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This business classic features straight-talking advice you'll never hear in school. Featuring a new foreword by Ariel Emanuel and Patrick Whitesell Mark H. McCormack, one of the most successful entrepreneurs in American business, is widely credited as the founder of the modern-day sports marketing industry. On a handshake with Arnold Palmer and less than a thousand This business classic features straight-talking advice you'll never hear in school. Featuring a new foreword by Ariel Emanuel and Patrick Whitesell Mark H. McCormack, one of the most successful entrepreneurs in American business, is widely credited as the founder of the modern-day sports marketing industry. On a handshake with Arnold Palmer and less than a thousand dollars, he started International Management Group and, over a four-decade period, built the company into a multimillion-dollar enterprise with offices in more than forty countries. To this day, McCormack's business classic remains a must-read for executives and managers at every level. Relating his proven method of "applied people sense" in key chapters on sales, negotiation, reading others and yourself, and executive time management, McCormack presents powerful real-world guidance on - the secret life of a deal - management philosophies that don't work (and one that does) - the key to running a meeting--and how to attend one - the positive use of negative reinforcement - proven ways to observe aggressively and take the edge - and much more Praise for What They Don't Teach You at Harvard Business School "Incisive, intelligent, and witty, What They Don't Teach You at Harvard Business School is a sure winner--like the author himself. Reading it has taught me a lot."--Rupert Murdoch, executive chairman, News Corp, chairman and CEO, 21st Century Fox "Clear, concise, and informative . . . Like a good mentor, this book will be a valuable aid throughout your business career."--Herbert J. Siegel, chairman, Chris-Craft Industries, Inc. "Mark McCormack describes the approach I have personally seen him adopt, which has not only contributed to the growth of his business, but mine as well."--Arnold Palmer "There have been what we love to call dynasties in every sport. IMG has been different. What this one brilliant man, Mark McCormack, created is the only dynasty ever over all sport."--Frank Deford, senior contributing writer, Sports Illustrated


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This business classic features straight-talking advice you'll never hear in school. Featuring a new foreword by Ariel Emanuel and Patrick Whitesell Mark H. McCormack, one of the most successful entrepreneurs in American business, is widely credited as the founder of the modern-day sports marketing industry. On a handshake with Arnold Palmer and less than a thousand This business classic features straight-talking advice you'll never hear in school. Featuring a new foreword by Ariel Emanuel and Patrick Whitesell Mark H. McCormack, one of the most successful entrepreneurs in American business, is widely credited as the founder of the modern-day sports marketing industry. On a handshake with Arnold Palmer and less than a thousand dollars, he started International Management Group and, over a four-decade period, built the company into a multimillion-dollar enterprise with offices in more than forty countries. To this day, McCormack's business classic remains a must-read for executives and managers at every level. Relating his proven method of "applied people sense" in key chapters on sales, negotiation, reading others and yourself, and executive time management, McCormack presents powerful real-world guidance on - the secret life of a deal - management philosophies that don't work (and one that does) - the key to running a meeting--and how to attend one - the positive use of negative reinforcement - proven ways to observe aggressively and take the edge - and much more Praise for What They Don't Teach You at Harvard Business School "Incisive, intelligent, and witty, What They Don't Teach You at Harvard Business School is a sure winner--like the author himself. Reading it has taught me a lot."--Rupert Murdoch, executive chairman, News Corp, chairman and CEO, 21st Century Fox "Clear, concise, and informative . . . Like a good mentor, this book will be a valuable aid throughout your business career."--Herbert J. Siegel, chairman, Chris-Craft Industries, Inc. "Mark McCormack describes the approach I have personally seen him adopt, which has not only contributed to the growth of his business, but mine as well."--Arnold Palmer "There have been what we love to call dynasties in every sport. IMG has been different. What this one brilliant man, Mark McCormack, created is the only dynasty ever over all sport."--Frank Deford, senior contributing writer, Sports Illustrated

30 review for What They Don't Teach You at Harvard Business School: Notes from a Street-Smart Executive

