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The Unanswered Letter: One Holocaust Family's Desperate Plea for Help

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In 1939, as the Nazi closed in, Alfred Berger mailed a desperate letter to an American stranger who happened to share his last name. He and his wife, Viennese Jews, had found escape routes for their daughters. But now their money, connections, and emotional energy were nearly exhausted. Alfred begged the American recipient of the letter, “You are surely informed about the In 1939, as the Nazi closed in, Alfred Berger mailed a desperate letter to an American stranger who happened to share his last name. He and his wife, Viennese Jews, had found escape routes for their daughters. But now their money, connections, and emotional energy were nearly exhausted. Alfred begged the American recipient of the letter, “You are surely informed about the situation of all Jews in Central Europe . . . . By pure chance I got your address . . . . My daughter and her husband will go . . . to America . . . help us to follow our children . . . . It’s our last and only hope . . . .” After languishing in a California attic for decades, Alfred’s letter ended up in the hands of Faris Cassell, a journalist who couldn’t rest until she discovered who couldn’t rest until she discovered the ending of the story. Traveling across the United States as well as to Austria, the Czech Republic, Belarus, and Israel, she uncovered an extraordinary story of heart-wrenching loss and unforgettable love that endures to this day. Did the Bergers’ desperate letter find a response? Did they—and their daughters—survive? Did they leave living descendants? You will find the answers here. A story that will move any reader, The Unanswered Letter is a poignant reminder that love and hope never dies.


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In 1939, as the Nazi closed in, Alfred Berger mailed a desperate letter to an American stranger who happened to share his last name. He and his wife, Viennese Jews, had found escape routes for their daughters. But now their money, connections, and emotional energy were nearly exhausted. Alfred begged the American recipient of the letter, “You are surely informed about the In 1939, as the Nazi closed in, Alfred Berger mailed a desperate letter to an American stranger who happened to share his last name. He and his wife, Viennese Jews, had found escape routes for their daughters. But now their money, connections, and emotional energy were nearly exhausted. Alfred begged the American recipient of the letter, “You are surely informed about the situation of all Jews in Central Europe . . . . By pure chance I got your address . . . . My daughter and her husband will go . . . to America . . . help us to follow our children . . . . It’s our last and only hope . . . .” After languishing in a California attic for decades, Alfred’s letter ended up in the hands of Faris Cassell, a journalist who couldn’t rest until she discovered who couldn’t rest until she discovered the ending of the story. Traveling across the United States as well as to Austria, the Czech Republic, Belarus, and Israel, she uncovered an extraordinary story of heart-wrenching loss and unforgettable love that endures to this day. Did the Bergers’ desperate letter find a response? Did they—and their daughters—survive? Did they leave living descendants? You will find the answers here. A story that will move any reader, The Unanswered Letter is a poignant reminder that love and hope never dies.

30 review for The Unanswered Letter: One Holocaust Family's Desperate Plea for Help

