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Swamp Thing by Nancy A. Collins Omnibus

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The two-year run on Swamp Thing by critically acclaimed Southern Gothic horror novelist Nancy A. Collins is collected for the first time ever. In these Swamp Thing tales written by critically acclaimed Southern Gothic horror novelist Nancy Collins, a mad priest called Father Tocsin has come to Houma to test his followers with a fatal poison. But when Tocsin indoctrinates on The two-year run on Swamp Thing by critically acclaimed Southern Gothic horror novelist Nancy A. Collins is collected for the first time ever. In these Swamp Thing tales written by critically acclaimed Southern Gothic horror novelist Nancy Collins, a mad priest called Father Tocsin has come to Houma to test his followers with a fatal poison. But when Tocsin indoctrinates one of his friends, Swamp Thing must stop the killings before they spread too far. Then, it's a grassroots political campaign as Swamp Thing finds himself a surprise candidate for governor of Louisiana. And Swamp Thing must get help to save Abigail Arcane and their young daughter, Tef�, from the murderous dream-pirates of Dark Conrad. Who's he gonna call? John Constantine! And Anton Arcane returns from the darkest pits of hell to seek revenge on Swamp Thing and all those he holds dear! This title collects Swamp Thing #110-139 and Swamp Thing Annual #6 and #7, not reprinted since their original publication in the early 1990s.


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The two-year run on Swamp Thing by critically acclaimed Southern Gothic horror novelist Nancy A. Collins is collected for the first time ever. In these Swamp Thing tales written by critically acclaimed Southern Gothic horror novelist Nancy Collins, a mad priest called Father Tocsin has come to Houma to test his followers with a fatal poison. But when Tocsin indoctrinates on The two-year run on Swamp Thing by critically acclaimed Southern Gothic horror novelist Nancy A. Collins is collected for the first time ever. In these Swamp Thing tales written by critically acclaimed Southern Gothic horror novelist Nancy Collins, a mad priest called Father Tocsin has come to Houma to test his followers with a fatal poison. But when Tocsin indoctrinates one of his friends, Swamp Thing must stop the killings before they spread too far. Then, it's a grassroots political campaign as Swamp Thing finds himself a surprise candidate for governor of Louisiana. And Swamp Thing must get help to save Abigail Arcane and their young daughter, Tef�, from the murderous dream-pirates of Dark Conrad. Who's he gonna call? John Constantine! And Anton Arcane returns from the darkest pits of hell to seek revenge on Swamp Thing and all those he holds dear! This title collects Swamp Thing #110-139 and Swamp Thing Annual #6 and #7, not reprinted since their original publication in the early 1990s.