  1. 5 out of 5

    Loy Machedo

    First and foremost - Who is Mark McCormack? Mark Hume McCormack (November 6, 1930 May 16, 2003) was an American lawyer, sports agent and writer. He was the founder and chairman of International Management Group, now IMG, an international management organization serving sports figures and celebrities. McCormack was featured as one of the Forbes 400 Richest Americans in 1995, 1998, 2001. In 1990, he was named the "Most Powerful Man in Sports" by The Sporting News. His impact on the Sporting World First and foremost - Who is Mark McCormack? Mark Hume McCormack (November 6, 1930 – May 16, 2003) was an American lawyer, sports agent and writer. He was the founder and chairman of International Management Group, now IMG, an international management organization serving sports figures and celebrities. McCormack was featured as one of the Forbes 400 Richest Americans in 1995, 1998, 2001. In 1990, he was named the "Most Powerful Man in Sports" by The Sporting News. His impact on the Sporting World was so great that even today they even have Awards named after him. The Mark H. McCormack Medal is awarded to the leading player in the World Amateur Golf Ranking after the U.S. Amateur Championship and the European Amateur Championship. The Mark H. McCormack Award is awarded to the player who has spent the most weeks at number 1 in the Official World Golf Ranking during a calendar year. The first 13 of these awards after its inception went to Tiger Woods. About the Book When I had read this book 18 years ago, I was completely mesmerized by the wisdom distilled in its pages. However, at 37 years of age, in the year 2014, now when I read it - the magic no longer is present. Lets get down to understanding the book. What They Don't Teach You at Harvard Business School came out in 1984 and was a New York Times Bestseller. Personalities like Robert Anderson (Chairman, Rockwell International), Christie Hefner (President and COO of Playboy Enterprise), Herbert J. Siegel (Chairman of Chris-Craft Industries) and even Rupert Murdoch (Chairman of News Corporation) were full of praise for this book. I suspect the reason this book became a best seller was primarily because of the impact, influence and the position of power Mark McCormack had on the Sporting / Celebrity Endorsed World - at that time. If you need an example of such authors from today's day and age - Barack Obama, Richard Branson and Jack Canfield come to mind. They are some of the many authors who talk anything from simple boring mundane stuff to absolute nonsense and end up having Best Sellers - because they leverage the sales based on their Brand Persona. So coming back to Mark McCormack Book - The title is pretty amazing. But the content is pretty ordinary, useless and at times nonsensical. The book is divided into 3 sections: Section 1 - People Section 2 - Sales & Negotiations Section 3 - Running a Business Section 1 - People 1. Reading People 2. Creating Impressions 3. Taking the Edge 4. Getting Ahead Section 2 - Sales & Negotiations 1. The Problems of Selling 2. Timing 3. Silence 4. Marketability 5. Stratagems 6. Negotiations Section 3 - Running the Business 1. Building a Business 2. Staying in Business 3. Getting Things Done 4. For Entrepreneurs Only What Mark McCormack has done is given his day-to-day examples like having Tea, going for a walk, playing golf, having dinner or meeting the family of Superstars (of those days) like Arnold Palmer, Bjorn Borg, CEO's of Companies, Vice Presidents etc and then throwing in a nugget of wisdom he learnt from that episode. Personally, I felt he was using the book to not only give us his gems of wisdom but also to advertise whom he knew and how close he was to the top names in the industry. (More of the latter and less of the former) In fact, some of the techniques like 'give less than your best' or 'doing something for their children to get their business' would be seen more as a Con-Artists or a Insincere Approach (How to Win Friends and Influence People - Remember?) rather than the Genuine Approach. The examples were not very interesting. But what really got to me was the long-drawn-out, old fashioned approach of writing Mark used to communicate his ideas. I think if you remove all the unnecessary words and sentences, this book could come to around 10 pages. Moment of Truth. Techniques like admitting "I don't know," "I need help," and "I was wrong", McCormack's advice on negotiation, the need to be organized, and the power of silence in interpersonal communication are today outdated. With the dawn of Information Technology, Social Media and Free Online Education - such ideas which were thought to be 'Secrets' are no longer fresh - if not useful. I felt Mark McCormack's main purpose of this book was nothing but to advertise his ego, brag about his achievements, keep advertising those big names under the pretext of preaching a worthwhile gem of wisdom. Overall the pointers mentioned in this book are definitely not the kind of stuff they would teach you at Harvards Business School. After all when did Harvard's Business School start teaching you outdated, boring and useless stuff? Overall Rating 3 out of 10 Loy Machedo loymachedo.com | whoisloymachedo.com