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Blankfein

    Incredible research conducted by author Faris Cassell as she took us on a journey following a single desperate family beginning in Vienna during the Holocaust. Heartbreaking and informative - this book is a must read as education is imperative so the atrocities committed against the Jews never happen again. Full review to come on Book Nation by Jen.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    The Unanswered Letter by Faris Cassell is a stunning and haunting book about the quest of an unrelated couple joining forces with an unknown family to find out what actually happened to a Jewish couple, Alfred and Hedwig Berger after receiving a long lost letter begging for help while entrapped within Austria’s closed and occupied borders during WWII. I will not rehash the synopsis with the reader in my review, as I want to focus on how amazing and unforgettable this book truly is. The search to The Unanswered Letter by Faris Cassell is a stunning and haunting book about the quest of an unrelated couple joining forces with an unknown family to find out what actually happened to a Jewish couple, Alfred and Hedwig Berger after receiving a long lost letter begging for help while entrapped within Austria’s closed and occupied borders during WWII. I will not rehash the synopsis with the reader in my review, as I want to focus on how amazing and unforgettable this book truly is. The search to find out what really happened to Alfred and Hedwig takes the author and her husband across several continents and several years. The work that was spent by the author is amazing, even more for the fact that this quest does not even involve her family. The amazing friends and people that she meets, and the family that she is able to bring together through introductions and answering long-standing fundamental questions is heartwarming. I have a great deal of knowledge at this point concerning the Holocaust, anti-semitism before and after the second war, as well as the displacement camps and difficulties the survivors faced thereafter, but I learned so much more about what the Austrian Jewish people, specifically the Viennese Jewish people, experienced and went through in trying to survive, escape, and hold on to their loved ones and their existence. It made this feel so much more real to me to feel as if I was traveling with them to Massachusetts, Vienna, Poland, and Russia. It was heartbreaking to see families torn apart, to have people you love just disappear one day, to stand in front of your own grave in your last previous moments made me cry several times while I read this journey. This amazing family should have never had to experience any of this. I loved seeing the pictures the author added, Sydney’s surprising addition to finding where his family originated near Minsk before immigrating to the US, and to find that Gretl and Martha created fulfilling lives despite their harrowing escapes and the loss of their parents. I am so glad to see life blooming despite being so carelessly extinguished. I am so glad that Celia, Micha, Peter, Judith, as well as other family members, were able to have some answers and some closure. The fundamental questions of who we are, where we came from, what matters most in life, what we truly believe, and what we would do if we were placed in that situation, became questions that the author and her husband asked themselves, as well as what I was asking myself at the end of the book. This is an amazing book that I will never forget. It is something that has brought me even closer to my own Jewish family and faith, and for that I am truly thankful. Thank you EW and Regnery Publishing for this ARC and in return I am submitting my unbiased and voluntary review and opinion. I am posting this review to my GR and Bookbub accounts immediately and will post it to my Amazon and B&N accounts upon publication.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Janilyn Kocher

    A tremendous read. By chance, a letter from a desperate Austrian Jew is given to an Oregon journalist. What happened to the coupe? Cassell embarks on a historical hunt for answers. She fleshes out the family's story against the backdrop of historical events. The desperation, the feelings of entrapment, hopelessness, and resignation leap off the pages. This is one of my favorite genres to read- genealogical historical family mysteries. It's a lengthy tome, but every word is riveting. Thanks to Ed A tremendous read. By chance, a letter from a desperate Austrian Jew is given to an Oregon journalist. What happened to the coupe? Cassell embarks on a historical hunt for answers. She fleshes out the family's story against the backdrop of historical events. The desperation, the feelings of entrapment, hopelessness, and resignation leap off the pages. This is one of my favorite genres to read- genealogical historical family mysteries. It's a lengthy tome, but every word is riveting. Thanks to Edelweiss and Regnery History for the ARC in exchange for my honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jt Furbay

    This is one of the best books i have read this past year. This is the true story of a desperate man's request sent to a stranger with the same last name in the USA hoping that the man may be able to help him and his wife get out of Nazi Austria. Both his daughters were able to get out of Europe. The author is given the letter by her husband who was given it by another person who knew the family who received it and kept it for many years. The author decides to find out about the man who wrote the This is one of the best books i have read this past year. This is the true story of a desperate man's request sent to a stranger with the same last name in the USA hoping that the man may be able to help him and his wife get out of Nazi Austria. Both his daughters were able to get out of Europe. The author is given the letter by her husband who was given it by another person who knew the family who received it and kept it for many years. The author decides to find out about the man who wrote the letter and what happened to him and his family. What happens is a deeply moving story about his family and what she finds out.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jen (Thismomreads)