43 review for Swamp Thing by Nancy A. Collins Omnibus

  1. 4 out of 5

    J

    Collins' run on the series was a step up from Wheeler only in the sense that she seemed to have a sense of humor where Wheeler's work felt like jokes were a foreign concept to him. Her attempts at doing John Constantine as a character were laughably bad Brit stock phrases lifted from Monty Python, Benny Hill, and other edifying examples of how people from the UK really talk. There also seemed a weird arc of destruction running through Collins' tenor as she took all the characters and said "fuck y Collins' run on the series was a step up from Wheeler only in the sense that she seemed to have a sense of humor where Wheeler's work felt like jokes were a foreign concept to him. Her attempts at doing John Constantine as a character were laughably bad Brit stock phrases lifted from Monty Python, Benny Hill, and other edifying examples of how people from the UK really talk. There also seemed a weird arc of destruction running through Collins' tenor as she took all the characters and said "fuck your lives" and broke tons of things. Liz Tremayne's shattered personality after all her trauma at some point just up and fixed itself and she said, "Okay, bye, I'm out" (which you could make a case for the previous male authors making too much of her as "broken woman" but Collins' seemed to just go "all right, I'm tired of this character so she's better, she's leaving." Then she ends the book on a wave of infidelities and takes the whole cast of characters and scatters them to the wind. I get that comics tend to trap characters in these repetitive cycles of storylines. The hero is just trying to do his job/go to school but criminals keep making him put on the mask and save the city again, and again, and again. Swamp Thing's plot lines have had a lot of that style action going on lately with "oh no, some new threat to the Swampy Family; will Tefe be taken by some evil force; will The Green once again make ST have to leave Abby; will Arcane come back again and again; will someone from Louisiana's small-minded community of religious bigots once again make things hot for our characters who just want some time alone to have some human on plant nookie? Sure I get it. One of the thing that happens with any of Alan Moore's titles is that he sets up his superpowered characters on a conflict with their essential godhood, leaving follow up writers nowhere to go, all their dramas seem so small in comparison, and so I get that it's hard to write your way out of that corner. Wheeler tried really his hardest to rewrite the mythos in a way that one-upped the Moore Paradigm and here Collins is kind of pulling a Veitch, downshifting into the day to day stuff more often (not that Veitch didn't have his own god-plot-issues), but a kind of rehumanizing of the character with a return to some nuts and bolts mundanity of having to work at your marriage, not lie to your spouse, the basics. It's part of the growing pains of comics that we take these superhero deities and we say, "but they're still like us; they still gotta eat and sleep and shit and their breath stinks" and you get caught on this tightrope between the ape and the divine. It's a tough balancing act and in some stories, Collins really did a good job, but overall, the breadth of her run tries to have the cake and eat it too and you just can't.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    Read these great comic books one by one when they first came out and was thrilled when the complete collection was compiled! Of course, want to plug my sister, Nancy A Collins, the writer!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    Before this omnibus was announced, I had no idea Nancy Collins had ever written Swamp Thing. I'm sure her run had its supporters, but it kind of feels like one of those runs that kind of got lost to history, especially when you consider that it has never been collected in any form until now. As a big fan of Swampy, and of Southern Gothic horror, I was excited to see what a genuine Southern horror writer would do with the title, particularly compared to the trippy, lore-obsessed stuff that follow Before this omnibus was announced, I had no idea Nancy Collins had ever written Swamp Thing. I'm sure her run had its supporters, but it kind of feels like one of those runs that kind of got lost to history, especially when you consider that it has never been collected in any form until now. As a big fan of Swampy, and of Southern Gothic horror, I was excited to see what a genuine Southern horror writer would do with the title, particularly compared to the trippy, lore-obsessed stuff that followed Alan Moore's famous run. Ultimately, Collins' run on the character is very good. She uses her familiarity with Louisiana to really flesh out the local color, writing Cajuns and Southerners with a reality that I've never seen anyone else do anywhere near as well. And as a person who grew up 45 minutes outside New Orleans, I can attest to its accuracy. Also, her horror chops in the early issues of this run are very much on display. In particular, a swamp monster she creates to rival Swamp Thing really shines, as it's simultaneously a horrifying killer and a flawed, emotional beast born of trauma. Unfortunately, as the story wears on, plotlines just never quite feel like they pay off, and her approaches to the central characters (Swampy, his wife Abby, and his daughter Tefe) start to fray. At a certain point, what was initially portrayed as a loving family facing hurdles together, devolves into a bunch of unreasonable infighting and finger wagging, with Abby getting mad at Swamp Thing for simply doing his job, and Swamp Thing lying to Abby to keep her happy. They both feel like big, unearned character choices intended to drive conflict rather than feel real, and the book really suffers from that point forward. I found myself furious at both Abby and Swamp Thing for just straight up refusing to listen or change, rather than feeling drawn in by any semblance of real marital trouble. Also, each of them end up fully abandoning their daughter at a certain point, and that just feels completely unforgivable. At that point I basically threw up my hands like "forget these assholes." With no redemption arc for either of them (at least not in this book), this really left a bad taste in my mouth. Also, this book's contents are... weird. DC has a tendency to toss stuff into omnibuses that makes utterly zero sense, and they've done it once again here. There are 2-3 stories throughout this book (titled the "Nancy A. Collins Omnibus") that are not written by Nancy A. Collins. They don't tie into the story almost at all, and are basically filler stories. I'm not sure why they were collected here, except to be completist. Additionally, there's a final two-issue arc at the end of this book that follows Collins' run and has utterly nothing to do with her storyline. It's an insanely boring two-parter starring Black Orchid written by a guy named Dick Foreman, and really has no business being in this book. In any case, Collins' writing is very solid throughout. Her dialogue is breezy and realistic, her storylines flow nicely. There's just never a real sense of payoff to her larger arcs, and thus it always ends up feeling a little like something's missing. This is by no means a bad run, but I do think it's probably better for die-hard Swampheads than anyone else.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Evan Schmalz

    Such a good collection of stories! I wish Ms. Collins wrote this book longer, because I just wanted to read more!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

  6. 5 out of 5

    ThomRo_BE

  7. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Thompson

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gui

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lucian Miner

  11. 4 out of 5

    Audrey Hacker

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Burley

  13. 4 out of 5

    Justin Munday

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Bevel

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chas

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emilio Mendoza

  17. 4 out of 5

    Zaff

  18. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Haywood

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jack

  20. 5 out of 5

    Clelie Ancelet

  21. 5 out of 5

    rêveur d'art

  22. 5 out of 5

    Krista

  23. 4 out of 5

    Walter Schoenly

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jose Alejandro Ramon

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chelsae

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Williams

  27. 5 out of 5

    Blake Howard

  28. 5 out of 5

    Percy Bell

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michael Guy

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lena Fickle

  31. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Patrick

  32. 5 out of 5

    Sli Shepherd

  33. 5 out of 5

    Channing

  34. 5 out of 5

    Teri

  35. 4 out of 5

    Pär Thorstensson

  36. 4 out of 5

    C.A. Hart

  37. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  38. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

  39. 5 out of 5

    Fiona

  40. 5 out of 5

    InJokeTaken

  41. 4 out of 5

    Kendall Moore

  42. 4 out of 5

    Elias Lossell

  43. 4 out of 5

    Rafaela

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