  2. 4 out of 5

    S.Ach

    You fell for the word "Harvard". Didn't you? At least I did, when I bought this book almost 20 years ago, as a dreamy-eyed teenager harbouring aspirations of being part of an IVY League Business School. Found it in the bottom of my unread shelf few days back, and decided to give it a go. Few pages into it, I realized when Mr. McCormack wrote this book, he didn't intend to have me - a cynic, possibly entering into mid-life crisis, as a reader. Naturally, they don't teach all these in Harvard You fell for the word "Harvard". Didn't you? At least I did, when I bought this book almost 20 years ago, as a dreamy-eyed teenager harbouring aspirations of being part of an IVY League Business School. Found it in the bottom of my unread shelf few days back, and decided to give it a go. Few pages into it, I realized when Mr. McCormack wrote this book, he didn't intend to have me - a cynic, possibly entering into mid-life crisis, as a reader. Naturally, they don't teach all these in Harvard Business School, cause these are pretty commonsense stuff that you learn from life. Had I read it 20 years back, probably, I would have made it my bible. Now, sadly, it is in my unfinished, not-recommended, balderdash shelf. Sorry.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David

    Filled with anecdotes and not many concrete strategies, "What They Don't Teach You" is an interesting collection of advice from a guy who's "been there." This book seems like something you might want to keep on your shelf and open up once in a while when you get stuck or need some good ideas.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Pretty disappointing in both content and form. It is basic common sense stuff...which they don't teach in HBS, probably because you are supposed to know this stuff early or intuitively.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sneh Asnani

    The book is about management strategies from the Marck which he had learnt during his career of working for various clients, starting his own firm and growing it. The tone of the book is prescriptive throughout and it makes you feel that someone is constantly teaching you the do's and dont's of business. If you have spent a couple of years in the industry already, you would already know most of the gyan. The examples are from Mark's real life, who runs a firm dealing with sports marketing and The book is about management strategies from the Marck which he had learnt during his career of working for various clients, starting his own firm and growing it. The tone of the book is prescriptive throughout and it makes you feel that someone is constantly teaching you the do's and dont's of business. If you have spent a couple of years in the industry already, you would already know most of the gyan. The examples are from Mark's real life, who runs a firm dealing with sports marketing and stuff. But how many of us are in such kind of firms. Frankly, I couldn't relate to any of the examples provided in the book. The book is a nice quick read, but very prescriptive, . My rating is 3/5

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kes

    One guy's takeaway from working in business. I liked his tips about negotiating and basically creating connections (e.g. by giving small favours). The writing style is also great. It's a good introduction into white collar life (navigating the business world).

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

    I would warmly recommend this book to anyone aiming to lead people and in general to anyone working in office environment.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Carlos

    Selling is what they don't teach you at Harvard Business School. ;-) Of course the book is loaded with useful facts from a real-world businessman. Street smarts will love this one from the late Mark McCormack.

  9. 5 out of 5

    J. R. Martin

    Read many years ago when tarnsitioning from the Navy to civilian life. Very insightful. Should be required reading for all college graduates.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Misha Kaura

    To the other reviewers giving him anything other than 5 stars: have you founded a company, let alone a multibillion dollar company? Have you people done anything with your lives other than criticising businesspeople? If its so easy to get ahead in business and to be rich then why arent any of you rich and famous businesspeople? Yeah, a lot of this is common sense but remember that common sense isnt that common. It sounds like everything is simple but the thing is, you have to do all these little To the other reviewers giving him anything other than 5 stars: have you founded a company, let alone a multibillion dollar company? Have you people done anything with your lives other than criticising businesspeople? If it’s so easy to get ahead in business and to be rich then why aren’t any of you rich and famous businesspeople? Yeah, a lot of this is common sense but remember that common sense isn’t that common. It sounds like everything is simple but the thing is, you have to do all these little things consistently so it becomes a habit. 98% of businesspeople and business-oriented lawyers with their own big law firms don’t do any of this consistently enough because they don’t crave winning BIG enough. If all y’all are so sure anyone can build a company like McCormack’s then why aren’t you people on the Forbes Richest list with big companies too? God himself is a businessman. There is no profession more valuable to society than business. Top businesspeople are doing God’s work. People in general are so jealous of businesspeople and use words like “greedy” to define them when greed is good. Ego is good. You can’t do big philanthropy without having big money first. You make the big money first and then you do big things with it. Besides, there’s nothing wrong with being the best and taking what is rightfully yours. If that means you M&A every competitor then that’s what you do. The world needs people like McCormack, like me. People like us create jobs.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kai Crawford

    A lot of good business advice. A lot of contradicting advice too but so is life and one has to deal with that somehow... There were some examples that were too difficult for me to comprehend. I think it was a useful book but could not get into it for some reason.