    Wow. This was an emotional, intriguing and heart-breaking read. From the publisher – In August 1939, just days before World War II broke out in Europe, a Jewish man in Vienna named Alfred Berger mailed a desperate letter to a stranger in America who shared his last name. “By pure chance I got your address . . . I beg you instantly to send for me and my wife…“ Decades later, journalist Faris Cassell stumbled upon the stunning letter and became determined to uncover the story behind it. How did the Wow. This was an emotional, intriguing and heart-breaking read. From the publisher – In August 1939, just days before World War II broke out in Europe, a Jewish man in Vienna named Alfred Berger mailed a desperate letter to a stranger in America who shared his last name. “By pure chance I got your address . . . I beg you instantly to send for me and my wife…“ Decades later, journalist Faris Cassell stumbled upon the stunning letter and became determined to uncover the story behind it. How did the American Bergers respond? Did Alfred and his family escape Nazi Germany? Over a decade-long investigation in which she traveled thousands of miles, explored archives and offices in Austria, Belarus, Czech Republic, and Israel, interviewed descendants, and found letters, photos, and sketches made by family members during the Holocaust, Cassell wrote the devastating true story of The Unanswered Letter. This story is unbelievable and reads like so many historical fiction texts that have been written about the war and the Holocaust. But it is not fiction – it is the true story of two desperate people, willing to reach out to strangers across the Atlantic for help, at a time when the chance of escape from Nazi forces was slim to none. As a history major, I have extensive background researching and studying World War II and The Holocaust. That being said, if you do not, the author does an excellent job providing a thorough background of life in Nazi-occupied Austria. This added context helps to create an atmosphere of urgency, fear and desperation that deeply connects the reader to the experience the Bergers (and all European Jewish people) faced during the height of the Nazi regime. The author’s relationship with the surviving Berger relatives serves to further enhance the reader’s understanding of the narrative and the photos included throughout give an extra layer of personal connection to the story. There is beautiful closure as the Berger grandchildren are able to find answers to their family’s lingering mysteries. While we cannot truly feel exactly what Alfred and Hedwig experienced, Cassell writes with such emotion and truth, that the reader becomes deeply involved in their fates and that of their children. Faris Cassell has dedicated years of her life to writing this book, traveling the globe for research and working with the Berger family to solve the surrounding mystery of a nondescript letter sent from Austria to America at the height of the Holocaust. It is a poignant and beautiful read and I highly recommend.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Deena B

    'THE UNANSWERED LETTER - One Holocaust Family's Plea For Help' by Faris Cassell This book was so much more than I expected! It is the true story of one large Jewish family's heartbreaking tribulations in Vienna and beyond in The late 1930s - the Anschluss, Kristallnacht, separation, isolation, persecution, humiliation, unimaginably sinister evils. The author's unwavering dedication to the Berger family, a staggering amount of research, years of unearthing answers to questions that went unasked - 'THE UNANSWERED LETTER - One Holocaust Family's Plea For Help' by Faris Cassell This book was so much more than I expected! It is the true story of one large Jewish family's heartbreaking tribulations in Vienna and beyond in The late 1930s - the Anschluss, Kristallnacht, separation, isolation, persecution, humiliation, unimaginably sinister evils. The author's unwavering dedication to the Berger family, a staggering amount of research, years of unearthing answers to questions that went unasked - this book helped me understand more about what happened and how. This book at times, to me, read like a horror story. I found myself dreading what was coming, thinking it can't get worse, but then it avalanched into MUCH worse. The fact that this is NOT a horror story, but a TRUE HISTORY is mind-boggling. I had no idea, and at times it just took my breath away. "The stones remember" ...... And so shall we never forget. I won this book in a Goodreads Giveaway! Thank you to the author, publisher and Goodreads for the honor.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    True stories of the Holocaust are always worth sharing. So much of the personal history was lost or hidden. When these stories surface, it seems imperative that we as a human race listen and remember them. This story is even more haunting because of how the tiny moments mount to effort that ends in horror. You know from the start Alfred and Hedwig don’t make it out alive. But hearing them struggle for every opportunity leaves them reader feeling frustrated through time. The author also laments w True stories of the Holocaust are always worth sharing. So much of the personal history was lost or hidden. When these stories surface, it seems imperative that we as a human race listen and remember them. This story is even more haunting because of how the tiny moments mount to effort that ends in horror. You know from the start Alfred and Hedwig don’t make it out alive. But hearing them struggle for every opportunity leaves them reader feeling frustrated through time. The author also laments with the reader - could any of us have done any differently? What happens when literally every card is stacked against you? It’s not 5 stars for me because it felt a little conflicted, going from the Berger’s story to the author’s own search for the truth. I also felt like exploring what happened to Alfred and Hedwig’s family was good for context but left the narrative going in a few directions at once. But the breadth of personal history here is a gift for any history lover. I would have liked to have seen a source list at the end, as the author did extensive international research but overall it’s an excellent book. Thank you Regnery History for an ARC!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I have an uncorrected page proof but that did not matter. It is a longer book but the premise is incredible. This is a story of survival and the will to go on. The author piecing this together did an excellent job and we find out about how one family found a way out of the Holocaust. Not an easy read but an important read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kim Bakos

