counter create hit The New Ministry of Truth: Combat Advisors in Afghanistan and America’s Great Betrayal - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The New Ministry of Truth: Combat Advisors in Afghanistan and America’s Great Betrayal

Availability: Ready to download

"A searing indictment of the self-delusion that plagued America's war in Afghanistan." - Sean Naylor, author of Relentless Strike: The Secret History of Joint Special Operations Command This is not a book about epic firefights. It’s not about battlefield heroics. No one will extract a blockbuster movie from these words. Rather, the purpose of this book is to use the story o "A searing indictment of the self-delusion that plagued America's war in Afghanistan." - Sean Naylor, author of Relentless Strike: The Secret History of Joint Special Operations Command This is not a book about epic firefights. It’s not about battlefield heroics. No one will extract a blockbuster movie from these words. Rather, the purpose of this book is to use the story of a combat advisor’s deployment to Afghanistan to illustrate one of America’s gravest betrayals. For nearly two decades, the United States has sent its youth to fight and die in Afghanistan, all the while failing to define a clear political objective to be achieved by these military means. This failure came to a head as 2014 rolled into 2015, and the U.S. government declared an “end to combat operations.” These empty words failed to align with the reality on the ground; they simply forced our nation’s warfighters to shoulder the risk of combat without the ability to defend themselves. This is the story of that time, about America’s new “Ministry of Truth” and the servicemembers sent to carry out its whims. “A solid, down-to-earth narrative that shows the skills a combat advisor must learn…Chipp has the insight and sense of humor to describe the wackiness of our endless mission in faraway and fractured Afghanistan.” —Bing West, author of The Wrong War and One Million Steps: A Marine Platoon at War


Compare
Ads Banner

"A searing indictment of the self-delusion that plagued America's war in Afghanistan." - Sean Naylor, author of Relentless Strike: The Secret History of Joint Special Operations Command This is not a book about epic firefights. It’s not about battlefield heroics. No one will extract a blockbuster movie from these words. Rather, the purpose of this book is to use the story o "A searing indictment of the self-delusion that plagued America's war in Afghanistan." - Sean Naylor, author of Relentless Strike: The Secret History of Joint Special Operations Command This is not a book about epic firefights. It’s not about battlefield heroics. No one will extract a blockbuster movie from these words. Rather, the purpose of this book is to use the story of a combat advisor’s deployment to Afghanistan to illustrate one of America’s gravest betrayals. For nearly two decades, the United States has sent its youth to fight and die in Afghanistan, all the while failing to define a clear political objective to be achieved by these military means. This failure came to a head as 2014 rolled into 2015, and the U.S. government declared an “end to combat operations.” These empty words failed to align with the reality on the ground; they simply forced our nation’s warfighters to shoulder the risk of combat without the ability to defend themselves. This is the story of that time, about America’s new “Ministry of Truth” and the servicemembers sent to carry out its whims. “A solid, down-to-earth narrative that shows the skills a combat advisor must learn…Chipp has the insight and sense of humor to describe the wackiness of our endless mission in faraway and fractured Afghanistan.” —Bing West, author of The Wrong War and One Million Steps: A Marine Platoon at War

36 review for The New Ministry of Truth: Combat Advisors in Afghanistan and America’s Great Betrayal

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad Manske

    Having literally read dozens of similar genre books I was particularly interested in this work as the author was serving in the CENTCOM AOR at the same time as me while I directed the entire theater’s logistics effort. The book takes us through a specific historical and transitional timeframe for operations in Afghanistan neatly coinciding with his deployment to Bagram Airfield, 2014-15. The book begins with stateside pre-deployment training before the author heads to the Republic of Georgia as Having literally read dozens of similar genre books I was particularly interested in this work as the author was serving in the CENTCOM AOR at the same time as me while I directed the entire theater’s logistics effort. The book takes us through a specific historical and transitional timeframe for operations in Afghanistan neatly coinciding with his deployment to Bagram Airfield, 2014-15. The book begins with stateside pre-deployment training before the author heads to the Republic of Georgia as a Marine captain whose role is to build camaraderie with the Georgian Army as they prepare to deploy together as advisors to the Afghan National Army. The book is an easy read, and will have you both laughing and scratching your head at the same time. Laughing, because if you are a military officer you remember your time (perhaps like me) as having a great time socializing and bonding with fellow brothers in arms. Scratching your head, in that you can both empathize with the frustrations Naylon and his men experienced at times, yet also at times understand some of the naïveté accompanying junior people who may not have the entire picture. Now, that is not to say that Naylon misses the mark—quite the opposite—he often hits it. Yet his understanding of the rules and decision making processes he rails against are ones that at times, and over time, put into place to protect lives. And as he so eloquently points out, common sense often lacks rigid and inane rule sets and ROEs. However, it is written from the youthful experience of a junior officer—a memoir many could write—at a point in time when OEF transitioned to a ‘non war-like’ footing and phase called Resolute Support. Even I as a brigadier general in theater could never fully comprehend the information and decisions more senior officers in my chain of command had to make, and like Naylon, it was our duty to diplomatically and courteously flag ideas, issues and decisions that may not have made the most sense. And in doing so we can still remain loyal to the chain of command while not abrogating our responsibility to speak up and say something. Disclaimer: Chipp provided me a copy of this book in exchange for my thoughts!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Amy K.