  12. 4 out of 5

    A-Bo Jeerayapa

    To know some trick using in real business that not teaching in business school.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Major Doug

    Read it based upon dated hype; that was a mistake. Got more out of the Epilogue than the rest of the book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    ilham.mukhtar

    Similar to Ray Dalio's Work Principle. Hard hitting baby boomer. Great insight into head honcho's perspective.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tuomas

    Some good tips, some bad tips, but in any case, the storytelling is awful. If this was written well, I'd probably remember ten different ideas out of this book for a few years as I'm a lover of a small amount of arrogance in writing, but now I'm stuck with one. Let's see how long it stays.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Devika

    Disclaimer: The author hasn't done a Harvard MBA, but has given guest lectures there. The central idea of the book is that things not taught at Harvard essentially can't be taught in a classroom but can only be learnt from real life experiences. The book is an easy to read set of guidelines/daily practices to follow in order to increase your own productivity. McCormack gives a lot of great examples from his own life which make this a very interesting read. The one part I couldn't quite follow, Disclaimer: The author hasn't done a Harvard MBA, but has given guest lectures there. The central idea of the book is that things not taught at Harvard essentially can't be taught in a classroom but can only be learnt from real life experiences. The book is an easy to read set of guidelines/daily practices to follow in order to increase your own productivity. McCormack gives a lot of great examples from his own life which make this a very interesting read. The one part I couldn't quite follow, however, is where he discusses the negotiation of Gary Player's contract with Slazenger. He never explains how Slazenger agreed to a termination clause of 'five years notice' although they wanted a short term contract. Some parts of the book might seem abrupt, but it is filled with some great advice overall. I'd recommend reading the Epilogue before starting the book, as it would completely change the way you read and absorb from it (Business Paradox: the better you think you're doing or the more satisfied you are with your accomplishments, the greater should be your cause for concern).

  17. 5 out of 5

    Keith Millar

    Reading this book was like opening a time capsule.Its like stepping back into a time of telex machines secretaries calling for their boss and Mad Men were at their height of power. I think I read the book when it first came out and it was relevant and hot. How times change or maybe your memory dims. That said I did get a number of points which I highlighted and valued. Possibly stuff I did know but had forgotten. It was a good investment in both time and money. I look for 3 points of information I Reading this book was like opening a time capsule.Its like stepping back into a time of telex machines secretaries calling for their boss and Mad Men were at their height of power. I think I read the book when it first came out and it was relevant and hot. How times change or maybe your memory dims. That said I did get a number of points which I highlighted and valued. Possibly stuff I did know but had forgotten. It was a good investment in both time and money. I look for 3 points of information I can use when I read a non fiction book. Out of Mark’s I got 20 or so. In a lot of ways just reading the title on the cover is worth the value in the power of a hook in what you are looking to sell. Thanks Mark RIP.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Joe Thacker