    The author comes upon a letter sent to one family in America by a couple in Vienna during WW2. The Austrian family pleads for help to get them out of Austria as the options for Jews are dwindling as Hitler tightens the noose around them. The author, who is a journalist, gets interested in finding out what happened to that couple - did the Americans help them? Did they end up being killed in the Holocaust? This story is how the author found those answers and so much more!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nissa

    This was such a great read, very informative, and descriptive, would read many more like this. A book that is hard to put down once you start to read. A book everyone should read who are interested in the Holocaust, WW2 and European history. I want to thank the publisher for allowing me a chance to read this book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    This review took me a while to write it. This story is soo sad and while many of the holocaust stories this story is heartbreaking. I think this one was one of the hardest, this family was reaching out for help and thier pleads went unanswered. Definitely recommend.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    The Unanswered Letter by Faris Cassell follows the author's research into the family history behind a haunting letter from a Jew living in Nazi Vienna. In this letter to a complete stranger, he pleads for help in obtaining the necessary support to allow his immigration into the United States, hinting at the dangers his wife and he face. What follows is an intimate look at Vienna, Austria before and during the Nazi government took control and its impact on one family. Having read my fill of Holoca The Unanswered Letter by Faris Cassell follows the author's research into the family history behind a haunting letter from a Jew living in Nazi Vienna. In this letter to a complete stranger, he pleads for help in obtaining the necessary support to allow his immigration into the United States, hinting at the dangers his wife and he face. What follows is an intimate look at Vienna, Austria before and during the Nazi government took control and its impact on one family. Having read my fill of Holocaust stories, I was not certain I wanted to read yet another one. Yet, the letter from one Alfred Berger is something I could not ignore. With ten sentences, none of which are explicit in listing the terrors he faces, you get one of the most private looks into the Jewish plight under the Nazis. Even though you know from the beginning that the recipient of the letter did nothing, which means you suspect the war did not end well for Herr and Frau Berger, you want to do nothing but find out what happened to them. The story of the Berger family is one of joy, sadness, perseverance, patience, and luck. It spans pretty much every continent as two generations of a very large family try their luck in emigrating from Vienna before it is too late. Because of the size of the family, at times their story needs a whiteboard in order to understand who each person is and their relation to the man who started it all. Ms. Cassell shows great patience and compassion as she helps the Berger family confront a terrible past. At the same time, Ms. Cassell inserts too much of herself into the narrative. She spends as much time theorizing on the emotional state of people she will never meet as she does telling us the Berger family story. Plus, at some point in time, the story becomes as much her husband's family story as it does the Berger family. As her husband is also Jewish and had no knowledge of what happened to his family during the war, Ms. Cassell uses her research of the Bergers to also look into her husband's family. I read The Unanswered Letter to find out what happened to Alfred and Hedwig. I did not read it to have to wade through her thought process as she uncovers their story or her deviations into her own personal connection to the period. What's worse is that she references all of these original documents from which she obtains clues or even direct knowledge of Alfred and Hedwig's lives, but the book contains no bibliography, no reference list. It does not even have pictures of the sources. I understand that Ms. Cassell is telling her true story as a narrative, but I have no patience when an author doesn't even include a list of the resources used or at least images of the precious documents. Putting aside the problems, The Unanswered Letter does an excellent job providing a highly personal look at Vienna before and during the war. The Berger story raises awareness of the insidiousness of hate. What I find truly shocking is how readily the Viennese accepted and celebrated Nazi rule as well as how quickly the majority embraced the anti-Jewish regulations the Nazis immediately put in place. The story of Nazi Vienna is not the same as Nazi Germany. It is more brutal, more obvious in its hatred of Jews, and more disconcerting at how an entire city can turn its back on one particular section of its citizens. If anything, it reinforces the increasing bigotry we have been seeing in the US since 2016. Given the chance to act upon their prejudices, most people will do so in a heartbeat.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Julia Whitmore