    Disclaimer: I was Captain Naylon’s high school English teacher. In that capacity as a reviewer, I can admit to some relief to discover that he paid attention to my lessons about transitions. In his refreshingly blunt, straightforward style, Naylon directs the reader through even the most Byzantine of US military jargon (and the bureaucracy that loves it) by telling us what he’s going to say, saying it, and then telling us what he’s going to say next. This makes his story, which is—vitally—about Disclaimer: I was Captain Naylon’s high school English teacher. In that capacity as a reviewer, I can admit to some relief to discover that he paid attention to my lessons about transitions. In his refreshingly blunt, straightforward style, Naylon directs the reader through even the most Byzantine of US military jargon (and the bureaucracy that loves it) by telling us what he’s going to say, saying it, and then telling us what he’s going to say next. This makes his story, which is—vitally—about how the US military establishment is failing its servicemembers in Afghanistan (and in other, similar areas of operation) clear and concise but also accurate and detailed. Instead of glossing over what are potentially confusing chains of command, Naylon identifies, explains, and reiterates important language and organizational details as he tells his story. Naylon achieves all of this without sacrificing his personal authorial voice, which is marked by the no-bullshit, profanity-laced, incisive diction of a US Marine who has arrived at the kind of personal and professional revelations he would, perhaps, have preferred not to discover. His cynicism and bitterness are nicely balanced by his self-aware recognition of the naivety by which he often approached his perceived goals as a military advisor, and he takes us through his process of growth-by-frustration in clear, well-defined steps rich with details about the experiences he had. He is unflinching in his portrayal of the Catch-22-like circumstances of his deployment as ISAF became Resolute Support, and like Heller’s classic, Naylon’s dark humor both eases the reader’s sense of vicarious frustration while also fueling the fires of righteous indignation. Naylon’s is a story that needs to be read, his message critical for avoiding the same self-perpetuating goat rodeo in the future. That said, I think it’s also important to note that Naylon and his brothers-in-arms from Afghanistan, the Republic of Georgia, and the US Marines all made the very best of an impossible situation and built a legacy worthy of passing on to the men who followed them at Bagram. While Naylon’s overarching message is a clear and ominous warning, his achievements are a beacon of hope.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Fuller

    At the beginning, I thought this was going to just be a re-telling of events. But Naylon does a great job to capturing the frustration and confusion that comes with serving as an IA in Afghanistan. Serving as the chaplain for all Navy IAs from 2016-2019, while the conflict has changed from Naylon’s time, the frustration, confusion, and Ministry of Truth continues. I’m grateful for his account, it reflects countless stories I’ve heard from IAs both serving inside and outside the wire.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Csimplot Simplot

    Excellent book!!!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gregory Keeney

    Good read! Provides some perspective into America's Afghanistan advisory mission, & its many challenges. Good read! Provides some perspective into America's Afghanistan advisory mission, & its many challenges.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Vincent

    A refreshing, honest insight into some of what went on in Afghanistan. A good read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Carol

  8. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tegan

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Turch

  12. 5 out of 5

    Zoia Kurtanidze

  13. 5 out of 5

    julian

  14. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

  16. 5 out of 5

    A. Buckmaster

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bill Schlott

  18. 5 out of 5

    Micielle

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kim Ellis

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sam

  21. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Gerhart

  22. 4 out of 5

    Natasha

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dayna

  24. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bridget

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gordon Bingham

  27. 4 out of 5

    V

  28. 4 out of 5

    Melisa Dowling

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jerrilynn Atherton

  31. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Roberson

  32. 5 out of 5

    Isley Forrester

  33. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Lavender

  34. 5 out of 5

    Barbie Campbell

  35. 4 out of 5

    ROY Law

  36. 4 out of 5

    Pam

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.