    The very first business book I ever read, my grandma bought it for me from the Cole's bookstore in Lethbridge when I was in grade 10. Not a very good book, but I have fond memories of starting my long path of learning.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    This book was recommended to me by someone earning about 4x my salary so I thought I had better read it and take it seriously. I made 144 kindle highlights in the books so that shows there was a lot of information that I found useful. The author also works in a very interesting industry representing sports stars, some sports governing bodies and some companies that want to use celebrities to enhance their image or sales. These stories helped keep the book interesting. Once thing to note is that the This book was recommended to me by someone earning about 4x my salary so I thought I had better read it and take it seriously. I made 144 kindle highlights in the books so that shows there was a lot of information that I found useful. The author also works in a very interesting industry representing sports stars, some sports governing bodies and some companies that want to use celebrities to enhance their image or sales. These stories helped keep the book interesting. Once thing to note is that the authors business started when he represented Arnold Palmer, a man he went to college with and the author was also a golf pro for a brief time. That is a lot of luck but also he was the person to capitalise on that opportunity, no one else did. Our everyday opportunities might not be quite that lucrative but it is still largely up to us whether we take them or not. Some of the key concepts the author covered: 1) Reading other people, their body language, their preferences 2) Putting yourself in the other persons shoes to best reach agreement and improve negotiation – how will they look to their superiors, how do they want to look, will they have to explain this or sell it to their fellow executives? 3) Time management, scheduling things, starting early for exercise and reading before the day starts 4) Writing everything down – both to keep track and also to avoid the mind worrying about things 5) Sharing information among executives to ensure people know what is going on – particularly with large geographical spread organisations 6) Delegation – explaining things now can save countless hours in the future 7) Dangers of short term thinking 8) Setting up a company with too little capital – likewise not doing in because you think you need so much 9) The importance of training – more than hiring 10) Only use calculated anger – never emotionally in reaction 11) Perceive any dispute as a negotiation 12) Extract deadlines from people – or the date by which they will know the deadline 13) Ask questions – listen AGGRESSTIVELY, observe AGGRESSIVELY, talk less 14) Delay the need for instant gratification and adjust your own timetable to put the needs of others first 15) If you’re bored it’s your fault. You just aren’t working hard enough at making your job interesting. It is also probably the reason you haven’t been offered anything better. 16) Many people, once they see the script in their minds, have an overwhelming need to depart from it. In their haste to make a deal, they want to compress the time frame or cut directly to Act III. They want to rewrite the dialogue or eliminate the buyer’s lines altogether. They see the signs for appropriate timing, but ignore them, and fail to properly massage the situation. By rewriting the script they give it an unhappy ending. 17) People who merely work up to their capabilities don’t become stars. Those who are stars combine their capabilities with other things – know-how, people-sense, an understanding of how the game is played. They are usually achievers and can show results, but this is because they are effective in selling their ideas and themselves inside the company as well as outside the company. 18) One of the best rules I know is when a crisis occurs or is in the process of occurring, don’t react. Just say you’d like to think about it. Make any excuse, but don’t respond. Once you have analysed the crisis in terms of its potential for opportunity as well as its potential for disaster, then you can respond. 19) I am practically a missionary for the importance of acting rather than reacting, if you don’t react you will never over-react. 20) In a company of 2500 people there are 2500 egos running around, each with his or her unique view of reality. Ego is why some things that should happen don’t, why other things that shouldn’t happen do, and why both take a lot longer than necessary.

  20. 5 out of 5

    M P

    This is a review on What They Don't Teach You at Harvard Business School by Mark McCormack. The subject of this book is focused on the antics and habits of the average person and how to read them and use it to your advantage, in terms of business. It teaches more of a street-smart and logic based way of business deals, not the nitty-gritty. It tells personal experiences written in a very engaging way, prompting you to read more. It does get a little bit boring and repetitive, but you will This is a review on What They Don't Teach You at Harvard Business School by Mark McCormack. The subject of this book is focused on the antics and habits of the average person and how to read them and use it to your advantage, in terms of business. It teaches more of a street-smart and logic based way of business deals, not the nitty-gritty. It tells personal experiences written in a very engaging way, prompting you to read more. It does get a little bit boring and repetitive, but you will quickly forget it after all the funny references. The message is pretty clear, but you will have to have a logic-based mind to really understand it. The book is humorous yet academic and offers good advice such as “If you aren't afraid to fail, then you probably don't care enough about success”(87) or “People don't plan to fail. They fail to plan”(102). This book is written easily for those with a business mindset. Those who do not know anything will enjoy it, but will still be confused. However, I believe the book is out of date. This information is not taught at Harvard because it should be assumed. As a 14 year old, some of the chapters seemed kind of obvious in the sense of logicality. The author uses his lunches, golfing, and meeting with celebrities as storytimes, prompting me to think he is just name-dropping. It seems a little gimmicky and untrustworthy. I would change that and the amount of sporting references it made because it was kind of confusing for me, not a fan of sports. I would give this book a 3/5 and would recommend this book to those who are focused and those who are absent-minded. This would be a great book for those to realize what the real world is like. Overall, I recommend this book and it was a good read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Divyani