    I was hesitant to start this. There are so many books on my to-read list. Could I bear another about the Holocaust? This was the moment for it though. Armed protestors with neo-Nazi insignia and confederate flags were storming our state capitol, and Black Lives Matter protestors around the world were marching. It's a time to reflect again on how racism can infiltrate the hearts and minds of good people. OK, I thought, one more. The story starts in 2,000 when Faris Cassell's physician husband bri I was hesitant to start this. There are so many books on my to-read list. Could I bear another about the Holocaust? This was the moment for it though. Armed protestors with neo-Nazi insignia and confederate flags were storming our state capitol, and Black Lives Matter protestors around the world were marching. It's a time to reflect again on how racism can infiltrate the hearts and minds of good people. OK, I thought, one more. The story starts in 2,000 when Faris Cassell's physician husband brings home an old letter. A patient of his has given it to him for safekeeping, hoping he'll "know what to do with it." The letter turns out to be a type-written plea in broken English from an elderly Jewish man in Austria in 1939, pleading for an affidavit of support to help him and his wife escape the Nazis. Cassell is haunted by the letter. Her decision to find out what happened starts her on an epic decade as she tracks down the man's extended family, and gently wins their trust. Bit by bit, the story unfolds. She travels to New York and Austria, painstakingly combing through archives and interviewing survivors and the children of survivors of that dark time. The story is gripping and heart-rending. Cassell tells it with a light and very human touch, providing photos and a family tree, and weaves in reminders of who is who as she unwinds the skeins of the many threads in the Berger family. She deftly brings it all home when she and her husband discover a serendipitous connection to their own lives.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    3.75 I have mixed feelings about this book. Like the author, I’m also a freelance journalist and also live in Oregon. I’m also an avid genealogist and am fascinated by family histories (even those of others), am Jewish, and grew up among many Holocaust survivors. I first read about this book in an Oregon magazine and immediately put it on my must-read list. As a journalist, I know what it’s like to become obsessed with a story and the author’s determination, research, and sleuthing skills are im 3.75 I have mixed feelings about this book. Like the author, I’m also a freelance journalist and also live in Oregon. I’m also an avid genealogist and am fascinated by family histories (even those of others), am Jewish, and grew up among many Holocaust survivors. I first read about this book in an Oregon magazine and immediately put it on my must-read list. As a journalist, I know what it’s like to become obsessed with a story and the author’s determination, research, and sleuthing skills are impressive. At times, however, I found the writing style overwrought (certainly not surprising given the subject, but I found it to be distracting). I also don’t like when writers project thoughts/feelings on to their subjects in the absence of facts (e.g., she must have felt..., or, surely they would have done...). Along with the search for information about the families involved, the author provides much historical background and details of the Holocaust. For those who know little about this horrific time, this is valuable and essential reading. For those—like myself—whose lives have in large part been shaped by the Holocaust, it didn’t add to my knowledge. In the end though, I’d recommend the book, especially for those unfamiliar with this period of history. As Jews we say, “never again,” and this book goes a long way towards explaining why.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Viscosi

