now going to read/view). S Favorite thought-provoking/philosophical read of 2020, so far. I am having a love-hate relationship with the hyper-connected phone/internet/social media world, and this explores many of the concerns quite nicely. I don't feel a need to throw it all away, but it definitely is time to practice a bit of what's being preached here. So marvelously written and bringing in unforgettable personal experiences of the author as well as great outside sources (several of which I am now going to read/view). Strongly recommended. (As strongly as I recommended Frankl's "Man's Search for Meaning" a couple years ago.)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tayyaba (Tubz)

    Just incredible. I was blown away by this book seriously. There were so many times where I had to put it down and say "omfg that's so effing true." This book starts off with Darwin's natural selection theory and how it comes into play in the world of technology. Axelrod explains that never before did an animal have to adapt to dual realities because now we're in an age where we live both in the physical world and the technological world. This constant jumping back and forth might not be the grea Just incredible. I was blown away by this book seriously. There were so many times where I had to put it down and say "omfg that's so effing true." This book starts off with Darwin's natural selection theory and how it comes into play in the world of technology. Axelrod explains that never before did an animal have to adapt to dual realities because now we're in an age where we live both in the physical world and the technological world. This constant jumping back and forth might not be the greatest and we may be adapting qualities in one world that are hurting us in the other. This is the basic premise of the book and each chapter then discusses some different human traits/qualities that are "endangered" due to the way we use technology and well what we can try to do about it. There are definitely times where I felt the book was really anti-progession and cynical towards technology. Despite that, this book is filled with philosophical quotes, statistics and anecdotes that help make sense of each chapter's main point. What we then get is the Enlightenment versus Romanticism ideologies and how essentially the both kind of need to work together if we want to retain these human qualities at their highest potentials. I appreciate this book for, more than anything, giving me another lens to look at the world from. To be aware of the way that I interact with technology on a daily basis and how it may be effecting me, changing me. This man took a lot of what I was feeling about technology and put it into a set of cohesive thoughts and explanations. It made sense of so many concerns I get from friends who are "taking social media breaks" or feeling like there's so much going on in the world for us to possibly keep up with and our inability to do anything to help out. Our lack of self awareness, our shorter attentions our sense of curiosity and even our ability to think for ourselves. All of it being in some way effected by technology. It made sense to me when reading this book and actually really encourages me to look up more books on this topic.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    The human brain's ability to adapt has been an evolutionary advantage for the last 40,000 years, but now, for the first time in human history, we're effectively living in two environments at once--the natural and the digital--and many of the traits that help us online don't help us offline, and vice versa. Drawing on his experience of acclimating to a life of solitude in the woods and then to digital life upon his return to the city, Howard Axelrod explores the human brain's impressive but indis The human brain's ability to adapt has been an evolutionary advantage for the last 40,000 years, but now, for the first time in human history, we're effectively living in two environments at once--the natural and the digital--and many of the traits that help us online don't help us offline, and vice versa. Drawing on his experience of acclimating to a life of solitude in the woods and then to digital life upon his return to the city, Howard Axelrod explores the human brain's impressive but indiscriminate ability to adapt to its surroundings. The Stars in Our Pockets is a portrait of, as well as a meditation on, what Axelrod comes to think of as "inner climate change." Just as we're losing diversity of plant and animal species due to the environmental crisis, so too are we losing the diversity and range of our minds due to changes in our cognitive environment. As we navigate the rapid shifts between the physical and digital realms, what traits are we trading without being aware of it? The Stars in Our Pockets is a personal and profound reminder of the world around us and the worlds within us--and how, as alienated as we may sometimes feel, they were made for each other.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Katy Nimmons

    The perfect book to begin reading in Lent. Axelrod explores the ways that our dependence on technology changes our relationship with ourselves, our perspectives, and our shared realities. He views 'inner climate change' as having transformative potential on par with climate change - I'm persuaded. This book is an invitation to slow down and take stock of how we actually move about in the world. I've been surprised by how phone-dependent I am.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Theresa Morris

    A serious read that everyone should take the time to read, comprehend and then read again. There is so much thought and wisdom in this book. He really is right the Stars are in Our Pockets. This book is transformative, inspiring! I am so happy I read it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Annarella

    This book is full of food for thought. I'm still grokking it so I have some issues to in words my thoughts. I can only say something like Please-read-it. Strongly recommended. Many thanks to the publisher and Edelweiss for this ARC, all opinions are mine.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sally Ray

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Literary nonfiction reads as an essay. Axel rods treatise on how digital things like cellphones change our brains is not a reflection of research or scientific investigation. However, it is very readable and gives a glimpse into the author’s own life.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Camille Pum

    I won this book in the giveaway! My thoughts lost some coherency as Howard Axelrod took me through different thought processes, exposing me to new ideas at the same time. Inspiring. Is sure to leave you awe-struck!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lee Barry

    I liked this a lot. If you're familiar with Douglas Rushkoff's Team Human if would be a good book to read contemporaneously. As a digital "immigrant", I find it easy to rewild my attention.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kendra

    Full review at https://bookkendra.home.blog/2020/02/... Full review at https://bookkendra.home.blog/2020/02/...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    Definitely something everyone who's maybe a little too attached to their phone/devices should read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Greg McCoy

    Very enjoyable quick read. He writes really well.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ron Schneider

    A very interesting book which discusses the effects that the digital age has had on our ability to think, to focus, to share our thoughts in a meaningful way. Very thought provoking.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    Sporadic and too scattered for me...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Csimplot Simplot

    Excellent book!!!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sheenie Lee

  23. 5 out of 5

    Marie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  26. 5 out of 5

    Parisa

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kristin Easter

  28. 4 out of 5

    Micah Buchanan

  29. 5 out of 5

    K

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chaitanyaa From Teatime Reading

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