    Hands down to an outstanding book. What they didn't teach you at Harvard business school by Mark H. McCormack. One of my most fave so far. One of my professor from TIME Institute suggested this book for MBA Students, this is how I got introduced to this one. A well-written book with detailing. Each & every insight that you need before stepping in the corporate world. Wish I would've read this book before my internship but nevermind, I've read it before my placement. There are three parts- Hands down to an outstanding book. What they didn't teach you at Harvard business school by Mark H. McCormack. One of my most fave so far. One of my professor from TIME Institute suggested this book for MBA Students, this is how I got introduced to this one. A well-written book with detailing. Each & every insight that you need before stepping in the corporate world. Wish I would've read this book before my internship but nevermind, I've read it before my placement. There are three parts- People, Sales & Negotiation and Running a business. All the chapters have self helped me. There are chapters which claims what to do, what not to do, what mistakes we do, how to negotiate, the problem of selling, how to read people, where to be silent, etc. I am more willing to make changes in me, in fact, I've started noticing the slight changes already. The book is well-written that you won't be able to get distracted, is the reason I chose to read it slowly and took a nice three weeks. There will not be a paragraph you won't understand because there are examples given for every logic mentioned. The main focus is not just about Harvard Business School, it's about all the business schools out there who teaches only theoretical knowledge to the Management students. Wanna know the real corporate world? Read the book!! It's definitely a must-read for MBA students. Apart from that this book is not only for students but for each and every type of person, be it 9-5 job people, salesperson, an entrepreneur, A CEO, boss, leader, etc. I will definitely go back and re-read this book once a while to keep the tips handy, to execute them practically and also to share them with everyone.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tony Vynckier

    Mark H. McCormack, in his book What they dont teach you at Harvard Business School: Notes from a street-smart Executive, claims that there is a big gap between being book-smart and being street-smart in business. True, after high-school I referred to this as being the ocean between theory and practice. Some of the key ideas of the book I found most interesting: - Graduate degrees will never be substitutes for common sense, people sense and street smarts. - Climbing the corporate ladder is not only a Mark H. McCormack, in his book “What they don’t teach you at Harvard Business School: Notes from a street-smart Executive”, claims that there is a big gap between being book-smart and being street-smart in business. True, after high-school I referred to this as being the ocean between theory and practice. Some of the key ideas of the book I found most interesting: - Graduate degrees will never be substitutes for common sense, people sense and street smarts. - Climbing the corporate ladder is not only a game, it is several games at different levels all going on at the same time. - The reality is that nobody ever reaches the top echelon without exceptional powers of persuasion – salesmanship. Selling (yourself) is still vitally important. - The challenges of starting a business and running a business are totally different. Everything becomes harder due to the fact there is now also momentum to be considered. - You have to be able to practice corporate flexibility, not just preach about it. - You need to be able to delegate. Instead of being the company’s expert, you need to become the expert manager that gets things done. So get out of the books and into the world … TONY VYNCKIER

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ia

    Like many of the reviews have already pointed out, a lot of what's taught in this book does just seem like common sense. I have never been to Harvard Business School, nor have I ever been involved in business in any way, but on reading a lot of the tips, I couldn't help but think, "isn't this obvious?" But with the pretty common tips like "be patient" "be nice to your customers" "keep your office clean" etc, there was definitely food for thought, and I ended up highlighting a lot, which meant a Like many of the reviews have already pointed out, a lot of what's taught in this book does just seem like common sense. I have never been to Harvard Business School, nor have I ever been involved in business in any way, but on reading a lot of the tips, I couldn't help but think, "isn't this obvious?" But with the pretty common tips like "be patient" "be nice to your customers" "keep your office clean" etc, there was definitely food for thought, and I ended up highlighting a lot, which meant a lot stuck out to me. I was expecting this book to be pretentious, very hard to read, and full of law and business lingo, but it was actually very easy to read, both in language, and the brief lengths of every section. When I reached his tip where he talks about the important of not using lingo, I realized why. I had already been duped. But all in all, I liked this book. Even though I'm not interested in business and will never go into it, I found it a valuable read, because there is definitely a lot here that can be applied to other careers, or even just everyday life.