    When Faris Cassell’s husband handed her a letter from 1939, her life changed. The letter was from a Jewish man living in Vienna with his wife. This couple, the Bergers, were sending letters to people in America with the same last name as theirs. They hoped that someone would take pity on them and be their sponsors. It was their last chance to escape Vienna before Hitler invaded. This letter was saved and given to the author’s husband after being recovered in an estate. After reading the appeal, When Faris Cassell’s husband handed her a letter from 1939, her life changed. The letter was from a Jewish man living in Vienna with his wife. This couple, the Bergers, were sending letters to people in America with the same last name as theirs. They hoped that someone would take pity on them and be their sponsors. It was their last chance to escape Vienna before Hitler invaded. This letter was saved and given to the author’s husband after being recovered in an estate. After reading the appeal, the author was curious as to what happened to this family. She wanted to find out and also return this precious memento to the family. Faris Cassell methodically researches this family history. She presents the facts without sensationalism. Learning of this family and how they are caught up in the events of the times is eye opening. Through this story, you find yourself wondering what your response would have been during the war. After looking at the photos and learning of this family, the horrors of war seem much more personal. It can’t be ignored. An Unanswered Letter is equal parts heart wrenching, compelling, and encouraging. This is a story you don’t want to miss.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    So we think our present immigration rules are bad. This is a story of Jewish family living in Vienna in 1939. A letter long lost is found and given to author. She researches the letter and finds a family still in the United States who are also looking for answers. This is a very well research family story which approaches the time in history through one family. Trying to get out of Vienna was hard but they Berger's managed to get both daughters out while having to remain. This is a different kin So we think our present immigration rules are bad. This is a story of Jewish family living in Vienna in 1939. A letter long lost is found and given to author. She researches the letter and finds a family still in the United States who are also looking for answers. This is a very well research family story which approaches the time in history through one family. Trying to get out of Vienna was hard but they Berger's managed to get both daughters out while having to remain. This is a different kind of Holocaust book in that explores a family history with its pain and joy and love. I had given up on Holocaust books until I was sent this one to review. New meaning to the love of family and sacrifice . Sacrifice is a word thrown around in the United States but this book gives a real picture of that action. Highly recommended which I don't do often.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    I was fortunate to receive an ARC of this book.Thank you for the opportunity! Remarkable in so many areas, I was riveted by the impetus, but also the amount of research done. The hesitant willingness of the family was understandable, but luckily in the end the family was extremely helpful in the research. Faris Cassell was unremitting in her quest for information which led to the resolution of this family's tragedy. Non-fiction can be so much more intriguing for me. The family had a treasure tro I was fortunate to receive an ARC of this book.Thank you for the opportunity! Remarkable in so many areas, I was riveted by the impetus, but also the amount of research done. The hesitant willingness of the family was understandable, but luckily in the end the family was extremely helpful in the research. Faris Cassell was unremitting in her quest for information which led to the resolution of this family's tragedy. Non-fiction can be so much more intriguing for me. The family had a treasure trove of information. I wonder how much more which did not directly deal with the book there could be. Thank you to the author Faris Cassell and also the family of Alfred and Hedwig Berger for such a tragic but enlightening book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    BookTrib.com