  24. 4 out of 5

    JLo Tran

    The book is about management strategies from the Marck which he had learnt during his career of working for various clients, starting his own firm and growing it. The tone of the book is prescriptive throughout and it makes you feel that someone is constantly teaching you the do's and dont's of business. If you have spent a couple of years in the industry already, you would already know most of the gyan. The examples are from Mark's real life, who runs a firm dealing with sports marketing and The book is about management strategies from the Marck which he had learnt during his career of working for various clients, starting his own firm and growing it. The tone of the book is prescriptive throughout and it makes you feel that someone is constantly teaching you the do's and dont's of business. If you have spent a couple of years in the industry already, you would already know most of the gyan. The examples are from Mark's real life, who runs a firm dealing with sports marketing and stuff. But how many of us are in such kind of firms. Frankly, I couldn't relate to any of the examples provided in the book. The book is a nice quick read, but very prescriptive, . My rating is 4/5

  25. 4 out of 5

    C

    This book starts off with a great insight into reading the people you meet in business, then gradually transitions into what you can improve on as a business person. Not necessarily for business but also a great book to learn how to work with people in your corporate workplace. It is a book I can read again and still learn a lot from considering the many points which may take time for me to absorb and digest. Mark McCormacks extensive experience in his own journey as well as case studies from This book starts off with a great insight into reading the people you meet in business, then gradually transitions into what you can improve on as a business person. Not necessarily for business but also a great book to learn how to work with people in your corporate workplace. It is a book I can read again and still learn a lot from considering the many points which may take time for me to absorb and digest. Mark McCormack’s extensive experience in his own journey as well as case studies from his previous deals serve as a great insight into how we can exploit different situations for them to serve in our favour.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amari Kadura

    Generally basic and full of old concepts. I mean, if you are looking to learn more about business history a 45-year-old book might be great, but if you are looking for an isight into the world of business today, you might want to read a more recent text. McCormack tells some interesting stories about famous individuals in his circle if that is of interest to you, though it is shocking all the pronouns used are 'him' - except those of secretaries - secretaries are always a 'she', considering in Generally basic and full of old concepts. I mean, if you are looking to learn more about business history a 45-year-old book might be great, but if you are looking for an isight into the world of business today, you might want to read a more recent text. McCormack tells some interesting stories about famous individuals in his circle if that is of interest to you, though it is shocking all the pronouns used are 'him' - except those of secretaries - secretaries are always a 'she', considering in 1984 (the year the book was published) 25% of Harvard Business School graduates were female and the publisher has had 45 years to edit it since.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stacey Grippen

    I really enjoyed this book. Its not as formulaic as other books, which is kind of good in a way, because its a more intimate read with the author. In a way, its kind of like Trumps Art of the Deal. One of the best parts about the book is that McCormack details a lot of other high profile businessmen and its really eye opening how many of these are really normal people. So, its encouraging to hear all these mega wealthy people who have similar ideas to you. I bought it for $20 and I though the it I really enjoyed this book. It’s not as formulaic as other books, which is kind of good in a way, because it’s a more intimate read with the author. In a way, it’s kind of like Trump’s “Art of the Deal”. One of the best parts about the book is that McCormack details a lot of other high profile businessmen and it’s really eye opening how many of these are really normal people. So, it’s encouraging to hear all these mega wealthy people who have similar ideas to you. I bought it for $20 and I though the it was a good buy. One of the better books that I’ve read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ján Lakatoš

    I got to this book by accident but loved it. I'm not an entrepreneur and I don't work in sales either but many of the anecdotes and advice are universal and timeless, and made me think a lot. I recommend this book to anyone who is doing business in any sense of the word. It's worth at least a skim, the short chapter structure is easy to navigate through and you'll easily find topics relevant to your interests. Also, ignore the book's title - and if you pick the book up because of its title, I got to this book by accident but loved it. I'm not an entrepreneur and I don't work in sales either but many of the anecdotes and advice are universal and timeless, and made me think a lot. I recommend this book to anyone who is doing business in any sense of the word. It's worth at least a skim, the short chapter structure is easy to navigate through and you'll easily find topics relevant to your interests. Also, ignore the book's title - and if you pick the book up because of its title, you'll probably end up disappointed just like all the bitter reviewers here.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tanmay Jadhav

    The book is very comprehensive and surely keeps it's promise of informing you of things "they don't teach you at Harvard" Yet, the book does get very repetitive and boring after a point and certainly becomes a drag unless you aren't in Business school or working in management. I'd definitely suggest reading the first half of the book that outlines the general principles you could start implementing right now. I guess I'll just have to circle back to my bookmarks here someday. -Tanmay J.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Brightside

    The title is excellent marketing. But the book is simply an amalgamation of common sense and advice often repeated in articles from Forbes or Business Insider. I do, however, like the anecdotes and examples from the author on how he tackled situations and issues. It gives us laymen a glimpse on how top executives and entrepreneurs do it at the big leagues. The question is, how can we confirm the validity of these anecdotes?

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