    Not only does it tell the story of the Berger family, but it also provides a greater understanding of what many Jewish families endured at the hands of the Nazis, governments and other countries in the late 1930s and 1940s. When reading a book like this that reminds us of the history of hatred, persecution and inhumane behaviors directed and supported by leaders, governments and the general population toward the Jews, the importance of Israel as a safe haven for the Jewish people is reiterated. Not only does it tell the story of the Berger family, but it also provides a greater understanding of what many Jewish families endured at the hands of the Nazis, governments and other countries in the late 1930s and 1940s. When reading a book like this that reminds us of the history of hatred, persecution and inhumane behaviors directed and supported by leaders, governments and the general population toward the Jews, the importance of Israel as a safe haven for the Jewish people is reiterated. It makes me think about the idea that if you are not part of the solution then you are part of the problem. Read our full review here: https://booktrib.com/2020/09/14/faris...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    I've read several books on the Holocaust and every book teaches me something I didn't know before. We all know the basics, but The Unanswered Letter takes one family's desperate attempts to escape and makes their stories hit us in the heart. Some family members made it to the United States or to Palestine, others didn't. They all had harrowing experiences. This story should be made into a movie. There's adventure, love, suspense, family relationships, tragedy, and occasional happiness. A big tha I've read several books on the Holocaust and every book teaches me something I didn't know before. We all know the basics, but The Unanswered Letter takes one family's desperate attempts to escape and makes their stories hit us in the heart. Some family members made it to the United States or to Palestine, others didn't. They all had harrowing experiences. This story should be made into a movie. There's adventure, love, suspense, family relationships, tragedy, and occasional happiness. A big thankyou to the publisher for sending me an ARC. I'm sorry it took so long to review but I didn't have the internet for several months.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Hoover

    The premise of the book intrigued me and was well carried through the entire book, but a heavy read both in trems of info and emotions. Recommend more for those having a solid background in the historical period as the learning curve to follow the story could be too great. I would like to see a young adult version of the book created as I can see so mnay ways to use it in a classroom.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Charlet Smith

    Haunting to believe that people had to live through such events. This story brought the Holocaust home differently than anything else. As the author stated: how does the Holocaust happen to ael normal person and family? this average family, how did it happen to them. This was a hard read, but an important one, and I'd recommend it to everyone. Haunting to believe that people had to live through such events. This story brought the Holocaust home differently than anything else. As the author stated: how does the Holocaust happen to ael normal person and family? this average family, how did it happen to them. This was a hard read, but an important one, and I'd recommend it to everyone.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joyce

    A VERY POWERFUL READ. VERY EMOTIONALLY CHARGED. A TRUE CHRONICLE WHERE EVERY WORD MUST BE READ TO FULLY UNDERSTAND THE TOTALITY OF THE SITUATION AND THE HORRORS OF THE TIMES. AN EDUCATION LIKE NO OTHER THROUGH THE EYES OF THOSE WHO LIVED IT. EXCELLENT WRITING THAT FORCES THE READER TO READ ON. THE BOOK ALLOWS THE READER TO BETTER UNDERSTAND THE CLIMATE AT THAT TIME. A MUST READ.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    This book must be read on Adobe Digital Editions. I read a very few pages, and then when I went to read more, I couldn't get it to load. Thanks to Simon & Schuster and Edelweiss. pub date 09/01/20 This book must be read on Adobe Digital Editions. I read a very few pages, and then when I went to read more, I couldn't get it to load. Thanks to Simon & Schuster and Edelweiss. pub date 09/01/20

  24. 4 out of 5

    Erika Dreifus

    Just finished this remarkable account ahead of an upcoming online book club. Please join us to discuss it! https://www.aju.edu/whizin-center-con... Just finished this remarkable account ahead of an upcoming online book club. Please join us to discuss it! https://www.aju.edu/whizin-center-con...

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pat

    A family’s story of the devastation of the Nazi horror in Austria and their desperate efforts to escape from Vienna. So well researched and such important history that everyone needs to know to prevent it from happening again.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Reads like a mystery novel unless you factor in that you know what happens to the main characters. Author spends a little too much time talking about herself and trying to connect to modern events. Still a gripping story on life before the deportations.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Reminded me of We Were the Lucky Ones, only this family story is told from an outsider's perspective rather than that of an insider. Reminded me of We Were the Lucky Ones, only this family story is told from an outsider's perspective rather than that of an insider.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chrystal Lee Stevens

    Great book for anyone interested in the real stories about the Holocaust.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Donna Carpenter

    Well written. This is a must read. I was drawn into the story and could feel the author’s emotions. The story is warm and heart wrenching at the same time.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Magnificent book, fantastic, reads like fiction but non-fiction. I hope to read more by Faris Cassell again soon.

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